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The Growing Organic Market Place

old message The Growing Organic Market Place Darrell Miller 06/26/07
old message How to remineralize the Earth – Getting vital nutrients back into the soil Darrell Miller 06/26/07
old message An organic farmer’s perspective Darrell Miller 06/26/07
old message What can we do about it? Darrell Miller 06/26/07
old message A simple solution Darrell Miller 06/26/07
old message The next logical step Darrell Miller 06/26/07
old message Do It Yourself Darrell Miller 06/26/07


TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On The Growing Organic Market Place

Date: June 26, 2007 01:51 PM
Author:
Subject: The Growing Organic Market Place

It probably doesn’t come as much of a shock that the market for organic produce is growing—estimated by various sources at about 20 percent a year. What may be surprising is that the organic food market, which generated about $13.8 billion last year, represents only about 2.5 percent of the total U.S. food consumption.

While those of us involved in the natural products industry or natural healthcare take for granted the advantages of organic products over “traditional” ones, there is a pressing need to mobilize resources in order to meet the consumer demand for pesticide-free foods.

Currently, only 0.2 percent of the U.S. farmland is organic. The other 99.8 percent produces food utilizing the high-production, low-nutrient and flavor lacking industrial chemical methods we grew up with—the same tradition that drove consumers to seek out organic produce in the first place. The picture isn’t any better in Canada, according to the Canadian Organic Growers Association, where only 1 percent of the food grown there is organic.

This of course raises the question as to how we are going to satisfy this increasing consumer demand. In a word: imports. We already import more than 10 percent of the organic food we eat. But perhaps the figure of greater interest is that we consume 42 percent of the worldwide organic food supply, leaving only 58% for world’s non-U.S. residents.

In this enlightened era in which we understand the downside of processed foods, chemical residue and the portent of global warming, it’s hard to understand why we don’t muster our great resources and legendary spirit to launch a program to address these issues—like JFK’s Apollo Project, which put a man on the moon in under a decade using computers less powerful than are commonly found on our desktops today.

While we ponder the question, there are people of good will and strong conviction who are working, albeit with limited resources, to do something about it. one group is working on remineralizing the earth. We are proud to be supporters and friends and we think you will find their concept as exciting as we do. -Peter Gillham – editor.



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On How to remineralize the Earth – Getting vital nutrients back into the soil

Date: June 26, 2007 01:55 PM
Author:
Subject: How to remineralize the Earth – Getting vital nutrients back into the soil

We know that “traditionally grown” fruits and vegetables we see in supermarkets are both lacking in vitamins and minerals and have added chemicals from fertilizers and pesticides. These toxic additions in particular fueled the demand for organic produce but did not completely address the lack of nutrients.

Going back in time, our soil was rich with minerals, which found their way into our foods in healthy doses. Mineralized soil grew healthier crops providing the vitamins and minerals we now need to take as supplements. Additionally, hardier plants were capable of repelling insects and other pests that are now a constant and costly threat to growers.

Over the years (and accelerated with the advent of modern industrialized farming), soil all over the planet has become depleted of minerals, resulting in crops and forests that struggle to perform their parts in our ecology—either providing nutrition or, in the case of trees, putting vital oxygen back into our atmosphere.

It’s a serious problem. A recent report based on U.S. agricultural records has found that the nutrient content of fruits an vegetables has been dropping since these records were first taken in the early 1960’s—just over 40 years ago. To illustrate the point, we would need to eat five apples today just to get the same nutrients we would of found in one apple in 1965.



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On An organic farmer’s perspective

Date: June 26, 2007 02:03 PM
Author:
Subject: An organic farmer’s perspective

How effective can remineralization be? Just as Dan Kittredge, executive director of Remineralize the Earth, who is also an organic farmer. Prior to remineralizing his farm, he had weaker crops and a horrendous insect problem. “I put in two greenhouses a year and a half ago and planted Asian greens in them. Last spring, all the plants were inundated with tiny holes made by insects. Unless you are extremely diligent, it happens to all of a particular family of crops around here, including broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage.”

This year, however, he had remineralized. “Under the exact same growing conditions and locations, with the exception of adding rock dust last year, the crops are now growing virtually insect free,” he reports.

The crops themselves are extraordinary. “They have this incredible sheen,” Kittredge says. “The flavor is far, far better, and they last longer. We were harvesting broccoli all the way into December, which is pretty amazing, especially from Massachusetts.”



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On What can we do about it?

Date: June 26, 2007 02:01 PM
Author:
Subject: What can we do about it?

The answer to this problem is amazingly simple. It’s called remineralization. “Remineralization is important because we are missing the minerals and trace elements in our food that should be there,” says Joanna Campe, president of a non-profit organization called Remineralize the Earth. “We can address this by returning minerals to the soil just as the earth does. The natural formulation of soil occurs through the recycling of organic matter, the crushing of rocks onto the earth’s soil mantle by glaciers, and volcanic eruptions that add minerals to the soil. We can add these minerals back ourselves and create fertile soils.”

Remineralized soils can provide two to four times the yield of current unhealthy soils, and greatly increase the health of plant biomass—a well-validated fat that even amazed a group of missoouri high-school students who, in conducting experiments with remineralization, watched pecan plants germinate 7-9 days earlier and grow consistently faster than non-mineralized plants.

Remineralization is also fundamental in solving global warming. “When forests are unhealthy and dying off, they release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere,” Campe says. “When they’re healthy, they store carbon.” And remineralization’s effects are already being felt in this area. Highly successful remineralization on trees has been done by Dr. Lee Klinger, an independent northern California scientist. In the last three years his methods have been used on more than 5,000 Californian oak trees afflicted with malnutrition and other disease conditions, with all but a handful responding with a flush of healthy canopy growth (see www.suddenoaklife.org).

Additionally, there are early-stage studies indicating that spreading rock dust can help bind up atmospheric carbon in the soil and contract global warming.



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On A simple solution

Date: June 26, 2007 02:02 PM
Author:
Subject: A simple solution

Remineralization is a straightforward procedure. Simply apply a specific fine rock dust (called glacial gravel) to a field, garden, forest, or even a planter. This type of dust creates a broad spectrum of minerals in the soil in a natural balance. Local sources of rock dust are available as well as products that can be purchased. (www.remineralize.org)

Remineralization is also far less expensive and labor intensive than traditional fertilizing and pest control. A ton of rock dust costs anywhere between nothing at all and $8.00 and only needs to be applied every 1 – 10 years, depending on the application. Compare this to chemical fertilizers, which cost over $400.00 per tone and need to be applied at least once each season.



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On The next logical step

Date: June 26, 2007 02:04 PM
Author:
Subject: The next logical step

When you examine the minerals involved, it is not surprising that remineralization is so much more effective for healthy plants than current methods. “Agriculture in the last several decades has mainly relied on three minerals—nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus, known as NPK,” says Joanna Campe. “Lately they’ve begun to add more minerals, maybe up to twelve, but that’s still nothing compared to the broad spectrum of a hundred or so minerals provided naturally by mineralized soil.”

Another great aspect to mineralization is that it can help eliminate our heavy reliance on petrochemicals (oil-based products). Modern farming relies on chemical fertilizers that are petrochemical based. “We can shift from an economics of scarcity to an economics of abundance by switching from reliance on chemical fertilizers to remineralizations.” Campe says. “Fossil fuels are quickly disappearing, and rocks are the most abundant resource on the earth.”

This kind of economic effectiveness should come as great news to the organic food industry. According to current statistics, the U.S. buys nearly half of all the organic food produced in the world, and only 0.2 percent of its farmland is dedicated to organic growing. Much of the food produced is also of suspect quality. The reason for this scarcity and lack of quality lie partially in the expense and difficulty of growing organic food due to the poor soil. Such problems would be easily remedied by the next logical step in natural food production—remineralization—making it possible for farmers everywhere to grow natural food easily and within economic boundaries.

Organic growers are starting to take notice and participate in remineralization. For example, the largest carrot farmer in the world is turning over its acreage to remineralization, and remineralized carrots can now be purchased from cal-organic at whole food markets. World-renowned Chef Alice Waters, inventor of what has become known as California Cuisine, is also an advocate of remineralization and has up to 70 remineralized fruits and vegetables grown for her famous restraint, Chez Panisse, by Bob cannard.



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On Do It Yourself

Date: June 26, 2007 02:06 PM
Author:
Subject: Do It Yourself

You, too, can take part in this vital movement, starting right in your own backyard. First, get some education on remineralizing and the kind of rock dust you need by visiting Remineralize the Earth’s website at www.remineralize.org. Then, discover how easy it really is—with the astounding results nutritionally and otherwise—to remineralize your own area. You can also become a contributor to remineralize the Earth and assist in their upcoming campaigns and remineralizations project worldwide.



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