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Clearing the Air
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Date: June 13, 2005 10:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Clearing the Air

Clearing the Air by Robert Gluck Energy Times, August 1, 1999

One crisp winter morning in Vermont, Alan hoisted his skis over his shoulder and tracked through the dazzling snowpack to the lift about a quarter-mile away. He had trekked this gently uphill route many times and valued it as an invigorating warmup for a day on the ski trails. The path seemed to grow steeper, however, and the winter sun more blazing as Alan struggled for breath, sweat dampening his woolen cap. Weak and wheezing, he paused for what seemed like an eternity and finally turned back, plodding arduously through the ice.

Fit and athletic, the 42-year-old Alan heard the alarming news from his health care practitioner: asthma. The therapy: inhaled steroids.

Breathing Uneasy

The incidence of asthma-a chronic condition characterized by narrowing of the bronchial tubes, swelling of the bronchial tube lining and mucus secretion that can block the airway, making breathing difficult-has ballooned to alarming rates.

In the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control, the number of people reported to suffer from asthma increased from 10.4 million in 1990 to 15 million in 1995. In 1998, the epidemic cost about $11.3 billion.

Worldwide, experts estimate that the prevalence of asthma increased approximately 50% over the last 10 to 15 years. Nations with the highest rates are the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia; lowest are Indonesia, Albania, Romania and Georgia.

Deaths from asthma have doubled in the last decade and, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, asthma is the seventh most common chronic health condition in the United States. Children constitute the most disturbingly burgeoning segment of the asthma explosion, its sufferers numbering five to six million. The rate of asthma among children five to 14 years old increased 74% between 1980 and 1994; the rate for preschool kids skyrocketed 160%. Asthma is the number one chronic childhood illness and the third leading cause of hospitalization for children under age 15. More than 5000 Americans die from asthma annually; the fatality rate among children five to 14 years old more than doubled from 1979 to 1995, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation.

Waging War on the Wheeze

Asthma is indeed chronic, but it can be prevented and controlled and its effects reversed. Mainstream MDs command an arsenal of pharmaceuticals, some of which are essential for severe or urgent conditions. Consult your health care practitioner about any breathing difficulties.

Because of its complexity, however, asthma requires a balanced therapeutic approach: careful attention to diet, exercise and stress reduction while taking supplemental nutrients and botanicals can help ease asthma's discomforts. Antioxidant nutrients like vitamins C and E, fruits and vegetables rich in phytochemicals plus herbs like echinacea and garlic, all possess the potential for helping the body fight asthma.

Induced by an array of inherent physiological vulnerabilities, some of which may not manifest until adulthood, as well as environmental factors, asthma benefits from extra sleuthing into its causes and planning for relief.

Triggers and Therapies

Asthma is derived from the Greek word meaning panting or breathing hard, which pretty much sums up the malady: Wheezing and shortness of breath typify the attack.

In bronchial asthma, the commonest variety, the passages that carry air from the throat to the lungs narrow as a result of muscle contraction, local inflammation or production of excess mucus. Breathing becomes difficult and wheezy as air is expelled.

"Asthma symptoms are triggered by various factors such as allergens, irritants, infections, pollutants, medications, and emotions," says Anthony Rooklin, author of Living with Asthma: A Comprehensive Guide to Understanding and Controlling Asthma While Enjoying Your Life (Penguin). "Triggers are substances or situations that would be quite harmless to people with ordinary airways, but that bring on asthma symptoms in susceptible individuals."

According to Ellen W. Cutler, nutritionist, enzyme therapist, chiropractor and author of Winning the War Against Asthma & Allergies: A Drug-Free Cure For Asthma and Allergy Sufferers" (Delmar), asthma is an allergic disease that is always triggered by allergens. "These allergens include not only foods, pollens and environmental factors such as perfume, animal dander and chemicals but also bacteria, climactic conditions and emotions," says Cutler.

"When these allergies are active from birth, asthma can be diagnosed early in life, even in infancy," she adds.

Cutler believes every individual with asthma should be able to lead a normal, drug-free life.

"Most asthmatics have been told that asthma is a chronic problem they will have to contend with for the rest of their lives. Asthma can be cured, not miraculously and instantaneously, but inevitably and permanently, once the allergies that cause it have been eliminated," she adds.

Dilating on Nutrients

Although it is vitally important for folks with asthma to develop a treatment plan with a trusted health care provider, that plan, according to experts, may lend itself to a rich variety of complementary options, especially nutrients, phytochemicals, minerals and enzymes.

According to Ruth Winter, author of A Consumer's Guide to Medicines in Food: Nutraceuticals That Help Prevent and Treat Physical and Emotional Illnesses (Crown), researchers in Nottingham, England, linked magnesium and lung function.

"Magnesium is involved in a wide range of biological activities, including some that may protect against the development of asthma and chronic airflow obstruction," Winter says. "Dr. John Britton and his colleagues at Nottingham University measured the magnesium in the diets of 2,633 adults aged 18 to 70 and they found that low magnesium was associated with reduced lung function and wheezing" (The Lancet 344, 1994: 357-62).

Magnesium actually boasts a long history as a bronchial relaxant, first demonstrated in 1912 on cows. Its potential was eclipsed, however, by pharmaceutical antihistamines and bronchodilators until its recent rediscovery.

Defending the Lungs

Antioxidants, with their ability to bolster the lungs' defense mechanisms by battling oxidizing free radicals that constrict bronchial tissue, wield tremendous force in the anti-asthma offensive. Michael T. Murray, ND, and Joseph E. Pizzorno, ND, in their Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (Prima), connect the steady decrease in dietary intake of antioxidants to the burgeoning incidence of asthma.

Among the top asthma-busting antioxidants:

Vitamin C. Murray and Pizzorno note that C is the major antioxidant present in the lining of the airway and cite generous evidence that when vitamin C is low, asthma incidence is high (Annals Allergy 73, 1994: 89-96). Vitamin C, taken over time, effectively suppresses histamine secretion by white blood cells.

Flavonoids. Also credited with reducing histamine production, flavonoids, notably quercetin and the extracts from grape seed, pine bark and ginkgo biloba, are key asthma-fighting antioxidants (J Allergy Clin Immunol 73, 1984; 769-74).

Carotenes. They limit production of allergy-related compounds (called leukotrienes) and bolster the lining of the respiratory tract (Biochem Biophys Acta 575, 1979: 439-45).

Vitamin E and selenium. Both reduce secretion of leukotrienes (Clinical Exp Allergy 26, 1996: 838-47).

Vitamin B12. Murray and Pizzorno cite the work of Jonathan Wright, MD, whose clinical trials with supplemental vitamin B12 proved strongly effective, especially for children with asthma.

A Bundle of Botanicals

Herbal remedies for asthma date back more than 5000 years to the Chinese emperor Shen-nung. The ancient Egyptians treated respiratory ailments with herbs as well; the Greeks favored mint, garlic, cloves and myrrh for pulmonary problems.

Today, the power of plants has been validated by clinical research and standardized for predictability. (Always consult a health care practitioner when seeking complementary therapies, and read the package labels carefully for dosages and cautions.)

In their book, Asthma: An Alternative Approach (Keats), Ron Roberts and Judy Sammut provide a concise guide to asthma-easing botanicals: Garlic: acts as antiviral, antibacterial and antihistamine; enhances immune response; contains the antioxidant selenium. Garlic also is an expectorant.

Echinacea: a traditional treatment for immune disorders and infections of the upper respiratory tract, known to shorten the duration of colds, coughs and flus.

Ginkgo biloba: inhibits the chemical responses that induce asthma discomfort (Br J Clin Pharmacol 29, 1990: 85-91).

Ginseng: stimulates immunity and the production of steroid-like hormones; helps chronic coughs.

Licorice: an expectorant, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergenic that also inhibits leukotriene production (Acta Med Okayama 37, 1983: 385-91).

Tylophora asthmatica: an Ayurvedic treatment that many respected experts believe can act both as an antihistamine and antispasmodic (Planta Med 57, 1991: 409-13).



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Acupuncture nutrient Connection
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Date: June 12, 2005 05:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Acupuncture nutrient Connection

Acupuncture nutrient Connection by Robert Gluck Energy Times, November 1, 1998

The theory behind the practice of acupuncture confounds western science. This therapy, originating in Asia, is based on the concept that currents of energy called meridians flow through your body. However, no one has ever been able to conclusively demonstrate the existence of these meridians.

Despite the evasiveness of these energy streams, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) holds that alterations in these energy flows can disrupt health and cause pain. Consequently, an acupuncturist punctures your skin with specialized needles to redirect the body's vital energy.

Alleviating Illness

Despite the fact that western scientists have not been able to find satisfactory evidence of the existence of these energetic meridians, studies show that acupuncture works and is especially effective at relieving pain. This therapy has been used to alleviate a variety of conditions including chronic pain, nausea and even mental illness. In addition, some practitioners apply it to those trying to shake off the chains of drug addiction. (More recently, many practitioners now also successfully use acupuncture to relieve physical problems in animals.)

Of course, no matter what your perspective on this therapy, acupuncture's no panacea. While you might use acupuncture to relieve the discomforts of chemotherapy, you wouldn't use this technique as your primary weapon against a dangerous disease like cancer. Still, this reliable therapy occupies a welcome spot as an adjunct to many mainstream therapies. Consequently, many mainstream practitioners accept the validity of using acupuncture and many managed care companies reimburse this therapy. Some HMOs even keep a list of approved acupuncturists that they make available to enrollees.

Acupuncture East and West

The practice of acupuncture dates back at least 2200 years ago in Asia. Only during the last forty years has it become well-known and widely available in the United States. Today, 29 accredited acupuncture schools train practitioners in North America. In addition, traditional healers in Belize (south of Mexico) have been found to use a form of acupuncture derived from traditional Mayan medicine.

Is the use of acupuncture by Mayan shamans coincidence? Or further evidence that acupuncture meridians really exist? No one knows for sure, although some experts believe the Mayan use of this therapy supports the notion that the original ancestors of the Mayans migrated from Asia.

Needle Relief

Acupuncturists insert needles into the body to relieve pain or enhance bodily functions. TCM holds that acupuncture, and the manipulation of these tiny needles, moves and manipulates qi (pronounced chee), the body's energy force.

"Acupuncture is a method of balancing the body's energy," says Carol Alexander, an acupuncturist at the North Jersey Health and Pain Relief Center in Hackettstown, New Jersey. "Disease occurs because of an imbalance...Insertion of the acupuncture needles into meridians will bring about the balance of qi." Alexander has practiced acupuncture for 10 years and studied at the Tri-State School of Traditional Acupuncture in Stanford Connecticut.

Alexander says patients sometimes suffer a blockage of qi or display too much or too little qi. The manipulation and placement of the acupuncture needles vary according to the need for adjusting meridian energy flow.

Acupuncture can be used to prevent disease and, if disease is already rampant, it can be used to help the body correct the problem.

In conjunction with her use of acupuncture needles, Alexander rarely prescribes single herbs but uses combinations of whole herbs that are very specific for different diseases and disease patterns. "Certain herbs, such as ginseng, are very prized in Chinese medicine," Alexander notes.

"Astragalus is an herb used in China and around the world to tonify the qi and increase qi energy as well as stimulate the immune system."

Licorice Root

Alexander uses licorice root for assisting digestion and for helping women with menopausal discomforts. On the other hand, she recommends whole food concentrates like bee pollen granules for enhancing the immune system, peppermint for treating gastro-intestinal problems plus fiber supplements as well as the antioxidant/antihistamine quercetin, coenzyme Q10 and melatonin.

"In terms of classes of nutrients, I use a lot of whole food concentrates: the green concentrates like barley greens, wheat grass powder, spirulina and blue-green algae," Alexander says. "These are high in minerals, antioxidants, nutrients and fatty acids. I also use some soy products because the isoflavone concentrates are very much anti-cancer."

The Fine Points of Acupuncture

Acupuncture needles are very fine, as thin as hairs. They are available in a variety of diameters and lengths. When an acupuncturist inserts these needles, the sensation is that of mild pinpricks. (The needles enter the body at depths of only 1/8th inch to two inches.) In many cases people experience mild pleasure during needle manipulation.

"From a Western point of view it's important to explain that there is a distinct function of acupuncture treatment and that is to increase circulation," Alexander says. "We do stimulate nerves and we know that with the stimulation of nerves many neurochemicals and neurotransmitters are released. They move through the nerves and find receptor sights, some in the brain, some in other parts of the body."

By stimulating nerves, acupuncturists can calm inflammation and deaden pain. These effects are believed to be linked to the release of endorphins and dinorphins, powerful painkillers and anti-inflammatories that the body produces for itself. Most acupuncturists use this therapy as part of an overall, multi-faceted treatment plan.

Unique Energy

"Qi is what makes you different from a sack of chemicals," points out David Molony, an acupuncturist at the Lehigh Valley Acupuncture Center in Catasaqua, Pennsylvania who studied at the Nanjing Traditional Medicine Hospital in China and has lectured at Cornell University.

What You Need

"You can manipulate qi with acupuncture, herbs and diet. Because people's bodies work differently, there are different approaches. When you ask the question what nutrients and herbs are effective at enhancing acupuncture, it depends on what the person needs, according to an Oriental Medicine diagnosis."

An Oriental Medical examination, Molony says, begins with a long list of health questions designed to reveal factors that contribute to disease. A practitioner measures your pulse in several different places along your arm, inspects your tongue, may press on your stomach, sniff your general odor and closely examine your nails and skin for signs of problems.

"You take in everything you can," adds Molony, a board member of the Acupuncture Society of Pennsylvania and former board member of the American Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. "This gives you clues that you need in order to make your diagnosis."

Acupuncturists use nutrients and herbs that complement the treatment, as well as dietary and lifestyle counseling. Some acupuncturists don't specialize in herbal remedies, so these practitioners might go to a specialist like David Winston for advice. Winston, an herb expert skilled in Cherokee, Chinese and Western eclectic herbal medicine, works as an instructor, lecturer and consultant.

"In China, acupuncture is considered a complementary therapy; you generally don't go for treatment and get purely acupuncture," says Winston who is working on a book about saw palmetto. "Herbal medicine, diet and qi gong are important therapies in their own right and acupuncture is one of those therapies. Qi gong is a form of martial arts that focuses on unique breathing and visualization methods. Qi is not exactly energy, it's energy in movement; it's what makes the blood move."

Open Blockages

Acupuncture is used to open blockages that sometimes build up in what TCM practitioners characterize as excessive heat or cold. These hot and cold spots do not always literally refer to the temperature of the body but are meant to depict changes in the character of the body's vital energy.

Chinese acupuncturists don't necessarily treat diseases, but target clusters of physical discomforts. Winston says, "Herbal formulas change depending on the 'symptom pictures.' Somebody could have acute appendicitis but the symptom picture could vary. Usually Chinese acupuncturists use herbs like isatis (a very cold, drying herb that's a powerful anti-bacterial agent) and coptis (a powerful anti-bacterial herb)."

Americans often visit acupuncturists complaining of back pain or some type of musculoskeletal problem-a wrenched knee, a ligament that hasn't healed properly or perhaps a torn rotator cuff. "If the injury is hot to the touch, it's red, it's inflammatory-that's a condition where there's excessive heat and in that condition the acupuncturist would give herbs that are cooling and anti-inflammatory such as the root of large leaf gentian."

Pain that Moves

If someone suffers pain that moves, pain that is sometimes exacerbated by damp or humid conditions, acupuncturists often prescribe clematis root, a wild variety of the garden plant that is an anti-spasmodic, or acanthopanax, a relative of Siberian ginseng used for damp pain.

"If there's pain with excessive dampness," Winston says, "acupuncturists might use duhuo, a drying herb that opens the meridians."

Molony agrees with Winston that when it comes to choosing herbs to enhance acupuncture, accurate analysis of the root cause of the health problem is paramount to making the right decisions. For example, if a person is qi deficient and her tongue is thickly coated, she may not be processing her energy properly. Phlegm builds up, decreasing energy. "What you want to do is give them herbs that move phlegm, like citrus peel, and combine that with acupuncture points that move phlegm also," Molony says.

For stimulating metabolism, Molony uses lactoferin-processed colostrum from cows. He uses ginseng and atractylodes as qi tonics and he adds herbs like magnolia bark or atractylodes alba.

Helpful Antioxidants

He believes antioxidants are helpful too, as preventive medicines, including vitamins C and E. These valuable nutrients disarm the harm that reactive molecules can wreak within the body.

So how important are herbs and nutrition to enhance acupuncture's effectiveness? Acupuncturists seem to agree that healthy doses of antioxidants (such as vitamins C and E plus antioxidants from grapeseed extract) as well as specialized herbs, turn this therapy into a highly effective healing tool. Those wanting to benefit from this penetrating technique should stock up on nutrients. Then sit back, relax, kick off your shoes and let the acupuncturist do her stuff.



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Allergy Alleviation
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Date: June 10, 2005 05:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Allergy Alleviation

Allergy Alleviation by Cal Orey , February 2, 2002

Allergy Alleviation By Cal Orey

Welcome to the stuffed up world of seasonal allergic rhinitis: the wheezing, sneezing "inhalant allergies" that torment 35 million Americans. Adding insult to sinus pain, other allergens attack year-round. Air pollution, dust mites (microscopic gremlins that infest bedding, upholstery and rugs) and animal dander trigger allergies-or other respiratory ailments-in any season. Urban air is full of rubber tire particles, a true blowout for those with latex sensitivity. Altogether, roughly 50 million Americans-about one in five-suffer from some form of allergy, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI). Tired of cross-pollinating with plants or being bowled over by dust balls? Vitamins, herbs and other nutrients can help you nip allergy discomfort in the bud.

The Allergy Response

Your immune system triggers an allergic response when it overreacts to otherwise harmless substances or antigens (we're talking dust, pollen and mold).The alarmed immune system then launches a defensive chemical reaction, releasing potent chemicals (antibodies) supposed to destroy the "invaders." The antibodies, called IgE, carry the invading substances to special cells, which zap them with more biochemicals. Among these protective cells are mast cells: they release histamine, the substance that causes swelling and inflammation to the linings of the nose, sinuses and eyelids, resulting in sneezing, upper respiratory congestion and itchy, watery eyes.

Just Blame The Folks

Most allergies are determined by your genes. If your Mom or Dad sneeze and scratch, there's a good chance you will, too. "That is not to say that we directly inherit an allergy to any specific substance. Rather, it seems as if we might inherit some kind of immune system defect or weakness that leaves us more vulnerable to allergies," explain co-authors Glenn S. Rothfeld, MD, and Suzanne LeVert in their book Natural Medicine for Allergies: The Best Alternative Methods for Quick Relief (Rodale). For some people, allergies lurk in food, throwing the immune system into overdrive. "Many natural medicine practitioners believe that a diet high in animal fats will contribute to the development of allergy and asthma, as does a diet high in food additives, such as preservatives and dyes," says Gary McLain, PhD, in his book The Natural Way of Healing: Asthma and Allergies (Dell). Worse, allergies can up the risk of asthma, which afflicts 15 million Americans. Most people afflicted with asthma also suffer allergies: the two are linked, according to the AAAAI. Allergy triggers of asthma include pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. Remember Helen Hunt's asthmatic son in the movie As Good As It Gets? His character endured allergies to dust, and living in New York (and watching his mom date Jack Nicholson) didn't help his immune system. Coughs, ear infections, fevers and visits to hospital emergency rooms curtailed his social life (and limited his close-ups as well). That kind of routine happens in real life, too. (Well, maybe close encounters with Jack N. are not included for most.) But when we breathe substances such as molds, they can induce swelling and inflammation of the bronchial airways which narrow and restrict air flow. This, in turn, causes wheezing and shortness of breath and can trigger an asthma "attack," according to Andrew Engler, MD, who specializes in allergy and asthma in San Mateo, California.

The Nose Knows: Chemical Sensitivities

Imagine a picture-perfect, crisp, clear Saturday morning. You make a final stop on your weekly errand run to the dry cleaner, where you drop off your laundry and spend a moment chatting up the owner. Back in your car, your eyes tear and you feel a bit woozy. Kenneth Bock, MD, and Nellie Sabin, writing in The Road to Immunity: How To Survive and Thrive in a Toxic World (Pocket Books) sense that your reaction could be chemical sensitivity, a difficult to diagnose but, in their opinion, very real malady. (Of course, a clinician can test you for immune responses to certain chemicals.) Reactions to chemicals produce the typical allergic responses: puffy or red-rimmed eyes; swelling; aching or stiff joints and muscles; irritability or dizziness; respiratory inflammations; headaches and the like. Villains include aerosol sprays, tobacco smoke, glues, insecticides and herbicides, household chemicals and fragrances. Identification and avoidance are key, say the authors. Vitamin C, which binds with chemicals, is one of the best nutritional defenses.

Breathing Problems Expand

Americans now freely take lifesaving medicines such as antibiotics and insulin but, in some people, "they have the potential to alter the immune system, which is where allergies begin," says Dr. McLain. (Consult your pharmacist if you have questions about your prescription medication.) We, as a nation, are also eating more chemicals, from the pesticides drenched on plants to the preservatives poured on prepared foods. We're breathing polluted air, which can lead to or exacerbate asthma, and then we choke on recycled air in sealed buildings. And while a century ago you were likely to have spent much of your time close to home, you can now hop on a supersonic plane and be taken to the other side of the globe within a matter of hours. With travel comes exposure to even more exotic allergens that can drive your immune system to distraction.

The All-Natural Gesundheit

Certain allergy-relief nutrients and herbs can help make life more bearable. Here's how they work: n Vitamin C for the lungs. According to experts, when vitamin C is low, asthma is high. Vitamin C carries the major antioxidant load in the airways and therefore contributes mightily to the health of the lungs. A study in the Annals of Allergy (73(1994):89-96) reported that in seven of 11 clinical trials since 1973, vitamin C supplementation provided "significant improvements" in respiratory function and asthma symptoms. n Vitamin E and carotene to suppress allergic reactions. These antioxidants may also help protect the respiratory tract from caustic pollutants. Vitamin E is reputed to be one of the most important nutrients for antioxidant protection in the lungs. In addition, these two substances decrease production of allergy-related compounds called leukotrienes. n Zinc for the immune system. Research shows that a deficiency in this trace mineral can weaken your immune system, setting you up as a target for allergies and infections. (Some vegetarians may not store sufficient amounts of this mineral and should take supplements.) Zinc comes to the body's rescue by taking part in the production of IgA, the gastrointestinal antibody that lines the digestive tract. "When IgA binds to an allergen, it keeps it from being absorbed into the bloodstream and thus from causing an allergic reaction," report Rothfeld and Levert. Also, zinc protects mucous membranes and helps convert beta carotene to vitamin A, another anti-allergy, immune-boosting nutrient. In a study of 100 participants at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, half took a zinc-based lozenge, while the other half received a dummy preparation. The participants taking zinc experienced a 42% reduction in the duration and severity of their common colds (Annals of Internal Medicine, 7/96). n Quercetin as an antihistamine. A valuable, anti-allergic flavonoid (plant coloring agent that is a powerful antioxidant), quercetin shines as a potent weapon against allergies and asthma. Believed to inhibit histamine release from mast cells and slow the production of other allergy-related compounds, it stabilizes mast cell membranes. Other flavonoid-rich extracts include grape seed, pine bark, green tea and Ginkgo biloba. n Additional helpful nutrients: Vitamin B-12, particularly to combat sensitivity to sulfites (The Nutrition Desk Reference [Keats]); selenium, an antioxidant that breaks down leukotrienes (Clinical Science 77, 1989: 495-500); and magnesium to relax bronchial tissues (Journal of the American Medical Association, 262 [1989]: 1210-3).

Herbal Remedies To The Rescue

n Nettles for hay fever relief. Research at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon, showed that 40 of 69 folks suffering from hay fever found moderate to extreme relief from taking freeze-dried stinging nettles (Planta Medica, [1990] 44-47). "It is nontoxic, cheap and preferable to antihistamines, which I think are significantly toxic," reports Andrew Weil, MD, in his book Natural Health, Natural Medicine: A Comprehensive Manual for Wellness and Self-Care (Houghton Mifflin). n Cayenne to reduce inflammation. Cayenne, known as hot red pepper, is rich in capsaicin, a potent flavonoid "counter-irritant" that dilates and soothes inflamed nasal and bronchial tissues, according to experts. A bonus: Cayenne also contains a rich amount of antioxidant vitamin C, which can help enhance your immune system. n Echinacea for allergy prevention. This popular Native American herb provides cold and allergy protection, particularly when you take it before encountering allergens. Studies reveal that echinacea aids your body's tissues and protects you from germs and allergens. In fact, German studies have found it possesses valuable antiviral, antibacterial and immunity-boosting properties.

Make Your World Allergy-Free

For the most effective allergy relief, make sure you stay clear of allergens that wreak allergy havoc. Visit an allergy-savvy health practitioner and get tested to find out which substances rock your respiratory world. Plus, allergy experts recommend: n Banish dust mites: sweep out clutter and have your house power-vacuumed, if necessary; wash bedding and linens in very hot water. n De-pollinate your environment: flip on the air conditioner to sift out pollen (keep its filter and any forced air registers clean); exercise indoors; machine dry, rather than line dry, your clothes. n Buy a home air filter, especially if you experience dust, pollen or pet dander allergies. n Avoid allergy triggers that dog your days: cats and canines (or consider the hairless or shed-less breeds), mold and tobacco smoke. No matter what you do or actions you take, allergies may always remain an annoyance in your life. But attention to the foods you eat, the places where you exercise and the right combination of anti-allergy nutrients can limit your discomfort.

Leveling The Leukotrine Playing Field

On a microscopic level, a series of biochemicals implicated in allergic reactions are leukotrienes, substances that may constrict the bronchial tubes (breathing passages). In some people, consuming the food additive tartrazine can cause severe asthmatic breathing difficulties by boosting leukotrine release. In turn, this can interfere with the body's use of vitamin B-6. The process in which lack of B-6 or "errors" in how your body uses B-6 causes allergic reactions and is complex. According to Michael Murray, ND and Joseph Pizzorno, ND in the revised edition of the Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (Prima), breathing problems may begin when the metabolism of tryptophan (an amino acid) goes awry: "Tryptophan is converted to serotonin, a compound that, among other things, can cause the airways of asthmatics to constrict...Vitamin B-6 is required for the proper metabolism of tryptophan." Accordingly, a study of vitamin B-6, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, shows that people with compromised breathing may possess less B-6 in their blood than others who breathe normally. When people with asthma were given B-6, their wheezing and asthmatic attacks dropped.

Fat Fix For Allergies

The fat in your diet or supplements can also influence your susceptibility to allergies and asthma linked to allergies. Epidemiologists have found that countries where children eat fish at least four times a month cut their risk of asthma by 67% compared to other parts of the world where they consume fewer fish. Research on omega-3 fatty acids, the kind of fat found in fish, flax and hemp oil, demonstrates that some of these substances can improve breathing. In particular, fatty acids called eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can help open up bronchial tubes. Studies in the American Review of Respiratory Disease and the International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology show that breathing passageways may not react so negatively to the presence of allergens when you eat more fish or take supplements containing these types of fats. Many of the scientists who study the kinds of fats we eat believe that the increase in allergies and asthma in the US during the twentieth century may be due to both increasing air pollution (which irritates our lungs) plus a simultaneous increase in our consumption of what are called omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-6 oils are contained in most of the vegetable oils Americans eat, including sunflower and peanut oils. While experts believe that we would be better off consuming a diet containing about five times as many omega-6 fatty acids as omega-3s, today we eat about 40 times as much omega-6s. The chemistry of how these fats influence our allergy susceptibility is complex. It begins in our cell membranes which consist mostly of fat. When we consume omega-3 fatty acids, in our diet or in supplements, and these fats enter cell membranes, the change in structure cuts the availability of arachidonic acid, a fatty acid your body can make and which is found in meat, eggs and dairy products. Eventually, it is thought that this change in cellular metabolism and reduction in arachidonic acid forces the body to make less 4-series leukotrienes, substances which are quite prone to provoking allergic inflammation and, instead, produce 5-series leukotrienes, leukotrienes which don't cause nearly as much trouble. This process requires patience. According to Pizzorno and Murray. "It may take as long as one year before the benefits are apparent, as it appears to take time to turn over cellular membranes in favor of the omega-3 fatty acids."

Chinese Medicine Versus Allergies

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) views allergies as an imbalance of the liver, says Jason Elias, co-author with Katherine Ketcham of The Five Elements of Self-Healing (Harmony Books). "The average American's (liver) deals with about fourteen pounds of chemicals a year. What would normally be a minor irritant becomes major because the liver can't process them anymore," explains Elias. Licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) has traditionally been used to fight allergies since this herb battles inflammation as evidenced by Japanese research and a study published in the journal Allergy. Much of this anti-allergy action is thought to proceed from licorice's interaction with a biochemical called cortisol, a hormone secreted by the adrenal glands. Cortisol (along with epinephrine, another adrenal hormone) relaxes the muscles controlling airways. By slowing the liver's breakdown of cortisol, licorice prolongs circulation of this hormone which, in turn, can help breathing passages stay clear. In addition, glycyrrhetinic acid, a compound in licorice, slows the body's manufacture of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, substances which exacerbate allergic inflammatory reactions. Ma Huang (Ephedra sinica) has been employed for thousands of years to aid breathing since chemicals in this plant widen breathing passages.

Homeopathic Remedies for Allergy

Homeopathic treatments consist of highly diluted substances designed to coax the body into healing itself. The effectiveness of homeopathy for hayfever has been demonstrated by research published in Lancet performed at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. There, scientists showed that homeopathically-prepared medicines produced statistically significant improvements in allergy sufferers. The appropriate homeopathic remedy for any illness depends on the personality type of the person suffering an allergy. These treatments are among those recommended by Dana Ullman: n Allium cepa: appropriate for burning nasal discharge that grows worse in warm rooms and improves outdoors. Relieves non-burning tearing from eyes, raw feeling in the nose with tingling sensation and violent sneezing. n Nux vomica: used when feeling irritable and chilled, with daytime fluent nasal discharge and night congestion that grows worse indoors. Also for those sensitive to cold and to being uncovered. n Pulsatilla: best for women and children with daytime nasal discharge and night congestion who are gentle, yielding, mild, impressionable and emotional. Used when congestion is worse in warm rooms, hot weather or while lying down.

Food Allergy Conundrum Food allergies can prove to be the toughest allergies to identify and eliminate. Jason Elias believes that people may develop food sensitivities from eating the same foods too often. "If someone has an allergy, I might say 'Let's get you off dairy for three weeks,'" he says, noting that some people have limited their hay fever problems by ceasing to consume dairy products. Many have also found relief by maintaining a food diary, keeping track of which foods are associated with allergy attacks and then eliminating those foods. So the next time you sneeze, don't just reach for your hanky, think back to the meal that you just ate. Your allergy problem may be sitting in your stomach as well as making you sneeze and stuffing your sinuses. Taking these kinds of anti-allergy preventive measures can provide life-enhancing relief that feels like a godsend. That lets you attain your healthy best.

This article included reporting by Judy Pokras.



--
Vitanet ®

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Important Information for Allergy Sufferers
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 13, 2005 09:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Important Information for Allergy Sufferers

Important Information for Allergy Sufferers

Richard Conant, L.Ac. C.N.

Imagine you are one among millions who greet each spring with worry about the flood of pollen that fills the air this time of year. When the pollen season arrives, as it inevitably does, you find yourself with two choices. You can either take over-the-counter antihistamines and put up with unpleasant side-effects, or endure the sneezing, runny nose, itchy, watery eyes and other discomforts of hay fever.

If there was a natural ingredient, a nutritional substance found throughout nature in many foods and plants, that could offer an alternative, would you not be interested?

Quercetin, one among hundreds of flavonoids found throughout the plant kingdom, is this ingredient. Quercetin has been researched in numerous pharmacological studies. The results of this work strongly suggest that quercetin helps to stabilize the fundamental process in the body which causes an allergic reaction. Quercetin, as shown in test-tube ("in vitro") studies, prevents the release of histamine from "mast cells," immune cells that stand guard in the tissues which meet the outside environment—the nasal passages, the lungs, the digestive tract and skin. While this has yet to be confirmed by human clinical trials, in the picture that emerges from the research so far, quercetin looks like a rescue nutrient for allergy sufferers.

Reports from Quercetin Users

I have seen numerous reports from individuals who have indeed achieved significant reductions in allergic sensitivity by using quercetin. And this includes food allergies as well as environmental allergies. Anecdotal stories like these carry little weight among scientists, because they do not provide evidence that the observed result will be repeated in other cases. Only placebo-controlled, double-blind studies can produce this kind of scientific proof. Yet, when anectodal evidence (this includes physician "case reports") correlates with the results of pharmacological research such as we have on quercetin, I believe it should be taken seriously. And quercetin is a nutrient that works effectively when taken as a dietary supplement.

For example, one gentleman writes that his wife, who is allergic to pollen and dust, is now "sneeze-free" after using quercetin for three years. A Pennsylvania woman writes that her husband, also a long time allergy sufferer, "seems to be nearly allergy free" after one month of use. Another man says that "quercetin has literally changed my life." These are not isolated cases; a respected nutritionist who specializes in allergies and environmental problems has seen many similar outcomes with a quercetin. Clearly something significant is going on with respect to quercetin as a nutritional approach for overcoming allergies.

Bear in mind, though, that quercetin does not function like an antihistamine medication; it is not a quick fix. As a nutrient that helps to normalize body functions naturally, quercetin needs time to work, and should be taken for at least two or three weeks to achieve these results.

Quercetin Quiets the Allergic Response

Exerting a broad range of biological effects, quercetin is perhaps the most active and versatile flavonoid. In test-tube studies, quercetin acts directly on the mast cell in a way that quiets the allergic response.

An allergic reaction occurs when IgE antibodies, positioned on the mast cell surface, come in contact with a potential allergy-causing substance like pollen. The mast cell is then signaled to release histamine from storage granules located inside the cell, through a process called "degranulation." The histamine circulates throughout the body, causing the runny nose, itching and other discomforts associated with allergies.

Quercetin stabilizes mast cell membranes, in effect turning down the allergic response signal. Quercetin also slows other mechanisms which are involved with inflammation, such as the production of inflammatory prostaglandins and leukotrienes. This adds to its membrane-stabilizing effect, and its value in allergy control.

Quercetin appears to substantially raise the threshold for initiation of an allergic reaction. In allergy sufferers this threshold is low, for reasons which are not well understood. They may have more IgE antibodies than normal, making the mast cells overly "trigger happy." Histamine has its proper place in the immune response that defends us against truly harmful foreign substances in the body. But like many chemicals produced by the body, histamine is a two-edged sword. In allergy-prone individuals, the mast cells have become overreactive, releasing too much histamine, unnecessarily. With quercetin in the bloodstream, histamine release from mast cells is kept under control. Quercetin's ability to down-regulate both the inflammatory and allergic responses makes it, I believe, a highly important nutrient for humans to consume on a regular basis.

Quercetin-the Scientific Evidence

Several studies, published in respected journals such as the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and others, have demonstrated quercetin's ability to control the release of histamine from mast cells. (Quercetin has the same effect on basophils, a type of white blood cell that also contains histamine.) In these experiments, mast cells taken from both animals and humans are exposed in the test tube to various substances—called "antigens"— that stimulate histamine release. The researchers then add an inhibiting agent such as quercetin to the mixture and measure the differences in histamine output. Quercetin has shown itself to be one of the more powerful histamine inhibitors, more powerful, in fact, than disodium cromoglycate, an anti-asthma drug.

Quercetin has other beneficial properties. A strong antioxidant, Quercetin has a higher level of antioxidant activity than both vitamin C and vitamin E. (Quercetin enhances the antioxidant activity of vitamin C; quercetin and vitamin C are true synergists.) Quercetin has been shown to block the oxidation of LDL cholesterol by free radicals. Quercetin also protects cell membranes from being injured by oxidized LDL. The damage that oxidized LDL causes to the delicate membranes of blood vessel linings allows plaque deposits to form, setting the stage for atheroslcerosis. These observations point to quercetin as a key nutrient for maintaining cardiovascular health.

Like all flavonoids, quercetin is not classified as an essential nutrient, although flavonoids were once called "Vitamin P." In view of its many beneficial actions, quercetin is a nutrient that clearly has important roles to play in human nutrition, for allergy sufferers, and for everyone.

  • Activated Quercetin from Source naturals 50tbs
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  • Quercetin Bromelain and Vitamin C from Solaray 60caps
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  • Quercetin Nutra Drops 4 fl.oz.
  • Quercetin with Bromelain and Ester C 60ct from KAL
  • Quercetin and Bromelain complex from Doctors Best 180ct (Best Value)
  • Quercetin 400mg 100ct Natures Life

  • --
    VitaNet ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=47)

    Search Term: " Anihisamine "

      Messages 1-25 from 25 matching the search criteria.
    Bee pollen proven to be a "treasure trove of active naturalmetabolites" that benefit human health Darrell Miller 2/17/19
    This is what happens with your lungs when you diffuse essentialoils Darrell Miller 11/29/18
    Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies Darrell Miller 4/23/18
    5 Essential Oils That Stop Allergies Forever! Darrell Miller 5/22/17
    The best (and worst) foods to help fight your allergies Darrell Miller 3/20/17
    Medical News Today: Probiotic could help alleviate hay fever symptoms Darrell Miller 3/13/17
    Does Quercetin Help Fight Allergies? Darrell Miller 8/22/15
    Can ButterBur Extract Help Fight Migraine Headaches? Darrell Miller 11/25/13
    What is Monk Fruit And Why Is It Healthy? Darrell Miller 7/24/13
    Herbs that Support Healthy Vision Darrell Miller 5/21/12
    What is Forskoline and How Does It Help You Loose Weight? Darrell Miller 2/9/12
    Can Quercetin And Bromelain Be Used As An Antihistamine? Darrell Miller 12/22/11
    Stop Constipation Darrell Miller 3/29/09
    Allergy Remedies Darrell Miller 11/25/08
    Genetically Engineered Foods May Cause Rising Food Allergies Darrell Miller 1/21/08
    Benefits of taking Vitamin C Daily Darrell Miller 7/26/06
    Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus... Darrell Miller 7/11/05
    Hayfever & Allergies - Herbs To Help You Breathe Easier Darrell Miller 6/30/05
    GARLIC (allium sativum) Darrell Miller 6/25/05
    The Colds & Flu Report Darrell Miller 6/18/05
    Bromelain Sinus Ease - Nature's Life Darrell Miller 6/16/05
    Clearing the Air Darrell Miller 6/13/05
    Acupuncture nutrient Connection Darrell Miller 6/12/05
    Allergy Alleviation Darrell Miller 6/10/05
    Important Information for Allergy Sufferers Darrell Miller 5/13/05




    Bee pollen proven to be a "treasure trove of active naturalmetabolites" that benefit human health
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: February 17, 2019 02:42 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Bee pollen proven to be a "treasure trove of active naturalmetabolites" that benefit human health





    The tiny balls of pollen that bees harvest from vegetation is known as bee pollen. Many people assume that allergies associated with bee pollen are fairly high, but research is showing this pollen can actually act as an antihistamine. Only two people in a six-year time period were shown to have genuine bee pollen allergies. On the other hand, the histamine reduction properties located within bee pollen have proven to be successful in reducing the risk of allergic reactions to other substances.

    Key Takeaways:

    • The tiny balls of pollen that are harvested by bees is what is referred to as be pollen.
    • Only three actual cases of bee pollen allergies were recorded within a six-year time span.
    • Bee pollen actually reduces the presence of histamines within the system, making it somewhat of an anti-allergen.

    "The ancient Greeks, Egyptians and Chinese all recognized the value of honey and bee pollen in medicine."

    Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-14-bee-pollen-treasure-trove-of-active-natural-metabolites.html

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6037)


    This is what happens with your lungs when you diffuse essentialoils
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: November 29, 2018 12:32 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: This is what happens with your lungs when you diffuse essentialoils





    Your lungs are the key to maintaining a positive breathing tunnel in your body. Making sure your body gets enough oxygen at every minute of the day is obviously very important. Some people abuse their lungs to a point where it is very hard for them to be healthy from that point on. As a result, there are a ton of people who suffer from asthma. It is a disease that there is no cure for but there are some oils that can help treat it.

    Key Takeaways:

    • As time goes on, more people are relying on different kind of oils for their health needs.
    • Some people are better than others when it comes to relieving their suffering quickly.
    • Your lungs are the key to your breathing and if the airway of your throat is impacted in any way, it can be really catastrophic. Essential Oils may help.

    "Peppermint essential oil has decongestant and antihistamine properties that relieve asthma attacks. Exposure to allergens such as dust mites and pollen trigger your body to release histamines, which in turn trigger asthma attacks."

    Read more: https://www.healthnutnews.com/this-is-what-happens-with-your-lungs-when-you-diffuse-essential-oils/

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5864)


    Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: April 23, 2018 09:17 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies





    Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies

    Chronic inflammation of the nasal membranes is a condition which affects millions of people. The condition can manifest as a stuffed up, or chronically runny nose. It can also cause chronic headaches, an inability to smell, and difficulty breathing through the nose. Environmental allergens, autoimmune disturbances and polyps can all be factors creating this disturbing condition, which most people attempt to treat using conventional, over-the-counter options. There are, however, useful natural, alternative treatment modalities, including the use of coconut oil.

    Coconut oil, and other nutrient-dense foods and spices, contain anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and antibacterial components that can aid this condition. Irrigating and cleansing the sinuses with a neti pot is another efficacious, alternative way to alleviate chronic inflammation of the nasal passages.

    Key Takeaways:

    • Spices and foods, like coconut oil and pineapple, have antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.
    • These properties can mitigate the suffering of the 40% of the world's population that is afflicted with chronic allergic rhinitis.
    • Irrigating and cleansing affected nasal passages with a neti pot is another way to treat chronic inflammation of the nasal membranes,

    "Many people turn to over-the-counter antihistamines and cold remedies to treat nasal congestion. By and large, these NSAID medications treat the symptoms of the condition rather than it’s underlying cause."

    Read more: https://www.thealternativedaily.com/coconut-oil-for-clogged-sinuses-plus-4-other-remedies/

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5584)


    5 Essential Oils That Stop Allergies Forever!
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 22, 2017 11:44 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: 5 Essential Oils That Stop Allergies Forever!





    Allergies are always an annoying especially during the spring time because they don't seem to ever get better. People are always sneezing, coughing, get itchy eyes are terrible headaches. There are always over the counter pills to take but they don't seem to last long. They may help for only a few hours or so and they your symptoms come back. However, this video says essential oils can stop allergies forever. Essential oils are supposed to be purifying because they are natural oils, they help to purify the air. Certain oils like lavender, lemon, peppermint, basil and tea tree oil are the five mentioned in the video that will help with allergies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dyhhUQf7MQ&rel=0

    Key Takeaways:

    • instead of usi9ng various medications you should use essential oils to use in case of allergy
    • lavendar oil has potent anti inflammatory properties and acts and an antihistamine
    • rub drops of lavendar near your palm and breathe deeply through your nose to stop your allergies

    "Tee tree oil quickly kills pathogens in the air that lead to allergies, so you should diffuse it at home to get rid of mold, bacteria, and fungi in the air. Its antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties also soothe irritated skin."

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4669)


    The best (and worst) foods to help fight your allergies
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: March 20, 2017 01:44 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: The best (and worst) foods to help fight your allergies





    There are some really good and really bad foods that will help to fight your allergies. Onions, cabbage and apples all have quercetin. This is a compound that gives fruits and veggies a reddish cue. Vitamin C is a natural antihistamine. That makes things like Broccoli and bell peppers your friend.

    Key Takeaways:

    • Allergy-fighting antihistamines come in pill and liquid forms, but they appear naturally vitamin C-packed vegetables. Those, as well as fish rich in Omega-3s, make up an anti-inflammatory diet that can help beat back allergy symptoms, said Emily Tel-fair, a naturopathic doctor in Baltimore.
    • Think of antihistamine medications "like the band-aid," she said, necessary for many just to get through the day. A few simple changes, though, may prevent your body from needing them in the first place.
    • Consuming it regularly, in food or supplement form, lends the body inflammation-calming nutrients. And don't get too hung up on the color, she said, as these foods need not be red to contain quercetin.

    "Allergy-fighting antihistamines come in pill and liquid forms, but they appear naturally vitamin C-packed vegetables."



    Reference:

    https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/03/15/best-and-worst-foods-help-fight-your-allergies/98979394/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNHKLlPu5H1QYPTQzwAUL2E66MTHiw

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4239)


    Medical News Today: Probiotic could help alleviate hay fever symptoms
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: March 13, 2017 11:59 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Medical News Today: Probiotic could help alleviate hay fever symptoms





    If you have ever suffered from hay fever during allergy season; you might be in luck due to this new study done through the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at the University of Florida. They have found that the probiotics, Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria have shown to assist people suffering from Hay Fever. This is great since there are no side effects from these two probiotics like there is from antihistamine and decongestants that most use to lesson the of symptoms hay fever .

    Key Takeaways:

    • Itchy eyes, runny nose, and sneezing- allergy season is just around the corner.
    • Fortunately, a new study suggests that symptoms of hay fever may be reduced with a simple probiotic.
    • A probiotic consisting of both Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria has been shown to improve the symptoms of hay fever and the quality of life for those afflicted by it.

    "Itchy eyes, runny nose, and sneezing; allergy season is just around the corner. According to a new study, however, symptoms of hay fever could be reduced with a simple probiotic."



    Reference:

    //www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/316177.php

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4135)


    Does Quercetin Help Fight Allergies?
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: August 22, 2015 07:57 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller
    Subject: Does Quercetin Help Fight Allergies?

    Every year, thousands of individuals suffer from seasonal allergies.  Although many people will head to the pharmacy to fill prescriptions to cover the symptoms of this condition, there are those who seek a more natural approach. Natural treatments are available that have been clinically proven to alleviate itchy eyes, runny nose and sneezing associated with allergies.  One such natural treatment comes in the form of a supplement called quercetin.

    Quercetin is a flavonoid with antioxidant properties, and is naturally found in green tea, onions and apples. Aside from being high in antioxidants, quercetin has also been found to have the same effect as over-the counter antihistamines.  By controlling the release of histamines, quercetin can alleviate many, if not all, of the symptoms of seasonal allergies.

    Green Tea

    When an individual encounters an allergen, such as pollen, the body releases histamines in response. These histamines trigger an inflammatory response within the body, causing congested nasal passages, swollen eyelids, etc. An antihistamine keeps these compounds under control, therefore eliminating any uncomfortable symptoms.

    Quercetin has been proven to reduce the symptoms and duration of viral illnesses, and to also prevent the release of histamines. Because it can be difficult for the body to assimilate, researchers have advised that allergy sufferers take a vitamin C supplement along with quercetin to ensure the maximum benefits are being received. Vitamin C also contains antihistamine qualities, and is most potent when taken alongside quercetin. The recommended dosage of vitamin C for allergy sufferers is 500 to 1000 milligrams, three times per day. The recommended dosage of quercetin is 500 milligrams per day, for a period of six to eight weeks. It would be most beneficial to begin taking this supplement one to two weeks before allergy season begins, and for six to seven weeks throughout allergy season.

    Allergy season doesn't have to mean weeks of watering eyes and stuffy noses. By supplementing with quercetin and vitamin C, you can alleviate your symptoms naturally and enjoy the outdoors without worry.


    References:

    //www.wellnessresources.com/health/articles/quercetins_rising_star_nerves_immunity_and_metabolism

    //www.needs.com/product/NDNL-0705-01/a_Quercitin

    //www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART03109/Allergic-Rhinitis.htmlRead More

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    Can ButterBur Extract Help Fight Migraine Headaches?
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: November 25, 2013 06:21 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Can ButterBur Extract Help Fight Migraine Headaches?

    What is Butterbur?

    butterburButterbur is a plant found in the daisy asteraceae and is in genus petasites. They are also known as sweet coltsfoot. They are mainly found in the temperate zones of the northern hemisphere in areas such as riverbanks, ditches and marshes it’s also found in Europe, Asia and North America. The plant was mainly used by Native Americans as a remedy for inflammation, coughs, asthma allergies and headaches. For many years its leaves and roots have been used as an important medicinal herb. In recent research, researchers have found out that extracts of butterbur contains an active ingredient that can be used to prevent migraines and also act as an antispasmodic supporting chronic cough or asthma.

    What are the Benefits of Butterbur?

    The plant contains two very active chemicals namely petasin and isopetasin. This chemicals are believed to be beneficial in treating headaches, the highest concentration of this chemicals mainly occurs in roots. Root extracts of the plant have been discovered to be very effective in the reduction of frequency and severity of migraines. Migraines are caused by rapid change in the blood flow to the head, they are characterized by episodes of headaches, sensitivity to light and sound and nausea. Treatment includes pain relievers and other medication that affect the openness of the blood vessels. Medication can help ease the pain as a short term measure but in the long run the may cause more headaches as a result of a condition known as medication overuse headaches. These resultant headaches are more difficult to treat than migraines; these medicines may also lead to other problems for people with other chronic illness.

    Butterbur root extracts presumably contains isopetasin and/or petasin that are effective in relieving and preventing migraine, since the compound prevents blood vessel inflammation, although it’s said to have gastrointestinal side effects. From research it was discovered that petasin contains anti-spasmodic properties which helps in reducing spasms in vascular walls and smooth muscles. It also contains a powerful anti-inflammatory agent that prevents the synthesis of leukotrienes that is the pro-inflammatory agent in the blood vessel walls. Isopetasin also contains an anti-inflammatory by modulating prostaglandin metabolism. The two together have an antispasmodic effect on vascular walls.

    Migraine

    According to a survey carried out in Germany where two hundred and two people who had migraines attacks three months prior to the survey and those who had stopped medication three months before were randomly assigned to receive 75mg of butterbur extract twice a day, the other group was assigned 50 mg or placebo. The results were recorded and it was discovered that people using a higher dosage of butterbur experienced a greater reduction in the frequency in migraines.

    Other Treatment of Butterbur

    Other than being used in migraine treatment butterbur have several other uses and benefits such as allergy relief without antihistamine side effects, while antihistamines have advance side effects such as fuzzy head and fatigue, when butterbur was used no side effects were evident. Butterbur extracts are also used to treat asthma; this is as a result of anti-inflammatory properties combined with bronchodilating properties.

    References:

    1. //www.prevention.com/health/health-concerns/butterbur-beats-migraines
    2. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petasites
    3. //nutritionreview.org/2013/04/butterbur-extract-petasites-hybridus-effective-reducing-migraine-attacks/
    4. //www.bastyrcenter.org/content/view/424/
    5. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-649-BUTTERBUR.aspx?activeIngredientId=649&activeIngredientName=BUTTERBUR
    6. //www.lef.org/magazine/mag2008/aug2008_Preventing-Migraine-Pain-with-Butterbur_01.htm

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2904)


    What is Monk Fruit And Why Is It Healthy?
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 24, 2013 10:24 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: What is Monk Fruit And Why Is It Healthy?

    monk

    Monk fruit also known as luo han guo is a green melon cultivated in central Asia. It has been cultivated for many years by the Buddhist monks. The fruit contains an intensely sweet compound known as mogroside. It is a healthy, natural alternative to sugars and artificial sweeteners. The fruit is extracted in order to get mogroside which is many times sweeter than sugar. Monk fruit is crushed, combined with water, filtered and spray-dried to produce a sweet-zero-calorie powder known as fruit-sweetness. This sugar is used in several foods and beverages.

    Health benefits

    Ancient Chinese and Buddhist used monk fruit as treatment for various ailments, such as constipation, sunstroke and coughing. Modern research shows that mogroside can be used to treat diabetes since it contains a low glycemic index and can stimulate insulin secretion. In china, monk fruit was also used for many years to treat obesity and diabetes. The fruit contains antioxidants with anti- inflammatory benefits.

    British Journal of Nutrition reported that use of monk fruit by animals showed a reduction in lipid peroxidation or cell damage as well as urinary albumin levels. This shows that it protects kidneys from diabetic damage.

    Monk fruit strengthens the immune system, digestive tract, respiratory system as well as glands. This fruit is capable of eliminating and defending people against various health-related issues. The fruit reduces cholesterol, triglycerides and improve liver function. Furthermore, it increases good cholesterol while protecting the liver. It prevents cholesterol oxidization (due to its antioxidant potential) this results to reduced risk of heart diseases and strokes.

    Monk fruit extract has an antihistamine effect. The extract tends to counter an allergic response by soothing the mast cells that produces chemicals such as histamine. This chemical is related to both allergies and asthma. It is considered one of the best non-sugar sweeteners. It is combined with supplements used to promote and maintain a healthy weight.


    Reference

    1. //www.thekitchen.com
    2. //thescienceofeating.com
    3. //www.tateandlyle.com/ingredientsandservices/chooseaningredientorservice/americas/pages/purefruit%E2%84%A2monkfruitextract.aspx

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2849)


    Herbs that Support Healthy Vision
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 21, 2012 08:02 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Herbs that Support Healthy Vision

    The overall health of the eyes is essential to help retain a healthy vision and vision is considered to be one of the greatest assets of the total body health. Healthy vision is important to lead a good life. As the whole body needs exercise, eyes also need exercise regularly. To maintain optimum vision health it is necessary to provide proper nutrients to the eyes. Natural herbs help prevent vision loss and antioxidants are good for aging eyes.

    Here are a few herbs that support a healthy vision:

    Eyebright (Euphrasia Officinalis)

    Eyebright grows wild throughout Bulgaria, Hungary and the Balkans. This herb is grown in Europe for commercial purposes. Eyebright is rich in vitamins A, B, C, D and E, iridoid glycosides, flavonoids and tannins. This herb is used to fro relieving eye problems such as eye strain, pink eye and inflamed, sore and irritated eyes. The common name, "Eyebright," is derived from its use as a nutritional support to the eyes. Eyebright is used in making external poultices, teas, tinctures, fluid extracts and the whole herb is used for dietary use.

    Bilberry

    Bilberry is a close cousin to blueberry and has been widely used in Europe for eye health. Bilberry is the world's most famous herb that supports healthy vision. Bilberry helps blood to flow easily to the eye nerves. It has an antioxidant called anthocyanins, which protects the delicate eye tissues and protects the eye from the harmful UV rays from the sun. The other nutrients present in bilberry nourish the eye for a clear vision and light adjustment.

    Goji Berries

    Goji berries contain anthocyanins, the antioxidants which help prevent age related damage and improves blood flow in the eyes.

    Wolfberry

    Wolfberry is a Chinese herb with potent medicinal properties to strengthen the eyesight. Wolfberry has been in use in China, for centuries, to protect the eye and to promote good vision.

    Red Raspberry

    Red Raspberry is a native European herb that is used to treat sore eyes. Their leaves are rich in vitamin C and are high in tannin content. This herb is used as eyewash for discharge.

    Grape Seed

    Grape seed is an important source of nature's most potent antioxidants - proanthocyanidins that are anti-inflammatory, antihistamine and antiallergenic, and they also act as free radical scavengers. Grape seeds helps vitamin C enter the body cells.

    Chrysanthemum Flowers

    Chrysanthemum flowers help reduce pressure build-up in the eye. Steep chrysanthemum flowers in hot water, drink the beverage or use it to wash eyes in eye-wash cups.

    Peppermint

    Peppermint is an antioxidant which can clear vision.

    Ginkgo Biloba

    Ginkgo Biloba improves blood flow in the eyes. People with diabetes will have blood circulation problems and increased blood clotting tendencies. The small clots in the retinal area of the eye leads to poor vision. Ginkgo Biloba reduces the blood clots, increases blood flow and makes the red blood cells more flexible. The flexible red blood cells squeeze through the tiny blood vessels and help to carry more oxygen to tissues and cells.

    Herbal treatment for a healthy vision is the best natural way to improve eyesight.

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    What is Forskoline and How Does It Help You Loose Weight?
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    Date: February 09, 2012 05:46 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: What is Forskoline and How Does It Help You Loose Weight?

    While the Ayurvedic Coleus forskohlii contains numerous ingredients, however, the most integral active ingredient in the herb is known as Forskoline. It is the mint family that this herb belongs to, and Burma,India and Thailand, which are all subtropical areas, are some of the places where this herb grows. Over the years, a lot research has been done on the main ingredient in this herb. In the recent times, this ingredient has become particularly popular for the benefits that have been discovered it offers for weight loss.

    What Can Forskoline Be Used For?

    In the few clinical and scientific studies that were conducted on Forskoline, this natural component was discovered to be a lipolytic or a fat burning agent. The individuals who were subjected to testing lost quite a significant weight when they were give this ingredient to use as a weight loss aid. Ever since then, several weight loss products have been produced that contain this component as their main ingredient.

    What is the Function of Forskoline?

    The adenylate cyclase enzyme is activated by this component. Typically, adenylate cyclase are also activated by fat burning hormones, however, their have higher CNS effects. On the other hand, the CNS effects of Forskoline are different so no side effects are caused if it is used for losing weight. Thus, while functioning like most fat loss agents, the levels of the lipolytic hormone are not increased by it.

    Apart from acting as a safe weight loss agent, Forskoline also offers various other health benefits too. It, in fact, particular helps with cardiovascular health. As far as cardiovascular health is concerned, not only this but several others of the active ingredients that the Coleus forskohlii have been discovered to be beneficial for the cardiovascular system.

    What are the Side Effects of Forskoline?

    There are actually no known side effects associated with the use of this component, which has been proven by the several studies conducted on it and the herb it comes from. Nonetheless, if people decide to use Forskoline, they should consult a doctor first. There are chances that people might experience drowsiness if they consume in a really large dose, which is natural considering it is an antihistamine, however, this should be avoided. Taking it before going to bed or taking it along with stimulate is most appropriate.

    Today there are numerous Forskoline products available in the market and those who are looking for the best one should pay attention to the amount of this particular ingredient the product contains. Typically, a 2% extract in a 250 mg tablet is adequate enough. Products containing 10 to 20% of this extract can be considered the best. People should start using such a product with two to three doses of 25 to 60 mg in a day, divided accordingly.

    These days it is hard to find weight loss products with so many benefits and almost no side effects. The weight loss products containing Forskoline might certainly seem like a miracle for those who want to lose weight and those who decide to use will indeed be able to effectively shed the pounds.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2567)


    Can Quercetin And Bromelain Be Used As An Antihistamine?
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    Date: December 22, 2011 07:59 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Can Quercetin And Bromelain Be Used As An Antihistamine?

    Bromelain and Quercetin

    One of the most discomforting things that anyone can experience is allergic reactions. In more severe cases it is a big concern health wise and can easily be a cause of death but in less severe cases it can be a cause of so much annoyance. Severe cases can shut your throat in a matter of minutes and keep you from breathing and the more annoying once are the ones sometimes that are caused by dust or cat hairs as a couple of examples and it will cause you to sneeze all day long or trigger a running nose or something of that sort.

    Antihistamine

    Simply put, it is a type of drug that is used to fight allergic reactions and it covers the minor to the more life threatening conditions. Each type of reaction also has a matching type of antihistamine however the bottom line is that it does one thing and that is to do what its name suggests, to counteract the chemical in our body known as histamine. This is the chemical which is released by our immune system when an allergen which is defined as a harmless external chemical, is exposed to the body. In a way an allergic reaction is our immune systems way of protecting us the problem is, in this case it is a false response. Histamine is a very powerful stimulant and has the ability to cause so much irritation within the body. The symptoms depends on the severity of the reaction, it ranges from itching, watery eyes, skin rashes, runny nose and the most life threatening one is closure of airways.

    Quercetin

    It is a pigment from plants which are found mainly in onions, berries, apples and grapes. It is considered a flavonoid. Quercetin has been used in many countries for many years to improve blood vessel health naturally and has been part of natural medicine for years now. It also has been shown in some studies to have good potency as an antioxidant and has been shown to have the ability to reduce the risk of oxidative DNA damage which is a precursor to cancer.

    Bromelain

    This refers to the plant extract which is obtained from pineapples to put it in simple terms. This substance is known to be protease enzymes as they initiate the digestion of protein which is its main function. It also has been shown on various studies that it has antiviral capabilities. However its best known medical use is for treatment of arthritis and other inflammation based illness.

    Both as antihistamines

    Quercetin, aside from the health benefits mentioned above has been shown to be able to fight against allergic reactions and bromelain helps with its absorption so if put together it could be a potent one two punch against the common cold or flu but for severe cases against severe allergic reactions further research needs to be done to cement the idea that these substance can take the place of antihistamines.

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    Stop Constipation
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    Date: March 29, 2009 10:08 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Stop Constipation

    Constipation occurs when one has difficulty passing stools, or infrequently passes hard, dry stools. This is the result of food moving extremely slowly through the large intestine. From time to time, most people experience constipation. However, lifestyle changes and better eating habits can help to relieve the symptoms and prevent recurrences. Constipation usually results from insufficient amounts of fiber and fluids in the diet. Fiber can be found in plant foods like whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Fiber that is water-soluble takes on a soft texture and is helpful in softening the stools. Insoluble fiber goes through the large intestine unchanged and is helpful in adding bulk to the stools to stimulate bowel contractions.

    Other factors that can cause constipation include inadequate exercise, advanced age, muscle disorders, structural abnormalities, bowel diseases, neurogenic disorders, and a poor diet, especially a heavy consumption of junk food. Constipation can also be a side effect of iron supplements and some drugs, like painkillers and antidepressants. It is also common during pregnancy. High levels of calcium and low levels of thyroid hormone can also lead to constipation. Those with kidney failure are also prone to having problems with constipation. Constipation is often caused by dehydration in older individuals, with depression being a factor in people of any age. Some medications, like cough syrups, pain medications that contain codeine, antidepressants, iron supplements, blood pressure and heart medicines, calcium supplements, and some antihistamines can also cause constipation.

    A small percentage of people with spinal injuries and other similar problems have constipation because the nerves that usually regulate bowel movement have been damaged or destroyed. A condition referred to as Hirshsprung’s disease makes the normal excretion of feces impossible because the nerves inside the bowel are missing. The nerve cells in the colon can also be damaged by long-term use of laxatives, which makes constipation inevitable. A thrombosed hemorrhoid, anal fissure, or a pocket of infection at the anus can create a spasm of pain that is strong enough to contract the muscles and prevent the evacuation of stools.

    Constipation can cause a variety of other ailments such as appendicitis, bad breath, body odor, coated tongue, depression, diverticulitis, fatigue, gas, headaches, hemorrhoids, hernia, indigestion, insomnia, mal-absorption syndrome, obesity, and varicose veins. It may even be involved in the development of other serious diseases like bowel cancer. It is important to have regular bowel movements in order to remove toxins from the body. Toxins from bowel bacteria and undigested food particles play a part in the development of diabetes mellitus, meningitis, myasthenia gravis, thyroid disease, candidiasis, chronic gas and bloating, migraines, fatigue, and ulcerative colitis. People can have bowel movements as infrequently as three times a week and still not be constipated, but there are some health practitioners that believe that it is important to have a bowel movement every day.

    The following nutrients are very helpful in dealing with and preventing constipation: garlic, vitamin C with bioflavonoids, apple pectin, chlorophyll liquid, essential fatty acids, a multi-enzyme complex, a multivitamin and mineral complex, vitamin B complex, vitamin D3, vitamin E. Additionally, the following herbs are also beneficial: alfalfa extract, fennel seed, aloe vera, ginger, milk thistle, triphala, cascara sagrada, goldenseal, rhubarb root, senna leaves, and yerba mate.

    Adding a good fiber supplement as well as the above mentioned supplements can help one stop constipation and start normal bowel movements again. Natural fiber, vitamins, and herbs are available at your local or internet health food store. Look for name brands such as Source Naturals, Solaray, Kal, Planetary Formulas, and Natures Plus to ensure quality and safely of all your natural supplement needs.

    *Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Vitamins, herbs, and fibers are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

    --
    Buy Fiber at Vitanet ®, LLC

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    Allergy Remedies
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    Date: November 25, 2008 12:08 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Allergy Remedies

    According to the 2006 National Health Survey from the National Center for Health Statistics, it is estimated that about 17.6 million adult Americans suffer from hay fever, with 6.8 children also suffering. Even more, physicians state that more than 11 million office visits are by patients seeking relief from hay fever, which is also known as allergic rhinitis. Symptoms of hay fever include itchy eyes, runny nose, congestion, and an endless amount of sneezing. All of these symptoms are caused by an overacting immune response to a variety of possible triggers, which include pollen from plants, dust, dust mites, airborne pollutants, mold, and pet dander.

    Hay fever is marked by inflammation of mucous membranes in the eyes, throat, ears, sinuses, nose, and lungs. Although the development of inflammation in allergies is complex, one of the most influential factors is immunoglobulin E (IgE), which responds to protein allergens. Although there is a genetic component to susceptibility to allergic response to certain triggers, the focus of allergy relief is on the events that occur as a reaction.

    Various natural products offer allergy relief by targeting the factors in allergy pathology. Similar to other areas of immune health, fruits and vegetables are suggested for the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that they provide. Vitamin C is a major antioxidant in the airway surface liquid of the lungs; therefore, it can severely impact allergies and asthma. Low levels of vitamin C have actually been associated with asthma in both adults and children. Also, low levels of vitamin E have been associated with asthma and other wheezing illnesses. Combining antioxidant ingredients also provides additional relief. Therefore, by combining vitamins C and E with the antioxidant NAC, pollen-induced airway inflammation is inhibited by blocking ragweed oxidases which cause oxidative stress and inflammation in the airways.

    On its own, NAC reduces mucous viscosity and protects against lung tissue damage. According to scientists, lycopene may also be beneficial. As far as minerals are concerned, both magnesium and zinc have been proven to help. Quercetin has both antihistamine and anti-inflammatory properties, allowing it to inhibit the release of histamine in nasal mucosa of allergic patients. Glucomannan was shown in a study to suppress allergy symptoms, while CLA reduces allergy symptoms such as sneezing.

    One of the best natural remedies for allergies is comprised of botanicals such as licorice root, skullcap, pine bark extract, and butterbur. Licorice root offers anti-inflammatory activities along with aide in fighting IgE allergic reactions, while skullcap can restrict inflammatory cytokine production. Pine bark extract blocks the release of allergy troublemakers in the body even better than a known pharmacological histamine inhibitor.

    Similarly, butterbur has abilities in blocking histamine release by IgE-sensitized mast cells and relieving allergy symptoms as effectively as drugs without the drowsy side effects. Although allergies are widespread and disrupt the daily lives of many people, they strike one out of every four Americans, affecting six times more than cancer. The mechanisms of allergic reactions in the body, especially those in the upper respiratory system, are becoming more and more well-known.

    Natural products are available that can help to address these mechanisms, along with the mediators that produce the inflammation and symptoms that allergies create. Natural vitamin supplements are available at your local or internet health food store.



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    Vitanet ®, LLC

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    Genetically Engineered Foods May Cause Rising Food Allergies
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    Date: January 21, 2008 02:14 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Genetically Engineered Foods May Cause Rising Food Allergies

    Arguments made by the Environmental Protection Agency, which regulates plant produced pesticides, tell us not to worry about the thought of consuming toxic pesticides. Instead, they say that the pesticides used, Bt, are produced naturally from a soil bacterium which has a history of safe use by organic farmers who have used the solution for yeas as a method of insect control. Genetic engineers simply remove the gene that produces Bt and insert it into the DNA of corn and cotton plants, making the plant do the work, instead of the farmer. They also say that the Bt toxin is quickly destroyed in our stomach, and even if it survived would not harm humans or any other mammals. However, these arguments are solely that, arguments, which are unsupported and refuted according to a lot of research.

    When a study was done, spraying natural Bt over areas in Vancouver and Washington State for months, about 500 people reported reactions, mostly those being allergy or flu-like symptoms. Six of those people had to go to the emergency room, while workers who applied the Bt sprays reported that their eyes, nose, and throats were irritated. Similarly, farmers who were exposed to liquid Bt said that they had reactions such as infection, ulcers on the cornea, skin irritation, burning, swelling, and redness. One woman even reported fever, altered consciousness, and seizures when she was accidentally sprayed with Bt. This proves that the statements of Bt doing no harm on humans is extremely false. As for being destroyed in the digestive system, studies on mice disproved this as well. Results of these, and other, studies showed that plant-produced Bt is always active and much more likely to trigger an immune response than the natural version.

    Additional studies in 2005 reported by medical investigators in India found that hundreds of agricultural workers are developing severe allergic reactions when they are exposed to Bt cotton. This exposure includes picking cotton, loading it, cleaning it, or simply leaning against it. Some people that work at ginning factories must take antihistamines daily in order to go to work. These reactions are only trigger with the Bt varieties and the symptoms are virtually identical to those that were described by the 500 people in Vancouver and Washington who were sprayed with Bt.

    Another study was done on the basis that Bt-toxin is produced in GM corn and can be eaten intact. It is also in pollen which can be breathed in. Therefore, a village of Filipino people were studied in 2003 when an adjacent Bt cornfield was pollinating. 100 of these people were stricken with disease which included symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, extreme stomach pain, vomiting, chest pains, fever, and allergies, along with respiratory, intestinal, and skin reactions. The symptoms first appeared in those that were living closest to the field and then progressed to those further away. When the same corn was planted in four other villages the following year, the same symptoms returned in all four areas only during the time of pollination.

    All of these studies confirm that GM crops engineered to produce built-in pesticides provoke a great variety of immune responses. Allergic reactions are a defensive and often harmful reaction from the immune system to an external irritant that occur when the body interprets something foreign as harmful and offensive and acts accordingly. Since all GM foods have something foreign and different, it is easy to see why the body would react in such ways. As the GM foods arise on the market place make sure you scan each label to make sure you are not buying a GM vegetable of fruit. Check every label this way you will not be stricken with debilitating symptoms that may prevent you from going to work. Always say NO to GM foods and support your organic foods store.

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    Benefits of taking Vitamin C Daily
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    Date: July 26, 2006 02:09 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Benefits of taking Vitamin C Daily

    Vitamin C benefits

    1. maintain normal connective tissue and wound healing.

    2. help strengthen bones.

    3. Vitamin C is a Cofactor in the production of epinephrine (adrenalin).

    4. Vitamin C helps in the production of Bile acids for digestion.

    5. Vitamin C helps in the production of Thyroxin (Thyroid hormone).

    6. helps in the absorption of Iron.

    7. aids in amino acid metabolism.

    8. helps strengthens the body during infection.

    9. helps counter oxidative stress.

    10. may help strengthen veins and aid in diabetic retinopathy.

    11. Vitamin c may help reduce the binding of glucose to proteins in diabetics.

    12. in large doses Vitamin C has shown to have an antihistamine effect and may be helpful with asthma and allergies.

    13. Vitamin C is needed for the synthesis of L-Carnitine, L-Carnitine helps transport fat into cells to burn as energy.

    1000mgs of vitamin C each day helps keep the doctor away ;)

    for proper vitamin C intake try Alacer Emergen C drinks...


    Also try: Now Vitamins for great Vitamin C!

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    Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus...
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    Date: July 11, 2005 09:15 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus...

    HANDLING SPRING(HAY)

    The National Institute of Health’s branch of Allergy and Infectious Diseases re p o rt that 40 to 50 million Americans suffer from allergies in one form or another. Many experience food allergies that a re treated somewhat diff e rently from hay fever allergies. Hay fever comes from airborne allergens, generally from pollen or pollutants.

    The symptoms of allergy occur when an immune system is overactive. The immune system often recognizes something as foreign and treats it as foreign by attacking it, when in fact it really isn’t a substance the body should be concern e d with. This over-activity of the immune system leads to the release of substances including histamine that cause the symptoms of hay fever.

    The most common symptoms include a runny nose and itching eyes and scratchy throat. Sometimes, an allergy will precede a sinus infection by causing swelling in the nasal membranes preventing fluids f rom exiting the sinus passages. An infection then ensues. However, most people who feel pressure over their sinuses, never develop an infection and so can be adequately treated with the supplements mentioned here. Many people experience a tickle or a shallow cough that comes from the throat rather than the lungs. They may also experience a change in emotions, becoming quite irritable or moody.

    These airborne allergies can often be g rouped by season. Those people sensitive to tree pollens usually have more severe allergies in the springtime. Those sensitive to grasses are often worse in mid-summer. Those allergic to weeds have their symptoms peak in the fall. There are some unfortunate people who have allergies all summer long who may be allergic to a few plants in each group. Those who have symptoms of allerg i e s all winter long probably are allergic to molds and mildew or household animals and dust mites. On occasion, it takes a real detective to determine from where the allergies come.

    There are several methods used to diagnose a cause of an allergy. In a scratch test, drops of an allergen are put on small scratches on the arm or the back. Are action is considered positive if swelling or redness occur around the scratch. A blood sample can also be used to meas ure antibody response to certain allergens. It is often helpful to determine the allergen which cause the hayfever to reduce the symptoms. There are also practitioners who use kinesiology or electronic devices to determine the cause of allergies.

    The most common treatment of allergies is with antihistamines. Their side effects include drowsiness and drying of the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth. Many of the newer prescription antihistamines don’t cause drying but often have serious drug interactions and the consumer must be very careful in combining the prescription antihistamines with antifungal drugs, and blood thinning as well as asthma medication. There are some natural products that can be taken to decrease allergy symptoms. They are often equally effective without the side effects of antihistamines.

    QUERCETIN

    One of the more popular is quercetin. Quercetin is a bioflavonoid found in red apples, red onions, brussels sprouts, kale, peas, bell peppers, pears and asparagus. It is also found in bee pollen and propolis, two plant materials found in the beehive. It is possible to consume a fair amount of quercetin through your diet. If you have allergies, however, diet is often not enough and you may need a supplement to get enough quercetin to ontrol your symptoms. It appears quercetin decreases allergic symptoms by stopping the release of histamine. If you start taking quercetin and other nutritional supplements I will mention below before an allergy attack, they are likely to be more effective. However, don’t let that discourage you from taking them even after the symptoms have started. A common dose is 300mg to 600mg per day.

    BROMELAIN

    Bromelain is a nutrient often extracted f rom pineapple. Found in many digestive formulas, it is an enzyme that helps absorption. If it is found in a combination formula, chances are, it is there to help with the absorption of the other nutrients such as quercetin. Bromelain also has an anti-inflammatory effect. When someone develops allergy symptoms, part of the reason is due to the inflammatory response to substances such as histamine that are released as the allergy takes hold. This causes inflammation in the tissues which then manifests with redness and swelling.

    VITAMIN C

    Vitamin C is useful in many conditions including hay fever. Higher doses are often required in the treatment of allergies: 2,000mg is beneficial and you can take up to 4,000mg or more during acute symptoms. It also stabilizes capillaries, reducing the swelling in the throat, nasal passages and around the eyes. If you are taking a multi-vitamin or a combination product that contains Vitamin C, I still recommend additional supplementation.

    NETTLE (URTICA DIOICA)

    Stinging nettle is probably a plant many a re familiar with, especially if it has come into contact with your skin, but it also has an historical use in the treatment of allergy. In fact, in double blind studies it was shown to decrease the symptoms of allergy, specifically runny nose.

    EPHEDRA (MA HUANG)

    The active component of the ephedra herb is ephedrine, an alkaloid. It is used in OTC asthma medication. As a natural herb, ephedra in small doses can be v e ry useful in decreasing the symptoms of colds, asthma, cough and in this case, hay fever. It is in many Chinese and American formulas that I use and I feel v e ry comfortable using 100mg to 200mg of ephedra that contain small doses of 2.5mg to 8mg of ephedra alkaloids per day. I feel comfortable using dosages of up to 15mg of ephedra alkaloids .

    FEVERFEW

    Feverfew is another herb with a variety of uses. You will find it in headache formulas, in fever reducing formulas, and many hay fever formulas. Like bromelain, it has an anti-inflammatory effect and reduces the swelling that occurs during a hay fever attack.

    Homeopathic formulas can also be useful to reduce hay fever. There is no re ason why the herbs I’ve mentioned cannot be combined with homeopathic formulas. You may want to take them at separate times of the day.

    So, if you suffer from hay fever, don’t give up. You can use these nutrients singly or in combination. You can take a formula that contains all of them and then add to that additional vitamin C for instance, or additional nettle. It may require trial and error to find the right amounts in combination that will work for you.



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    Vitanet ®

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    Hayfever & Allergies - Herbs To Help You Breathe Easier
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    Date: June 30, 2005 09:36 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Hayfever & Allergies - Herbs To Help You Breathe Easier

    Hayfever & Allergies By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt Runny nose, watery eyes, itchy skin...oh no, it's that time of year again! Are you one of the 30 million Americans who suffer from hayfever? If so, breath easier and let the herbal world replace your antihistamines and steroids with both preventative and therapeutic remedies.

    Allergies and hayfever are abnormal reactions to everyday substances such as pollen, dust, dander, etc. and involve many different organ systems of the body, primarily the respiratory, liver and adrenal glands. Using herbs to strengthen these systems will give your body a preventative edge over allergic reactions, and will further help decrease the severity of uncomfortable symptoms.

    Licorice is a wonderful ally to the adrenal glands and is probably the most widely studied adrenal herb. Licorice has anti-inflammatory actions similar to the glucocorticoids (which are produced by healthy adrenals) and are involved with resolving allergic reactions. It also preserves the effects of cortisol, and adrenal hormone involved in clearing allergies.

    A second well-known herb used to strengthen the adrenals is Ginseng. Often times, the onset of allergies can be attributed to stress. The adaptogenic properties of Ginseng allow the glands to balance stress and energy while creating an overall resistance to allergic reactions, colds, flus and infections.

    A strong liver is also vital to a healthy balanced body, acting as a protective factor against allergies. Dandelion is one of the most nutritive and strengthening herbs to the liver. It helps clear toxins and stimulates the energy of the liver to work towards the resolution of the allergic reaction. Milk Thistle acts as both a protector and regenerator of the liver. This herb helps repair damaged tissue and support the actions necessary for dealing with allergens and their accompanying symptoms.

    When confronted with the copious secretions commonly experienced by allergy sufferers, Nettles and Eyebright are two of the best herbs to choose to control the "drip". Both work well for short-term relief, but may be taken before the season begins as a means of prevention. For those people who become congested and need a remedy which allows them to breathe while draining occurs, Ma Huang is a good choice. Due to its stimulating nature, use Ma Huang with caution if you have high blood pressure, heart disease, etc. Additional herbs suitable for allergy relief include Red Clover, Elder Flower and Bayberry.

    For a potent synergistic formula, try Allertone. This outstanding product featrues a blend of the well-known Echinacea and Goldenseal, along with Red Clover, Bayberry and Mullein to combat both the discomfort of allergies as well as reduce excess mucous from the nasal and respiratory tract.

  • These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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    GARLIC (allium sativum)
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    Date: June 25, 2005 09:54 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GARLIC (allium sativum)

    GARLIC (allium sativum)

    Common Names: Stinking Rose, Poor Man’s Treacle

    Plant Parts: bulb

    Active Compounds: Garlic contains more than 200 chemical compounds.

    Some of its more important ones include: volatile oil with sulphur-containing compounds: (allicin, alliin, and ajoene), and enzymes: (allinase, peroxidase and myrosinase). Allicin is what gives garlic its antibiotic properties and is responsible for its strong odor. Ajoene contributes to the anticoagulant action of garlic. Garlic also contains citral, geraniol, linalool, Aphellandrene and B phellandrene. The allyl contained in garlic is also found in several members of the onion family and is considered a very valuable therapeutic compound.

    Pharmacology: The allicins contained in garlic have a fibrinolytic activity which reduces platelet aggregation by inhibiting prostaglandin E2. Allivium sativum has also exerted some effect on glucose tolerance for both hypo-and hyperglycemia by reducing insulin require-ments to control blood sugar. The compounds contained in garlic have also demonstrated their ability to lower total serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels while elevating HDL levels. LDL synthesis is suppressed by garlic. Garlic allicins have also acted as a larvacide and bacteriostat, active against gram-positive or gram-negative microorganisms. In addition, the compounds can destroy certain fungi such as Candida albicans. Several other microbes are effected by garlic, including some viruses. Most researchers agree that the sulfur containing compounds of garlic, especially allicin, alliin, cy-croalliin, and dialllyldisulphide are the most biochemically active. In addition, certain unidentified substances of garlic will probably emerge as other therapeutic agents.

    (Note: Before a bulb of garlic is crushed or chopped, it contains relatively few medically active compounds. Once it is cut, however, chemical reactions take place which create dozens of new compounds.)

    Vitamin and Mineral Content: B-vitamins especially B-1, vitamin C, vitamin A, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, phosphorous, potassium, sulphur, selenium, calcium, magnesium, germanium, sodium, iron, manganese and trace iodine. Seventeen amino acids are found in garlic, including eight essential ones.

    Character: antibiotic, antihistamine, anticoagulant, expectorant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, alterative, diaphoretic, diuretic , expectorant, stimulant, antispasmodic, promotes sweating, lowers blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels, lowers blood pressure Body Systems Targeted: respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, and nervous systems

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    The Colds & Flu Report
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    Date: June 18, 2005 08:38 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: The Colds & Flu Report

    The Colds & Flu Report by Sherrill Williams Energy Times, October 13, 2004

    The nose knows the misery of a cold: stuffiness, watery eyes, sore throat and nagging cough. These annoyances are especially frustrating when there's not enough time in your busy schedule to be sick.

    Traditional remedies help: Slurping a cup of Grandma's chicken soup. Sweating in a hot bath. Climbing under the covers until further notice.

    While no one can guarantee you won't catch a cold this year, a few simple measures can limit your sick days and give you the best chance to dodge upper respiratory distress. The common cold is a frequent and expensive problem, causing about 15 million lost work days for Americans each year. Some people seem just about immune to the group of viruses that cause colds. But others may endure as many as 12 colds per year. For the lucky ones, a cold's irritations last a couple of days. For the unfortunate, a cold can drag on for a couple of weeks.

    Influenza (commonly known as the flu) has many of the same discomforts as a cold, and both disorders originate in the upper respiratory tract. But while a cold usually stays on tract, the flu is often accompanied by fever, prominent headaches and severe aches and pains around the body. Fatigue from the flu can last as long as two to three weeks during recovery. All this distress demonstrates that your body is fighting off the invaders.

    Earnest Echinacea

    Traditional healers advocate the use of the herb echinacea at the first sign of getting sick. Echinacea, commonly known as purple coneflower, is native to North America and was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia until the 1950s.

    Rosemary Gladstar, a Vermont herbalist and author of Family Herbal (Storey Books), suggests taking echinacea (Echinacea ssp.) in frequent small amounts in tincture or tea form at the first sign of cold or flu.

    " Most of the compounds in echinacea are water soluble, so it makes a fine tea," says Gladstar. She also encourages echinacea tea as a gargle or spray to relieve sore throats.

    Research at Mt. Holyoke College in Massachusetts validates what traditional healers such as Rosemary Gladstar have known: echinacea works best if taken at the onset of colds or flu. In an animal study, scientists found that echinacea triggered a humoral immune response, an immune reaction that spurs the production of special proteins that latch onto and destroy viruses (Immunopharmacology & Immunotoxicology 2003 Nov; 25(4):551-60).

    In another study, researchers found that echinacea enhances immune actions called T cell subsets or helper cell activity (Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 2004 Jul; 27(7):1004-9). Helper cells are lymphocytes that take part in the destruction of viruses. In the quest for the kind of immunity that makes you less vulnerable to infection by troublesome viruses, Gladstar says that "echinacea is safe for children, the elderly and everyone in between."

    C Is for Colds-And So Is E

    The reputation of vitamin C as the anti-cold nutrient has been batted back and forth in the media for decades. Your body can't store up much of this antioxidant water-soluble vitamin, so you have to consume it every day on a regular basis. And while vitamin C may not prevent the common cold, research does demonstrate that it can help reduce a cold's severity and make it go away faster (Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics 1999 Oct; 22(8):530-3).

    Adequate vitamin C is crucial for a healthy immune system. Even a marginal deficiency of this nutrient can leave you more vulnerable to the viruses that cause cold and flu. Plus, if you get a runny nose, researchers believe vitamin C can act as a mild antihistamine, slowing that runny nose to a walk.

    In a University of Texas study reported at the 60th Anniversary meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in 2003, daily doses of vitamin C were shown to significantly aid immunity.

    After two weeks of taking vitamin C, the people in this study had their blood examined. Researchers found increased numbers of NK (natural killer) cells, immune warriors that destroy infected cells. In addition, vitamin C activated T cells, a class of immune cells that also fight viruses.

    And now a newsbreak: you can add vitamin E, vitamin C's antioxidant companion, to your cold prevention shopping list, at least if you're a senior citizen. According to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (2004; 292(7):828-36), nursing home residents aged 65 and older who took vitamin E enjoyed a 20% risk reduction when it came to developing upper respiratory infections.

    Don't Be Sick, Stay Happy

    " When you smile, the whole world smiles with you" is a melody that is music to immunity. Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have found that folks who are relaxed, happy and maintain positive emotions are less likely to catch colds. In addition, people who are depressed, nervous or angry are more likely to complain of cold symptoms whether or not they actually have a cold (Psycho Med 2003 Jul; 65:652-7). According to Sheldon Cohen, PhD, "Study participants who had a positive emotional style weren't infected as often and experienced fewer symptoms compared to people with a negative emotional style."

    So you don't have to be a passive cold victim this winter. When viruses threaten you, according to Mary L. Hardy, MD, you can also try:

  • • Tea made from elderflower, linden or yarrow to reduce fever.
  • • Thyme to ease breathing.
  • • Taking fenugreek or fennel to loosen mucus.
  • • Loosening sinuses by adding hot pepper, horseradish or ginger to your diet. If you have another medical condition beside your cold, are pregnant or breastfeeding, consult your health practitioner. Also, consult a practitioner before giving herbs to children.

    " The first caution I give people is to get a good diagnosis," says Dr. Hardy. "If your cold is not acting like a normal cold, or if it has lasted more than a short amount of time, make sure you don't have a more serious condition, such as pneumonia." In that case, seek professional help.

    But if you've contracted a run-of-the-mill winter cold, keep your spirits and immunity up! Even if you've been impulsively singing and dancing in the rain, the chill and wet won't result in a cold if you let a smile be your immune umbrella!



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Bromelain Sinus Ease - Nature's Life
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    Date: June 16, 2005 10:57 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Bromelain Sinus Ease - Nature's Life

    Bromelain Sinus Ease™


     

    Nature's Life Sinus Products:


     

    Sinus cavities are lined with delicate mucous membranes, which act as filters for your respiratory system. Normal sinuse tissues are pink and healthy. For many people, when their sinuses come in contact with allergens, pollutants or harmful micro-organisms, histamines are released as a protective measure by the immune system. Sinuses naturally respond by becoming irritated, red, and inflamed with these healing histamines. This process, called the natural inflammatory response, helps to neutralize and remove the irritants in sinuses cavities. Sometimes, however, the immune system continues to flood the sinuses even after the irritants are removed. Bromelain Sinus Ease™ contains three ingredients that have been shown to enhance the body’s ability to reduce this natural inflammatory response and help clear up sinuses.*

    Bromelain

    Bromelain is a group of protein-digesting enzymes extracted from pineapples (Ananassa sativa). Bromelain breaks down fibrin—a key component of the body’s natural inflammatory response to allergens and other foreign stimuli.* Bromelain also appears to inhibit the natural formation of prostaglandins (hormone-like substances) that trigger the natural inflammatory response.*1  It makes mucus less thick,2  allowing the mucus to drain more easily.*

    Human trials have shown that by breaking down and helping to remove fibrin, bromelain reduces the discomfort of irritated tissues.*3   Double-blinded trials in patients with irritated sinuses show that the natural inflammatory response is reduced more effectively by concentrated bromelain than by placebo.*4 ,5 ,6 ,7  In all cases, a majority of people responded well to bromelain supplements.*

    Bromelain has also helped reduce the dura­tion of the natural inflammatory response after nasal procedures by over 70% in a controlled trial.*8 

    The recommended daily amount of Nature’s Life Sinus Ease™  utilizes 1,200 mg a very high potency bromelain enzyme which has an activity of 2,880 GDU (Gelatin Digestive Units), or 4,320 MCU (Milk Clotting Units) per serving.

    Vitamin C

    Vitamin C also helps reduce histamine release.*9   Some studies have reported that vitamin C is useful in reducing the natural inflammatory response in nasal passages.*10, 11, 12   The effectiveness of vitamin C in reducing histamine release is still debated, however, because a controlled trial was unable to show consistent effects.*13  Doses up to 2 grams per day have been used by researchers. It may be diffi­cult to show these effects in research trials because vitamin C appears to help only some people without affecting others.*14  Studies, however, clearly show that vitamin C supplementation can lower elevated blood levels of histamines.*15, 16 Nature’s Life adds naturally-buffered vitamin C to Sinus Ease due to its safety, immune-supporting effects and potential effica­cy to reduce histamine release.*

    Quercetin is a bioflavonoid found in many natural foods including citrus fruits, onions, apples, tea and lettuce. As with bromelain, quercetin helps reduce the natural inflammatory response by inhibiting the natural formation of the pro-inflammatory agents, prostaglandins and leukotrienes (white blood cells).*17,18  Quercetin also helps lessen the natural inflammatory response for children with sensitivities to inhalants.*19  Additionally, quercetin may help reduce the effects of harmful micro-organisms *20  Bioflavonoids at doses of 1,200 mg per day have reduced the natural inflammatory response in human studies in combination with 1,200 mg vitamin C,21 an outcome con­firmed in double-blinded research using 600 mg/day of bioflavonoids and 450 mg/day of vitamin C.*22

    Substances which inhibit the natural inflammatory response rarely target just one part of the body.* While quercetin has yet to be tested in reducing the natural inflammatory response in sinuses specifically, doctors of natural medicine frequently use it for that purpose because of its proven ability to lessen the natural inflammatory response elsewhere in the body.*

    Nature’s Life Sinus Ease™

    Nature’s Life has combined these powerful phytonutrients to make Sinus Ease™. High potency Bromelain, Quercetin and vitamin C work to inhibit the natural pro-inflammatory response and encourage adequate sinus drainage.* No safety concerns have been identified with any of these ingredients.23, 24  It is recommended to take the three capsules per day between meals. Since bromelain is a proteolytic enzyme, if taken with a meal it will act on the protein in the food rather than the natural pro-inflammatory fibrin, so remember to take it between meals.*  Enjoy the winter season and find relief from allergens throughout the year!  Nature’s Life Sinus Ease™ can help.

    References:

    1.   Taussig SJ. The mechanism of the physiological action of bromelain. Med Hypoth 1980;6:99-104.

    2. Martin GJ. Bromelain pineapple proteases with anti-edema activity. Exper Med Surg 1962;20:228-48.

    3. Blonstein JL. Control of swelling in boxing injuries. Prac­titioner 1969;203:206.

    4. Seltzer AP. Adjunctive use of bromelains in sinusitis: a controlled study. EENT Monthly 1967;46:1281-8.

    5. Taub SJ. The use of Ananase in sinusitis—a study of 60 patients. EENT Monthly 1966;45:96-8.

    6. Ryan RE. A double-blind clinical evaluation of bromelains in the treatment of acute sinusitis. Headache 1967;7:13-7.

    7. Taub SJ. The use of bromelains in sinusitis: a double-blind clinical evaluation. EENT Monthly 1967;46:361-5.

    8. Seltzer AP. Minimizing post-operative edema and ecchymoses by the use of an oral enzyme preparation (bromelain). EENT Monthly 1962;41:813-7.

    9. Johnson CS, Martin LJ, Cai X. Antihistamine effect of sup­plemental ascorbic acid and neutrophil chemotaxis. J Am Coll Nutr 1992;11:172-6.

    10. Zuskin E, Lewis AJ, Bouhuys A. Inhibition of histamine-induced airways constriction by ascorbic acid. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1973;51:218.

    11. Ruskin SL. High dose vitamin C in allergy. Am J Dig Dis 1945;12:281.

    12. Holmes HN. Hay fever and vitamin C. Science 1942;96;497.

    13. Fortner BR, Danziger RE, Rabinowitz PS, Nelson HS. The effect of ascorbic acid on cutaneous and nasal response to histamine  and allergen. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1982;69:484-8.

    14. Bai TR, Martin JG. Effects of indomethacin and ascorbic acid on histamine induced bronchoconstriction in normal  subjects. NZ  Med J 1986;99:163 [abstr].

    15. Holmes H, Alexander W. Hay Fever and Vitamin C. Science 1942;96:497-99.

    16. Johnston CS, Martin LJ, Xi C. Antihistamine Effect of Supplemental Ascorbic Acid and Neutrophil Chemotaxis. J Am Coll Nutr 1992;11:172-6.

    17. Middleton E, Drzewieki G. Naturally occurring flavonoids and human basophil histamine release. Arch Allergy Applied Immunol 1985;77:155-7.

    18. Welton AF, Tobias LD, Fiedler-Nagy C, et al. Effect of flavonoids on arachidonic acid metabolism. Prog Clin BiolRes 1986;213:231-42

    19. Balabokin II, Gordeeva GF, Fuseva ED, et al. Use of vitamins in allergic illnesses in children. Vopr Med Khim (Russia) 1992;38:36-40.

    20. Ohnishi E, Bannai H. Quercetin potentiates TNF-induced antiviral activity. Antiviral Res 1993;22:327-31.

    21. Miller MJ. Injuries to athletes. Med Times 1960;88:313-6.

    22. Cragin RB. The use of bioflavonoids in the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. Med Times 1962;529-32.

    23. Taussig SJ, Yokoyama MM, Chinen N, et al. Bromelain: A proteolytic enzyme and its clinical application. Hiroshima J Med Sci 1975;24:185-193.

    24. Hertog MGL, Feskens EJM, Holman PCH, et al. Dietary flavonoids and cancer risk in the Zutphen elderly study. Nutr Cancer 1994;22:175-84.

     



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