SearchBox:

BackRefresh

Sytrinol - MultiPronged Heart Health

old message Sytrinol can lower Cholesterol by 27% - 34% Darrell Miller 09/20/05


PreviousNextListen To An Article On Sytrinol can lower Cholesterol by 27% - 34%

Date: September 20, 2005 09:56 AM
Author:
Subject: Sytrinol can lower Cholesterol by 27% - 34%

Sytrinol – MultiPronged Heart Health

According to the American Heart Association, more than 60 million Americans suffer from on of more forms of cardiovascular imbalances. When we add in those individuals with blood cholesterol concerns, we see over 100 million Americans who may be in need of specific diet and lifestyle recommendations for achieving and maintaining heart health.

Aside from the generalized recommendations that we typically hear for heart health (lose weight, exercise more, and eat less fat and more fruits and vegetables) There are a number of potentially beneficial dietary supplements that may help to maintain cholesterol levels in the normal range. Among supplements there is a wide range of safety and efficacy between products—but a newer product called Sytrinol stands out for its clinical effectiveness.

Sytrinol is a patented blend of polymethoxylated flavones (from citrus) and tocotrienols (from palm fruit). One of the factors that sets Sytrinol apart from existing natural products for heart health is its multipronged approach to controlling multiple factors related to overall heart health—including control of cholesterol, cellular irritation, oxidation, triglycerides, and others.

Cholesterol Conundrum

While it is unarguable that cholesterol is an important contributor to overall heart health, it couldn’t be further from the truth that cholesterol is the “only” or even the most important factor when it comes to protecting your heart. Did you know that approximately HALF of all serious heart challenges each year are experienced by people with NORMAL cholesterol levels? If Cholesterol is not to blame, then what is?

In addition to total cholesterol levels (the “number” that you may know as 200 to 240 of other values in “mg/dl” units), we know how that LDL and HDL matter a lot (Low-density lipoprotein—the “bad” cholesterol, and High-density lipoprotein—the “good” cholesterol). We also know that some forms of the bad and LDL can be “Badder” than others—specifically those with lots of structural protein called “apolipoprotein B” (which tends to encourage LDL cholesterol to become embedded in your blood vessel linings—bad!). In addition to our total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and the various apoproteins, we also need to know our triglyceride levels, our levels of cellular irritation, what our free radical load looks like, and what our antioxidant defenses are. Sytrinol addresses each of these important aspects of heart and health simultaneously.

The Sytrinol Solution

Polymethoxylated Flavones (PMFs) in Sytrinol are just what they sound like – flavonoid compounds with extra methoxy groups compared to “regular flavones. Like all flavonoids, the PMFs deliver potent antioxidant activity, but the PMF version is about three times more potent in its ability to address cholesterol levels (20% - 30% reduction in clinical Studies). The two primary PMFs are nobiletin and tangeretin.

In addition to the PMFs, Sytrinol contains palm tocotrienols—one of the most potent antioxidant nutrients known. An interesting effect of tocotrienols is a reduction in cholesterol synthesis in the liver—by a mechanism similar to (but safer than) the commonly utilized mechanism of inhibition of the HMG-CoA Reductase Enzyme.

Sytrinol is known to work via several unique mechanisms to reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL). First, by reducing DGAT activity (Diacylglycerol acetyl transferase) and increasing liver PPAR (Peroxisome porliferator-activated receptor)—Sytrinol can reduce overall synthesis of TG (DGAT inhibition). The overall effect is to reduce TG levels in the blood by two complementary mechanisms.

In terms of LDL effects, Sytrinol also reduces both Apolipoprotein B levels (ApoB—needed for the synthesis of LDL particles) and MTTP levels (microsomal triglyceride transfer protein-needed to transfer fat into the new LDL particles). By reducing levels of both these tructural LDL components, Sytrinol reduces overall LDL levels, and thus total cholesterol levels, in the blood.

The clinical results behind Sytrinol are impressive—showing a reduction in levels of total, LDL, and triglycerides by 27% - 34% within 4 weeks. In one of these studies, ApoB levels were reduced (suggesting reduced LDL) and ApoA1 levels were increased (suggesting increased HDL)—as would be expected based on the biochemistry of PMFs and tocotrienols.

Sytrinol is also wonderfully safe—and at the effective dose of 300mg daily, users will benefit from its multipronged effects. One aspect of Sytrinol safety that I especially like is the finding that, unlike some flavonoids like naringin from grapefruit, there are no known risks of drug interactions with the form of citrus derived PMFs found in Sytrinol (certain grapefruit flavonoids can interfere with liver enzymes needed to metabolize many prescription drugs).

Summary

Not since Red Yeast Rice was removed from the market by the FDA, have we had a truly effective, multimechanism solution for cholesterol control (and nearly total heart health). There are certainly other options for addressing heart health and cholesterol levels, but among the available choices, such as policosanol, guggulipid, niacin, and plant sterols, we’re looking at about half the cholesterol-lowering ability (10% - 15% in most cases) compared to Sytrinol. If youre in the “borderline” zone of cholesterol levels (about 240mg/dl and below), you should absolutely consider Sytrinol to keep your cholesterol levels under control.

References

Kurowska EM, manthey Ja. Hypolipidemic effects of absorption of citrus polymethoxylated flavones in hamsters with diet-included hypercholesterolemia. J Argic food chem.. 2004 may 19;52(10):2879-86.

Kurowska EM, manthey Ja, Casaschi A, Theriault AG. Modulation of HepG2 cell net apolipoprotein B secretion by the citrus polymethoxyflavone, Tangeretin. Lipids 2004 feb;39(2):143-51.

Manthey JA, Grohmann K, Montanari A, Ash K, Manthey CL, Polymethoxylated flavones derived from citrus suppress tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression by human moncytes. J Nat Prod. 1999 mar;62(3)441-4.

Mora A, Paya M, rios JL, Alcaraz MJ. Structure-activity relationships of polymethoxyflavones and other flavonoids as inhibitors of non-enzymic lipid peroxidation. Biochem Parmacol. 1990 Aug 15;40(4):797-7.

Takanaga H, Ohnishi A, Yamada S, Matsuo H, Morimoto S, Shoyama Y, Ohtani H, Sawada Y. Polymethoxylated flavones in orange juice are inhibitors of P-glycoprotein but not cytochrome P450 3A4. J Pharmacol exp. Ther. 2000 Apr;293(1):230-6.

By: Shawn M. Talbott, PH.D.

Disclaimer: The above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider. The information in this article has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.



--
Vitanet ®






Guarantee: VitaNet® LLC Offers a 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed!



VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.
--->