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Bayberry can boost the immune system and more

old message Bayberry Darrell Miller 05/19/09


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Date: May 19, 2009 01:10 PM
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Subject: Bayberry

Even though bayberry is known best for the candle wax that is made from its fragrant berries, the dried root bark is used very often for its medicinal properties. Bayberry has been long used as a tonic to treat both diarrhea and external wounds. This herb has also been used as stimulant. Some Native American tribes even use bayberry to help reduce fevers. Bayberry is recommended as a tonic for its ability to stimulate the system and increase immune function. It is also recommended as a gargle to help treat tonsillitis and sore throat. It has also been considered that the astringent value of this plant may make it a great candidate for healing wounds.

The root, bark, and leaves of bayberry are used to provide alterative, antibacterial, antiseptic, astringent, emetic, febrifuge, insecticide, sialagogue, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb include calcium, magnesium, manganese, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, vitamins B1, B2, C, and zinc. Primarily, bayberry is used for its beneficial effects in treating cholera, colds, congestion, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, flu, glandular problems, goiters, uterine hemorrhage, indigestion, jaundice, excessive menstruation, and primary tuberculosis. Additionally, this has been shown to be extremely helpful in dealing with bleeding, colitis, bleeding gums, liver disorders, excessive mucus, scurvy, sore and ulcerated throat, thyroid problems, ulcers, prolapsed of the uterus, and varicose veins. For more information of the many beneficial effects of bayberry, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

Bayberry was initially only used in the south of the United States, where the Choctaw Indians boiled the leaves and drank the decoction as a treatment for fever. Later, Louisiana settlers drank bayberry wax in hot water as a treatment for the most violent cases of dysentery. Bayberry was popularized by Samuel A. Thomas, a New England herbalist, in the early 19th century, for its ability to produce “heat” within the body. He recommended this herb be used for colds, flu, and other infectious diseases, in addition to using it for the treatment of diarrhea and fever.

Since then, other herbalists recommend bayberry as it is an excellent emetic after narcotic poisoning of any king. This herb is also valuable when it is taken daily for all kinds of hemorrhages. Bayberry has an excellent general effect on the female organs as it is excellent in helping the uterus during pregnancy. Additionally, it makes a great douche for women. Excellent results have also been demonstrated after bayberry’s use in goiter. Bayberry tea should be used as an enema in treating diarrhea and dysentery.

To treat sores, boils, or carbuncles, the herb should be used as a wash or poultice, or can be applied to the infection as a powder. Bayberry tea is also an excellent wash for both spongy and bleeding gums. When the tea is taken internally, it is useful in jaundice, scrofula, and canker sores in both the throat and mouth. When the tea is taken warm, it promotes perspiration, improves the whole circulation, and tones up tissues. If bayberry is combined with yarrow, catnip, sage, or peppermint, it provides an incomparable remedy for colds.

As you can see bayberry is an herb that is good for many different ailments. Look for this wonderful herb in capsule or tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. Always purchase name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.




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