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Myrrh oil is worth more than gold when it comes to the healthbenefits it provides Darrell Miller 5/17/19
Fight menopausal symptoms with fermented red clover extract VitaNet, LLC Staff 10/14/18
Activated Charcoal for Intestinal Detox, Food Poisoning, and Hangovers Darrell Miller 7/23/17
new from Now Foods, Empty Glass Bottles to Mix Your Own Oils Darrell Miller 9/28/16
Thyme Oil Darrell Miller 2/26/14
What Are The Benefits Of Taking Wheat Germ Oil? Darrell Miller 12/31/13
What Makes St Johns Wort Good For Depression And Anxiety? Darrell Miller 9/18/12
Can Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Cholesterol And Triglycerides? Darrell Miller 12/5/11
Agave Nectar Darrell Miller 4/8/10
Probiotic 10 - 25 and 50 Billion Darrell Miller 9/28/09
Figwort Darrell Miller 9/28/09
Active Coenzyme Q10 Darrell Miller 7/7/07
CoQ10 for Heart Health Darrell Miller 3/28/07
For Better Heart Health ... Darrell Miller 2/6/07
Carnitine Creatinate Darrell Miller 12/8/05
TMG Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/7/05



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Myrrh oil is worth more than gold when it comes to the healthbenefits it provides
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Date: May 17, 2019 04:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Myrrh oil is worth more than gold when it comes to the healthbenefits it provides





Essential oils are used for aromatherapy but that is just one of their myriad uses. They have been used by Chinese medicine and ayurvedic medicine for centuries due to their numerous health benefits. Now, science has backed many of the claims on health benefits. One of these oils is myrrh. Myrrh is produced from a steam distillation process by extracting the reddish brown sap from the Commiphora myrrha tree. The oil is amber in color and has an earthy aroma. It has a lot of healthy benefits. One of them is that it is used to eliminate harmful bacteria. Ancient Egyptians used this oil to embalm their dead and mummies because it slows down the process of decay. This is due to the antibacterial and antimicrobial properties of myrrh oil. Another advantage of this oil is that it can eliminate some parasites. Myrrh oil has been reported to cure infections such as trichomoniasis and giardiasis. Myrrh oil can also support oral health. It has been used by researchers to treat mouth sores with complete relief for the patients. Other benefits of this wonderful oil are highlighted in the blog.

Key Takeaways:

  • Myrrh is gotten from the plant, Commiphora myrrha, and is its reddish brown dried sap that was extracted using a steam distillation process.
  • One of the many benefits of myrrh which is amber color to the eyes is that it eliminates harmful bacteria from the body.
  • Myrrh was used by traditional Egyptians for the dead to embalm bodies which did not only make them not to smell but to delay decay.

"In fact, myrrh essential oil, which is often used in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine, has many science-backed health benefits."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-04-17-myrrh-oil-is-worth-more-than-gold.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6333)


Fight menopausal symptoms with fermented red clover extract
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Date: October 14, 2018 01:38 PM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fight menopausal symptoms with fermented red clover extract





Fight menopausal symptoms with fermented red clover extract

According to a recent Danish study, fermented red clover is an herbaceous plant that can effectively be used to treat mood swings and hot flashes associated with menopause. Furthermore, the red clover extract can help to prevent osteoporosis that may occur for some menopausal women. Researcher Dr. Lambert claims that the key to the beneficial properties of red clover extract is the fact that it’s fermented, which helps support the bioavailability of the plant’s estrogen-like compounds, otherwise known as isoflavones. This research on fermented red clover is important given that the unpleasant symptoms of menopause affect one in three women over age 50.

Key Takeaways:

  • You need to figure out what works for your body and how it reacts to certain things.
  • There are a lot of ways in which you can fight the symptoms that come with these disease.
  • Being able to be your own boss of medical decisions is really important as you know your body the best.

"The fermented extract is a remedy of great efficacy. In addition, the extract prevents osteoporosis or bone loss that is accelerated by menopause, which affects one in three women over the age of 50."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-09-24-fight-menopausal-symptoms-with-fermented-red-clover-extract.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5792)


Activated Charcoal for Intestinal Detox, Food Poisoning, and Hangovers
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Date: July 23, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Activated Charcoal for Intestinal Detox, Food Poisoning, and Hangovers





A blog about alternative health treatments has published an article about the benefits of activated charcoal. This material adsorbs chemicals and has a great surface area. Thus, activated charcoal is good for treating poisoning. The article mentions how a professor drank poison and survived because he mixed charcoal into the drink. The article states this product can be used to treat digestive disorders. It can be applied to insect bites. It can even whiten teeth. A photo of activated charcoal is included.

Key Takeaways:

  • Can resist up to 60% of the absorption of drugs, chemicals and other toxins.
  • Activated charcoal is made in an oxygen absent chamber, burnt at extremely high temps, until it's charred.
  • Very porous, two teaspoons full, have the surface areas of one entire football field.

"This makes the fine black powder incredibly valuable as an antidote for poisons, which readily adhere to the large surface area of the pores like paper clips to a magnet."

Read more: http://criticalhealthnews.com/health-news/25-ben-fuchs-articles/310-activated-charcoal-for-intestinal-detox-food-poisoning-and-hangovers

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5021)


new from Now Foods, Empty Glass Bottles to Mix Your Own Oils
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Date: September 28, 2016 05:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: new from Now Foods, Empty Glass Bottles to Mix Your Own Oils

Empty Glass Amber Glass bottles For The DIY beauty Products

With more and more consumers seeking healthier, natural alternatives to chemically laden mass market home products, the do-it-yourself (DIY) market continues to gain in popularity.  Making DIY beauty products is a trend that continues to gain steam, especially for those using essential oils and carrier oils such as jojoba, shea, and grape seed.


Now Solutions health and beauty line is well-positioned to capitalize on this emerging consumer trend, and we're making it even easier for you to do it your self.  These Empty bottles include blank labels so you will have everything you need to create your own recipes and samples based on individual tastes. 

Enjoy!


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3318)


Thyme Oil
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Date: February 26, 2014 08:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Thyme Oil

What is thyme

thymeThyme is delicate herb with a highly penetrating fragrance. It has very many varied importance in culinary, medicinal and ornamental purposes. Thyme is an ancient herb that was used for medical purposes by Greeks and Egyptians. It has a sweet yet strong herbal smell and is reddish-brown to Amber in color. Thyme essential oil is carefully extracted through distillation from Thymus Vulgaris that belongs to the Labiatae plant family. This oil is considered to have very many health benefits that range from curing some ailments to preventing as well as improving the general body health.

Benefits of thyme

To begin with, it is an excellent disinfectant that is highly regarded particularly in aromatherapy for the protection against infectious diseases. Thyme oil is an antiseptic as well as an expectorant. When diffused into the atmosphere, it can be really beneficial in the treatment and as well as revealing the symptoms of bronchitis, sinusitis, pneumonia, coughs, cold and flu.

The components in this volatile oil have also been proven to expel antimicrobial activity against a host of different bacteria and fungi. For thousands of years, this essential oil has been used to preserve foods; protecting them from microbial contamination. In this way, using the oil helps people avoid various health issue associated with contaminated food.

Thyme oil is also crucial in stimulating the formation of white blood cells as well as aiding in the oxygenation of cellular tissues; which helps in the removal of toxic wastes during illness. Thyme oil generally boosts your lymphatic system and builds your self-esteem and confidence in your ability to make quick recovery during illness.

For a vitamin or supplement, thyme oil taken by mouth and can be very helpful in curing arthritis, stomach pain and a sore throat. It has also been used to treat skin disorders, movement disorders (dyspraxia) as well as parasitic worm infections. This oil can also be applied directly to the skin for swollen tonsils, hoarseness and sore mouth.

In clusion

I would like to caution you. Please note that there are lots of cheap, synthetic copies of essential oils. You, therefore, need to be careful when purchasing thyme oil and ensure that you get it from a trusted supplier to avoid getting a counterfeit product that may not give you the expected results.

Sources

  1. www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266016.php
  2. www.experience-essential-oils.com/thyme-oil.html
  3. www.essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/thyme.htm
  4. www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=77
  5. www.wedmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-823-THYME.aspx?activeIngredientId=823&activeIngredientName=THYME

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3037)


What Are The Benefits Of Taking Wheat Germ Oil?
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Date: December 31, 2013 04:39 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Benefits Of Taking Wheat Germ Oil?

What is Wheat Germ Oil

wheat plantWheat germ oil is extracted from a wheat kernels’ germ in a technique known as cold processing. Its color is brown or Amber and has a nutty flavor, and strong odor. The following is a look at its immense health benefits, the persons required to take it and the reasons for its intake.

Benefits of Wheat Germ

It is known to be one of nature’s greatest sources of vitamin E, which is very helpful for persons intending to prevent the risk of contracting cataracts, cancers and coronary heart diseases. Vitamin E has been found to interact with zinc and selenium to act as powerful antioxidants.

Persons with skin conditions that result from pollution, ageing, wrinkling, eczema, scaring, stretch marks, psoriasis, sun spots and dry skin have noticed tremendous improvement in their skin after topically applying wheat germ oil. The remarkably positive results have been identified to result from the vitamin E content in the oil, which causes the regeneration of the skin, improved circulation and prevention of further damage.

Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy can benefit from the intake of the oil to prevent the recurrence of malignant tumors.

Wheat germ oil is invaluable for persons with blood clot problems because it enhances the process, which prevents excessive bleeding.

Muscle fatigue, spasms, aches and lowered endurance are common in persons, who engage in strenuous activities. The oil is helpful in relieving these effects on the muscles, resulting to restored vitality.

Its omega 3-fatty acid content is helpful in preventing cholesterol and blood pressure levels in persons with high risks of developing diabetes and coronary heart diseases.

If a person is suffering from poor memory, dizziness or fatigue, regular intake of wheat germ oil is essential in relieving these problems. This is due to the oil’s lecithin content, which is effective in strengthening the blood vessels and improving circulation.

References:

  1. //www.naturalnews.com/026959_wheat_germ_oil.html
  2. //www.doctoroz.com/videos/why-you-need-wheat-germ?page=3
  3. //www.buzzle.com/articles/benefits-of-wheat-germ-oil.html
  4. //www.doctorsresearch.com/prod_wheat.html
  5. //www.essentialoil.in/wheat-germ-oil.html

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What Makes St Johns Wort Good For Depression And Anxiety?
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Date: September 18, 2012 09:18 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Makes St Johns Wort Good For Depression And Anxiety?

St Johns wort

St Johns wort is a particular plant species. Firstly, in ancient Greek the medicinal uses of St Johns wort are recognized. It is an herb with yellow flowers. It contains active ingredients like flavonoids, anthrancenes, volatile oil and sugar alcohol which are used for medicinal purpose. St Johns wort binomial name Hypericum perforatum is also considered as wild plant, herb and weed. The other common names for this plant are Amber Touch-and-heel, goat weed, Klamath weed, Rosin rose and Tipton weed. As it is an herb its leaves and flowers are used for medicinal purpose.

What is St Johns wort?

St Johns wort is considered as a medicinal plant. It has yellow flowers which are used for medical purposes in various parts of the world. It is an herbal remedy to treat depression. This medicinal plant is also used for migraine, headache, muscle pain, chronic fatigue syndrome. It is also used for cancer and HIV/AIDS. St Johns is known as natural herbal remedy for mild to moderate depression. This highly valuable contains a chemical known as hypericin which effects against depression. This chemical act as mediatator in the nervous system which control the mood.

Does St Johns worth help depression? Depression has now become a common problem in humans now days. Due to the side effects of antidepressant medications, people are frequently moving towards natural remedies. St John wort is a complete health booster for the entire nervous system. It is recommended as a useful herbal remedy. It is scientifically proven that this particular plant is effective for mild to moderate depression. It has been used to treat mental disorders. St John wort is commonly used for depression and the conditions which are responsible depression such as anxiety, tiredness and sleep disorders. In most of the countries it is widely prescribed for depression. Wort is beneficial to people with mild depression but it is less effective on major depression.

St Johns wort medicinal properties:This medicinal plant is a powerful medicine.It is effective and well tolerated by the patients.You can feel yourself improving within the first week of usage of St John wort.As it is well tolerated by the patients, you can see fast results with fewer side effects.It decreases anxiety related to depression.It includes medicinal properties like antibacterial, anti inflammatory, antiviral, antidepressant and pain relieving.Traditionally it has been used to cure burns, headache, wounds, etc.

Though this is a powerful and remarkable medicine for treating mild to moderate depression, but still there is a question in the mind of health experts regarding major depression? In accordance with this, medicinal wort is less effective for the people who are taking other medications. St John wort is not effective on severe depression as discussed earlier. St John wort causes drug interaction so it might not be the right choice for the people who take other medication. You cannot ignore St Johns Wort, as it is a natural remedy for treatment of depression in spite of having few side effects.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2675)


Can Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Cholesterol And Triglycerides?
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Date: December 05, 2011 09:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Cholesterol And Triglycerides?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Cholesterol

Apple cider vinegar is a classification of vinegar which is derived from apple or cider. As you can observe, apple has an acidic taste which makes it possible to be processed into a type of vinegar. Apple cider vinegar is pale yellow to Amber in color. This kind of vinegar may be pasteurized or unpasteurized. Non - processed or unpasteurized form of apple cider vinegar has a semi - solid or firm appearance because of its thickness and cobweb - like make - up. This form of apple cider vinegar is considered to be the “mother of vinegar”.

Apple cider vinegar is yielded by mashing the fruit and squeezing out the juice it contains. Friendly microorganisms such as bacteria and yeasts are usually combined into the extracted juice to allow alcoholic fermentation. These microorganisms are the ones responsible for converting the sugar contained in the apple extracted juice into its alcohol form. Apple cider vinegar undergoes a second fermentation process. The alcohol produced from the first fermentation process is converted into its vinegar form by adding an ample amount of acetic acid – forming bacteria specifically known as Acetobacter. As a result, the juice extract will have a sour taste because of the acetic acid and malic acid it contains after several fermentations.

In the food industry, apple cider vinegar is commonly used as an ingredient of salads, marinades, food preservatives and the like. Aside from its acetic acid content, apple cider vinegar also contains amino acids, vitamins and minerals.

Clinical studies on whether apple cider vinegar can help control the amount of bad cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood have shown significant results. Yes, apple cider vinegar can have promising effects on the regulation of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. However, the studies also revealed that this fruit extract must not serve as a substitute for the medications prescribed by your doctor to regulate blood cholesterol and maintain or improve cardiovascular health. In animal studies, apple cider vinegar has shown positive effects on lowering triglycerides by almost 50 %. However, effects on Low Density Lipoprotein or the so – called “bad cholesterol” are not that efficient.

Needless to say, the American Heart Association stated that a good lifestyle and balanced diet can effectively reduce the amount of bad cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood. Apple cider vinegar will also greatly help in lowering these substances in the blood.

Other studies have also revealed that the acetic acid content in apple cider vinegar stimulates the expression of the genetic material which activates fatty acid oxidation enzymes. As a result of this biological process, there will be a significant lowering or control of body fat accumulation by the liver. This is the reason why apple cider vinegar can also be employed as a weight loss agent.

Apple cider vinegar is all – natural. Therefore, safety is relatively established. However, health experts still suggest that before you start using this product, you have to consult your doctor and discuss your current and past health condition as well as the other medications you are taking. This will reduce the incidence of adverse health reactions and drug to drug interactions.

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Agave Nectar
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Date: April 08, 2010 04:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Agave Nectar

Agave Nectar Light Certified Organic 17 oz from NOWComments by Craig Gerbore, CEO of Madhava:

Reading through the attack articles and blogs that have surfaced recently one could think that using agave is bad for one's health. These claims are utterly false and misleading. They are extreme views drawn from extreme examples and applied way out of context. They are propagandizing and clearly designed to frighten, not educate. All of the fears and concerns associated with the overconsumption of sugars and calories in general have been unfairly cast on agave.

What is a "healthy" sweetener? One that you use moderately and sensibly.

Health concerns related to fructose and caloric sweeteners are all dependant on the overconsumption of them. All foods have calories and it is the overall consumption of calories that lead to obesity and related issues, not any one food source.

Agave's caloric value is comparable to the other sweeteners in the category. Due to its greater sweetness though, less agave is used compared to the others, so agave actually can reduce caloric consumption per serving. This is due to a higher fructose content. The higher content does not mean higher consumption though, due to the smaller portion used. But, it is not the single serving that matters, it is the number of servings which lead to the overconsumption issues which may result in health concerns.Agave Nectar Amber Certified Organic 17 oz from NOW

As a reference point, 9-10 teaspoon servings of agave would be the approximate caloric equivalent of one 16 oz soft drink. With this perspective, is agave really being overconsumed as a choice of sweetener for home use?

Every single health issue which the attackers have tried to associate with agave is really the result of a caloric overconsumption issue. There are no documented issues with normal, moderate consumption of agave or sweeteners in general as part of our everyday diet. For reasons unknown, some have attempted to isolate agave from the real world and real world conditions with the goal of inhibiting agave's use. They play on people's fears, reference false information and fail to address health issues in any meaningful way.

The purpose of this article is to debunk the controversial misinformation surrounding agave. All information debunking the myths and misinformation is based on current science and facts. It is our goal to provide you with useful information so that you can make your personal nutritional choices in a well-informed, science-based manner.

The Agave Controversy: Exposing the fraudulent article by Rami Nagel

By Dr. Susan Kleiner, PhD, RD, FACN, CNS, FISSN

And Craig Gerbore, CEO Madhava

The controversy about agave syrup was manufactured by the publication of a single article on the internet, which has been reproduced and adapted for virtually every other article produced on the internet and other media venues. That article, written by Rami Nagel and published on Naturalnews.com, was highly biased and full of inaccuracies, half-truths and misinformation about agave. Since the Naturalnews.com article has been the sole source of nearly all other popular articles in public media, we want to set the record straight with science-based, reliable information to offer a more balanced resource to those interested in learning more about agave syrup. Organic Blue Agave Nectar 16 Liq from FunFresh Foods Who is the author, Rami Nagel?

According to the description on the Naturalnews.com website, Rami Nagel is a "citizen journalist". This means that Mr. Nagel is self-employed, and not employed as an in-house journalist by the website. He wrote and published the article without any editorial or content oversight, and the editor of the website, Mike Adams, makes it clear that the article was not checked for incorrect or inaccurate information or facts. The introduction to the article, written by Mr. Adams, states that readers had written to comment that Mr. Nagel's resources were biased with conflicts of interest due to their financial interests in competing sweeteners, such as brown rice syrup. So even the website editor himself states that the article is not fact-checked, and it is biased and unbalanced.

Who is Russ Bianchi?

The sole resource interviewed for the article is Russ Bianchi, identified by the author as Managing Director and CEO of Adept Solutions, Inc. Mr. Bianchi has clear conflict of interest ties to the sweetener industry. We have documentation of the fact that Mr Bianchi had plans to market a product named Replace. It was to be touted as a low calorie alternative sweetener composed of natural and artificial ingredients! Mr Bianchi was prevented from marketing this sweetener as the result of a lawsuit against him by the owner of the formula.

Mr Bianchi is quoted by Nagel extensively and exclusively. Many, if not all, of his statements are blatantly false or misrepresentations of fact. He is clearly propagandizing against agave nectar.

Was anyone else interviewed for this article?

Yes. Craig Gerbore, president and owner of Madhava Agave Syrup, was extensively interviewed by the author but no parts of that interview were included in the article. Organic Maple Agave Nectar 16 Liq from FunFresh Foods

It is important to note that neither Mr Nagel or Mr Bianchi have not made themselves available for questions on their statements since the articles appearance. They remain out of sight and have entirely avoided the controversy their statements created.

What is agave nectar?

The opening line of this paragraph in the article by Mr. Nagel states:

"The principal constituent of the agave is starch, such as what is found in corn or rice."

This is absolutely false. There is no starch in agave. The source of carbohydrate in agave syrup is inulin, a polysaccharide made up primarily of strings of fructose units. Starch is a polysaccharide made up of strings of glucose molecules. They are significantly different, and this difference is why agave syrup is naturally sweet.

The very basis of the argument presented by Mr. Nagel is false.

The Process

The agave plant is a succulent, similar to a cactus. The agave sweetener comes from both the Salmiana agave plant and the agave Tequilana (Blue Agave) which are both organically farmed in Mexico and certified organic by USDA approved certifiers. As the salmiana plant grows it produces a stalk called the "quiote" and when this is removed, a natural liquid called "aquamiel". The liquid is collected from the plant, while Blue agave pinons are harvested and shredded to remove the similar juice. Either can be naturally processed thermally or by enzymes into agave nectar.

The juice of the plant is not naturally sweet. The string of connected fructose units that makes up the major proportion of inulin does not have a sweet taste, but when the fructose units are separated (the process is called hydrolysis) by the addition of an enzyme, similar to digestion, or thermally for most blue agave, the syrup becomes quite sweet. That is the entire processing chain for agave nectar. There are no additives, other ingredients or chemicals in Madhava agave nectar. It is absolutely pure and organic and GMO free.

? Mr. Nagel claims that agave syrup is a "refined corn fructose" similar to high fructose corn syrup. This is absolutely false. There is no relationship between agave syrup and high fructose corn syrup in any way, including the source of the product, or the manufacturing process.

? Mr. Nagel refers to a "confidential FDA letter" from Mr. Martin Stutsman, claiming that agave is fraudulently labeled. We contacted Mr. Stutsman at the United States Food and Drug Administration, and his response made it clear that there was never a "confidential FDA letter". He did publish a public letter referenced in an FDA document as "FDA letter from Martin Stutsman to Dr. Eric

Wilhelmsen (Wilhelmsen Consulting), May 8, 2000", regarding evaporated cane juice, a topic wholly unrelated to agave syrup.

? He continued in his response to us that the paragraph in Mr. Nagel's article inaccurately reflected the substance of his comments in the document.

This link will take you to the original document in which the letter was referenced (reference #2):

//www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/GuidanceDocuments/FoodLabelingNutrition/ucm181491.htm

In fact, Mr. Nagel fabricated the entire story of the letter. Mr. Stutsman is a lawyer, not a doctor. The quotes were completely taken out of context from the document, and the quotes never referred to agave syrup at any time. Nagel goes on to further misrepresent Mr. Stutsman's intent in the published document by weaving in other inaccurate information that is thoroughly unrelated to the original document. Mr Bianchi's subsequent statements on labeling issues are false and without merit.

Mr. Nagel is clearly caught red-handed. He has misrepresented the words of a government official, lied about the facts, and twisted the information to achieve his own agenda. This strategy is repeated throughout the article.

? Mr. Nagel continues his deceptive writing by referring to a quote by the late Dr. Varro Tyler in his book, The Honest Herbal. The first line of the paragraph is a direct quote from the book. Nothing else in that paragraph remotely resembles anything else found in Dr. Tyler's book. Mr. Nagel is trying to claim that agave syrup contains large quantities of saponins, and that they can be harmful to health. Here is the debunking of that paragraph:

1. Dr. Tyler does not include the variety of agave plant used for agave syrup.

2. The entire discussion is about the use of the sword-shaped leaves and the stem. Agave syrup is produced from the natural liquid in the plant. The saponins are isolated from the leaves of the plant.

3. There is no documented evidence to suggest agave syrup contains worrisome levels of saponins and the entire rest of the discussion about health dangers is fabricated and false.

Sugars

People are going to continue to consume sweet food and drink. There are only three categories of choice to sweeten food. Those are artificial sweeteners, stevia, or caloric sweeteners from natural sources, sugars.

Most people will not choose artificial. Many will not choose stevia. That only leaves the category of sugars. In this group, agave is a good choice due to its organic quality, ease of

use, neutral flavor, low glycemic index and the fact that less is used to equal the sweetness of the others in the category.

The sweeteners in this category are composed of three primary sugars used to sweeten foods: glucose, fructose and sucrose. These sugars belong to a class of compounds known as carbohydrates. "Saccharide" is a term that denotes sugar, or substances derived from sugar. Monosaccharides are simple or single sugars; disaccharides are derived from two joined monosaccharides and when they are hydrolyzed, or separated, they yield two molecules of simple sugar. Strings of more than two sugar molecules are called polysaccharides. This category includes compounds such as starches, cellulose and inulin.

Glucose and fructose are monosaccharides. Glucose and fructose are found abundantly in nature in fruits and plants. Sucrose is the disaccharide formed by the joining of glucose and fructose, also known as table sugar. When comparing their relative sweetness, glucose is the least sweet tasting, sucrose is next, and fructose is the sweetest of the three sugars, measured as 1.4 times sweeter than table sugar. Because it is so sweet, people typically use less fructose when sweetening foods compared to sucrose.

? In the article by Mr. Nagel he states , "fructose is not what is found in fruit. Commonly, fructose is compared with its opposite and truly naturally occurring sweetener, known as ‘levulose' (made by nature)..."

Another fabrication. In fact, levulose is just another name for fructose. There are various nomenclatures used in the scientific naming of compounds. Fructose and levulose are exactly the same thing; the names are interchangeable. It is no different than if you called your father, "dad", and your sibling called your father, "father". He would still be the exact same person. Fructose and levulose are different names for the exact same thing: a sugar found in nature.

Mr. Bianchi also is quoted to say that the body does not recognize the fructose in agave. This is another false piece of propaganda which demonstrates just how far he is reaching. If this were true, it would have no impact on us. He immediately contradicts himself with the claims of detrimental effects caused by the overconsumption of fructose.

Using Sugars

Sugars can be compared to each other in their ability to raise blood sugar levels by using the Glycemic Index. The scale is set from zero to 100, where low numbers do not have much impact on blood sugar levels, and high numbers raise blood sugar levels quickly. Fructose is very low on the scale. Because agave syrup is high in fructose, it has a rating of 32 or lower. Honey, which has a higher proportion of glucose to fructose, has a Glycemic Index of 58. Sucrose has a Glycemic Index of 68, and glucose, serving as the index standard, is 100.

All sugars, whether fructose, glucose, sucrose or others, contribute 4 calories per gram to our total diet. 1 teaspoon of sugar = 4 grams = 16 calories

In addition to calories, sugars sweeten our foods offering a desirable taste and adding enjoyment and pleasure to our dining. During cooking and baking, sugars allow for browning and the unique consistencies of syrups, candies, frostings and frozen desserts. The varieties of sugars, such as crystallized table sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, molasses, honey and agave nectar, among others, contribute different properties and flavors to foods.

When you add your own sugar to foods you are in control of how much sugar you use. Most people would never add as much sugar as do the food manufacturers. Moderate amounts of sugar can certainly be enjoyed as part of a healthy diet for an active individual. Natural sugars are easily metabolized and utilized by the body, offering a very efficient source of fuel for physical and mental activity.

Of course, sugars should be used in moderation in the diet. This can control calories and help create a diet that is dense in nutrients.

Impact of sugar on health and disease

? The remainder of Mr. Nagel's article works to link agave syrup with the increased incidence of obesity, diabetes, metabolic disease, and the general rise of morbidity and mortality in the population. This is an overconsumption issue involving far more than the occasional use of agave. Here are the facts:

• Rats that are fed a high fructose diet become obese and will develop the chronic diseases associated with obesity: insulin resistance, diabetes and metabolic disease.

• No one should eat a diet that reflects this type of experimental diet.

• Too much sugar in the diet, whether from fructose, glucose or sucrose, can be unhealthy. Diets high in sugar promote tooth decay and periodontal disease; create an overabundance of calories and a deficit of nutrients. This scenario typically leads to weight gain and the development of chronic disease.

• Active individuals can include a moderate amount of added sugar in their diet without negative health consequences. When calorie intake is balanced with physical activity, sugar serves as an efficient source of fuel for muscles, the brain and the central nervous system.

• According to the World Health Organization (2003), individuals can healthfully include 10% of their daily calories from added sugars. This translates into 200 calories for a 2000 calorie diet, or 12½ teaspoons of added sugar daily. Clearly, one can safely add a couple of teaspoons of sweetener to a cup of tea or coffee, or have a little sweetened food without worrying about their risk of developing disease.

• Agave syrup, which is sweeter than other sugars and low on the Glycemic Index scale, is a good choice to include as one of the added sugars in your diet because you will use less sugar (and therefore fewer calories) and minimally raise blood sugar levels.

Just a teaspoon of agave: the healthy use of sweeteners in your diet

We all want to live healthier and longer lives. Diet and nutrition plays a key role, impacting our health and our ability to perform physically and mentally now and into the future. Food offers us not only sustenance, but also pleasure and enjoyment. Food is present in so many parts of our lives: at celebrations, business events, family events, religious and spiritual occasions, sports outings, the focus of our family meals, intimate dinners, and sometimes just the excuse to socialize.

Sweet foods make us feel good. Sugar allows for the elevation of serotonin in our brains, the "feel good" neurotransmitter that elevates mood, helps us focus, and in the evening, helps us relax and sleep.

Sugar is a source of energy for our muscles, brain and central nervous system. Without sugar our bodies will not function at peak capacity.

Too much sugar, however, is not good. In small amounts sugar energizes us, but in large doses, repeated throughout the day, day in and day out, sugar puts stress on the body. The extra calories can lead to weight gain and obesity, which in time can lead to chronic disease. In the short term, high sugar intakes can lead to a nutritionally deficient diet and a sense of being on an emotional roller coaster.

So be selective about your use of sugars and use them in moderation in your diet. Just like all foods, a variety will enhance the nutritional content of your diet and the flavor and tastes that you can enjoy. Since sugars come in different forms and have different flavors, they can be used most effectively in specific foods and beverages. For instance, agave syrup is liquid and less viscous than honey, making it easy to mix into cold liquids like iced tea and coffee, and is great to add to cold unsweetened cereals for a little sweet taste. Agave's mild flavor allows chefs and bakers to sweeten foods lightly, without overpowering the taste of the dish.

Pay attention to how much sugar is added to your diet every day. Read labels so that you know when sugar is added to manufactured foods. Keep the consumption of added sugars in your diet to no more than 10% of your total daily calorie intake so that you have plenty of room for nutrient dense foods like fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein-rich foods, nuts, seeds and healthy oils.

Remember that nutrition is a science based on facts. We are making great advances in our understanding of the science of foods and nutrition. Beware of people with hidden agendas using fear tactics to influence your choices. Don't take their opinion at face value. What are their credentials? What conflicts of interest do they have? If they do not disclose conflicts, then assume that they are manipulating the truth.

Most of all enjoy food. Think about what you need to eat to promote whole health. Don't overindulge, but don't deprive yourself of the bounty of wonderful tastes, either. Use celebrations as occasions to enjoy your favorite foods and try new ones. A teaspoon or two of sugar easily fits into the diet of an active, healthy person. Agave syrup offers an organic low-glycemic choice for those looking for that option.

Resources for this article:

Charley H. Food Science, 2nd Edition. John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, 1982.

Figlewicz DP et al. Effect of moderate intake of sweeteners on metabolic health in the rat. Physiology and Behavior 98:618-624, 2009

Johnson RK et al. Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, 2009

Tyler VE. The Honest Herbal, Third Edition. Pharmaceutical Products Press, New York, NY, 1993.

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Probiotic 10 - 25 and 50 Billion
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Date: September 28, 2009 02:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Probiotic 10 - 25 and 50 Billion


Protiotic 10

Probiotics play an important role in human health. Aside from their support of the digestive system, friendly flora are involved in countless biological actions that significantly affect the quality of life.

Unfortunately, the industry has been without a line of truly “allergen-free” probiotics; a void that has proven problematic for allergen-sensitive individuals wishing to complete their supplement regimen with probiotics. Additionally, many probiotic formulas claiming to be allergen-free are not 100% vegetarian/vegan. Trace amounts of dairy media from which they were cultured is often retained, while others may be encapsulated using beef gelatin or other animal-derived ingredients. We don’t think something of such great importance should come with such limitations. NOW® Probiotic-10™ is a unique blend of ten probiotic strains delivering either 25 or 50 billion beneficial organisms, respectfully, providing nutritional support for the maintenance of a healthy digestive system.*

Allergen-free, Dairy-free

Today’s probiotics are grown mainly in dairy media. And while some manufacturers assure dairy-free status, third-party testing often proves otherwise.

The bacteria strains in NOW® Probiotic-10 are grown on a vegetarian media. This ensures the absence of dairy and other allergens, while providing a high digestive tolerance.

Superior Potency & Quality

Extreme care is taken throughout each manufacturing phase of NOW® Probiotic-10™. Its probiotic strains are cultured with non-GMO media, and packed in Amber glass bottles for superior protection. NOW guarantees full potency (25 or 50 billion live organism) through each product’s “Best By” date.

Vegetarian/Vegan Assurance

From initial fermentation to final encapsulation, NOW guarantees that Probiotic-10™ is 100% vegetarian/vegan.

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Figwort
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Date: September 28, 2009 11:10 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Figwort

Figwort is the common name for some members of the Scrophulariaceae family, which is comprised mainly of herbs and small shrubs. These plants are distributed widely over all continents, with the family including few types of climbing plants and some parasitic and saprophytic forms.

There are approximately 2800 species and 200 genera of Figword distributed worldwide. Many of these grow in the American Northwest. The name was derived from European species of Scrophularia, which is the common figwort. The plants are used to treat hemorrhoids, which were known as figs. Additionally, figworts were used to treat scrofula, which is a form of tuberculosis that is carried in the milk of infected cows.

Figwort finds the majority of its use in the treatment of skin problems. In a broad manner, it acts to help the body function well. This herb brings about a state of inner cleanliness. Figwort may be used for eczema, psoriasis, and any skin condition where there is itching and irritation. Part of the cleansing that comes from figwort is due to the purgative and diuretic actions that it possesses. The herb may be used as a mild laxative to treat constipation. It can also be used as a heart stimulant. For safety purposes, figwort should be avoided where there is any abnormally rapid heartbeat.

The figwort family is characterized by irregular, bilaterally symmetrical flowers with four to five petal, joined to a calax and four to five petals, joined to a corolla. This forms a tube, with the petals flaring outward at the end. The lower ones form a down turned lip. The flowers are bisexual and are sometimes brightly colored. The leaves of the plant are alternate, opposite, and sometimes whorled. The fruit is typically a two-chAmbered capsule. Some common hemiparasites can be found in the figwort family. Among these are Indian paintbrush, owl’s clover, lousewort, and bird’s beak. These hemiparasites have green, photosynthetic leaves. A substantial portion of the parasite’s carbon comes from the host plant, which is parasitized from the roots.

Figwort is typically used as a skin medication for eczema, scabies, tumors, and rashes. The herb also provides hormone-like materials that are helpful in soothing the digestive organs. The herb has diuretic properties and can help to clean the kidneys. Figwort is sometimes used to treat circulatory disorders and may assist with the treatment of varicose veins. The herb is recommended for its ability to lower high blood pressure. Figwort can be used as poultice for ulcers, piles, scrofulous gland sin the neck, sores, wounds, and toothaches.

The leaves, stems, and roots of the figwort plant are used to provide alterative, anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic, bitter, demulcent, diuretic, purgative, parasiticide, and stimulant properties. Primarily, figwort is extremely beneficial in dealing with abrasions, athlete’s foot, cradle cap, fever, impetigo, indigestion, restlessness, and skin diseases. Additionally, the herb is very helpful in treating anxiety, burns, cuts, eczema, hemorrhoids, insomnia, kidney problems, and light flow in menstruation, nightmares, and worms. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by figwort, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Active Coenzyme Q10
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Date: July 07, 2007 01:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Active Coenzyme Q10

Active CoQ10

 

The benefits of Coenzyme Q10 have become increasingly well-known. This important nutrient has been shown in clinical trials to improve heart function, reduce the side effects of certain drugs used to treat cancer, and slow the progression of serious brain diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. Now research has opened a new chapter in the CoQ10 story, highlighting the benefits of ubiquinol, the active form of CoQ10, to increase energy and stamina, and reduce some of he physical signs of aging.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor we will review the benefits of Coenzyme Q10, and discuss the differences between CoQ10 and its active form –ubiquinol.

 

Q. What is CoQ10?

A. CoQ10 is a natural, fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all cells. CoQ10 also is known as ubiquinone. That’s because CoQ10 is ubiquitious and exists everywhere there is life. CoQ10 is vital to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. ATP is the energy-rich compound used for all processes requiring energy in the body. Although CoQ10 is produced by the body and exists in some limited dietary sources, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirements. CoQ10 levels diminish with age and as a result of dietary inadequacies and various disease states. Also, some drugs, especially a group of cholesterol lowering prescription drugs known as “statins,” (Pravachol, Zocor, Lipitor, etc.) significantly reduce CoQ10 levels in the body.

 

Q. What is ubiquinol? Is it the same or different from CoQ10?

A. Ubiquinol and CoQ10 are very closely related. Ubiquinone, or CoQ10, is the oxidized form of the molecule. This means it has to be converted to a non-oxidized form before it can perform its work. Ubiquinol is the active form of this nutrient. Our bodies convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol – which is the form needed to produce cellular energy. Until recently, it was not possible to use ubiquinol as a supplement because it is very unstable outside the human body. But research has now found a way to keep this molecule stable so it can be successfully taken in supplement form.

 

Q. If CoQ10 gets converted to ubiquinol anyway, can’t I just take CoQ10?

A. While it is true that our bodies can convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol, it isn’t true that we all do this equally well. In fact, as we age, our ability to convert CoQ10 to ubiquinol declines. And some people even have a gene that makes them less effective at this conversion than the majority of the population. IN fact, several common health issues have been associated with less than optimal ratios of CoQ10 to QH. For healthy people the ideal ratio is approximately 97% Ubiquinol to 3% CoQ10. But in people with diabetes, for example, the ratios have been found to range from 43% ubiquinol to 47% CoQ10 in mild diabetes, to only 24% ubiquinol to 76% CoQ10 in severe diabetes. These numbers are for men; the numbers for women vary by 2 to 5 percentage points.

So for older folks, the 30-50% of people who have the gene that impairs CoQ10 conversion, or for people who have serious health concerns, supplementing with ubiquinol instead of CoQ10 might be the smart choice.

 

Q. What are the health benefits of CoQ10 and Ubiquinol?

A. There have been many studies showing that CoQ10 is beneficial in treating and preventing heart disease and conditions such as high blood pressure atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), angina, and congestive heart failure (CHF). It’s been shown that heart attacks tend to occur when CoQ10 levels are low in the body. Exciting new research has found that CoQ10 in a unique delivery system supplementation may slow the progression of symptoms associated with neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, ALS, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition, CoQ10 is beneficial for diabetes, immune dysfunction, cancer, periodontal disease, prostate cancer, and neurological disease. While the research on ubiquinol is still very new, it is reasonable to expect that its benefits will be equal to or perhaps even better than CoQ10, because it is the more active form.

 

Q. Why is CoQ10 especially important for preventing and treating heart disease, and for neurological diseases like Parkinson’s disease?

A. The heart and brain are some of the most metabolically active tissues in the body. Both require large amounts of uninterrupted energy, which means these tissues also need increased amounts of ubiquinol. Research has shown that many people with heart of brain diseases have serum CoQ10 levels that are lower than those of healthy people. Correcting such deficiencies often can produce significant results. However, these diseases become more common as we age – right at the time our ability to convert CoQ10 to its active form, ubiquinol, declines.

 

Q. How might ubiquinol be important for the heart?

A. Heart Health: A study on patients admitted to the hospital with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) found that CoQ10 can provide rapid protective effects in patients with a heart attack if administered within three days of the onset of symptoms. Seventy-three patients received CoQ10 (120 mg/d). The study’s control group consisted of 71 similarly matched patients with acute AMI. After treatment, angina pectoris (severe chest pain signifying interrupted blood flow to the heart), total arrhythmias (dangerously irregular heartbeats), and poor function in the left ventricle (the essential chAmber of the heart) were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden cardiac failure and nonfatal heart attacks also were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared with the placebo group.

In another study, CoQ10 was studied in 109 patients with high blood pressure (hypertension). The patients were given varying doses of supplemental CoQ10 with the goal of attaining a certain blood level (greater than 2.0 mcg/l). Most patients were on medications to treat hypertension. Half the patients were able to stop taking some or all of their prescription drugs at an average of 4.4 months after starting CoQ10. The 9.4% of patients who had echocardiograms, performed both before and during treatment, experienced a highly significant improvement in heart wall thickness and function. This improvement was directly attributed to CoQ10 supplementation.

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating disease that affects 5 million people in the U.S. It causes edema, difficult breathing, and impaired circulation. In another study, CoQ10 restored healthy heart function in CHF patients. Patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the investigators introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of patients’ hearts to determine the degree of CHF damage to the heart muscle. The patients’ heart muscles at rest and work improved significantly. The researchers concluded CHF patients would greatly benefit from adjunctive CoQ10 treatment. Since ubiquinol is the active form of CoQ10, it may be able to overcome the hurdles to providing maximum impact, most importantly, age and genetic related inefficiencies in converting CoQ10 to active CoQ10 (Ubiquinol).

 

And Neurological Health?: A study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health showed that supplementing with CoQ10 in a unique delivery system was associated with a slowing of the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Participants were divided into 4 groups and their physical skills (coordination, walking, etc) and mental skills were evaluated. Each group then received 300 mg, 600 mg, or 1200 mg of a special form of chewable CoQ10, or a placebo. The researchers evaluated the participants after 1, 4,8, 12, and 16 months of treatment. Each participant was again scored on motor, mental, and activities of daily living skills.

The results of the study showed that the people who took the highest dosage of CoQ10-1200 mg-experienced the least decline in their physical abilities. The results were so encouraging that the researchers will be continuing with new studies, suing higher dosages to see if the results can get even better.

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating and degenerative inherited disease that is always fatal. In fact, no other medication, drug, or nutritional supplement has ever been shown to cause a decline in the progression of this terrible disease. A study compared CoQ10 against remacemide (an investigational HD drug made by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals), in 347 HD patients who were in the early stages of the disease. Remacemide blocks glutamate, the neurotransmitter scientists think may cause the death of brain cells that occurs in Huntington’s disease. While remacemide had no effect on the progression of HD, CoQ10 showed a trend toward slowing the disease by an average of 15%. This meant the HD group taking CoQ10 was able to handle every day activities of life a little longer than the patients taking remacemide or a placebo. They also were able to focus their attention better, were less depressed, and less irritable.

The 15% slowing of decline can result in about one more year of independence of HD patients. Needless to say, the gift of an additional year of health in the lives of HD patients is incredibly significant.

Because of these impressive results, researchers are hopeful that supplemental CoQ10 will have beneficial effects for people with other neurological diseases such as ALS and Alzheimer’s disease, too. Studies are under way to confirm these effects.

Using the active form of CoQ10 helps to assure that, regardless of age or illness, the CoQ10 can have the greatest impact.

 

Q. What have been the results of research studies with Ubiquinol?

A. One of the most interesting effects of Ubiquinol that has been reported so far is its ability to slow the physical signs of aging. In laboratory studies, administration of stable ubiquinol to mice forestalled the changes associated with aging – rounded spine, patchy fur and irritated eyes. While the mice who received ubiquinol did not necessarily live longer than the mice that didn’t, they lived better. But it is important to note that these mice were bred to die at a young age. Human studies are needed to determined true impact on longevity.

Additionally, supplemental, stable ubiquinol has been shown to increase physical energy and stamina. In an animal study, the length of time rats were able to run on a treadmill before getting tired was measured. The same rats were then given ubiquinol and the treadmill test was repeated. The length of time the rats were able to run before tiring increased 150 times.

 

Q. How can one supplement have applications for neurological diseases, heart health, and even the immune system?

A. Supplements often have more than one function, especially when it’s a substance like CoQ10, which is present in all parts of the body. All nucleated cells (most cells other than red blood cells) have mitochondria and all cells require energy to function. CoQ10 is vital to ATP production. Thus, CoQ10 has applications not only in neurological (neurons or nervous system cells) and cardiac health (myocardium or heart tissue), but also for the immune system.

 

Q. Should I take CoQ10 or ubiquinol? How much should I take?

A. While everyone can benefit from CoQ10 or ubiquinol supplementation, it appears that ubiquinol should be the first choice for older adults, people with known genetic inefficiencies in converting CoQ10 to ubiquinol, and for people with serious heart disease or neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, who are otherwise supplementing with high levels of CoQ10. For people in overall good health, a high quality CoQ10 supplement with proven absorption is a good choice.

Take 200 to 300 mg of CoQ10 or 100 mg ubiquinol daily, depending on your health history. The safety of both forms has been tested, and no significant side effects reported. Occasional mild stomach upset may occur. Taking your CoQ10 or ubiquinol with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

 

Conclusion
CoQ10 is not the only answer to the complex issues of heart disease, neurological diseases, or immune dysfunction; however, research indicates that it’s a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagines. The more we study this naturally occurring compound, the more benefits we find. And with this new ability to provide CoQ10 in its active form, ubiquinol, for the first time, even greater benefits may be derived.

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CoQ10 for Heart Health
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Date: March 28, 2007 12:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CoQ10 for Heart Health

CoQ10 for Heart Health

 

More than 40% of all deaths in the U.S. are from cardiovascular disease (CVD). You have a greater chance of dying from heart disease than from cancer, AIDS, diabetes, and accidents combined. More than 2,600 Americans die each day of CVD – an average of 1 death every 33 seconds. One in 5 men and women have some form of CVD. If all forms of major CVD were eliminated, life expectancy would rise by almost 7 years.

One of the most – if not the most – important things people can do to improve their overall health and life expectancy is to improve their heart health. Diet, exercise, and the wise use of dietary supplements can improve heart health dramatically. One dietary supplement that’s extremely beneficial to heart health is coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10).

 

Q. What is CoQ10?

A. CoQ10 is a natural, fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all cells. CoQ10 also is known as ubiquinone. That’s because CoQ10 is ubiquitous and exists everywhere there is life. CoQ10 is vital to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. ATP is the energy-rich compound used for all energy-requiring processes in the body. Although COQ10 is produced by the body and exists in some dietary sources, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirements. CoQ10 levels diminish with age and as a result of dietary inadequacies and various disease states. Also, some drugs, especially a group of cholesterol-lowering prescription drugs known as “statin,” (Pravachol, Zocor, Lipitor, etc.) significantly reduce CoQ10 levels in the body.

 

Q. For what health conditions is CoQ10 used?

A. CoQ10 is beneficial in treating and preventing CVD and conditions such as high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), angina, and congestive heart failure (CHF). It’s been shown that heart attacks tend to occur when CoQ10 levels are low in the body. In addition, CoQ10 is beneficial for diabetes, immune dysfunction, cancer, periodontal disease, prostate cancer, and neurological disease.

 

Q. Why is CoQ10 especially important to heart health?

A. The heart is one of the most metabolically active tissues in the body. In the average person, the heart propels 2,000 gallons of blood through 65,000 miles of blood vessls by beating 100,000 times each day. Thus, it requires large amounts of uninterrupted energy. Heart cells have a greater number of mitochondria, and subsequently, more CoQ10 than any other type of cell. Each heart cell can have thousands of mitochondria to meet these energy demands.

 

Mitochondria are highly specialized structures within each cell and are often referred to as cell powerhouses. These tiny energy-produces produce 95% of the energy the body requires. The number of mitochondria in a cell depends on its function and energy needs. A cell’s ATP production is dependent on adequate amounts of CoQ10.

 

Heart disease patients are commonly CoQ10 deficient. Correcting such deficiencies often can produce amazing results. The presence of supplemental CoQ10 is a key to the heart’s optimum performance.

In people who have had a heart attack (myocardial infarction), CoQ10 assists in repairing the heart muscle and restoring heart function. This is due to increased ATP production.

 

Q. What studies support this fact?

A. A 1998 study found CoQ10 can provide rapid protective effects in patients with a heart attack if administered within three days of the onset of symptoms. The study focused on patients admitted to the hospital with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) diagnosis. Seventy-three patients received CoQ10 (120 mg/d). The study’s control group consisted of 71 similarly matched patients with acute AMI. After treatment, angina pectoris (severe chest pain signifying interrupted blood flow to the heart), total arrhythmias (dangerously irregular heartbeats), and poor function in the left ventricle (the essential chAmber of the heart) were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden cardiac failure and nonfatal heart attacks also were significantly reduced in the CoQ10 group compared with the placebo group.

 

In another study, CoQ10 was studied in 109 patients with high blood pressure (hypertension). The patients were given varying doses of supplemental CoQ10 with the goal of attaining a certain blood level (greater than 2.0 mcg/l). Most patients were on medications to treat hypertension. Half the patients were able to stop taking one to three antihypertensive drugs at an average of 4.4 months after starting CoQ10. Only 3% of patients required the addition of one antihypertensive drug. The 9.4% of patients who have echo cardiograms, performed both before and during treatment, experienced a highly significant improvement in heart wall thickness and function. This improvement was directly attributed to CoQ10 supplementation.

 

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating disease that affects 5 million people in the U.s. It causes edema, difficult breathing, and impaired circulation. In another study, CoQ10 restored healthy heart function in CHF patients. Patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the investigators introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of patients’ hearts to determine the degree of CHF damage to the heart muscle. The patients’ heart muscles at rest and work improved significantly. The researchers concluded CHF patients would greatly benefit from adjunctive CoQ10 treatment.

 

Q. I’ve heard that CoQ10 can also help people who have neurological diseases. Is this true?

A. Yes, it is. CoQ10 has been studied for its ability to improve the health of individuals with amotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. A recently completed study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health showed that CoQ10 caused a slowing of the progression of Huntington’s disease, a devastating and degenerative disease that is always fatal. In fact, no other medication, drug, or nutritional supplemental has ever been shown to cause a decline in the progression of this terrible disease.

 

The study compared CoQ10 against remacemide (an investigational HD drug made by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals), in 347 HD patients who were in the early stages of the disease. Remacemide blocks glutamate, the neurotransmitter scientists think may cause the death of brain cells that occurs in Huntington’s disease. While remacemide had no effect on the progression of HD, CoQ10 showed a trend toward slowing the disease by an average of 15%. This meant the HD group taking CoQ10 was able to handle every day activities of life a little longer than the patients taking remacemide or a placebo. They also were able to focus their attention better, were less depressed, and less irritable. The 15% slowing of decline means that CoQ10 can result in about one more year of independence for HD patients. Needless to say, the gift of an additional year of health in the lives of HD patients is incredibly significant.

 

Because of these impressive results with HD, researchers are hopeful that the studies of CoQ10 in those with ALS and Parkinson’s disease will similarly have a positive effect on the symptoms and/or progression of these neurological disorders, too.

 

Q. Why is it crucial for a CoQ10 supplement to cross the blood-brain barrier?

A. The brains’ blood vessels are composed of cells with extremely tight junctions. These junctions form the blood-brain barrier, which restricts what can pass from the bloodstream into the brain. While this barrier protects the brain, it can be a significant obstacle to central nervous system therapy. To leave the bloodstream and reach the brain cells, a substance must pass through the tightly connected cells of the capillary walls. Only substances with unique solubilities or those with a transport system can cross the blood-brain barrier to a significant degree. As a result, crossing the blood-brain barrier presents a significant challenge to supporting neurological health.

 

While most CoQ10 supplements enter the bloodstream and increase blood serum levels, only special forms of CoQ10 have been shown to cross the blood-brain barrier. For CoQ10 to enter the mitochondria within the brain, CoQ10 must first cross the blood-brain barrier to produce significant neurosupportive clinical results.

 

Q. How can one supplement have applications for neurological diseases, heart health, and even the immune system?

A. Supplements often have more than one function, especially when it’s a substance like CoQ10, which is present in all parts of the body. All nucleated cells (most cells other than red blood cells) have mitochondria and all cells require energy to function. CoQ10 is vital to ATP production. Thus, CoQ10 has applications not only in neurological (neurons or nervous system cells) and cardiac health (myocardium or heart tissue), but also for the immune system.

 

Q. Are all CoQ10 supplements created equal? Doesn’t CoQ10 just have to get into the bloodstream to be effective?

A. There are some important distinctions among CoQ10 products, as they vary greatly in quality and absorbability. It’s crucial to find a CoQ10 product that’s:

 

1. Scientifically shown to absorb through the digestive tract, cross cellular membranes, and increase mitochondrial levels of CoQ10. Chewable forms of CoQ10 provide rapid bioavailability and absorption. Serum level determination of CoQ10 in the bloodstream is not necessarily the most important measure of efficacy. For a CoQ10 supplement to be fully effective, it must cross the cellular barrier and raise intracellular CoQ10 levels. A key indicator of effective CoQ10 supplementation is its presence in cell mitochondria.

 

2. The natural form of CoQ10. The natural process uses living organisms. CoQ10 also can be synthesized by a chemical process, which produces a distinctly different product that contains chemical compounds not found in the natural form.

 

3. Formulated with ingredients that provide the transport system CoQ10 needs to cross cellular membranes and the blood-brain barrier. Not all forms of CoQ10 have been scientifically proven to cross cell membranes and the blood-brain barrier. Some prestigious groups that have investigated this issue include researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

 

4. Studied by respected organizations, with research published in peer-reviewed journals by reputable scientists.

 

Q. How much CoQ10 should I take?

A. Take 100 to 200 mg of CoQ10 daily, depending on your family history of heart disease and personal heart disease experience.

 

CoQ10’s safety has been evaluated. Dosages in studies have ranged from 100 mg to 1,200 mg per day. To date, no toxicities have been reported. Occasional mild stomach upset may occur. Taking CoQ10 with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

 

Q. What are some other heart-friendly supplements?

A. CoQ10 is an excellent supplement for overall cardiovascular health, as in L-carnitine. L-carnitine is the naturally occurring form of carnitine that’s found in food and synthesized in the body. Much of the body’s L-carnitine is found in the heart and skeletal muscle, tissues that rely on fatty acid oxidation for most of their energy. Nearly 70% of the energy needed for heart function is derived from fatty acid breakdown. Proper L-carnitine supplementation transports fatty acids into cell mitochondria, where it’s burned for energy. L-carnitine is an excellent addition to CoQ10, especially for people with heart disease, and has been shown to improve many symptoms associated with CVD. In one study, people who had experienced one heart attack received either L-carnitine or placebo. The L-carnitine group had a statistically significant reduction in second heart attacks, and improved overall survival.

 

Q. What supplements support healthy blood pressure and cholesterol?

A. In addition to maintaining overall cardiovascular health, it’s also important to address your essential fats/lipids levels and healthy circulation/blood pressure. Fish oil supplements can significantly reduce blood pressure, cholesterol, and homocysteine levels. Choose a supplement that’s a rich source of EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids naturally obtainable in fish oil. Find a product that’s been clinically studied and purified to ensure it contains the beneficial active constituents of the whole oil, while removing any dioxins, DDT, PCBs, or heavy metals, toxins present in some commercial fish oil preparations. An enteric-coated garlic product that provides a minimum of 5,000 mcg of beneficial allicin supports healthy blood pressure and circulation. And magnesium, niacin, vitamin E, folic acid, hawthorn extract, and L-cysteine provide overall nutritional support to the heart and vascular system.

 

Conclusion

CoQ10 is not the only answer to the complex issues of heart disease, neurological disease, or immune dysfunction; however, research indicates that it’s a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagined. The more we study this naturally occurring compound, the more benefits we find.

The key to this supplement is the manufacturing quality. For safety and overall effectiveness, use a CoQ10 product that’s supported by product-specific research from reputable institutions. Choose tested products from a well-respected company to increase your potential to achieve and maintain heart and blood vessel health.

Supplementation with clinically studied products can have a major impact on your heart’s health and strength. However, no supplement replaces the need to eat a healthful diet low in refined foods (especially sugar), and saturated fats, and to exercise your most important muscle – your heart – on a regular basis.

 

 



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For Better Heart Health ...
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 06, 2007 12:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: For Better Heart Health ...

Nutrients Every Heart Needs

 

High blood pressure. High cholesterol levels. Ever increasing stress. All are factors related to the development of heart disease – the leading cause of death for both men and women. In fact, 1 in 2 women in the United States die of heart disease or stroke, while 1 in 30 dies of breast cancer. If current trends remain unchanged, not only will heart disease remain the primary killer in our country, the number of people it claims will steadily and dramatically increase in the next 20 years.

 

Fortunately, heart disease is a problem you can do something about. Proven ways to prevent or mitigate the effects of heart disease include taking targeted nutritional supplements, making changes in the foods we eat, exercising most days of the week, drinking in moderation, eliminating tobacco use and adapting a positive attitude. Research shows that those of us who are often angry and depressed have more heart disease than people that live their lives with a more positive outlook.

 

In this Ask the Doctor, we’ll talk about specific nutritional supplements that are heart healthy, whether your goal is to prevent heart disease or reduce the effects of heart disease if you currently have it.

 

Q. I am trying hard to live a healthier life. But it all seems so overwhelming. How do I start?

A. It may help to know that you’re not alone in feeling overwhelmed. Lots of people feel this way. This is why the Centers for Disease Control and the American Heart Association are both urging people to prevent heart disease by identifying their individual health risk factors.

 

A risk factor is an indicator of whether or not you may develop a certain health condition. In heart disease prevention, there are two kinds of risk factors. There are risk factor you can control – such as diet, exercise, and the supplements you take. There are also risk factors you can’t change or control –your age, race, and gender, as well as your family’s history of heart disease.

 

Examples can be really helpful. Let’s follow three adults – Fred, Jane, and Earl – and determine their risk factors.

 

Low Risk

Fred is 32, single, has a job he loves, has an optimistic attitude about his life, and works out 5 days a week. Most days Fred’s diet is fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low fat. Occasionally Fred will eat a cheeseburger and fries when he watches the game with his buddies. Fred’s risk factors are his male gender and the occasional high fat content in his diet.

 

Moderate Risk

Jane is 55, a lawyer, married, and has a very stressful job. Jane eats lots of salads, fruits, and whole grains. However, her job requires her to work long hours which leaves little time to exercise. Jane is for the most part happy with her life, but her work stress had led to times of negativity. Her father had a heart attack when he was 56. Jane’s risk factors include her age (greater than 50), negativity from job stress, lack of regular exercise, and a family history of heart disease.

 

High Risk

Earl is 65, married, and has just retired from a job he hated. He spends most of his day watching TV and eating potato chips and other high fat, salty snacks. Earl has told his friends and family since he worked so hard for so long, he is sure to drop dead soon after retiring. He has high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Earl’s father had a heart attack and died when he was 73. Earl’s risk is his male gender, age (greater than 50), sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, negative outlook on life, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and a family history of heart disease.

 

Q. OK, it’s pretty easy to see that Fred needs to watch his diet, Jane needs to exercise more, and Earl needs lots of help. But, which supplements should they take?

A. The Whole Heart Nutrition chart is an easy way to determine the supplements each risk level needs. As you can see, everyone wanting to prevent heart disease – Fred, Jane, Earl, you, and I – need to take quality heart formula multivitamin, garlic, and a fish oil supplement providing Omega-3 fatty acids. CoQ10 is also a smart choice for complete heart heath support.

 

Q. Why do we all need to take a “heart multivitamin”? Why can’t we take a regular multivitamin to prevent heart disease?

A. Since the human heart simply cannot function without adequate amounts of certain vitamins and minerals, it seems logical that a multivitamin would be the foundation of good nutrition for your heart. Heart-health formulated multivitamins provide the exact nutrients needed to prevent heart disease.

 

That’s why we need to take a specially formulated heart-focused multi-vitamin. The cells and the tissues that make up the heart must have vitamins C, A, and E, as well as B1, B6, and B12 to function. Folic acid, the little B vitamin that is so crucial in preventing spina bifida (a birth defect), breast cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease is also needed to keep heart muscles strong. The B vitamins and folic acid are very important to heart health because they help lower homocysteine levels. Homocysteine is a potential and emerging cardiac risk factor,

 

Magnesium is a mighty mineral and healthy hearts need it every day. Aloha lipoic acid, a fatty acid, provides protection against heart cholesterol and high blood pressure. Lutein and lycopene are all-natural nutrients and keep our arteries free from the buildup of plaque, a condition linked to heart attacks and strokes.

 

Multivitamins formulated with these exact vitamins, minerals, and nutrients will work with medications often prescribed to treat heart disease and provide the nutrition our hearts need.

 

Q. Don’t all multivitamins work with medications prescribed to treat heart disease?

A. Many multivitamin formulas contain herbs and other nutrients that can interfere with prescription medications, especially mediations prescribed to treat heart disease. One multivitamin does not fit all.

The more risk factors you have, the greater your chance of developing heart disease.

Factors you CAN’T change

 

Increasing age

About four out of five people who die of coronary heart disease are 65 or older.

Male gender

Men have more heart attacks than women. Even after menopause, when women’s death rate from heart disease increases, men continue to have more heart attacks until both groups reach their 80s.

Heredity (including Race)

While heart disease has often been noted to occur in families, recent research has shown this link may be the result of environment more than heredity. In other words, your dad’s high blood pressure and your high blood pressure may be related more to your mutual love of salty foods than your genetics. African Americans tend to have very high blood pressure and a higher risk of heart attacks than other races.

Factors you CAN change

 

Tobacco smoke

Smokers have twice the risk of heart attack than nonsmokers.

High blood cholesterol

As blood cholesterol rises, so does the risk of heart disease.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure increases the heart’s workload, causing the heart to thicken and become stiffer.

Physical inactivity

Exercise most days of the week helps prevent heart disease. The more vigorous the activity, the greater your benefits.

Obesity and overweight

People who have excess body fat are more likely to develop heart disease and stroke even if they have no other risk factors.

Individual coping styles

Research has shown there is al ink between heart disease risk and stress, happiness, negativity, and socioeconomic status.

Alcohol consumption

Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure. However, the risk of heart disease in people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol (an average of one drink for women or two drinks for men per day) is lower than in nondrinkers.

 

Q. What can garlic supplements do for Fred, Jane and Earl or other people with low to high risk factors?

A. Garlic supplements have a very long and very successful history of preventing premature death from heart attacks. Lately, however, there have been some conflicting news stories about supplemental garlic’s ability to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure – the causes of heart disease and death. That’s because many different garlic supplements have been used in these studies – garlic oil, garlic powder, aged garlic extract, and supplements made from fresh garlic. They have all been studied clinically for their effects in heart disease.

 

The best garlic supplements (and the ones that showed the best effects in garlic studies) contain alliin, which is then converted to allicin. Allicin is the compound that lowers harmfully high cholesterol levels and dangerous blood pressure readings. Allicin is also responsible for garlic’s characteristic odor. Because alliin is very stable when dry, properly prepared and enteric coated fresh garlic preparations preserve the allicin-producing action until the garlic mixes with the fluids of the intestinal tract. Fresh garlic extract’s enteric coating also prevents garlic breath. In contrast, aged garlic contains absolutely no allicin or allicin potential. This fact is probably responsible for the poor results noted in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure from aged garlic preparations.

 

The most effective garlic supplements are made from fresh garlic, enteric coated, and provide a daily dose of at least 10 milligrams (mg) alliin or a total allicin potential of 4,000 micrograms (mcg). Taking a once-daily garlic supplement that delivers 4,000 mcg of allicin will lower Jane’s and Earl’s high blood pressure and Earl’s high cholesterol, naturally and effectively.

 

Whole Heart Nutrition

Supplement

Low Risk

Moderate Risk

High Risk

Heart multivitamin

Every day

Every day

Every day

Garlic supplement 4,000 mcg allicin

1 tablet each day

1 tablet each day

1 tablet each day

Fish oil supplement with omega-3 fatty acids

600 mg each day

1200 mg each day

1800 mg each day

CoQ10

60 mg

100-200 mg each day

200-400 mg each day

Each additional risk factor requires additional supplements or increased doses for protection from heart disease.

 

Q. What about fish oil supplements? I know they can prevent heart disease but I’ve also heard they contain harmful substances, too.

A. You’re right on both counts. But, there are excellent fish oil supplements naturally loaded with Omega-3 fatty acids, powerful nutrients that prevent heart disease, that are also certified free of harmful contaminants.

 

In the 1980s, researchers first began noticing the native Inuit (Eskimo) populations of Greenland and Alaska had hardly and heart disease despite a very high-fat diet. The deep-water fish that these peoples eat (and continue to eat to this day) are indeed quite fatty. But, this kind of fat, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids actually protects the heart instead of harming it.

 

Research has shown that the Omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil supplements can:

-Reduce the risk of arrhythmias, lethal heartbeat rhythms that cause sudden death.

-Lower the levels of triglycerides, fats in the blood that can increase a person’s

risk of dying from a heart attack, even if a person’s cholesterol levels are normal.

-Slow atherosclerosis – the growth of harmful plaque on artery walls.

Atherosclerosis develops over many years. If the plaque growth is slow and

stable, chances are low that a heart attack will result. However, rapidly growing

or unstable plaques can rupture. The body responds with inflammation, which

causes blood clots to form. These blood clots block the artery and cause a heart

attack.

-Keep blood pressure levels low. Many people have high blood pressure for years

without knowing it. That’s because it has no symptoms. Uncontrolled high

blood pressure can lead to stroke, heart attack, heart failure, and kidney failure.

While 25% of Americans have high blood pressure, nearly one-third of these

people don’t know they have it. This is why high blood pressure is often called

the “silent killer.”

 

You can get all of this heart disease preventive protection from just 600-1800 mg of fish oil. It’s pretty simple to see why Fred, Jane, Earl, and you and I need to take fish oil supplements every day.

 

However, it is absolutely critical that the fish oil supplement you take is free of contaminants and guaranteed fresh! Make sure that the manufacturer of the fish oil supplement you buy is able to provide documentation of purity in their product. Supplements should contain no detectable dioxin (a widely used toxic preservative), DDT (a toxic insecticide), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) or heavy metals such as mercury and lead.

 

Before you buy any fish oil supplement, ask the clerk if you can open the bottle or jar and smell the contents. A fishy smelling fish oil supplementation means it is rancid. Rancid fish oil is not going to help your heart at all and may actually hurt it.

 

Q. That leaves CoQ10. Why is it important for Jane and Earl?

A. CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone, is the premier heart supplement! CoQ10 is part of our energy producing system. It works directly in the mitochondria of each cell. Mitochondria are highly specialized structures within each cell and are often referred to as powerhouses. These tiny energy producers generate 95% of the energy the body requires. The number of mitochondria in a cell depends on its function and energy needs. The heart has very important functions and requires a vast amount of energy. Thus, the heart has a lot of mitochondria or little powerhouses.

 

CoQ10 is incredibly crucial to the health of our hearts. Especially to hearts that are pumping blood with too much cholesterol. But, in a dangerous paradox, CoQ10 levels can become dangerously depleted when physicians treat high cholesterol in their patients with certain medications. The so-called “statin” drugs (Mevacor/lovastatin and Crestor/rosubastatin are two examples) are powerful and medications prescribed to lower harmful cholesterol levels. However, one very harmful side effect they share is that they deprive cells of CoQ10. While some physicians are aware of this serious side effect and tell their patients to take at least 400 mg of CoQ10 each day, most are not. The result? Any good the statin drugs may be doing is actually negated by their depletion of CoQ10.

 

Q. How does CoQ10 actually work? Has it been studied in heart disease?

A. Yes, it has! CoQ10 has been extensively studied in heart disease. This natural nutrient is present in every nucleated cell in our body (the only cells that don’t contain CoQ10 are red blood cells). Heart cells, however, are absolutely loaded with CoQ10. Its job is fairly simply – CoQ10 is vital to the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the compound our body uses for 95% of its energy needs.

 

In 1998, 144 patients who had been admitted to the hospital after a heart attack, participated in a CoQ10 study. Half of the patients received 120 mg of CoQ10 a day in addition to the usual treatments given to heart attack patients. The other half, the control group, received the usual treatments and a placebo, but no CoQ10.

 

The results showed that the group taking CoQ10 had less irregular heartbeat, experienced less angina (a type of heart pain), and had much better function in the left ventricle (the most essential chAmber of the heart), compared to the placebo group. Total deaths due to sudden heart failure or another heart attack were also reduced in the CoQ10 group.

 

Q. What if I have already been diagnosed with Congestive Heart Failure? Will CoQ10 still help me?

A. CoQ10 has been proven in study after study to help slow down the destruction that occurs in congestive heart failure (CHF), a serious heart disease, and heal the heart muscles damaged by heart attacks. In fact, heart attacks often occur when the body’s CoQ10 levels are low.

 

In a CHF study, patients received 100 mg of CoQ10 or a placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Before and after the treatment period, the researchers introduced a catheter into the right ventricle of the patients’ hearts to determine the degree of muscle damage CHF had caused. In the group who took CoQ10, the pumping ability of the heart improved significantly. The placebo group’s hearts did not. The researchers conducting the study recommended that people with CHF add CoQ10 to the other medications they need to take to stay alive and well.

 

Q. Are some types of CoQ10 better than others?

A. Indeed they are. CoQ10 products are not created equally. The key to this natural medicine is the quality of the manufacturing. Take a CoQ10 supplement that’s been used in research conducted by prestigious universities (it will tell you this right on the label). Researchers want the best CoQ10 for their studies. You want the best CoQ10 for yourself and your loved ones.

 

The best CoQ10 has to meet the following criteria:

1. Must be easily absorbed during the digestion process so that it can get into the

bloodstream.

2. Must reach the mitochondria in the cell.

3. Must be proven effective in studies.

4. Must be safe and free of impurities.

 

Q. It sounds as if CoQ10 is only for people with moderate or high risk factors. Can others benefit from this supplement?

A. Many people, including those like Fred with low risk factors or no risk of heart disease take CoQ10 every day. CoQ10 supplements may reduce your risk of cancer, prevent gum disease, and help certain nerve cells work more effectively.

 

Conclusion

Understanding your personal risk factors, making it better lifestyle choices, taking a multivitamin formulated for your heart, an enteric-coated fresh garlic supplement, fish oil supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids, and CoQ10 – the heart’s super-nutrient – can help keep your heart healthy and strong.

 

Helen Keller, the famous lecturer and author, who was both blind and deaf wrote, “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot e seen or even touched. They must be felt with the human heart.”

 

Healthy hearts have the most opportunities to “feel” the best and are the most beautiful thing our world has to offer.

 



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Carnitine Creatinate
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 08, 2005 03:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Carnitine Creatinate

Carnitine Creatinate

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 6/30/05

LIKELY USERS: Athletes, Bodybuilders, Dieters, People who consume a lot of fat, People needing cardiovascular support (energy for the heart), People who need quick energy, especially for fast muscle response, People with muscle wasting problems (including the elderly), Weightlifters

KEY INGREDIENTS: L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate is a specialized form of Creatine bonded to L-Carnitine. Creatine is a compound natural to the human body that aids in the regeneration of ATP, the chemical energy used by muscle tissue. During exercise, large quantities of creatine are irreversibly consumed. Clinical studies have shown that oral supplementation with Creatine can increase the amount of Creatine available in muscles for ATP production. L-Carnitine is an amino acid that is necessary for the transfer of fatty acids into the fat-burning parts of the cell, facilitating energy production from fat. The combination of these two compounds can produce a synergistic effect, making NOW® Carnitine Creatinate an ideal energy supplement.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: Carnitine and Creatinate Monohydrate is a patented ingredient that has been the subject of research studies. It is supported by the scientific staff in the laboratories of both NOW Foods and the raw material supplier, both of which have a mutual interest in protecting the integrity and efficacy of this product. Protected by U.S. Patent No. 5,994,581 (L-Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate).

Look at the price: this is a better way to buy both supplements than purchasing them separately.

This formula is suitable for vegetarians and is offered in both tablet and powder forms.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: As a dietary supplement, every two tablets provide 1,000 mg. (one gram) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Or one teaspoon provides 1,150 mg.) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Take one or more servings per day with a carbohydrate source, such as fruit juice or sports drinks.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: CoQ10, carbohydrates, B-Complex vitamins, chromium, vanadium, Hawthorn leaf and flower extract, protein supplements. Adaptogenic herbs: ginsengs, Eleuthero, Rhodiola, Maca, Ashwaganda, licorice root

CAUTIONS: none.

PRODUCT SPECIFIC: This product is very sensitive to moisture. Please keep in the original packaging or in a moisture resistant container. Do not take more than 20 grams per day. Discontinue use if cramps of stomach upset occur, especially if taking large doses. Do not take if kidney disease is present. Do not use large doses of caffeine with creatine, as it may increase the possibility of muscle cramping.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. When taking any new supplement, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time to avoid any potential problems.

Packages may contain moisture or oxygen controlling packets or canisters that are not intended for consumption. In order to maintain maximum freshness, please do not remove these from your bottle (until the bottle is empty). Please recycle your container.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

Fang S-M (1998) Carnitine Creatinate. U.S. Patent 5,994,581.

L-CARNITINE:

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Broquist HP (1994) Carnitine, in Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 8th ed., Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M (eds.) Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, pp. 459-465. Casey A, Greenhoff PL (2000) Does dietary creatine supplementation play a role in skeletal muscle metabolism and performance? Am J Clin Nutr 72(suppl):607S-17S. Columbani P, Wenk C, Kunz I, et al. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on physical performance and energy metabolism of endurance-trained athletes: a double blind crossover field study. Eur J Appl Physiol 1996;73:434-9.

Dal Negro R, Pomari G, Zoccatelli O, Turco P. L-carnitine and rehabilitative respiratory physiokinesitherapy: metabolic and ventilatory response in chronic respiratory insufficiency. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 1986;24:453-6.

Dal Negro R, Turco P, Pomari C, De Conti F. Effects of L-carnitine on physical performance in chronic respiratory insufficiency. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 1988;26:269-72.

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Becque MD, Lochmann JD, Melrose DR. Effects of oral creatine supplementation on muscular strength and body composition. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2000;32:654-8.

Casey A, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Howell S, et al. Creatine supplementation favorably affects performance and muscle metabolism during maximal intensity exercise in humans. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E31-E7.

Earnest CP, Almada AL, Mitchell TL. High-performance capillary electrophoresis-pure creatine monohydrate reduces blood lipids in men and women. Clin Sci 1996;91:113-8.

Earnest C, Almada A, Mitchell T. Influence of chronic creatine supplementation on hepatorenal function. FASEB J 1996;10:4588.

Earnest CP, Snell PG, Rodriguez R, et al. The effect of creatine monohydrate ingestion on anaerobic power indices, muscular strength and body composition. Acta Physiol Scand 1995;153:207-9.

Felber S, Skladal D, Wyss M, et al. Oral creatine supplementation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a clinical and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Neurol Res 2000;22:145-50.

Feldman EB. Creatine: a dietary supplement and ergogenic aid. Nutr Rev 1999;57:45–50.

Green AL, Hultman E, Macdonald IA, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments skeletal muscle creatine accumulation during creatine supplementation in man. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E821–6.

Green AL, Simpson EJ, Littlewood JJ, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments creatine retention during creatine feeding in humans. Acta Physiol Scand 1996;158:195-202.

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Greenhaff PL. The nutritional biochemistry of creatine. J Nutr Biochem 1997;8:610-8 [review].

Greenhaff PL, Bodin K, Soderlund K, et al. Effect of oral creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle phosphocreatine resynthesis. Am J Physiol 1994;266:E725-30.

Greenhaff PL, Casey A, Short AH, et al. Influence of oral creatine supplementation on muscle torque during repeated bouts of maximal voluntary exercise in man. Clin Sci 1993;84:565-71.

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Juhn MS, O’Kane JW, Vinci DM. Oral creatine supplementation in male collegiate athletes: a survey of dosing habits and side effects. J Am Diet Assoc 1999;99:593–5.

Kreider RB, Ferreira M, Wilson M, et al. Effects of creatine supplementation on body composition, strength, and sprint performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1998;30:73-82.

Poortmans JR, Auquier H. Renaut V, et al. Effect of short-term creatine supplementation on renal responses in men. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 1997;76:566–7.

Poortmans JR, Francaux M. Long-term oral creatine supplementation does not impair renal function in healthy athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999;31:1108–10.

Pritchard NR, Kaira PA. Renal dysfunction accompanying oral creatine supplements. Lancet 1998;351:1252–3 [letter].

Sewell DA, Robinson TM, Casey A, et al. The effect of acute dietary creatine supplementation upon indices of renal, hepatic and haematological function in human subjects. Proc Nutr Soc 1998;57:17A.

Silber ML. Scientific facts behind creatine monohydrate as a sports nutrition supplement. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 1999;39:179–88 [review].

Sipila I, Rapola J, Simell O, et al. Supplementary creatine as a treatment for gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina. N Engl J Med 1981;304:867-70.

Stone MH, Sanborn K, Smith LL, et al. Effects of in-season (5-weeks) creatine and pyruvate supplementation on anaerobic performance and body composition in American football players. Int J Sport Nutr 1999;9:146-65.

Stout JR, Eckerson J, Noonan D, et al. The effects of a supplement designed to augment creatine uptake on exercise performance and fat-free mass in football players. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1997;29:S251.

Tarnopolsky MA. Potential benefits of creatine monohydrate supplementation in the elderly. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2000;3:497-502 [review].

Tarnopolsky M, Martin J. Creatine monohydrate increases strength in patients with neuromuscular disease. Neurology 1999;52:854-7.

Tarnopolsky MA, Roy BD, MacDonald JR. A randomized, controlled trial of creatine monohydrate in patients with mitochondrial cytopathies. Muscle Nerve 1997;20:1502-9.

Toler SM. Creatine is an ergogen for anaerobic exercise. Nutr Rev 1997;55:21-5 [review].

Vandenberghe K, Gills N, Van Leemputte M, et al. Caffeine counteracts the ergogenic action of muscle creatine loading. J Appl Physiol 1996;80:452–7.

Vandenberghe K, Goris M, Van Hecke P, et al. Long-term creatine intake is beneficial to muscle performance during resistance training. J Appl Physiol 1997;83:2055-63.

Walter MC, Lochmuller H, Reilich P, Klopstock T, Huber R, Hartard M, Hennig M, Pongratz D, Muller-Felber W. Creatine monohydrate in muscular dystrophies: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Neurology. 2000 May 9;54(9):1848-50. PMID: 10802796

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TMG Fact Sheet
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Date: December 07, 2005 02:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: TMG Fact Sheet

TMG Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 03/07/05

LIKELY USERS: People with high homocysteine levels; People with risks of developing Alzheimer’s Disease; People needing greater metabolism of fats; People with liver detoxification challenges; People consuming alcohol KEY INGREDIENTS: TMG is composed of three methyl groups attached to a glycine atom. It can “donate” methyl groups.

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: TMG is a metabolite of the B vitamin family product called Choline. Choline has 4 methyl groups, TMG has 3 and DMG has 2. These substances plus Folic acid, Vitamin B-12 and SAM-e are all methyl donors. Methyl donors can contribute methyl groups to biological processes such as liver function, detoxification and cellular replication (production of new cells). Methylation protects the kidneys and stimulates production of the fat-transporting molecule l-carnitine.

TMG helps the liver metabolize fats, preventing the accumulation of fats in the liver. It also helps to detoxify chemicals in the liver, while protecting the liver from being damaged by those chemicals.

Methylation with TMG helps to convert the dangerous, inflammatory chemical homocysteine into the amino acid methionine. TMG may lower homocysteine when B-6, B-12 and folic acid cannot.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT INFORMATION: TMG is also known as Betaine and is a component of Betaine hydrochloride (Betaine HCl), a stomach acid supplement that is very acidic. But Betaine HCl is not used in the same way as TMG. TMG is not highly acidic and will not supplement low stomach acid.

TMG may be useful for autistic children, along with B-6 and magnesium. It may also be useful in strengthening the body’s immune response against pathogenic bacteria. There is very preliminary evidence that TMG and methyl donors may help against some forms of seizures.

DMG has been used as a sports supplement. TMG is 50% more effective than DMG in any application where the methyl groups are useful. Otherwise, they can used interchangeably.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: One serving per day, or up to 6,000 mg., as needed.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: SAM-e, Milk Thistle (Silymarin), Dr. Verghese’s Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator, Antioxidants, NAC, Homocysteine Regulators, D-Flame, Detox Support

CAUTIONS: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement.

People with Parkinson’s or taking L-dopa should not use methyl donors like TMG without a physician’s specific approval and supervision. There are no other known drug interactions with TMG.

This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. This is not an official publication by any company, nor has this information been screened or approved by the FDA or any private company.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. REFERENCES:

General:

Craig SA. Betaine in human nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):539-49. Review. PMID: 15321791

Methylation:

Barak AJ, Tuma DJ. Betaine, metabolic by-product or vital methylating agent? Life Sci 1983;32:771-4 [review].

Benson R, Crowell B, Hill B, et al. The effects of L-dopa on the activity of methionine adenosyltransferase: relevance to L-dopa therapy and tolerance. Neurochem Res 1993;18:325–30.

ChAmbers ST. Betaines: their significance for bacteria and the renal tract. Clin Sci 1995;88:25-7 [review].

Charlton CG, Crowell B Jr. Parkinson’s disease-like effects of S-adenosyl-L-methionine: effects of L-dopa. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1992;43:423–31.

Charlton CG, Mack J. Substantia nigra degeneration and tyrosine hydroxylase depletion caused by excess S-adenosylmethionine in the rat brain. Support for an excess methylation hypothesis for parkinsonism. Mol Neurobiol 1994;9:149–61.

Cheng H, Gomes-Trolin C, Aquilonius SM, et al. Levels of L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase activity in erythrocytes and concentrations of S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine in whole blood of patients with Parkinson’s disease. Exp Neurol 1997;145:580–5.

Crowell BG Jr, Benson R, Shockley D, Charlton CG. S-adenosyl-L-methionine decreases motor activity in the rat: similarity to Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms. Behav Neural Biol 1993;59:186–93.

Selhub J. Homocysteine metabolism. Annu Rev Nutr 1999;19:217-46 [review].

Homocysteine:

Brosnan JT, Jacobs RL, Stead LM, Brosnan ME. Methylation demand: a key determinant of homocysteine metabolism. Acta Biochim Pol. 2004;51(2):405-13. Review. PMID: 15218538 Gahl WA, Bernardini I, Chen S, et al. The effect of oral betaine on vertebral body bone density in pyridoxine-non-responsive homocystinuria. J Inherit Metab Dis 1988;11:291-8.

Olthof MR, van Vliet T, Boelsma E, Verhoef P. Low dose betaine supplementation leads to immediate and long term lowering of plasma homocysteine in healthy men and women. J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4135-8. PMID: 14652361

Olthof MR, Verhoef P. Effects of betaine intake on plasma homocysteine concentrations and consequences for health. Curr Drug Metab. 2005 Feb;6(1):15-22. PMID: 15720203

Schwab U, Torronen A, Toppinen L, Alfthan G, Saarinen M, Aro A, Uusitupa M. Betaine supplementation decreases plasma homocysteine concentrations but does not affect body weight, body composition, or resting energy expenditure in human subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Nov;76(5):961-7. PMID: 12399266

Selhub J. Homocysteine metabolism. Annu Rev Nutr 1999;19:217-46 [review].

van Guldener C, Janssen MJ, de Meer K, et al. Effect of folic acid and betaine on fasting and postmethionine-loading plasma homocysteine and methionine levels in chronic haemodialysis patients. J Intern Med 1999;245:175-83.

Wendel U, Bremer HJ. Betaine in the treatment of homocystinuria due to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency. Eur J Pediatr 1984;142:147-50.

Wilcken DE, Wilcken B, Dudman NP, Tyrrell PA. Homocystinuria—the effects of betaine in the treatment of patients not responsive to pyridoxine. N Engl J Med 1983;309:448-53.

Wilcken DE, Dudman NP, Tyrrell PA. Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency--the effects of betaine treatment in pyridoxine-responsive patients. Metabolism. 1985 Dec;34(12):1115-21. PMID: 3934499

Liver function:

Babucke G, Sarre B. Clinical experience with betain citrate. Med Klin 1973;68:1109-13 [in German].

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Badakhsh S, Tuma DJ. The effect of betaine in reversing alcoholic steatosis. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1997;21:1100-2.

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Matti J, Tuma DJ. Dietary betaine promotes generation of hepatic S-adenosylmethioine and protects the liver from ethanol-induced fatty infiltration. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1993;17:552-5.

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Tuma DJ. Betaine, ethanol, and the liver: a review. Alcohol 1996;13:395-8 [review]. PMID: 8836329

Freed WJ. Prevention of strychnine-induced seizures and death by the N-methylated glycine derivatives betaine, dimethylglycine and sarcosine. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1985 Apr;22(4):641-3. PMID: 2581277

Junnila M, Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Rahko T. Betaine reduces hepatic lipidosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in Sprague-Dawley rats. Vet Hum Toxicol 1998;40:263-6.

Ji C, Kaplowitz N. Betaine decreases hyperhomocysteinemia, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and liver injury in alcohol-fed mice. Gastroenterology. 2003 May;124(5):1488-99. PMID: 12730887

Kettunen H, Tiihonen K, Peuranen S, Saarinen MT, Remus JC. Dietary betaine accumulates in the liver and intestinal tissue and stabilizes the intestinal epithelial structure in healthy and coccidia-infected broiler chicks. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2001 Nov;130(4):759-69. PMID: 11691612

Kim SK, Kim YC, Kim YC. Effects of singly administered betaine on hepatotoxicity of chloroform in mice. Food Chem Toxicol 1998;36:655-61.

McCarty MF. Co-administration of equimolar doses of betaine may alleviate the hepatotoxic risk associated with niacin therapy. Med Hypotheses. 2000 Sep;55(3):189-94. PMID: 10985907

Murakami T, Nagamura Y, Hirano K. The recovering effect of betaine on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol 1998;44:249-55.

Poschl G, Stickel F, Wang XD, Seitz HK. Alcohol and cancer: genetic and nutritional aspects. Proc Nutr Soc. 2004 Feb;63(1):65-71. Review. PMID: 15070439

Semmler F. Treatment of liver diseases, especially of fatty liver with betaine citrate. Ther Ggw 1977;116:2113-24 [in German].

Zapadniuk VI, Panteleimonova TN. [Cholagogic effect of trimethylglycine in normal animals of different ages and in experimental atherosclerosis] Biull Eksp Biol Med. 1987 Jul;104(7):30-2. Russian. PMID: 3620644

Autism & Seizures:

Rimland B. Seizures, Vitamin B6, DMG, and Sudden Speech. Autism Research Review International. 1996;10(2):1.

Roach ES, Carlin L. N,N-dimethylglycine for epilepsy. N Engl J Med. 1982;307:1081-82.

Vitamin B6/DMG. Letters to the Editor, Autism Research Interview International. 1994;8(2):6.

Immunity:

Reap EA, Lawson JW. Stimulation of the immune response by dimethylglycine, a nontoxic metabolite. J Lab Clin Med. Apr1990;115(4):481-6.

Safety:

Hoorn AJ. Dimethylglycine and chemically related amines tested for mutagenicity under potential nitrosation conditions. Mutat Res. 1989 Apr;222(4):343-50. PMID: 2468082



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