SearchBox:

Search Term: " Boils "

  Messages 1-39 from 39 matching the search criteria.
30 surprising food swaps that will immediately improve the health of every organ in your body Darrell Miller 7/27/17
Named the best spice for cleansing the body Darrell Miller 5/15/17
Sooth Diverticulitis Marshmallow Root Darrell Miller 9/27/16
The benefits of sandalwood oil Darrell Miller 2/28/14
What Is Pine Oil? Darrell Miller 2/23/14
Myrrh oil health benefits Darrell Miller 2/21/14
What Are The Magnesium Malate Benefits? Darrell Miller 5/17/13
Is Colloidal Silver Good For Boils? Darrell Miller 2/4/13
All-Natural Red Marine Algae An Effective Cold Sore Treatment Darrell Miller 1/24/13
Information on slippery elm bark Darrell Miller 2/9/12
What is Fenugreek Seed and How Does It Boost Your Health? Darrell Miller 7/7/11
Fenugreek Seed Darrell Miller 11/25/09
Psyllium Husk Fiber Darrell Miller 9/23/09
Hops And Good health Darrell Miller 9/20/09
Red Clover Blossom Darrell Miller 8/29/09
Myrrh Gum Darrell Miller 8/15/09
Milk Thistle And Silymarin Darrell Miller 8/12/09
Marshmallow Root Herb Darrell Miller 8/12/09
Slippery Elm Bark Darrell Miller 7/23/09
Hops and St. John's Wort Darrell Miller 7/15/09
ChickWeed Darrell Miller 6/16/09
Black Walnut Darrell Miller 6/5/09
Bayberry Darrell Miller 5/19/09
Barley Grass Darrell Miller 5/14/09
Barberry Darrell Miller 5/13/09
alfalfa Darrell Miller 4/8/09
Garlic Darrell Miller 9/1/08
Health Comes From The Honey bee Darrell Miller 8/8/08
Echinacea Purpurea Root Darrell Miller 6/17/08
Natural Remedies For Bumps, Bruises, Scrapes, and Insect Bites Darrell Miller 11/10/07
How to deal with Stress and Cortisol... Darrell Miller 8/30/06
New Man Food Darrell Miller 7/27/05
PRIMARY USES OF ST. JOHN'S WORT Darrell Miller 7/15/05
ST. JOHN’S WORT (Hypericum perforatum) Darrell Miller 7/14/05
HERBS FOR HEALTHY SKIN Darrell Miller 7/14/05
TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia) Darrell Miller 7/11/05
HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia) Darrell Miller 7/11/05
SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH ECHINACEA Darrell Miller 6/24/05
Cancer and Echinacea Darrell Miller 6/24/05




30 surprising food swaps that will immediately improve the health of every organ in your body
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 27, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 30 surprising food swaps that will immediately improve the health of every organ in your body





All of us have favorite foods, dishes, go-to condiments, that appear invariably on our plate. Whether it’s the easy-to-make no-fuss nature of the choice, the it’s ‘what my store carries appeal,’ or it just boils down to how our taste buds feel about it, we can get in nutrition rut.

Fortunately, it’s not that hard to start swapping items we use daily for other easy-to-use items that taste good, even often having a similar taste and texture to those items we already use. The plus is that the swapped in items are better for us. Better, because they’re higher, in things that matter, like protein, amino acids, fiber, vitamins and minerals, besides being lower in things we should want to avoid, like empty calories, trans fat, excess carbs, and more.

By swapping some things daily, such as trying cinnamon, or organic honey, over sugar, substituting plain, organic coffee for that latte, a veggie wrap, for that bread and meat sandwich, could have big overall benefits in reduced pounds, renewed energy and a better overall nutritional profile, making for a healthier you.

Key Takeaways:

  • Swapping out healthier ingredients in your recipes can improve your overall health
  • Sugary and starchy foods can be replaced by natural and healthy alternative
  • Guidelines,swaps and healthy recipes can be found in the provided article.

"Coffee often gets a bad rap when in fact, quality coffee consumed in moderation can have some great benefits."

Read more: https://www.healthnutnews.com/30-surprising-food-swaps-that-will-immediately-improve-the-health-of-every-organ-in-your-body/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5043)


Named the best spice for cleansing the body
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 15, 2017 08:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Named the best spice for cleansing the body





Turmeric has been recognized and used in Eastern medicine for its cleansing and energizing properties. It can cleanse your digestive tract and improve digestion. It can be eaten with several foods or added to yogurt. It's essential oils and healthy fats prevents wrinkles, aging and gives your face a healthy appearance, it can also treat acne. It can be used in cosmetics or made into a face mask as well as a scrub. It is a versatile spice that can cleanse you inside and out .

Key Takeaways:

  • Turmeric can be used as a medicine to detox the body and gives you energy.
  • Turmeric helps to heal the intestines and clears it out for better digestion.
  • You can use Turmeric for cosmetics and face masks. It makes your complexion smoother and helps with aging.

"Turmeric helps to cure eczema, itching, dissolves boils, improves the complexion and cleans the skin."

Read more: http://micetimes.asia/named-the-best-spice-for-cleansing-the-body/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4619)


Sooth Diverticulitis Marshmallow Root
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 27, 2016 05:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Sooth Diverticulitis Marshmallow Root

Diverticulosis occurs when pouches form along the wall of the gastrointestinal wall, especially in the colon. Diverticulitis refers to the inflammation or infection of the pouches. The cause of diverticulosis is not yet clear, but medical experts suggest that it may result from the lack of sufficient fiber in the body. Due to insufficient fiber, the colon has to strain to push its contents forward, the pressure from the strain results in weak spots in the colon wall. The bacterial growth in the weak spots is thought to be the cause of the inflammation and infection.

Management of Diverticulitis with Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow root is obtained from Althaea Officinalis. It has both demulcent and emollient effects. The herbal remedy works by gelling and soothing the inflammation experienced in the colon wall.

Marshmallow root also has several other health benefits including:

  1. It is used in the management of respiratory conditions such as asthma and bronchitis.
  2. It is used for external topical applications due to its anti-inflammatory effects. Several skin conditions such as burns Boils and other skin irritations can be managed using the herb.
  3. It is employed in the formulation of beauty products such as cosmetics. It is also included in shampoos due to its ability to detangle hair.



References

//www.diverticulitisinfo.com/blog/?p=638

//www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/diverticulitis-topic-overview

//umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/condition/diverticular-disease

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3315)


The benefits of sandalwood oil
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 28, 2014 10:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The benefits of sandalwood oil

What is sandalwood

sandalwoodSandalwood oil is the extract of the Santalum tree which are mainly found in India and other countries like Australia, Indonesia and South Asia. At first the tree is chopped and the resulting sap is distilled in order to harvest the oil which is then diluted to the appropriate strength which can be used in many places.

Benefits of sandalwood

The essential oil which is present in sandalwood softens the skin by increasing and restoring its ability to restore moisture which helps to reduce the irritation in the skin. The sandalwood oil is also used in many ayurvedic or natural medicines due to its highly beneficial perfume and its antimicrobial properties which helps in fighting skin infection, fungi and irritation. Being antimicrobial it can be used as an antiseptic agent which can be used for preventing injuries, Boils, lesion, etc. It also reduces the chance of acne of the skin as well as helps against general problems such as ring worm and athlete's foot.

Sandalwood oil also helps in maintaining the blood pressure of a person under control. The oil contains hypotensive components which helps in regulating ones blood pressure efficiently when consumed. The oil also helps in promoting urination. The essential oil present in the sandalwood has an ability to curb down the soreness of excretory system and induce a cooling effect on it. As a result the passage of urine becomes easier and the amount and frequency of urination gets boosted.

Today sandalwood oil is not only used in soaps but also in moisture reducing talc. Bath and shower gel also includes this as it helps in moisturizing dry skin especially for the people suffering from psoriasis. Many of the skin condition, irritations and diseases can be treated with this oil. In short you can say that the oil offers a total host of benefits.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3041)


What Is Pine Oil?
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 23, 2014 08:07 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Pine Oil?

What is pine

pine treeHuman beings have used the bark and roots of pine for many years for medicinal purposes. Pines also could be used for religious purposes in some communities. Most pine trees are found in Europe and Asia. There are approximately eighty species of pine trees and Norwegian and Scottish pine produces the greatest amount of pine oil.

The following are major benefits of pine oil.

Injuries: One of the characteristics of pine oil is being antiseptic. This makes it to be commonly used in treating Boils, injuries and cuts. It is not only because of its antiseptic characteristics but also anti-fungal properties. The fungal infections are very difficult and dangerous conditions to treat especially when they become internal. Pine helps in clearing all these problems.

Respiratory Problems: Pine oil can help greatly in curing respiratory problems and medical experts use it in making coughing and cold drugs. Pine oil is an expectorant and this enables it to loosen mucus and phlegm from respiratory tracts. When your body has little deposition, it becomes very easy and faster in fighting infections reducing the recovery period.

Reduce inflammation: pine oil reduces inflammation of the gall bladder and gallstones. Apart from medicinal purposes, pine oil has pleasant aroma and this makes it widely used when making most household products.

Eye Health: Pine oil has the ability to neutralize free radicals and has a positive health effect on human eye. Free radicals often cause cataracts, macular degeneration and many other vision related problems. Free radicals cause degradation of eye cells.

Pain: Pine oil has analgesic properties therefore making it the best in treating people suffering from rheumatic, joint pain and arthritis conditions. Apart from being analgesic, pine oil is also an anti-inflammatory agent. This means that it can as well reduce inflammation and some redness on areas affected, hence pain reduction.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3034)


Myrrh oil health benefits
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 21, 2014 05:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Myrrh oil health benefits

Know what Myrrh essential oil is

myrrh resinAs you have probably read somewhere else, Myrrh oil is an aromatic resin that comes from trees belonging to the genus commiphora. It has a unique sweet and smoky aroma. Myrrha, hirabol myrrh and bola are other alternative names that people use frequently when referring to myrrh oil. Known to contain cadinene, cuminaldehyde, a-pinene, acetic acid, m-cresol, eugenol and formic acid, this pale yellow oil has been the source of debate due to its many benefits which go back to the time of ancient Egyptians.

Why take myrrh oil?

Modern scientific research has found evidence suggesting that myrrh has a wide range of uses that are beneficial to boost the health condition of an individual. Myrrh is an amazing extract that can be used in aromatherapy to effectively treat colds, coughs, insomnia and sore throat. In the digestive system, the oil is widely used for indigestion and ulcers treatment. Women and young girls find it necessary to increase their menstrual flow using normal remedies but have failed. However, this sap-like oil does not only increase the menstrual flow but it also relieve painful periods and ease difficult labor in childbirth.

For all medical dental infections, the oil is included when mixing a mouthwash. On the skin, it has great success when wiping out bedsores, Boils, cracked skin, skin ulcers, athlete's foot and eczema. As a matter of fact, it is sometimes used as an ingredient in many skincare products, creams and lotions.

Myrrh is also purported to treat certain cancers and tumors. The extract from Commiphora trees is highly effective against the gynecologic cancer cells. When used as an anti-oxidant, amazing results are achieved in protecting against lead induced hepatotoxicity.

When can you start taking myrrh resin?

It is recommended to take myrrh essential oil three times in a day or as needed. Pregnant and nursing women should start using it after consulting a qualified practitioner. It can be used as a dietary supplement for children when they reach the age of six years.

Sources

  1. //www.essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/myrrh.htm
  2. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-570-MYRRH.aspx?activeIngredientId=570&activeIngredientName=MYRRH
  3. //altmedicine.about.com/od/aromatherapy/a/Myrrh-Essential-Oil.htm
  4. //www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/267107.php
  5. //www.youngliving.com/en_US/products/essential-oils/singles/myrrh-essential-oil


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3030)


What Are The Magnesium Malate Benefits?
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 17, 2013 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Magnesium Malate Benefits?

magmalatemolicule

A combo Mineral:

Magnesium Malate is a combination of Malic acid and magnesium. Both compounds come together to form a powerful supplement that is crucial for the body. Magnesium is used in more than 300 processes in the body making it one of the most needed minerals in the body. It is also found in the bones mostly and is synthesized from the locations to aid in optimizing many bodily functions.

Malic acid is an organic ingredient mostly found in the fruits. The compound combines with compounds forming salts known as Malates. The combination of Malic acid and magnesium forms magnesium Malate which is an important compound when it comes to the generation cellular energy. It is also important when it comes to a variety of physical and muscular conditions. The compound also comes in handy to treat a number of conditions in the body when used as a supplement.

These include;

Constipation

If you are suffering from constipation, this is one to go. It is commonly used to loosen stools and induce laxative actions to clean the system. It is a perfect detox agent and is famously used in colonoscopy and bowel surgery. The Malic part of the compound is ideal for the laxative action giving relief to anyone suffering from constipation. The combination of the two compounds enhances these effects making them more potent in effectiveness.

Fibromyalgia Pain Relief

This compound is used to induce relief on patients suffering fro fibromyalgia. This condition will often cause muscle stiffness, muscoskeletal pain and chronic severe pains. These supplements are used to exponentially reduce the effects that come with the disorder. A study was done and published in the Journal of Nutritional Medicine where 15 patients were placed under observation with the treatment. All patients reported increased comfort when using the supplements in relation to fibromyalgia symptoms.

Solving Syndromes of chronic fatigue

Magnesium Malate enhances the production of energy at a cellular level increasing the condition of the individual using it. The process eliminates the chronic Fatigue syndrome and its effects allowing the individual to enjoy a wholesome life. This also deals with any accumulated stress and distraction factors that come with a tired out body. A rejuvenated body enhances performance in all aspects of life making this product one major energy and performance booster in the long run.

Other ailments

The combination can also be used to target heart related disease reducing the risk of experiencing closed valves and blood vessels. It is used to treat heart related diseases in the hospitals. Magnesium is also ideal when it comes to dealing with skin breakouts ranging from Boils to skin ulcers. The compound will target many functions of the body through a domino effect. No matter how minute the effect may be on a general sense, it is important for the running of the boy functions such as the heart, nervous system and the epidermal system. The compound is one of the most widely used supplements from a varied number of conditions producing great results.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2838)


Is Colloidal Silver Good For Boils?
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 04, 2013 03:21 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Colloidal Silver Good For Boils?

Colloidal silver is one of alternative medicines whose popularity is increasing everyday. Although most people in the world are experiencing this product for the first time, the fact is that it has been there for a very long time. The product is prepared by mixing silver nitrate with distilled water. Basically, this product is made by suspending the molecules of silver in distilled water. The resulting suspension is used as a nutritional supplement and also as an antibiotic.

When used as antibiotic, it helps in killing different types of pathogens including bacteria, virus and fungus. It works by disabling a specific enzyme in the pathogen which is responsible for oxygen metabolism. When this enzyme is disabled, the pathogen will not be able to make food and therefore it will die within a very short period of time. The good thing about colloidal silver is that it does not touch healthy blood cells as it only targets the pathogens.

When used as a nutritional supplement, colloidal silver helps to boost body's immunity. When you take this product, it is absorbed into the body through small intestines and then it is transported in to different body cells. The process of eliminating pathogens may take up to four days. It is important to note that many pathogens today are becoming resistant to traditional antibiotics and therefore patients and health professionals are always looking for a better solution. Due to the fact that this product is able to deal with different types of pathogens, it has found use in treating a wide range of infections including Boils.

How colloidal silver helps to get rid of Boils

Boils are very common among so many people around the world. They are mainly caused by a bacterial infection. One may get Boils when exposed to the specific bacteria. When body's immunity falls, one has a higher risk of getting Boils. Colloidal silver helps to treat Boils in two ways; When this product targets the bacteria causing the Boils, the bacteria will die off and the Boils will heal. Due to the fact that this product is fast acting, the Boils may disappear within 3 or four days. Colloidal suspension provides a different kind of immunity that works parallel to the existing body immunity. This means that the body is given a new power to fight infections. A strong immunity allows the body to effectively fight foreign organisms in the body. Therefore the body will be able to fight the boil bacteria. This will not only ensure recovery, it will also prevent future recurrence of the condition.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2824)


All-Natural Red Marine Algae An Effective Cold Sore Treatment
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 24, 2013 03:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: All-Natural Red Marine Algae An Effective Cold Sore Treatment

Can Red Marine Algae Help With Cold Sores? Lets Find out!

While a permanent solution for cold sores is not currently known, it has been realized for some time now that red marine algae topical ointments and oral supplements can both help prevent and reduce the number of and severity of your outbreaks. This treatment ensures safety as a priority considering it is an all-natural proper food that is used in a variety of different items. It directly aids the body's first line of defense, or neutrophils, against those pesky cold sores.

The active components in red marine algae are sulfated polysaccharides, which help with immune system response and the increased production of lymphocytes within the thymus. T-cells and antibodies are stimulated, causing the launch of an attack against the virus.

There are two primary sulfated polysaccharides, fucoidan and carrageenan, that help stop the outbreak and replication of cold sores. Carrageenan is often used as a topical application, and fucoidan has a specific focus geared towards limiting replication of the virus.

The two strains of the algae that are effective in fighting against cold sores are Gigartina and Dumontacea, meaning not all red algae are the same when battling this virus. It is common knowledge that there are many triggers that contribute to herpes outbreaks.

Cold Sore Triggers:

While you still should avoid as many triggers as possible, red marine algae is a significant factor in reducing the effectiveness of particular triggers. Some of these triggers include chocolate, nuts, coffee, alcohol and more.

When learning about taking a new supplement, one of the main concerns you might have is the side effects. However, this all-natural algae supplement has absolutely no known side effects.

This helps put your mind at ease.

Did you know that this specific algae has also been used traditionally for dealing with urinary infections, asthma, Boils, ulcers and more? With this supplement containing so many immune-supporting qualities, it is definitely a safe bet for formulating a much stronger plan against cold sores.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2819)


Information on slippery elm bark
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 09, 2012 11:56 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Information on slippery elm bark

The Ulmus fulva tree is medicinal tree that was commonly found in deep soil areas that are rich in nutrients. The type of tree was predominantly found along stream banks and areas with low hillsides but rocky. The medicinal properties of the slippery elm bark were first discovered by Americans of Indian origin where they used it in healing of wounds and preservation of meat. They placed it in water and it swelled and produced a sticky substance that was soothing.

Later on, English early settlers were able to discover the wide use of the tree and to improve their medicinal remedies, they added it during their manufacture especially those that were mainly used to treat wounds, cold sores and Boils. They also used it to relieve urinary tract diseases, sores of the throats and coughs.

During wars, the tree was largely used as an antiseptic in form of a cream for treating wounds caused by gunshots and as the only food that was available for people to eat. This food was made by mixing the tree with water to make gruel which was very nutritious and everyone including the little children, the old and the sick were served to eat. People were also ingesting it in order to treat coughs, sore of the throats as well as respiratory infections.

The tree has numerous health benefits and the main one is the soothing property it has hence it has been widely used to treat inflammation of the throat plus esophagus. Traditional medicine men have added it in their cough treatments to sooth sores of the throats and irritations in the mouth.

It has also been used to prevent constipation, constant diarrhea and a neutralizer for excess acids in the linings of the intestines. Its gum like nature makes it a perfect meal for people suffering from cancer or ulcers and is the only food that remains in the stomach to sustain them and provide energy during hunger.

Because of its high nutritional content, it is widely used as food and when grounded to powder it can be used to make porridge, which is very nutritious and is similar to the porridge made from oatmeal. It helps babies who have digestion problems and is ideal for sick people and the aged.

It has been widely used to lubricate and relieve pain during childbirth and is very good in removing toxins and other impurities from the body. It is a natural preservative, an antiseptic for healing wounds and may be applied as a dysentery injection. If used earlier, it can be useful as a dental treatment to kill bacteria in the tooth.

It is used widely recommended as a perfect natural alternative treatment for heart problems as compared to other medicines, a suggested treatment for cancer and in females, it has been useful in treating various infections and diseases affecting their organs. Indeed the slippery elm bark is a significant part of the tree and a natural remedy for a wide number of diseases.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2566)


What is Fenugreek Seed and How Does It Boost Your Health?
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 07, 2011 11:16 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is Fenugreek Seed and How Does It Boost Your Health?

Fenugreek seed and your health

Fenugreek seed is a spice often added to curries and other Indian dishes. It is a good source of protein and nutrients. In folk medicine, it has been used in the treatment of pain and irritation characteristic of inflammation. It is historically utilized to promote lactation. More recent studies have shown that it displays antiviral properties. In particular, it has been tested in allaying symptoms of cold infections.

Trigonella foenum-graecum is a plant species that belongs to the legume family. As such, it has been cultivated as a vegetable even before the ancient times. It is believed to be an indigenous species of the Fertile Crescent, a historic region that comprises the modern countries Israel, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, and Syria. To this day, it remains an important crop, herb, and food source in these countries.

Combats Diabetes Mellitus

Fenugreek seed has been the subject of scientific research in the past few years. Drawing on its use in traditional medicine, it has been employed in the management of blood sugar. It improves the effect of the hormone insulin in regulating glucose levels. In fact, it has shown great potential in treating both type I insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and type II noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

Alters Blood Lipid Profile

The phytochemical content of fenugreek seed enables it to effectively lower cholesterol levels in the blood. Clinical trials have recorded changes in lipids present in the systemic circulation after intake of fenugreek seed products. It is now postulated that it blocks the metabolic pathway for the synthesis of low density lipoproteins or bad cholesterol. Some sources say that it raises good cholesterol levels.

Solaray - Fenugreek Seeds 180ct 620mgIncreases Milk Production

Fenugreek seed is rich in organic compounds that promote the secretion of milk products within the mammary glands of lactating women by as much as 900 per cent. Traditionally, the seeds are ground into powder and consumed in large quantities by pregnant women. Today they are made into capsules, which have been reported to display the same benefits and remain popular in the Indian subcontinent.

Relieves Viral Infections

There is a growing body of literature devoted to the putative antiviral properties of fenugreek seed. A number of researchers have attested that the seed displays biochemical activity that interferes with the replication of viruses. For instance, topical applications of fenugreek extracts have shown desirable results in removing viral skin conditions, and oral intake has been effective in easing the common cold.

Promotes Skin Health

Fenugreek seed is a natural conditioner and moisturizer. It promotes retention of moisture in the skin and protects the outer layer of the skin from irritants. It has been used as salves to wounds, rashes, Boils, bruises, allergies, and insect bites. It is made into a syrupy mixture that is directly applied to the hair. It regulates the production of sebum in the hair follicles and helps control dandruff.

Solaray - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

Grab some fenugreek seed and feel the difference!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2364)


Fenugreek Seed
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 25, 2009 03:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fenugreek Seed

fenugreek leavesFenugreek is one of the oldest herbal remedies, used for both a cooking spice and a medicinal remedy. Fenugreek is a plant that can be found in the family Fabaceae. This plant is used both as an herb and as a spice. The leaves of the plant are used as an herb, while the seeds of the plant are used as a spice. Fenugreek is cultivated worldwide as a semi-arid crop. Frequently, fenugreek can be found as a main ingredient in curry. Originally native to southwestern Asia, this herb was used for inflamed bowels and stomach problems because of its bowel-lubricating abilities. Fenugreek was used by the Greeks for respiratory problems. Additionally, fenugreek was used in both the East and West and thought of as one of the most effective medicinal herbs. Often, fenugreek plants were fed to sick animals to improve their health.

This herb has a reputation of being able to dissolve hardened masses of accumulated mucus in the body. Fenugreek helps to rid the lungs of mucus and the bronchial tubes of phlegm. Often, it is combined with lemon juice and honey to help expel waste through the lymphatic system. Fenugreek is known for the antiseptic properties that it contains, which help kill infections in the lungs. Additionally, this herb is recommended for treating an inflamed gastrointestinal system. This herb contains thirty percent mucilage, which may be used as a poultice on wounds, inflammations, Boils, and skin ailments. Formulas containing fenugreek are often touted as the miracle medicine for all gynecological problems. Some studies have found that fenugreek simulates the uterus and contains diosgenin, a constituent similar to estrogen. fenugreek leaves Research on diabetic animals has found that Fenugreek seeds are able to reduce urinary glucose levels. The active ingredient seems to be the defatted portion of the seed, which possesses the alkaloid trogonelline, nicotinic acid, and coumarin. When the defatted seeds were added to insulin treatment of diabetic dogs, it was noted that insulin dose was decreased. Fenugreek contains choline and liptropic, which aid in dissolving cholesterol and lowering cholesterol levels. Animal studies have shown beneficial results in lowering serum cholesterol levels. Fenugreek helps reduce mucus in cases of asthma and sinus and bronchial congestion. Evidence of anti-inflammatory activity has been show in some studies, which may explain why some individuals with arthritis have been helped by fenugreek.

The seeds of the fenugreek plant are used to provide alterative, anti-catarrhal, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, astringent, bitter, demulcent, emollient, expectorant, febrifuge, galactagogue, mucilant, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are choline, iron, lecithin, minerals, protein, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, and D. Primarily, fenugreek is extremely beneficial in treating allergies, loss of appetite, bronchial catarrh, high cholesterol, diabetic retinopathy, gas, gastric disorders, lung infections, excessive mucus, and sore throat.

Additionally, the herb is very helpful in dealing with abscesses, anemia, asthma, body odor, Boils, bronchitis, cancer, swollen eyes, fevers, gallbladder problems, heartburn, inflammation, sinus problems, ulcers, uterine problems, and water retention. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by fenugreek, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2113)


Psyllium Husk Fiber
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 23, 2009 11:08 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Psyllium Husk Fiber

The Native Americans used psyllium as an eye-wash. It was also used to treat sprains and abrasions. Additionally, it was and continues to be used as a laxative to help relieve constipation. This herb contains aucubine, enzymes, fats, glycosides, mucilage, and protein.

Fiber comes in many forms but psyllium is the least expensive of fibers avaliable for purchase on the market today.

When psyllium is taken internally it is an excellent remedy for a variety of problems in the digestive system. The herb can be used to help prevent autointoxication, if used over a period of time, from the re-absorption of toxins into the bloodstream by removing the toxins. Since psyllium prevents toxic re-absorption, it allows for added protection to the colon. This helps the body to fight disease and illness. The herbal fiber also works as a lubricant on the intestinal tract. Additionally, it helps with diarrhea.

Research has determined that psyllium is a useful treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is considered to deal with an overly sensitive colon that responds to stress. This herb may help the colon by soothing, healing, and aiding in the elimination of toxins from the colon. Psyllium has also been recommended for diabetics. The herb produces copicous mucilage which soothes and heals the large intestines and cleans the colon. Psyllium does not irritate the delicate mucus membrane. Instead, it works to strengthen and restore the tissues. Jethro Kloss suggested the use of psyllium in cases of colitis and anal ulcers.

This herb is considered to be a safe alternative to drug therapy for chronic constipation when it is used properly. The husks from psyllium seeds are a great source of insoluble and soluble fiber. They also serve as an intestinal cleanser and stool softener. Additionally, psyllium is a hydrophilic bulking agent, which means that it is able to increase several times in size when it is combined with water. This occurs because of mucilage, one o the main components of psyllium. Mucilage is a thickening and stabilizing agent that swells in water. When psyllium swells in the intestines, it helps to increase the peristaltic activity of the bowel. This bulks up stool and promotes bowel movement. Because of this, it is crucial to drink plenty of water when one is taking psyllium. Mucilage is also able to help soothe and heal inflamed tissue in the intestinal tract.

Studies have determined that psyllium is beneficial for lowering cholesterol and strengthening the heart. An article in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggested that dietary modifications such as psyllium should be used to lower cholesterol levels before turning to drug therapy. By adding mucilage, like that found in psyllium, to the diet, one can successfully reduce serum cholesterol levels. Recent studies on psyllium and other forms of fiber have determined that mucilage in fiber is responsible for inhibiting cholesterol production. Not only does psyllium reduce bad cholesterol and triglyceride levels, it also increases levels of good cholesterol.

The externally use of psyllium is helpful in dealing with skin inflammation and irritation. A poultice of crushed psyllium seeds is very beneficial. Additionally, psyllium is a great drawing agent. It is recommended for drawing the pus out of both Boils and sores.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription drugs. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by psyllium, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2086)


Hops And Good health
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 20, 2009 08:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hops And Good health

Hops are the female flower cones, which are also known as strobiles, of the hop plant. The hop plant is part of the Cannabaceae family, which also includes hemp. Primarily, hops are used as a flavoring and stability agent in beer. The first documented use in beer is from the eleventh century. Today, hops are used extensively in brewing because of their many benefits. Among these are balancing the sweetness of the hops with bitterness. However, hops are also used for various purposes in other beverages and herbal medicine.

Nicholas Culpeper, a seventeenth-century herbalist, suggested the use of hops to open obstructions of the liver and spleen, cleanse the blood, loosen the belly, cleanse the veins, and promote urination. Hops were used as food by the Romans. Gerard, a famous herbalist, recommended using the buds in salads. Native American tribes also found hops to be of value. The Mohicans used it as a sedative and also for toothaches, while the Menominee tribes used hops as a cure-all. The lupulin that is found in hops is described as both a sedative and hypnotic drug. It was recognized in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1831 to 1916. Most often, hops are probably used in the production of beer.

Hops are best known for their sedative action. Also, they are used for their antibiotic properties. These properties are beneficial for sore throats, bronchitis, infections, high fevers, delirium, toothaches, earaches, and pain. Although hops are strong, they seem to be safe to use. Their main uses are to alleviate nervous tension and promote a restful sleep. They have been used to naturally relieve insomnia. For inflammation, Boils, tumors, and swelling, a poultice of hops is recommended. Hops have been used as a stimulant to the glands and muscles of the stomach. They have also been used as a relaxant on the gastric nerves. Hops have a relaxing influence on the liver and gall duct and a laxative effect on the bowels. Many studies indicate that hops have sedative properties. This herb is known to be fast-acting, soothing, and calming to the nervous system. Hops are often nervine herbs that aid in promoting sleep. Certain elements of the plant have been shown to possess hypnotic effects. Hops are also used for their antispasmodic effects. Additionally, hops contain antibacterial properties, which validates some of their historical uses.

The flower of the hops plant is used to provide alterative, anodyne, antibacterial, antibiotic, antineoplastic, carminative, cholagogue, galactagogue, nervine, sedative, stomachic, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are chlorine, copper, fluorine, iodine, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, sodium, vitamin B-complex, and zinc. Primarily, this herb is extremely beneficial in treating appetite loss, bronchitis, delirium, gastric disorders, headaches, hyperactivity, and indigestion, insomnia, absent lactation, nervousness, pain, and excessive sexual desire.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with alcoholism, anxiety, blood impurities, coughs, intestinal cramps, dizziness, earaches, fevers, gas, jaundice, kidney stones, liver disorders, menstrual symptoms, menopausal symptoms, neuralgia, restlessness, rheumatism, skin disorders, sleeplessness, toothache, ulcers, venereal diseases, water retention, whooping cough, and worms. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by hops, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2083)


Red Clover Blossom
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 29, 2009 01:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Red Clover Blossom

Red clover is also commonly referred to as wild clover, purple clover, meadow clover, honeysuckle clover, or cow grass. This herb is a member of the pea family. It is commonly found in pastures, lawns, along roadsides, and in meadows. Many consider this herb to be a nuisance and, thus, they try to eliminate it from their lawns. However, this is not easily accomplished due to red clover’s hearty nature.

The use of red clover most likely originated in Europe. There, it was used as an expectorant and a diuretic. Additionally, it was burned as incense to invoke the spirits of the deceased. Some people even wore the leaves of red clover as charms against evil. The red clover was revered by early Christians because they associated its three leaves with the Trinity. The flowers of this plant were dried by the ancient Chinese and then put in pillows to help relax both the body and mind. The Native Americans used red clover as an infusion gargle for sore throats, whooping cough, and asthma. Additionally, they used it on children because it was a milder, safer way to fight debilitating childhood diseases.

This herb has been used for treating cancer, bronchitis, nervous conditions, spasms, and toxins in the body. It is considered by herbalists to be a blood cleanser. Herbalists also recommend this mild herb in formulas when using a cleansing program. Red clover is often mixed with honey and water to make a cough syrup and act as an expectorant. The herb is a mild sedative and is useful for spasmodic conditions, bronchitis, wheezing, and fatigue. Because red clover is mild, it can often be used by children.

Research has determined that red clover contains some antibiotic properties that are beneficial in fighting several kinds of bacteria. Among these types of bacteria is the one that causes tuberculosis. Additionally, red clover has a long history of use in treating cancer. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute have uncovered some anticancer activity in red clover, including daidzein and genistein activity. Even though the findings are preliminary and the use of red clover as a cancer treatment has not yet been validated, research is continuing to show promising results.

Externally, red clover has been used to treat skin problems such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, and even vaginal irritation. It can also be applied topically to burns, Boils, sores, and ulcers. Red clover has also been documented for use in treating AIDS, syphilis, and leprosy. This herb can be applied externally to help soothe lymphatic swelling and as an eyewash.

In short, the flowers of red clover are used to provide alterative, antibiotic, antispasmodic, blood purifier, nutritive, sedative, stimulant, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in red clover are calcium, cobalt, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, selenium, sodium, tin, and vitamins A, C, B-complex, F, and P. Primarily, red clover is extremely beneficial in dealing with acne, AIDS/HIV, athlete’s foot, blood impurities, bronchitis, cancer, eczema, leukemia, liver disorders, nervous disorders, psoriasis, skin disorders, spasms, and the effects of toxins.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating arthritis, asthma, Boils, burns, childhood diseases, colds, constipation, coughs, muscle cramps, fatigue, flu, gallbladder, gastric disorders, indigestion, leprosy, lymphatic irritations, rheumatism, sores, syphilis, sore throat, tuberculosis, ulcers, urinary infections, vaginal irritations, whooping cough, and wounds.

For more information on red clover, look for this wonderful herb at your local heath food store. Remember to always look for name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2069)


Myrrh Gum
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 15, 2009 01:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Myrrh Gum

Myrrh is the reddish-brown resinous material that comes from the dried sap of a number of trees. Primarily, it is obtained from the Commiphora myrrha, which is native to Yemen, Somalia, and the eastern parts of Ethiopia. Additionally, it comes from Commiphora gileadensis, which is native to Jordan. The sap of a number of other Commiphora and Balsamodendron species is also referred to as myrrh. Its name is most likely of Semitic origin. The quality of myrrh can be identified through the darkness and clarity of the resin. However, the best method of judging the resin’s quality is by feeling the stickiness of the freshly broken fragments. The scent of raw myrrh resin and its essential oil is sharp, pleasant, somewhat bitter, and be described as being stereotypically resinous. It produces a heavy, bitter smoke when it is burned.

In ancient times, myrrh was valued as a fragrance and healing agent. Ancient Egyptain women used the burned myrrh to get rid of fleas in their homes. The Chinese used myrrh to heal wounds. They also used this herb for menstrual problems, bleeding, hemorrhoids, and ulcerated sores. Myrrh is often mentioned throughout the Bible. In the Old Testament it is referred to in the preparation of the holy ointment. In Esther, myrrh is used as a purification herb for women and it is a perfume in Psalm 45:8.

This herb is a powerful antiseptic. Similar to Echinacea, it is a valuable cleansing and healing agent. Myrrh works on the stomach and colon to soothe and heal inflammation. This herb also provides vitality and strength to the digestive system. Myrrh stimulates the flow of blood to the capillaries. Additionally, it helps speed the healing of the mucus membranes. Among these include the gums, throat, stomach, and intestines. Myrrh can be applied to sore and it also works as an antiseptic. It can help promote menstruation, aid digestion, heal sinus problems, soothe inflammation, and speed the healing process.

Research has verified the use of myrrh as an antiseptic. Sometimes, it is added to mouthwash and toothpaste. Myrrh has also been found to have mild astringent and antimicrobial properties. This herb contains silyamrin, which is able to protect the liver from chemical toxins and help increase liver function.

The resin of the myrrh plant is used to provide alterative, antibiotic, antimicrobial, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, emmenagogue, expectorant, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are chlorine, potassium, silicon, sodium, and zinc. Primarily, myrrh is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, bronchitis, colds, colitis, colon problems, cuts, emphysema, gangrene, gastric disorders, sore gums, hemorrhoids, herpes, hypoglycemia, indigestion, infection, lung disease, excessive mucus, pyorrhea, sinus problems, mouth sores, skin sores, tonsillitis, and toothaches.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with abrasions, arthritis, Boils, breath odor, canker sores, coughs, diarrhea, diphtheria, eczema, gas, menstrual problems, nervous conditions, phlegm, rheumatism, scarlet fever, thyroid problems, tuberculosis, ulcers, wounds, and yeast infections. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by myrrh, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2056)


Milk Thistle And Silymarin
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 12, 2009 12:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Milk Thistle And Silymarin

In Europe, milk thistle was used as a well-known remedy for liver problems and also as a digestive aid. Pliny the Elder, the early Roman writer, explained how the juice of milk thistle mixed with honey was used for carrying off bile. Gerard, an herbalist, said in 1597 that milk thistle was one of the best remedies for liver-related diseases. Milk thistle was also given to nursing mothers to improve milk production.

The liver is an extremely important organ that is found in the body. It is responsible for filtering toxic material from the body, which prevents accumulation that can lead to disease and death. Often, the vital functions of the liver are overlooked. Nevertheless, they are extremely important. It is essential to keep the liver working properly. Milk thistle has been proven to be very beneficial for liver function. Milk thistle extract has been shown in observations to help reverse both acute and chronic liver problems, including cirrhosis and viral hepatitis. The antioxidant properties may be due to the bioflavonoid content. Milk thistle has also been found to help heal the liver from damage that occurs from alcohol toxicity. It has been used to treat many different liver ailments. Among these are fatty liver disorders, chronic hepatitis, inflammation of the bile duct, hardening of the liver, and cirrhosis. Milk thistle is also thought to actually help liver regeneration when part of the liver is removed.

Milk thistle possesses a variety of compounds which are known as Silymarin. This includes silybin, silydianin, and silychristin. All of these substances are known to protect the liver against some toxins, which helps to increase the function of this important organ. Silybin is used as an antidote to the deathcape mushroom, which is known to destroy liver cells. The deathcap species is one of the most toxic of liver poisons and has a death rate of up to fifty percent. A study with sixty patients suffering from deathcap poisoning treated with silybin produced incredible results. None of the participants died. Silymarin is an effective remedy if it is administered within forty-eight hours of ingestion. This compound seems to occupy the receptor sites to protect the cell membranes. Not only does it work to treat serious liver conditions, but it also prevents damage from occurring. Silymarin contains amines which are known to help stimulate the production and flow of bile. This compound has been found in studies to work exclusively on the kidneys and liver. Milk thistle has also been shown to stimulate the synthesis of protein.

The seeds of the milk thistle plant are used to provide alterative, antioxidant, galactagogue, hepatic, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are bioflavonoids. Primarily, milk thistle is extremely beneficial in treating cirrhosis, hepatitis, jaundice, kidney problems, and liver disorders. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with alcoholism, appetite loss, high blood pressure, Boils, chemotherapy, depression, epilepsy, fatty deposits, gas, heartburn, heart problems, hemorrhages, hypoglycemia, indigestion, absent lactation, menstrual symptoms, effects of radiation, skin diseases, varicose veins, and the effects of toxins.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2052)


Marshmallow Root Herb
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 12, 2009 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Marshmallow Root Herb

The marshmallow plant can be found in southern and western Europe, western Asia, and the northeastern region of North America. The plant originally grew in salty soils, but now it thrives in moist, uncultivated ground. The fleshy, upright stems of the marshmallow plant reach a height of three to four feet. The pale yellow roots are tapered, long, and thick. They have a tough, yet flexible, exterior. The short-stemmed leaves are round, with irregularly toothed margins and three to five lobes. The leaves and stem are covered with a soft and velvety down. The flowers have five reddish-white petals. The whole plant, especially the root, is filled with a mild mucilage.

Since ancient Egyptian times, marshmallow has been used as food and medicine. One of the herbs found in the grave of a Neanderthal man in a cave in Iraq was marshmallow. This herb was used anciently for irritated throats and intestinal tracts. The Europeans used marshmallow for bronchitis, colds, and coughs. This was because of its soothing and healing properties. Native Americans also used marshmallow to treat snakebites and wounds.

This herb is responsible for helping to expel phlegm and relax the bronchial tubes while soothing and healing. The herb aids in healing lung ailments such as asthma and inflammation. The soothing and healing properties that are found in the mucilage in marshmallow make it a valuable herb for many lung ailments. Also, it is useful on sore throats, infections, diarrhea, dysentery, skin irritations, and for coughs. This herb is a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant. This fact makes it good for both the joints and the gastrointestinal tract. Marshmallow is used as a poultice with cayenne, which allows it to help with gangrene, blood poisoning, burns, bruises, and wounds.

Studies have found that the mucilaginous properties of marshmallow yield a soothing effect on the mucous membranes. A study that was done on animals showed some indication of a reduction in blood sugar levels and hypoglycemia activity. This may be beneficial for diabetics.

The root of the marshmallow plant are used to provide alterative, anticatarrhal, anti-inflamamtory, antilithic, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, galactagogue, lithotriptic, mucilant, nutritive, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iodine, iron, pantothenic acid, sodium, and vitamins A and B-complex. Primarily, marshmallow is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, bed-wetting, bleeding, Boils, bronchitis, emphysema, kidney problems, lung congestion, nervous disorders, pneumonia, urinary incontinence, urinary problems, uterine problems, whooping cough, and wounds. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with allergies, breast problems, burns, constipation, coughs, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery, sore eyes, gangrene, gastric disorders, glandular problems, inflammation, intestinal problems, kidney stones, absent lactation, liver disorders, irritated membranes, excessive mucus, and skin disorders.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by marshmallow, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2051)


Slippery Elm Bark
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 23, 2009 10:35 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Slippery Elm Bark

The slippery elm plant can be found natively growing in eastern North America. It is similar to the American elm in general appearance, but it is more closely related to European Wych Elm. Other common names for this plant are Red Elm, Gray Elm, Soft Elm, Moose Elm, and Indian Elm.

The Greek physician Dioscorides used slippery elm in ancient times to help speed up the healing of broken bones. A seventeenth-century herbalist, Nicholas Culpeper, also recommended this herb for healing broken bones, balding, and burns. This herb was known as a survival food by Native Americans and early colonists. These people considered this herb to be extremely valuable. They used the inner bark of slippery elm as a salve and applied externally for burns and wounds. Slippery elm bark was also used for colds, coughs, sore throats, wounds, as a poultice to bring Boils to a head, and also for bowel complaints. This herb was considered to be one of the most valuable remedies in herbal practice by Dr. Edward Shook.

This herb contains about the same amount of nutrition as oatmeal. It is responsible for providing a wholesome and sustaining food for those people for young children and invalids. Slippery elm is mainly used to treat gastrointestinal problems. Like stomach and intestinal ulcers, soothing the stomach and colon, indigestion, acidity, and to lubricate the bowels. The mucilage content that is found in this herb is believed to help in healing ulcers and ulcerated colons. The herb has also been used for asthma, bronchitis, colitis, colon problems, and all lung problems. Slippery elm is also a mild purgative, which helps to assist with elimination.

Research done on slippery elm has found that it is an excellent demulcent. It is also beneficial for diarrhea, coughs, stomach problems, colitis, and lung problems. The bark of slippery elm contains mucilage which is responsible for swelling in water. This swelled mixture can then be applied to wounds or taken internally to soothe and heal. Some lozenges for throat irritations have powdered bark included in them to help soothe the throat and promote healing.

In short, the inner bark of the slippery elm plant is used to provide antacid, antineoplastic, astringent, demulcent, emollient, expectorant, mucilant, and nutritive properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, copper, iodine, iron, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, vitamins A, F, K, and P, and zinc. Primarily, slippery elm is extremely beneficial in treating abscesses, asthma, bronchitis, burns, colitis, colon problems, constipation, coughs, diaper rash, diarrhea, gastric disorders, and lung problems.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with appendicitis, bladder problems, Boils, cancer, croup, diphtheria, dysentery, eczema, eye ailments, fevers, flu, hemorrhoids, herpes, inflammation, kidney problems, pain, phlegm, pneumonia, sores, syphilis, sore throat, tuberculosis, tumors, ulcers, uterine problems, vaginal irritations, warts, worms, wounds, and whooping cough. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by slippery elm, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2036)


Hops and St. John's Wort
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 15, 2009 12:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hops and St. John's Wort

St. John’s wort has emerged recently as an herb that is known to assist the nervous system. Quite a few naturopathic physicians rank kava kava, valerian, St. John’s wort, passionflower, and hops as the most effective herbs for treating insomnia. A study that took place in 1994 and was published in the Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology proved that St. John’s wort extracts increased deep sleep during the total sleeping period of the patients. This study also makes an interesting connection between sleep and depression. It was found that many standard antidepressants and MAO inhibitors used to treat those people who suffer from depression cause a decrease in deep sleep. St. John’s wort has demonstrated the ability to treat both insomnia and depression.

Hops, an herb that is commonly found throughout the world, was originally used as a food. The tips of the food were both cooked and eaten. The young plants were the ones eaten because the older plants were too tough. A famous herbalist, Gerarde, recommended using the buds of these plants in salads, while the Romans anciently used hops as a food and Native American tribes found hops to be of great value. Hops have been appreciated for a long time for its nervine properties. A hop was first used as a beer ingredient in England around 1500. At this point, hops farmers noticed that their farmhands often seemed tired and easily fatigued. With time, the herb gained a huge reputation as a natural sedative. Pillows were filled with hops to promote rest and relaxation during the reign of King George when people were recovering from an illness.

Lupulin is a compound that is found in hops. It is described as a sedative and hypnotic drug. Certain parts of the plant have been found to have sedative and hypnotic effects. This herb is known to be fast-acting, soothing, and calming to the nervous system. Additionally, it is another nervine herb that assists in promoting sleep. It is mainly used to alleviate nervous tension and promote restful sleep. Also, hops is used for antispasmodic effects. Its relaxing effect has the potential to calm the nerves and muscles in cases of muscle spasms. This herb has also been shown to contain appetizing and tonic properties. It acts as a stimulant to the glands and muscles of the stomach, while calming the hyperexcitable gastric nerves. Hops also has a relaxing influence upon the liver and gall duct, and a laxative effect on the bowels.

Along with other uses, hops is also used for its antibiotic properties. It is very helpful for sore throats, bronchitis, infections, high fevers, delirium, toothaches, earaches, and pain. A hops remedy is a great way to help with inflammation, Boils, tumors, and swelling. Hops is extremely high in B-complex vitamins, which are known for their calming effect on the nervous system. B vitamins also promote energy and aid in problems of depression, anxiety, nervousness, and memory. Additionally, hops is extremely rich in potassium, which is necessary for nerve transmission, contraction of muscles, and hormone secretion. Low levels of potassium are often found in those people who have high blood pressure. Additionally, hops contains magnesium, zinc, copper, iodine, manganese, iron, sodium, and fluoride.

Hops and st. johns wort are a wonderful herb that has many therapeutic uses. Hops and st. johns wort come in tea bag, capsule, and tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. For more information on St. John’s wort and hops, contact your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2032)


ChickWeed
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 16, 2009 09:46 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ChickWeed

Chickweeds are an annual herb that can be found growing in temperate zones, artic zones, and throughout. The most likely origin of this plant, although not known for sure, is Eurasia. Chickweeds have established themselves all over the world, as they may have been carried by clothes and shoes of explorers. Chickweed plants are as numerous in species as they are in region. Most species are succulent with white flowers. All of the species have practically the same edible and medicinal values.

This plant exhibits an interesting trait, as it folds its leaves over its buds and the new shoots every night. This event is known as the sleeping of the plant. Cultivating this plant is not exactly necessary, as it is abundant and easy to find. The plant can be gathered fresh and edible between May and July, as soon as the flowers appear. Not only can the plant be used fresh, it can also be dried for later herb use.

Chickweed can be found growing abundantly in areas of Europe and North America. The Ojibwe and Iroquois Native American tribes used chickweed as eyewash. They also used it in poultice form to heal wounds. It has recently been studied for its abilities in helping to prevent cancer.

Chickweed is extremely valuable in treating blood toxicity, fevers, and inflammation. Its mucilage elements are known to help with stomach ulcers and also inflamed bowels. Chickweed is great for helping to dissolve plaque in blood vessels as well as other fatty substances that can be found in the body. Chickweed acts as an antibiotic in the blood, as it may be recommended as an anticancer treatment. Some people have used chickweed to treat tumors.

Chickweed can be used as a poultice for Boils, burns, skin diseases, sore eyes, and swollen testes. Chickweed is also recommended to aid in weight loss and to break down cellulite. This herb is mild and has been sued as a food as well as a medicine.

Chickweeds are very nutritious and high in vitamins and minerals. They can be added to salads or cooked as a pot herb. The plant tastes somewhat like spinach. The whole plant can be taken internally as a postpartum depurative, emmenagogue, glactogogue, and cirucaltory tonic. A decoction can also be used externally to treat rheumatic pains, wounds, and ulcers. Chickweed can be applied as a medicinal poultice to relieve any kind of roseola. It is effective wherever there are fragile superficial veins or itching skin conditions.

The entire chickweed herb is used to provide alterative, anorectic, antineoplastic, blood purifier, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, febrifuge, mucilant, nutritive, pectoral, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, copper, iron, manganese, phosphorus, sodium, vitamins C, D, and B-complex, and zinc. Primarily, this herb is extremely beneficial in dealing with excessive appetite, bleeding, blood impurities, convulsions, obesity, skin rashes, and ulcers. Additionally, chickweed can be extremely helpful in treating arteriosclerosis, asthma, bronchitis, bruises, bursitis, colitis, constipation, cramps, eye infections, gas, hemorrhoids, lung congestion, excessive mucus, pleurisy, blood poising, swollen testicles, inflamed tissue, water retention, and wounds. For more information the many beneficial affects of chickweed, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

Chickweed is available in capsule and tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. Look for name brands like Solaray, Natures Answer, and Natures Herbs to ensure quality and purity of the products you purchase.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Chickweed is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2018)


Black Walnut
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 05, 2009 10:13 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Black Walnut

Black walnut is a species of flowering tree in the hickory family. This plant grows mostly from southern Ontario, west to southeast South Dakota, south to Georgia, northern Florida, and southwest to central Texas. The black walnut is large tree that reaches heights of 30 to 40 feet. The bark is grey-black and deeply furrowed. The leaves are alternate are about 30-60 centimeters in length. The male flowers droop to about eight to ten centimeters long, while the female flowers are terminal and can be found in clusters of two to five. These flowers ripen during the autumn into a fruit that has a brownish-green, semi-fleshy hush, and brown nut. The whole fruit falls in October. Although native to the Midwest and east central United States, the black walnut tree was introduced into Europe in 1629. Black walnut is more resistant to frost than the English walnut, but it thrives best in the warmer regions of fertile, lowland soils with a high water table. The nuts are harvested by hand from wild trees, with about 65% of the annual wild harvest coming from the U.S. state of Missouri.

For centuries, black walnut has been used in Europe to treat skin ailments and constipation. Recent research has led to findings that support its use for skin problems like Boils, eczema, herpes, and ringworm. Additionally, it has many benefits for the stomach that are well represented. Black walnut was used by Native Americans as a laxative. Additionally, black walnut was used as a remedy for diarrhea and dysentery during the Civil War.

Black walnut has also been used for syphilis, TB, varicose veins, chronic infections of the intestines, and urogenital problems. Black walnut is considered to be very useful for killing parasites, tapeworms, and ringworm by herbalists. This nutrient causes oxygenation of the blood, which kills parasites. This fact has been proven through recent research. The brown stain that is found in the green husk of the black walnut is known to contain organic iodine, which has both antiseptic and healing properties.

It has been determined by scientific research that black walnut contains astringent properties that are healing to the skin and mucous membranes of the body. Black walnut can be gargled to clean stains on the teeth as well.

The hulls and leaves of the black walnut plant are used to provide alterative, anthelmintic, antigalactagogue, antineoplastic, antiseptic, astringent, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in black walnut are calcium, chlorine, iron, magnesium, manganese, niacin, organic iodine, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silicon, selenium, vitamin A, B1, B2, B6, B15, C, P, and bioflavonoids. Primarily, black walnut is extremely beneficial in treating athlete’s foot, Candidiasis, canker sores, cold sores, dandruff, fungus, gum disease, herpes, infection, malaria, parasites, rashes, ringworm, and tapeworm.

Additionally, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with abscesses, acne, asthma, body odor, Boils, cancer, colitis, diarrhea, diphtheria, dysentery, eczema, eye diseases, fevers, hemorrhoids, liver disorders, lupus, poison ivy, skin diseases, tonsillitis, primary tuberculosis, tumors, ulcers, varicose veins, and wounds. For more information on the many beneficial effects of black walnut, please contact a representative from your local health food store with questions. Black walnut is available in capsule and tablet forms at your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Black walnut is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2012)


Bayberry
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 19, 2009 01:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bayberry

Even though bayberry is known best for the candle wax that is made from its fragrant berries, the dried root bark is used very often for its medicinal properties. Bayberry has been long used as a tonic to treat both diarrhea and external wounds. This herb has also been used as stimulant. Some Native American tribes even use bayberry to help reduce fevers. Bayberry is recommended as a tonic for its ability to stimulate the system and increase immune function. It is also recommended as a gargle to help treat tonsillitis and sore throat. It has also been considered that the astringent value of this plant may make it a great candidate for healing wounds.

The root, bark, and leaves of bayberry are used to provide alterative, antibacterial, antiseptic, astringent, emetic, febrifuge, insecticide, sialagogue, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb include calcium, magnesium, manganese, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, vitamins B1, B2, C, and zinc. Primarily, bayberry is used for its beneficial effects in treating cholera, colds, congestion, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, flu, glandular problems, goiters, uterine hemorrhage, indigestion, jaundice, excessive menstruation, and primary tuberculosis. Additionally, this has been shown to be extremely helpful in dealing with bleeding, colitis, bleeding gums, liver disorders, excessive mucus, scurvy, sore and ulcerated throat, thyroid problems, ulcers, prolapsed of the uterus, and varicose veins. For more information of the many beneficial effects of bayberry, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

Bayberry was initially only used in the south of the United States, where the Choctaw Indians boiled the leaves and drank the decoction as a treatment for fever. Later, Louisiana settlers drank bayberry wax in hot water as a treatment for the most violent cases of dysentery. Bayberry was popularized by Samuel A. Thomas, a New England herbalist, in the early 19th century, for its ability to produce “heat” within the body. He recommended this herb be used for colds, flu, and other infectious diseases, in addition to using it for the treatment of diarrhea and fever.

Since then, other herbalists recommend bayberry as it is an excellent emetic after narcotic poisoning of any king. This herb is also valuable when it is taken daily for all kinds of hemorrhages. Bayberry has an excellent general effect on the female organs as it is excellent in helping the uterus during pregnancy. Additionally, it makes a great douche for women. Excellent results have also been demonstrated after bayberry’s use in goiter. Bayberry tea should be used as an enema in treating diarrhea and dysentery.

To treat sores, Boils, or carbuncles, the herb should be used as a wash or poultice, or can be applied to the infection as a powder. Bayberry tea is also an excellent wash for both spongy and bleeding gums. When the tea is taken internally, it is useful in jaundice, scrofula, and canker sores in both the throat and mouth. When the tea is taken warm, it promotes perspiration, improves the whole circulation, and tones up tissues. If bayberry is combined with yarrow, catnip, sage, or peppermint, it provides an incomparable remedy for colds.

As you can see bayberry is an herb that is good for many different ailments. Look for this wonderful herb in capsule or tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. Always purchase name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2009)


Barley Grass
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 14, 2009 01:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Barley Grass

Barley is a cereal grain that is derived from the annual grass known as Hordeum vulgare. This nutrient serves as a major animal feed crop, but also is used for malting and in health food. Barley is also used in the making of beer and whisky. In a 2005 ranking of cereal crops in the world, barley was ranked number four in both quantity produced and area of cultivation. It is still used as a major food in the middle east. Barley is a member of the grass family, descending from and inter-fertile with wild barley. For this reason, the two forms are often treated as one species. The main difference between the two forms is the brittle spike on the seeds of the wild barley, which help with dispersal.

Barley tends to be more tolerant of soil salinity than wheat, which potentially explains the increase of barley cultivation in Mesopotamia from the 2nd millennium BC and forward. Although barley is not as cold tolerant as the winter wheat, fall rye, or winter triticale, it can be planted as a winter crop in warmer areas of the world like Australia. It is important to note that barley not only as a short growing season, but it is also relatively drought tolerant, making it an easier plant to grow.

Barley was valued by the ancient Egyptians and Greeks for its immense health benefits. Because of this, it was cultivated. Hippocrates even wrote of the benefits of gruel that is made from barley. New World settlers planted barley in order to sustain both health and vitality. Barley juice contains antiviral properties that help to strengthen the immune system. This herb can help cleanse the body on a cellular level. It can also normalize metabolism and neutralize heavy metals in the body, such as mercury. Barley can benefit the body by lowering cholesterol levels, aiding digestion, and relieving constipation. This herb also strengthens the entire body as a whole.

One study done in Japan separated a new antioxidant that has been found in barley leaves called 2-0-GI. This antioxidant was found to be effective in the preservation of food. 2-0-GI was also found to have anti-inflammatory and antiallergenic activity. Another Japanese study found beneficial results in barley’s ability to inhibit the AIDS virus.

Both the juice and powder made from the young leaves and grass of barley are helpful in producing adaptogen, alterative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, blood purifier, demulcent, emollient, immunostimulant, nutritive, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients in this herb include calcium, chlorophyll, iron, live enzymes, magnesium, potassium, protein, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and vitamins B1, B2, and C with bioflavonoids. Primarily, barley is beneficial in helping to treat anemia, arthritis, and impurities in the blood, Boils, cancer, and metal poisoning. However, this nutrient also offers great benefits with acne, AIDS/HIV, allergies, hay fever, bronchitis, candidiasis, eczema, herpes, infection, kidney problems, leprosy, liver disorders, lung disorders, psoriasis, skin conditions, syphilis, tuberculosis, and ulcers. For more information on the many benefits that barley has to offer, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Barley is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

--
Buy Barley Grass At Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2007)


Barberry
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 13, 2009 12:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Barberry

The barberry plant is a shrub that has gray, thorny branches. This shrub can grow up to nine feet tall. The flower of the barberry plant are bright yellow and bloom between the months of April and June. These flowers then become dark, drooping bunches of red berries in the fall.

The use of barberry dates back approximately three thousand years, originating in China in India where it was used for the treatment of diarrhea and intestinal infections. The barberry plant was used by Native Americans for treating liver conditions like jaundice. Additionally, Egyptians mixed the berries of the plant with fennel seed to protect themselves from the plague. Barberry is made up of an alkaloid known as berberine, which can also be found in other medicinal herbs such as goldenseal and Orgeon grape. The therapeutic effects of barberry can be attributed to its berberine content.

Studies have concluded that berberine contains properties that are effective against a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. These studies also found that berberine was much more effective in treating some bacteria than even a strong antibiotic. Other studies have found that barberry has the potential to kill microorganisms including staphylococci, streptococci, salmonella, Giardia lamblia, Escherichia coli, shigella, and Candida albicans. The berberine in barberry has been noted to contain antidarrheal properties. This alkaloid is also recommended for stimulating the immune system.

The effects of barberry include helping against cancer, liver problems, kidney problems, coughs, cholera, diarrhea, fever, inflammation, hypertension, and tumors. Barberry has also been recommended to increase bile secretions and stimulate the appetite. This herb may also help in cases of anemia and malnutrition. Barberry stimulates bile production for liver problems and also dilates blood vessels to lower blood pressure.

Barberry is used in easing inflammation and infection of the urinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts, as well as candida infections of the both the skin and vagina. Barberry extract has also been shown to improve symptoms that are associated with certain skin conditions, such as psoriasis. However, more research is still needed on determining the reliability of these findings. Barberry is shown to be an extremely effective treatment for diarrhea. A few studies have found that barberry is able to improve symptoms faster than antibiotics. This is possibly because of its astringent properties. However antibiotics are still thought to be more effective at killing bacteria in the intestines. For this reason, it is best to use barberry to ease symptoms, along with a standard antibiotic, as bacterial diarrhea can have extremely serious consequences.

The bark, root, and berries of the barberry plant are used to provide alterative, antibacterial, antineoplastic, antiseptic, aromatic, astringent, blood purifier, cholagogue, diuretic, hepatic, hypotensive, purgative, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients provided by this herb include iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamin C. Primarily, barberry can be beneficial in dealing with loss of appetite, high blood pressure, impurities in the blood, candidiasis, constipation, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, indigestion, infections, jaundice, liver disorders, pyorrhea, and sore throat. However, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with anemia, arthritis, Boils, breath odor, cholera, gallstones, heart problems, heartburn, hemorrhages, itching, kidney problems, migraines, rheumatisms, ringworm, and skin conditions. For more information on barberry or to make a purchase, along with its many beneficial effects, feel free to contact a representative at your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2006)


alfalfa
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 08, 2009 04:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: alfalfa

Alfalfa was considered to be a miracle herb in ancient times, as the Arabs called it the “Father of Herbs.” This herb has been cultivated for more than two thousand years. When the Medes and the Persians invaded Greece in 400 B.C., they began cultivating alfalfa in that region. This was primarily because of its ability to survive even the roughest of climates. The roots of the alfalfa plant can extend as long as sixty-six feet into the subsoil. The Romans later discovered that alfalfa was excellent for their horses. North America was introduced to alfalfa thanks to the Spanish. Here in North America, the herb was used to treat arthritis, Boils, cancer, scurvy, urinary tract disorders, and bowel problems.

The health benefits of alfalfa have been document thanks to modern research. This herb has been shown to be one of the most nutritious foods available. Herbalists consider this herb to be beneficial for many problems, with some even recommending it for any sickness due to the way it helps the body absorb protein, calcium, and other essential nutrients. Additionally, alfalfa is helpful in removing poisons and their effects from the body. It is also thought to neutralize the acidity of the body and help to break down carbon dioxide. Alfalfa is actually used to treat recovery cases of narcotic and alcohol addiction. It has also been found to help in cases of anemia by building blood.

Alfalfa is great because it contains both antibacterial and antifungal properties. This makes the herb a great body cleanser, infection fighter, and natural deodorizer. Alfalfa has also been used to clean teeth that are stained. Specifically, the extracts of alfalfa produce antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria.

Alfalfa is great for helping with milk production in nursing mothers. This herb can also stimulate appetite. This herb has also been researched and found to help lower cholesterol levels. Additionally, research has found that alfalfa can neutralize cancer. Alfalfa has been found to help in healing ulcers and treating arteriosclerosis, allergies, diabetes, and in strengthening the capillaries and blood vessels. Often, alfalfa is used to treat appendicitis, water retention, urinary and bowel problems, muscle spasms, cramps, and digestive problems.

The leaves and flowers of this herb are used in order to provide healing effects. The properties of alfalfa include: alterative, antibacterial, antifungal, antirheumatic, bitter, blood purifier, deodorant, diuretic, and nutritive. The primary nutrients that are provided by alfalfa include essential amino acids, chlorine, chlorophyll, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B12, E, E, and K.

Alfalfa is primarily used to help with cases of anemia, arthritis, diabetes, contaminated kidneys, and pituitary problems, loss of appetite, blood impurities, hemorrhages, nausea, and peptic ulcers. Additionally, alfalfa can be beneficial when dealing with alcoholism, chronic appendicitis, allergies, high blood pressure, body odor, bursitis, cancer, high cholesterol, muscle and stomach cramps, gastric disorders, gout, intestinal problems, jaundice, absence of lactation, weak muscles, nosebleeds, stained teeth, and urinary problems. For more information on the healing effects of alfalfa, please contact your local health food store.



--
Buy Alfalfa at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1988)


Garlic
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 01, 2008 01:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Garlic

Garlic is a member of the lily family, related to onions and chives, and offers many health benefits other than deterring vampires. There is now ample scientific evidence and proof of its beneficial effect on both a healthy immune system and the circulatory system.

The active ingredients in garlic are thiosulfinates, of which the predominant one is allicin, sulfoxides such as alliin and dithiins, of which ajoene is the most widely researched. These compounds are not only responsible for the pungent odor of garlic, but also for its benefits to your health. Among the other components of garlic are selenium, manganese and vitamins B6 and C.

Before considering the other effects of garlic on your health, we shall first consider how it benefits the immune system. The immune system is an essential part of human biology, and protects your body from invasion by pathogenic organisms. Without the immune system your body would rapidly be overcome by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites and other foreign bodies, and your body would rapidly fail to function.

The immune system consists of several components that can act in concert to protect you from these foreign invaders. It is too large a subject to be discusses in this article, although its major components are the thymus, the spleen, the lymphatic system, bone marrow, antibodies, and white blood cells of various types. Without it your body would rapidly be broken down to nothing, and would revert to a skeleton in a few weeks.

It is your immune system that causes inflammation, fevers, Boils and pus. These are all examples of the immune system at work to protect your body, and even a fever is the immune system raising your body temperature to one that is unfavorable to invaders. Arthritis and hay fever are other examples of how your immune system reacts to invaders, in one case mistaking damaged joint tissue as being foreign and responding by causing inflammation to protect the joint, and in the other a reaction to invading bodies such as pollen.

So what does garlic do to help your immune system? Let's first have a look at the inflammatory reaction of the immune system, a prime example of which is rheumatoid arthritis. The inflammation is caused by compounds known as prostaglandins and thromboxanes, the biosynthesis in your body of which requires the enzymes lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase (LOX and COX). If these enzymes can be inhibited, then the inflammatory response can be modulated, and LOX and COX inhibition is one of the studies currently being carried out into the treatment of some forms of cancers.

However, where garlic comes in here is that two effective non-reversible inhibitors of LOX and COX are the chemicals Di(1-propenyl) sulfide and ajoene, and both of these are components of garlic. Garlic can therefore be used, not to stop the inflammatory response altogether since it is an essential part of the immune system for certain infections, but to modulate it and protect you from the more severe effects of conditions such as arthritis - both osteo and rheumatoid - and asthma, which is also an immune response.

Allicin has been shown to work with vitamin C to kill certain types of bacteria and viruses, and can help the immune system to protect you from colds and flu, Candida and some gastroenteric viruses. It can also be effective against some of the more powerful pathogens such as tuberculosis. It should be stressed that garlic will not cure these conditions, but help the immune system to deal with them. In fact with respect to the common cold, a study at Munich University has shown that garlic significantly reduces the activity of kappa-B, which is a nuclear transcription factor that mediates the inflammatory response. In other words, the cold symptoms are greatly reduced.

This is significant, since increased kappa-B levels can be triggered off by any pathogen that causes an inflammatory response by the immune system (e.g. infection, allergens, physical trauma). The study showed that unfertilized garlic provided a reduction of 25% in kappa-B activity, while garlic fertilized with sulfur reduced it by 41%.

There have been other studies carried out that demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori, the organism responsible for gastritis and peptic ulcers, was less active in those that took a regular amount of garlic in their diet. This was shown by measuring the antibody concentration, and while H.pylori was found in both sets (with and without garlic in the diet), the antibody count in the garlic-eating set was much lower indicating a significantly lower population of the bacterium.

Another unexpected result was that a group taking both cooked and uncooked garlic had a lower antibody count than those taking either cooked or uncooked. This appears to indicate that cooking changes the chemical nature of garlic, so that both forms work together to provide a more potent effect that cooked and uncooked separately.

What has also been established is that odorless garlic has less of an effect on the immune system that natural garlic, so while the odorless type is more socially acceptable, it is not so good at supporting your immune system. The allicin levels in odorless garlic are very much lower than in the natural bulb.

Garlic has also been found to be able to help with certain types of cancer. Two servings weekly have been found effective in protecting from colon cancer. Allicin has been found to protect colon cells from the toxic effect of various chemicals, and also reduce the growth rate of any cancerous cells that develop. People in Southern Europe consuming large quantities of garlic have been shown to be 39% less liable to contract cancer of the mouth and pharynx, and 57% less liable to contract cancer of the esophagus. It also had an effect on other cancers, including breast and ovarian cancer. However, the effect of onions on such cancers is even greater.

Most people are aware of the cardiovascular benefits of garlic, and it can reduce blood pressure, cholesterol levels and serum triglyceride levels, thus protecting against the harmful condition of atherosclerosis and also of diabetic heart disease. Reduced atherosclerosis means a reduced chance of heart attacks or strokes. It also appears to possess antioxidant properties.

There is no doubt that garlic helps to promote a healthy immune system, although the odorless form appear to be less effective in this respect as natural garlic, and there is evidence that a diet containing uncooked and cooked garlic can be more effective than either of these alone.

--
Buy Garlic at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1879)


Health Comes From The Honey bee
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 08, 2008 04:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Comes From The Honey bee

The substances found in the beehive have held a treasured place in history among the ancient cultures of Egypt, Greece, Rome, China, Middle East, and the Slavic and Native American peoples. Experts have long theorized that bees came into being when flowering plants first began blossoming in abundance. The fossilized remains of pollen, leaves, and even flowers have been dated back to when dinosaurs roamed the land back when time began.

Bees collect pollen from flowers and mix it with their nectar, which transforms it into a nutrient-dense super food with bioactive ingredients numbering in the thousands including enzymes, bioflavonoids, essential fatty acids, free amino acids, natural chelated minerals, and whole vitamin complexes. Ancient Egyptians, Orientals, Hebrews, and South American natives often applied a combination of honey mixed with bee pollen to wounds, burns, and Boils, while Orientals used honey and bee pollen mixed with fruit or vegetable juice as a health drink. Norse mythology even states that honey and bee pollen were the secret to the eternal life of their gods.

Whether bee pollen is the secret to eternal life or not, there have been many studies done which show the connection between its consumption and healthy longevity. Bee pollen is seen as an immune system enhancer due to its ability to strengthen the body against viral infections. It is also effective in relieving fatigue, improving concentration, the treatment of asthma and of allergies, and in confronting skin problems and inhibiting wrinkles.

Bee pollen has also helped many women with painful menstrual cramps or hot flashes. It can also relieve headaches and heart palpitations as well as increase sexual potency, fertility, and benefit the prostate. Bee pollen can be used to regulate colon problems and as a diuretic for the kidney and bladder. Evidence has even been found for bee pollen’s effectiveness on children with ADD.

Bee pollen is packed with many different nutrients including amino acids, antibiotic factors, DNA/RNA, enzymes, glucosides, hormones, minerals, vitamins, and other ingredients that have not yet been determined. There are a total of 22 amino acids in bee pollen, including all of the essential ones, which makes it an extremely usable and complete source of protein. It is higher in protein than steak, eggs or cheese weight for weight, without large amounts of fat.

Bee pollen is rich in phytochemicals such as flavonoids, carotenes, and phytosterols, which allows it to provide important antioxidants including lycopene, selenium, quercetin, and beta carotene. Bee pollen also has the ability to regulate intestinal bacterial, which neutralizes toxic waste and improves blood health. Bee pollen contains 18 different enzymes including amylase, diastase, phosphatase, pepsin, and tryspin. Because bee pollen is such a rich source of enzymes, it greatly assists the body since they are required for all bodily functions.

Glucosides, which are natural sugars, are involved in the creation of energy within the body, can be found in bee pollen, as they promote better healing and coagulation and also control hypertension by regulating blood flow. Bee pollen contains plant hormones which activate and assist the body’s own endocrine glands, allowing them to function better, which can lead to an increased sperm count for men.

Twenty-seven different kinds of minerals can be found in bee pollen including calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, boron, chlorine, copper, iodine, molybdenum, phosphorus, selenium, silicon, sodium, sulfur, titanium, and zinc. All known vitamins, from A through K, are found in concentrated amounts in bee pollen. With all of these nutrients present, bee pollen is an excellent addition to the diet which will ensure healthy functioning of all your body’s processes.



--
Bee Pollen Available at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1859)


Echinacea Purpurea Root
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 17, 2008 06:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea Purpurea Root

There are nine known species of Echinacea native to the United States and southern Canada. The most commonly used and most potent of them is Echinacea purpurea.

Other common names for Echinacea are purple coneflower, American coneflower and coneflower. The plants contain large heads of flowers that bloom in early to late summer.

In North America, Native Americans used Echinacea more than any other herb for its healing properties. For Europeans and Americans, it was believed to aid in curing Anthrax and snakebites as well as contain antimicrobial properties.

Echinacea is well known for its abilities to boost the immune system and to help fight infections. It is also widely used to prevent infections, colds and the flu. In lesser known medicinal practices, it is used to treat wounds and such skin problems as acne and Boils. Some studies have shown that Echinacea has been effective in treating upper respiratory infections.

The whole Echinacea plant is used for treating various indications. Fresh or dried, the plant and roots are used to make teas, extracts, juices or external salves, creams and ointments. As a general rule, the fresh-pressed juice of the Echinacea plant is most effective in treating colds in children. In adults, both the root and herb in combination are most effective.

When taken at the first signs of a cold, Echinacea has been found to reduce the length and severity of cold symptoms. Be aware that Echinacea is not a one-dose fix-it remedy. Begin taking recommended doses at the first signs of a cold. Subsequent doses should be taken regularly, according to the product label, until all symptoms have disappeared.

Unfortunately, many herbal preparations can vary in effectiveness due to a lack of systematic extraction and refining. It is best to research the manufacturers of herbal products to find out how they cultivate and store their herbs. Their methods will cause the chemical compositions to vary greatly. The different parts of the plant that are used vary widely in their chemical makeup as well. One part may be extremely useful as an antimicrobial, while another may stimulate stronger reactions from the immune system. Other factors that may affect the quality of the product you purchase are:

* Species * Plant part * Extraction method * Contamination * Adulteration

Side Effects and Warnings:

When taken orally (by mouth), Echinacea usually does not produce any side effects. In rare cases, some people have experienced allergic reactions and side effects that include:

* Rashes or dermatitis * Pruritus (itching) * An increase in asthma symptoms * Anaphylaxis (life threatening allergic reaction) * Hepatoxicity * Nausea * Dizziness * Dyspnea (difficulty breathing)

All of these symptoms tend to be mild and infrequent. If you suffer from asthma symptoms, you should probably avoid using echinacea. In most cases the most common side effects are gastrointestinal in nature, such as gas or mild cramping. People are much more likely to experience side effects if they are allergic to other plants in the daisy family. These plants include:

* Ragweed * Chrysanthemums * Marigolds * Daisies

Use of Echinacea in children younger than 12 years is not recommended due to lack of sufficient data to support safety. It is also not recommended for use in pregnant or nursing women.

Echinacea should not be used if you have progressive systematic or auto-immune disorders, connective tissue disorders or other diseases that may be related to these. It should not be taken if you are taking immune-suppressants and heap-toxic drugs. It may also interfere with anesthesia.

It is important to communicate with your health care providers. Be sure they are aware of any alternative herbs or other substances you are using and what their purpose is in your daily diet.

--
Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1819)


Natural Remedies For Bumps, Bruises, Scrapes, and Insect Bites
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 10, 2007 09:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Remedies For Bumps, Bruises, Scrapes, and Insect Bites

Whether you are a child or an adult you are as susceptible to the damage done to skin and soft tissue by hard activities as anybody else. So what can you look for if you decide have a day outdoors and face the dangers that you will come across that want to leave you bruised ,scratched, scraped, cut and itching from all the falls, knocks, stings and bites that most people experience when they are more used to spending their time indoors?

Bruises are caused by a knock, and can happen without you even being aware of it. The blood vessels get damaged and leak. If you notice it right away, you can lessen the degree of bruising by applying ice or cold water to constrict the capillaries and cut down the flow of blood leaking from them. Some people bruise easier than others, and excessive bruising for no apparent reason could be a symptom of a more serious underlying condition and you should see your doctor.

A bump, or lump, can appear for many reasons, but generally settles down after a while. It can simply be the body's reaction to a hard knock that did not damage the blood vessels, but prompted a natural swelling to protect the area. They can also be caused by insect bites. You don’t always see these little pests – they have lunch then zip off without you even being aware of it until the area begins to itch and swell. However, if you have a lump under the armpit, in your neck or behind your ears it could be a swollen gland and you should contact your physician.

Everybody gets minor scrapes now and again, and when you spend any time outside you can get bitten by insects such as mosquitoes, midges, blackflies, horse flies – you name it, they will lunch on you as on any other animals. You can also get stung by vegetable nasties, though if you do then look around for a remedy. Strangely, many stinging plants have another plant close by that can be used as a remedy. This is likely because, after being stung, people just rubbed whatever was handy on the area and eventually these remedies were discovered.

Thus, dock leaves are often found beside nettles, and touch-me-not beside poison ivy. These are good natural remedies for stings caused through contact with these particular plants, and there are many other natural remedies that can be used for the other everyday hurts that people receive just for carrying out normal activities outside in a natural environment. Let’s have a look at some of the natural remedies that people have used through the ages, and that are still used to this day, even in proprietary creams and salves.

Calendula, or marigold, is very effective in relieving skin irritations and inflammation. It can be applied topically to relieve the symptoms of bruises, cuts and scrapes, and also for the initial treatment of burns and scalds. It has anti-inflammatory properties and can be used on inflamed or infected cuts and skin lesions. These properties are believed to be due to the high level of flavonoids found in calendula that have anti-oxidant properties and help the immune function to do its work. Among these is the powerful Quercetin with its strong anti-histamine properties.

It also appears to possess anti-viral properties, though the reason for this is not clear and is still under investigation. Marigold also contains carotenoids and triterpene saponins, both of which will contribute to the medicinal effects. The dried flowers or leaves, or the fresh flowers, can be used and it is an old adage that pus will not form where marigold is used. It is also good for the treatment of insect bites and Boils, where it appears to either prevent infection or clear up any that are there. It has also been proven to prevent the seeping of blood from the capillaries in scrapes, and to promote blood clotting.

Calendula was used during the First World War by British doctors to dress wounds and prevent infection. A dressing steeped in a mild solution of calendula extract was enough, and it likely saved many lives.

Another plant with similar properties is the alpine Arnica, which is useful to reduce the swelling and pain of bruises. It works simply by rubbing the leaves on the area when you have a fall or a hard knock. The active ingredients here are again flavonoids, and sesquiterpene lactones along with tannins, carotenoids and thymol. These, along with the flavonoids, stimulate the circulation and carry away any fluids trapped in bruises and swellings.

The sesquiterpene lactones act as anti-inflammatories and boost the immune system, helping to reduce swelling and pain. In fact terpenoid chemicals are common to many of the herbs and flowers that have found a use in the relief of pain in swelling and bruises. The same is true of Ledum, better known as Rosemary, traditionally used for the treatment of burns, ulcers dandruff, and dry skin and to get rid of lice among many other internal and topical applications.

The active ingredients of rosemary (ledum) include mono-, di- and triterpenes and also the ubiquitous flavonoids and camphor and linalool. If you wash down burns, grazes and cuts with a wash of ledum extract, then you will protect the patient from infection at the time when they are most vulnerable to infectious agents.

Hypericum has uses as an anti-inflammatory and antiseptic, and is therefore useful for exactly the same conditions as all of the above. It also has astringent properties, so that like Calendula, Hypericum can be used to prevent the capillary seepage that frequently leads to infections. The active ingredients here are apparently flavonoids again, with their antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Considering that they are among the most common antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents in the plant world; it is no coincidence that flavonoids just happen to be contained in the vast majority of natural treatments for scratches, grazes and bruises. They reduce swelling, pain and inflammation, and also act as antiseptics by disrupting the cell walls of bacteria.

Hypericum is well known by its alternative name St. John’s Wort, where it is used in the treatment of depression. However, the active ingredients here are mainly hyperforin and hypericin, which have little to do with the topical benefits of the plant.

If you have suffered from insect bites and stings, then you would have been thankful had you brought some Apis Mellifica with you. Obtained from bees, this again contains terpenes among many other chemicals, and is used paradoxically in the treatment of bee stings and other insect stings and bites. It’s amazing how many of these old remedies contain terpenes of various types and also flavonoid chemicals. It is useful for most rashes that have raised puffy lumps, such as hives.

Finally, if you manage to stay out without getting any bruises, abrasions, scratches or bites, you will be very lucky. However, if you get sunburn through being out in the sun too long, just look around for some stinging nettle, or Urtica. The leaf contains polysaccharides and lectins that stop the production of prostaglandins in the body that cause inflammation. Your sunburn will ease and you be able to return home relatively symptom free from your day outdoors.

These natural remedies can be hard to find growing naturally due to many factors such as the time of year or your geographical location these herbs may grow in. Alternative sources are available at your local health food store where you can find all the above mentioned herbs in ointments and creams specifically formulated for your needs.



--
Natural Remedies

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1624)


How to deal with Stress and Cortisol...
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 30, 2006 09:36 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to deal with Stress and Cortisol...

Beating the Aging Odds

All of us grow older, but aging is a choice. You have it in your power to retain much of the health, vitality and beauty of your youth. It Boils down to a simple fact – retard oxidative stress and you’ll retard the aging process. The 70 million people who make up the “boomer” generation and are getting ready for an active retirement welcome this news.

Stress and Cortisol

The early twentieth century “stress doctor” Hans Selye, M.D. was renowned for his work on the human adaptive response and the effects of stress on aging. He taught that every stress leanves an indelible scar, and the organism pays for its survival after a stressful situation by becoming a little older. That’s because stress raises levels of the adrenal hormone cortisol. It increases internal generation of free radicals, disrupts normal metabolism and leads to aging conditions. Because of this, cortisol has been dubbed the age-accelerating hormone.

The more stressful our lifestyle and the level of environmental hazards we are exposed to, the higher cortisol levels will climb in an effort to jump-start our adaptive response. Coupled with a poor diet, this is a recipe for pre-mature aging. At least eleven major aging factors are related to high cortisol levels:

  • Breakdown of collagen and elastin in muscles, joints, and bone
  • Memory loss and reduced cognitive function
  • Increased cardiovascular risk
  • Hypertension and fluid retention
  • Disordered lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL to LDL ratio)
  • Decreased immune function
  • Increased inflammation (vascular network, allergies, asthma, acne and hair loss)
  • Hormone imbalances
  • Disordered sugar metabolism
  • Skin problems (wrinkling, psoriasis, seborrhea, acne and hair loss)
  • Nerve system damage

So, there you have it. Now let’s see how to tame cortisol and reduce oxidative stress.

Reducing Cortisol and Oxidative Stress

Be in the moment – stress reducing techniques such as meditation, prayer, visualization, yoga, chi gong, and listening to inspirational tapes induce calmness and a sense of balance.

Eat right for your genes – as we get older, we don’t digest animal protein as efficiently as when younger. Shifting to plant source proteins that are easier to digest and contain the full complement of vitamins and minerals is most desirable. We are accustomed to thinking of dairy, meat, poultry, and fish as “protein.” All vegetables are good sources of protein. Along with legumes, whole grains, and nuts, daily protein needs are easily fulfilled. Meals that combine a variety of tastes from plant foods also require less salt for flavor enhancement and this helps keep hypertension at bay. So, explore just how good meals can be that either do not contain meat or use it as a condiment. If you do need some salt, try substituting table salt with NOW Vitamins Potassium Chloride crystals.

Enzymes Increase Digestion

Use digestive enzymes such as Optimal Digestive System to insure that you are absorbing all the nutrients in your food. This product has been clinically tested for its digestive effectiveness helping to digest fats, carbs, proteins and even gas producing beans and cruciferous vegetables. Other enzymes, Serrazimes is a systemic enzyme that will help keep lymphatic’s clear of debris, support immune function, and boost your adaptive response to stress.

Tame Cortisol

As many people reach middle age they have a tendency to gain weight around the navel. High stress amps up levels of cortisol that results in increased girth. Middle body fat is considered a significant risk factor for impaired glucose metabolism and cardiovascular disease. Check your waist to hip ratio by dividing your waist measurement in inches by your hip measurement. If you have a ratio of 0.85 or below, you have lower risk of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. This measurement is one of the best indicators of cortisol induced metabolic syndrome and weight gain.

Super cortisol support with Relora is an herbal, vitamin and mineral formula that’s designed to fight mid-body fat by taming cortisol. Its key ingredient is Relora which is a blend of the herbal extract of Phellodendron amurense and Magnolia officinalis. A small double blind clinical trial found that pre-menopausal obese women – half of whom took Relora – lost a significant amount of weight. These were women who eat in response to stress. Thus the researchers proposed that Relora appeared to reduce cortisol and perceived stress, resulting in weight loss. Super cortisol support also contains Ashwagandha and Rhodiola, herbs traditionally use for increasing adaptive response and reducing stress. You can read about these herbs and other nutritional products in the book 7-syndrome healing: supplement essentials for mind and body. Written by myself and coauthor Jayson Kroner. This book can be ordered from Now Foods.

Additionally, Chinese scientists found that the active components in Relora called honokiol and magnolol delayed gastric emptying, which would make you feel full longer. An additional anti-aging benefit was observed by another group of Chinese scientists. They reported that honokiol is a potent arterial thrombosis inhibitor because it inhibits prostacyclin release; a promoter of platelet adhesion. Platelet stickiness increases stroke risk. Phellodendron and Magnolia have been used in Chinese medicine for centuries.

Quell Free Radicals

Health and longevity essentially rests on the body balance between free radical load and antioxidant reserves. Toxic exposure depletes some of your antioxidant reserves. Eating a diet rich in antioxidant fruits, vegetables, legumes and grains, helps you rebound. Continued toxic exposure will challenge your antioxidant status and may overwhelm your reserves. VitaBerry Plus+ is a powerful antioxidant formula that contains a range of high ORAC fruits that naturally augment the diet. ORAC stands for oxygen radical absorbance capacity. It is a measure of the ability of a food to quell oxygen free radicals, the most dangerous kind. VitaBerry Plus+ is a product after my own heart. In my book The Anti-Aging Solution, I wrote about how different color foods protect DNA and prevent aging. VitaBerry Plus+ contains the important colors described in my bood. You can order your copy from Now Vitamins.

True-E Bio Complex rounds out the antioxidant colors. It contains all eight tocopherols and eight tocotrienols in the natural ratio found in “tan” foods such as whole grains and legumes. It is the only natural vitamin E that is produced from soy that has not been genetically modified.

The best anti-aging advice I can pass on is from my friend and food columnist Joan Jackson. “Take Pleasure in Your Life TODAY and Enjoy What You Eat”



--
Buy Now Vitamins, minerals and herbs at Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1362)


New Man Food
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 27, 2005 04:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: New Man Food

New Man Food

Listen up, guys. Masculinity isn’t defined by what you eat. It’s all about how well you hold up through the years, which means taking care of yourselves. So ditch the doughnuts, double burgers and draft beer, and adopt a healthier diet. Here’s how!

Back in 1982, a best-selling, humorous manifesto of masculinity known as Real Men Don’t Eat Quiche epitomized the male backlash against feminism, by then a formidable force in the American cultural landscape. But the joke, it turns out almost 25 years later, is on the men- and not just because quiche doesn’t have that many fewer calories than a Quarter Pounder. We may have maintained out mach-ness all these years by eating “manly food,” but we’ve become unhealthy and ultimately weaker because of it.

In 2000, the National Health & Nutrition Examination Survey revealed that among men 20 years and older, a whopping 65.1 million (67.2%) were considered overweight and 26.6 million (27.5%) were considered obese. Only 30.6 million (31.8%) of men 20 to 74 were considered to have a healthy weight. The fallout from such a fatness factor is that more men are dying each year of heart disease and related illnesses and more money than ever is being spent on health care (to say nothing of how poor male health affects the women and children who depend on the men in their lives). Another cheeseburger, guys?

Those numbers, though shocking at first, shouldn’t be that surprising. As a gender, men are more vain, ego-driven and stubborn than women. How does this manifest itself when it comes to wellness? Until a man is hit with his first health crisis, no matter what the age, he thinks he’s indestructible.

That’s why it’s so difficult to convince men to get regular medical checkups (which they should do especially when they hit 50). It’s not that many American men aren’t trying to lose pounds. It’s just that they are a bit misguided in their efforts. Weight-conscious men really gravitated to the Atkins diet. Why? Because at the same time the plan says to cut carbohydrates and increase protein, it gives men carte blanche to eat mass quantities of high-fat “manly” foods like beef and pork. Trading pounds for clogged arteries doesn’t seem like a good deal.

So the time has come for all American men to turn their testosterone-driven energy into changing their nutritional lifestyle. We have to stop eating the same high-caloric and fat-laden foods we usually consume in large doses and start pursuing a diet based on variety, moderation and balance. It’s time to start eating “new” man food: the kind of foods that will make us feel (and look) like a new man.

Out With the Old

But before we can embrace the new, we must wean ourselves off the old, particularly the male habit of eating food in humongous portions. Easier said than done because all of us, men and women, have found it hard to resist the marketing power of super sizing. Who among us wants to feel like and idiot because we didn’t double the size of popcorn, soda or french fries for a mere 49 cents? But resist we must.

We also have to steer clear of the killer Fs-fried food and fat. New York-based nutritionist Annie Hauck-Lawson, PHD, RN, says that also requires willpower because fried foods can be addicting. “They taste so good and fat conveys a lot of flavor,” she admits. “So the best strategy is going cold turkey to get that taste off the palate.” Hauck-Lawson also suggests not beginning a meal with fried foods or fatty meats.

“The start of the meal is when you’re the most hungry so you’ll eat the most during the first course.” She says. “If you start most lunches and dinners with a broth-based soup or a big salad, you’ll load up on high-fiber, high nutrient foods rather than high-fat foods and you’ll be too full to eat the bad stuff. Besides, food can be broiled with herbs and spices instead of being fried and still be delicious.”

Nutritionists like Hauck-Lawson strongly advise men to eat more fiber-base foods, which means adding more fresh fruits and vegetables (about five servings a day), whole grains and beans to the diet. Fiber may not sound manly, but it aids digestion, reduces the risk of colon cancer by moving waste out of your system, supports healthy cholesterol levels and makes you feel full so you won’t gorge yourself on those super-sized portions.

Hydro Power

And when you’re eating all those nutritious and healthy new man foods, please don’t offset the benefits by washing it down with soft drinks. Did you know that a can of cola contains 39 grams of refined sugar, which is equivalent to seven teaspoons of the sweet stuff? Okay, we know what you’re going to say when we mention water as an alternative. B-O-R-I-N-G! But you can’t ignore a liquid that is crucial to your hydration, digestion and metabolism. If you must drink something interesting with your meal, try an organic red wine, which can have a positive effect on cholesterol and blood pressure. (When the liquid is the meal, a smoothie can fill the bill.)

During and after your transitional phase into the new man food lifestyle, nutritional supplements can ensure that you get enough vitamins and minerals from your diet. Besides taking a general multivitamin designed for men, you should incorporate heart- and prostate-healthy supplements such as omerga-3 fatty acids (especially if you aren’t eating more fish), magnesium, lycopene (found in abundance in tomatoes), zinc and vitamin D, which supports bone health and offers cancer protection. (You should see a licensed practitioner for guidance on which supplements are best for someone in your age group.)

What it Boils down to, guys, is choices. We can choose to be set in our unhealthy eating ways or act like men and do the work it takes to make the adjustments. “men have been stereotyped as meat and potatoes freaks and that view is fairly accurate,” says Hauck-Lawson. “Trying to get men to eat healthier has been difficult.” But then she offers a carrot that men just might bite on. “Look at it this way: if a man eats more fish, fruit and vegetables for the nutrients he needs to stay healthy, he looks smart. And to women, smart is sexy.”



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=715)


PRIMARY USES OF ST. JOHN'S WORT
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 15, 2005 09:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PRIMARY USES OF ST. JOHN'S WORT

PRIMARY USES

  • • DEPRESSION
  • • NERVOUS DISORDERS
  • • EMOTIONAL/MENTAL REGULATOR
  • • VIRAL INFECTIONS
  • • TUMOR AND CANCER RETARDANT
  • • AIDS VIRUS INHIBITOR
  • • SEPTIC WOUNDS/ Boils
  • • BLOOD TREATMENT

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=636)


    ST. JOHN’S WORT (Hypericum perforatum)
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 14, 2005 10:42 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: ST. JOHN’S WORT (Hypericum perforatum)

    Overview

    St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) belongs to the family Hypericaceae, which consists of eight genuses and about 350 species. St. John’s wort is a plant whose leaves are whorled, gland-dotted, simple, and usually smooth-margined. Its flowers are five-petalled and yellow with many stamens, which are often united in bundles. St. John’s wort was first known to be used in the Crusades to treat battle wounds. Contemporary research supports this, with various diseases proving Hypericum’s worth in aiding all types of topical wounds in their healing and recovery. It is specifically used for putrid leg ulcers that are difficult to heal, and is used to treat many varying septic wounds, Boils, and inflammation in cellulite and lymphangitis.1

    For centuries, St. John’s wort has been used to treat disor-ders of mood and temperament.” Modern research is also backing this up, with several very recent studies demonstrating St. John’s wort’s ability to treat mild and moderate forms of depression as well and with fewer side effects as the standard antidepressant drugs used.

    Recent investigation is also revealing St. John’s wort to be helpful for a number of other disorders. Among them is AIDS/HIV, a disease that leads several age/gender groups in cause of death. But St. John’s wort is being researched for its ability to hinder viral growth and production, perhaps making it key to at least treating the virus, if not able to cure the disease. Hypericum is being used for treatment research of several other virus-caused diseases as well. Another area in which St. John’s wort is showing great promise is that of cancer. Various forms of cancers and growths have been successfully treated with therapies including Hypericum or hypericin (one of its compounds). And the list goes on and on. St. John’s wort is certainly an herb worth investigating for its seeming abilities to combat various disorders prevalent among us.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=622)


    HERBS FOR HEALTHY SKIN
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 14, 2005 04:07 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: HERBS FOR HEALTHY SKIN

    HERBS FOR HEALTHY SKIN

    The skin is actually the largest organ of he body and the largest channel of elimination. The health of the skin is dependent on the health of the other organs in the body. If they are running efficiently, the skin will be healthy. When the body is overloaded with toxins the liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal system cannot process and eliminate them fast enough. This puts excess burden on the skin which may lead to conditions such as acne, psoriasis, Boils or rashes.

    Red Clover

    Red clover is a great blood detoxifier allowing for healthy skin. It is often recommended for cleansing programs.

    Yellow Dock

    Yellow dock has been found to be a good alterative, especially for chronic skin problems. It is useful for leprosy, psoriasis and cancer. Modern herbalists recommend yellow dock for anemia, as a blood purifier, liver congestion, and skin problems. It is also considered beneficial for toxemia, infections, lymph congestion, ulcers and wounds. It is considered one of the best blood builders in the herbal kingdom.

    Burdock

    Burdock is valued highly in the plant kingdom. It is used to purify the blood and strengthen the liver, kidneys, stomach and lungs. It contains volatile oils which are known to help clear the kidneys of excess wastes and uric acid, and burdock is used as a diuretic. It is used for skin problems such as acne, Boils, psoriasis, and canker sores.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=619)


    TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia)
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 11, 2005 09:32 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia)

    TEA TREE OIL (Meleleuca alternifolia)

    Another important component of the first aid kit is tea tree oil. It can help with many minor conditions that commonly occur. Some include athlete’s foot, acne, Boils, burns, warts, vaginal infections, tonsillitis, sinus infections, ringworm, skin rashes, impetigo, herpes, corns, head lice, cold sores, canker sores, insect bites, insect repellent and fungal infections. It is truly a remarkable oil with valuable properties for healing and to prevent infection. Tea tree oil is extracted from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia which is a shrub like tree found in the northeast t ropical coastal region of New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. There are over 300 different varieties of tea tree but only a few are known to produce the valuable, medicinal oil.

    Tea tree oil contains at least 48 different organic compounds. The compounds work together to produce the healing abilities found in the oil. Research done in the 1950s and early 1960s found that tea tree oil is a germicide and fungicide with additional characteristics of dissolving pus and debris.1 Recent studies have found it effective for thrush, vaginal infections of candida albicans, staph infections, athlete’s foot, hair and scalp problems, mouth sores, muscle and joint pain, pain, and Boils.2

    Tea tree oil is a valuable antiseptic for skin infections. It is able to penetrate the epidermis to heal from within. Clinical studies have found that tea tree oil can heal quickly and with less scarring than other treatments. The oil is even effective against Staphylococcus aureus, which is often difficult to treat and is becoming resistant to antibiotic therapy. The oil can be applied two to three times a day with full strength or diluted. If an irritation occurs, a diluted solution can be tried. Even highly diluted concentrations have been found to heal in clinical studies.

    Organisms against which tea tree oil has been shown to be effective include aspergillus, baceroides, Candida, clostridium, cryptosporidium, diptheroids, E. Coli, enter-obacter, epidermophyton, fusobacterium, gonococcus, hemophilus, herpes viruses, meningococcus. microsporium, petococcus, proteus, pseudomonas, spirochetes, staph, strep, trichinosis, and trichophyton3

    Tea tree oil is an effective bactericide. It is safe for healthy tissue. It is a strong organic solvent and will help heal and disperse pus in pimples and wounds. It has been used to neutralize the venom of minor insect bites. It is able to kill bacteria by penetrating the skin layers and reaching deep into abscesses in the gums and even beneath the fingernails. It has been found to have some of the strongest antimicrobial properties ever discovered in a plant.4 Tea tree oil can help with fungal infections such as candida. Dr. Eduardo F. Pena, M.D. has studied Melaleuca alternifolia oil for its value in treating vaginitis and candida albicans.5 In studying candida researchers have gone to the extreme of infecting healthy volunteers with the organism. The yeasts proceeded to invade the bloodstream and internal organs. Then they were cultured from these regions. However, within a matter of hours yeasts could no longer be cultured, indicating that the immune systems of these individuals efficiently cleared the organisms from the tissues. Unfortunately, in today’s era a great many people are afflicted with compromised immune function.6

    Tea tree oil acts as a mild anesthetic when applied to painful areas and to soothe cuts, burns, and mouth sores. It can help heal as well as reduce scarring. Burn victims in Australia are often treated with tea tree oil to help prevent infection, relieve pain and speed healing.

    Tea tree oil can help prevent and heal acne. Tea tree oil has a reputation of being gentle on the skin. It does not produce the side effects of some medications such as dry skin, stinging, burning and slight redness after application. Tea tree oil can help to heal and prevent infections from occurring. A minor scrape or scratch can sometimes result in infection. Tea tree oil applied to the area can help prevent infection. The oil is effective in healing many types of bacteria but the most amazing thing is that is does not damage the skin tissue. Many of the recommended treatments can actually do damage to the skin resulting in scarring and sensitivity.

    Tea tree oil can be used to prevent bites and stings. Bugs don’t like the scent and may stay away. There is no way to entirely void coming into contact with insects. Anyone who likes to be outdoors is vulnerable. Whether you live in the city or the country or anywhere in between, bugs abound. Tea tree oil or lotions and creams containing the oil can also be used to prevent bites. Insects don’t like the scent of the oil and are actually repelled by it. The Australian tea tree oil has been found to be highly effective in treating infections and destroying microbes while not irritating the skin. Many antiseptics can cause skin irritation, but tea tree oil seems to cause no harm to skin tissue.

    Tea tree oil is an antiseptic and generally not taken internally. Some evidence has suggested mild organ damage from internal use. The oil when absorbed through the skin is non-toxic. Tea tree oil is most often recommended for exposed surfaces of the body such as the skin tissue and the mucous membranes. It should be noted that the original Australian aborigines made tea from the leaves without adverse affects. And the early settlers followed their exam - ple with positive results. But the tea was a very diluted form and the distilled oil is much stronger.

    Endnotes

    1. Cynthia B. Olsen. Australian Tea Tree Oil. (Pagosa Springs, CO: Kali Press, 1991).
    2. James F. Balch MD and Phyllis A. Balch, Prescription for Nutritional Healing. (Garden City Park, N.Y.: Avery Publishing Group Inc., 1990), 681, 682.
    3. Cass Ingram, Killed On Contact. (Cedar Rapids, Iowa: Literary Visions Publishing, Inc.), 15.
    4. Michael A. Schmidt, Lendon H. Smith and Keith W. Sehnert. Beyond Antibiotics. (Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books), 207.
    5. Olsen, 8.
    6. Ingram, 64-65.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=573)


    HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 11, 2005 08:50 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)

    INTRODUCTION

    In a time when we are more concerned than ever with issues of health, a tried and true tropical herb called noni needs t o be added t o our list of the best natural remedies. It susage over hundreds of years supports it s description as a veritable panacea of therapeutic actions. At this writing, noni continues to accrue impressive medicinal credentials, and its emergence as an effective nat ural healing agent is a timely one. Amidst rising cancer rates, the high incidence of degenerative diseases like diabetes, and the evolution of ant ibiotic resist ant bacteria and new viral strains, herbs like noni are sought after for their natural pharmaceutical properties. Unquest ionably, all of us want to know how to:

  • • protect ourselves f rom toxins and pollut ants
  • • prevent t he premature onset of age-related diseases such as arthritis, heart disease, diabetes and stroke
  • • boost our immune defenses to protect ourselves from new viral and bacterial strains that have become antibiotic-resist ant
  • • reduce our risk of developing cancer
  • • better digest our food for proper assimilation and purge the intestinal system wit hout the dangerous side effects of harsh drugs. Its actions are multifaceted and must be considered when assessing natural treatment s for disease or injury. It s impressive and widespread use among various native cult ures of t ropical island regions supports the notion that it does indeed possess valuable, therapeutic compounds.

    Genus Rubiaceae

    Common Names

    Indian Mulberry (India), Noni (Hawaii), Nono (Tahiti and Raratonga), Polynesian Bush Fruit, Painkiller Tree (Caribbean islands), Lada (Guam), Mengkudo (Malaysia), Nhau (Southeast Asia), Grand Morinda (Vietnam), Cheesefruit (Australia), Kura (Fiji), Bumbo (Africa) Note: This is only a small sampling of vernacular names for Morinda citrifolia. Almost every island nation of the South Pacific and Caribbean has a term for this particular plant . This booklet will refer to the herb mainly as “ noni” or M. citrifolia, and is referring primarily to Hawaiin noni.

    Parts Used

    The parts of the noni plant most used for their medicinal and nutritional purposes are the fruit, seeds, bark, leaves, and flowers. Virtually every part of the noni plant is utilized for its individual medicinal properties; however, it is the fruit portion that is regarded as its most valuable. The seeds have a purgative action, the leaves are used to treat external inflammations and relieve pain, the bark has strong astringent properties and can treat malaria, the root extracts lower blood pressure, the flower essences relieve eye inflammations and the f ruit has a number of medicinal actions.

    Physical Description

    Morinda citrifolia is technically an evergreen shrub or bush, which can grow to heights of fifteen to twenty feet . It has rigid, coarse branches which bear dark, oval, glossy leaves. Small white fragrant flowers bloom out of cluster-like pods which bear creamy-white colored fruit. The fruit is fleshy and gel-like when ripened, resembling a small breadf ruit . The flesh of the fruit is characterist ically bitter, and when completely ripe produces a rancid and very dist inctive odor. Noni has buoyant seeds that can float formont hs in ocean bodies. The wood of the inflammatory, astringent, emollient, emmenagogue, laxative, sedative, hypotensive (lowers blood pressure) , blood purif ier, and tonic.

    Chemical Constituents

    Noni has various chemical constituents. First, it has an impressive array of terpene compounds, three of which—L. Asperuloside, aucubin, and glucose— have been identified by their actyl derivatives. Both caproic and caprylic acids have been isolated.1 Second, bushfruits, a category of which noni fruit is a member, are also considered a good source of vit - amin C.2 Third, Hawaiin noni has been linked to the synthesis of xeronine in the body which has significant and widespread health implications. Last , the alkaloid cont ent of the noni fruit is thought to be responsible for its therapeutic actions. Alkaloids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological and biological act ivitiesin the human body. They are nitrogencontaining organic compounds which can react with acids to form salts and which are the basis of many medicines. The following is an in-depth chemical analysis of each plant part and it s chemical constituents.

  • • amino acids (which include alanine, arginine, asparticacids, cysteine, cystine, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan tyrosine, and valine)
  • • anthraquinones
  • • glycosides
  • • phenolic compounds
  • • resins
  • • B-sitosterol
  • • ursolic acid

    FLOWER

  • • acacet in 7-0-D (+) -glucophyranoside
  • • 5,7,-dimet hylapigenin-4-0-8-D(+) -galactophyranoside
  • • 6,8,-dimet hoxy-3-methyl anthroquinone-1-0-8-rhamnosyl glucophyranoside

    FRUIT

  • • antioxidant
  • • alizarin
  • • anthraquinones
  • • caproic and caprylic acids

    discovered an alkaloid in the Hawaiin noni fruit which he calls proxeronine and which he believes has appreciable physiological actions by acting as a precursor to xeronine, a very crucial compound (see later sections) . In addition, a compound found in the fruit called damnacanthol is believed to help inhibit cert ain viruses and cellular mutations involved in cancer.

    ROOT AND ROOT BARK

  • • carbonate
  • • chlorubin
  • • rubicholric acid
  • • soranjidol
  • • chrysophanol
  • • phosphate
  • • magnesium
  • • ferric iron
  • • sodium
  • • glycosides
  • • morinadadiol
  • • morindine
  • • resins
  • • rubiadin
  • • sterols4

    Pharmacology

    Recent surveys have suggested that noni fruit exerts antibiotic action. In fact, a variety of compounds which have antibacterial properties (such as aucubin) have been identified in the fruit.5 The 6-Dglucopyranose pentaacet ate of the fruit extract is not considered bacteriostatic.6 Constituents found in the fruit portion have exhibited ant imicrobial action against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi (and other types) , Shigella paradysenteriae, and Staphylococcus aureaus. Compounds found in the root have the ability to reduce swollen mucous membrane and lower blood pressure in animal studies. Proxeronine is an alkaloid constituent found in Hawaiin noni fruit which may prompt the production of xeronine in the body. It is considered a xeronine precursor and was discovered in noni fruit by Dr. Ralph M. Heinicke. He has theorized that this proenzyme can be effective in initiating a series of beneficial cellular reactions through its involvement with the integrity of specific proteins. He points out that tissues contain cells which possess certain recept or sites for xeronine. Because the reactions that can occur are so varied, many different therapeutic actions can result when xeronine production escalates, explaining why Hawaiin noni is good for so many seemingly unrelated disorders. Damnacanthol is another compound contained in the fruit of the Hawaiin noni plant which has shown the ability to block or inhibit the cellular function of RAS cells, considered pre-cancerous cells.

    Body Systems Targeted

    The following body systems have all been effec-freeze-dried capsules, dehydrated powder or fruit, and oil. Noni plant constituents are sometimes offered in combination with other herbs. Some products contain a percent age of the fruit, bark, root and seeds for their individual therapeutic properties.

    Satety

    Extracts of M. citrifolia are considered safe if used as directed; however, pregnant or nursing mothers should consult their physicians before taking any supplement . High doses of root extracts may cause constipation. Taking noni supplements with coffee, alcohol or nicotine is not recommended.

    Suggested Uses

    Ideally, noni extracts should be taken on an empty stomach prior to meals. The process of digesting food can interfere with the medicinal value of the alkaloid compounds found in Hawaiin noni, especially in its fruit . Apparently, stomach acids and enzymes destroy the specific enzyme which frees up the xeronine compound. Take noni supplements without food, coffee, nicotine or alcohol. Using supplements that have been made from the semi-ripe or light - green fruit is also considered preferable to the ripe, whit ish fruit .

    NONI: ITS USE AND HISTORY

    Noni is a tropical wandering plant indigenous to areas of Australia, Malaysia and Polynesia. It is considered native to Southeast Asia although it grows from India to the eastern region of Polynesia. Morinda citrifolia has a long history of medicinal use throughout these areas. It is thought to be the “most widely and commonly used medicinal plant prior to the European era.” 7 Centuries ago, the bushfruit was introduced to native Hawaiians, who subsequently called it “noni” and considered its fruit and root as prized medicinal agents. Among all Polynesian botanical agents of the 19th and 20th centuries, Hawaiin noni has the widest array of medical applications. Samoan and Hawaiian medical practitioners used noni for bowel disorders (especially infant diarrhea, constipation, or intestinal parasites) , indigestion, skin inflammation, infection, mouth sores, fever, contusions and sprains. Hawaiians commonly prepared noni tonics designed to treat diabetes, stings, burns and fish poisoning.8 The herb’s remarkable ability to purge the intestinal tract and promote colon health was well known among older Hawaiian and Tahitian natives and folk healers. Interestingly, field observations regarding its repu-remarkable healing agent .

    Wonder Herb of Island Folk Healers

    Common to t he thickets and forests of Malaysia and Polynesia, and the low hilly regions of the Philippine islands, noni has been cultivated throughout communities in the South Pacific for hundreds of years. Its Hawaiian use is thought to originate from inter-island canoe travel and settlement dating to before Christ . Its hardy seeds have the ability to float which has also contributed to its distribution among various seacoasts in the South Pacific region. Historical investigation has established the fact that some of Hawaii’s earliest settlers probably came viaTahiti. For this reason, Tahitian herbal practices have specific bearing on the herbal therapeutics of islands to the nort h. The very obvious similarities between the Hawaiian vernacular for herbal plants like noni and Tahitian names strongly suggests the theory of Polynesian migrations to Hawaii. Cultures native to these regions favored using Morinda citrifolia for treating major diseases and ut ilized it as a source of nourishment in times of famine.9 Noni fruit has been recognized for centuries as an excellent source of nutrition. The peoples of Fiji, Samoa and Rarat onga use the fruit in both its raw and cooked forms.10 Traditionally, the fruit was propicked before it was fully ripe and placed in the sunlight . After being allowed to ripen, it was typically mashed and its juice extracted through a cloth. Noni leaves provided a veget able dish and their resiliency made them desirable as a fish wrap for cooking.

    Noni’s Medical Reputation

    Elaborate traditionalrituals and praying rites usually accompanied the administration of noni. Int erestingly, cultures indigenous to the Polynesian islands had a significant understanding of their flora. For example, native Hawaiians maint ained a folkmedicine taxonomy t hat was considered second to none.11 Noni was not only used for medicinal purposes but for its food value, for clot hing and for cloth dyes as well. Research indicates that noni was among the few herbal remedies that islanders considered “ tried and true.” In Hawaii, trained herbal practitioners reserved the right to prescribe plant therapies.12 Records indicate that Hawaiian medical practices were based on extensive and very meticulous descriptions of symptoms and their prescribed herbal treatments. Dosages were controlled and the collection and administration of plant extracts was carefully monitored.13 In addition to Morinda, it was not uncommon for these herbal doctors to also recommend using In regard to its application for common ailments, Hawaiians and other island communities traditionally prescribed noni to purge the bowel, reduce fever, cure respiratory infections such as asthma, ease skin inflammations, and heal bruises and sprains. In other words, noni was widely used and highly regarded as a botanical medicine.

    A Timely Reemer gence

    Today, the natural pharmaceutical actions of the chemical constituents contained in noni are scientif-ically emerging as valuable bot anical medicines. Tahitian “nono” intrigued medical practitioners decades ago; however, due to the eventual emergence of synthetic drugs, interest in this island botanical diminished until recent years. Ethnobot anists are once again rediscovering why Hawaiian people havet reasured and cultivat ed Morinda citrifolia for generations. Noni is now finding its way into western therapeutics and is referred to as “ the queen” of the genus Rubiaceae. Its ability to reduce joint inflammation and target the immune system have made it the focus of the modern scientific inquiry. Dr. Ralph Heinicke has conducted some fascinating studies on the chemical constituents of the Hawaiin noni fruit. His research centers on the proxeronine content of the fruit juice and how it profoundly influences human physiology. In addition, scientific studies investigating noni as an anti-cancer agent have been encouraging. It s conspicuous attributes and varied uses have elevat edits status to one of the best of the healing herbs. Today Morinda citrifolia is available in liquid, juice, freezedried capsules, or oil forms, and is considered one of nature’s most precious botanicals.

    TRADITIONAL USES OF NONI

    Throughout tropical regions, virtually every part of Morinda citrifolia was used to treat disease or injury. Its curative properties were well known and commonly employed. PatoaTama Benioni, a member of the Maoritribe from the Cook Islands and a lecturer on island plants explains: Traditionally Polynesians use noni for basically everything in the treatment of illness. Noni is a part of our lives. Any Polynesian boy will tell you he’s had exper ience with it . We use juice from its roots, its flowers, and its fruit... my grandmother taught me to use noni from the roots and the leaves to make medicine for external as well as internal use, and for all kinds of ailments, such as coughs, Boils, diseases of the skin, and cuts.15

    decoctions to stimulate delayed menst ruation.

  • • Noni was frequently utilized for its antiparasitic activity.
  • • Respiratory ailments, coughs, and colds were treated with noni.
  • • A juice made from pounding noni leaves, roots and fruit mixed with water was administered for diarrhea.
  • • Dried and powdered forms of the bark mixed with water and administ ered with a spoon treated infant diarrhea.
  • • Small pieces of fruit and root infused with water were given to kill intestinal parasites.
  • • Boiled bark decoctions were given as a drink for stomach ailments.
  • • Coughs were treated with grated bark.
  • • Charred unripe fruit was used with salt on diseased gums.
  • • Pounded fruit combined with kava and sugar cane was used to treat tuberculosis.
  • • Babies were rubbed with fresh, crushed leaves for serious chest colds accompanied by fever.
  • • Eye washes were made from decoctions for eye complaint s from flower extracts.
  • • Leaf infusions were traditionally taken to treat adult fevers.
  • • A mouthwash consisting of crushed ripe fruit and juice was used for inflamed gums in young boys.
  • • Pounded leaf juice was used for adult gingivitis.
  • • Sore throats were treated by chewing the leaves and swallowing the juice.
  • • Skin abscesses and Boils were covered with leaf poultices.
  • • Swelling was controlled with leaf macerations.
  • • Heated leaves were often used for arthritic joins and for ringworm.16

    XERONINE: THE SECRET OF NONI?

    One informed professional on the subject of noni is Dr. Ralph Heinicke, a biochemist who has researched the active compounds of noni fruit for a number of years. He discovered that the Hawaiin noni fruit contains an alkaloid precursor to a very vital compound called xeronine. Wit hout xeronine, life would cease. In Dr. Heinicke’s view, noni fruit provides a safe and effective way to increase xeronine levels, which exert a crucial influence on cell health and protction. His research suggests that the juice from the M. citrifolia fruit contains what could technically be considered a precursor of xeronine—proxeronine. This compound initiates the release of xeronine in the intestinal tract after it comes in contact with a specific enzyme which is also contained in the fruit .

    Because proteins and enzymes have so many varied roles within cell processes, the normalization of these proteins with noni supplemenation could initiate avery wide variety of body responses and treat many disease condit ions. Proteins are the most important catalysts found in the body. The beauty of obtaining a precursor to xeronine from the noni fruit is that the body naturally decides how much of this precursor to convert to xeronine. Disease, stress, anger, trauma and injury can lower xeronine levels in the body, thus creat ing a xeronine deficit . Supplementing the body with noni fruit is considered an excellent way to safely and naturally raise xeronine levels. It is the research and theories of Dr. Heinicke which have made the juice of the Hawaiin noni fruit a viable medicinal substance. He writes: Xeronine is analkaloid, a substance the body produces in order to activate enzymes so they can function properly. It also energizes and regulates the body. This par-ticular alkaloid has never been found because the body makes it, immediately uses it, and then breaks it down. At no time is there an appreciable, isolable amount in the blood. But xeronine is so basic to the functioning of proteins, we would die without it . Its absence can cause many kinds of illness.17 Because so many diseases result from an enzyme malfunction, Dr. Heinicke believes that using the noni fruit can result in an impressive array of curative applications. Interestingly, he believes that we manufacture proxeronine while we are sleeping. He proposes t hat if we could constantly supply our bodies wit h proxeronine from other sources, our need to sleep would diminish.18

    NONI PROCESSING

    How an herb is processed is crucial to how beneficial it is: this is especially true of noni, with its unique enzymes and alkaloids. Morinda citrifolia should be picked when the fruit is turning from its dark green immature color to its lighter green color, and certainly before it ripens to its white, almost translucent color. Once picked, noni, like aloe, will denature extremely quickly due to its very active enzymes. After harvesting, it should swiftly be flash frozen. This is similar to what is done to fish caught at sea to keep them f esh. This stops it from losing its potency while not damaging any of its constituents. To process noni, freeze-drying is recommended. This removes only the water without damaging any of this miracle plant’s vital enzymes and other phytonutrients like xeronine and proxeronine. This pure high-quality noni fruit juice powder is then encapsu-has a very harsh taste and an extremely foul smell, similar to the fruit it self . Other methods of processing include thermal processing, dehydrat ion and air drying. Thermal processing is generally found in liquids, while the dehydrat ed noni is then milled and encapsulated. Unfortunately both methods utilize high heat (110+°F) , which can deactivate many of the vital compounds that make noni so import ant . Air-drying is effect ive without using damaging heat but has serious quality control problems for commercial production.

    MODERN APPLICATIONS OF NONI

    Overview

    Noni possesses a wide variety of medicinal properties which originat e from its differing plant component s. The fruit and leaves of the shrub exert antibacterial activities. Its roots promote the expulsion of mucus and the shrinkage of swollen membranes making it an ideal therapeutic for nasal congest ion, lung infect ions, and hemorrhoids. Noni root compounds have also shown natural sedative properties as well as the ability to lower blood pressure.

    Leaf extracts are able to inhibit excessive blood flow or to inhibit the formation of blood clots. Noni is particularly useful for its ability to treat painful joint conditions and to resolve skin inflammations. Many people drink noni fruit extracts in juice form for hypert ension, painful menstruation, arthritis, gastric ulcers, diabetes, and depression. Recent studies suggest that its anticancer activit y should also be considered. Concerning the therapeutic potential of the Hawaiin noni fruit, Dr. Heinicke writes: I have seen the compound found in noni work wonders. When I was still investigating its possibilities, I had a friend who was a medical research scientist administer the proxeronine to a woman who had been comatose for three months. Two hour safter receiving the compound, she sat up in bed and asked where she was. . . . Noni is probably the best source of proxeronine that we have today.19 Studies and surveys combined support the ability of noni to act as an immunost imulant, inhibit the growth of certain tumors, enhance and normalize cellular function and boost tissue regeneration. It is considered a powerful blood purifier and contributor to overall homeostasis.

    xeronine, which appears to be able to regulate the shape and integrity of cert in proteins that individually contribute to specific cellular activities. Interestingly, this effect seems to occur after ingestion, inferring that the most active compound of noni may not be present in uneaten forms of the fruit or other plant parts. Some practitioners believe that xeronine is best obtained from a noni fruit juice precursor compound. The enzymatic reactions that occur with taking the juice on an empty stomach are what Dr. Heinicke believes set cellular repair intomotion.

    Cancer

    A study conducted in 1994 cited the anticancer activity of Morinda citrifolia against lung cancer. A team of scientists from the University of Hawaii used live laboratory mice to test the medicinal properties of the fruit against Lewis lung carcinomas which were artificially transferred to lung tissue. The mice that were left untreated died in nine to twelve days. However, giving noni juice in consistent daily doses significantly prolonged their life span. Almost half of these mice lived for more than fifty days.20 Research conclusions state that the chemical constituents of the juice acted indirectly by enhancing the ability of the immune system to deal with the invading malig-nancy by boosting macrophage or lymphocyte activit y. Furt her evaluation theorizes that the unique chemical constituents of Morinda citrifolia initiate enhanced T-cell activity, a reaction that may explain noni’s ability to treat a variety of infectious diseases. 21

    In Japan, similar studies on tropical plant extracts found that damnacanthol, a compound found in Morinda citrifolia, is able to inhibit the function of KRAS- NRK cells, which are considered precursors to certain types of malignancies.22 The experiment involved adding noni plant extract to RAS cells and incubating them for a number of days. Observation disclosed that noni was able to significantly inhibit RAS cellular function. Among 500 plant extracts, Morinda citrifolia was determined to contain the most effective compounds against RAS cells. Its damnacanthol content was clinically described in 1993 as “a new inhibit or of RAS function.” 2 3 The xeronine fact or is also involved in that xeronine helps to normalize the way malignant cells behave. While they are still technically cancer cells, they no longer function as cells with unchecked growth. In time, the body’s immune system may be able to eradicate these cells.

    Arthritis

    with arthritic disease. One link to arthritic pain may be the inability to properly or completely digest proteins which can then form crystal-like deposits in the joints. The ability of noni fruit to enhance protein digestion through enhanced enzymatic function may help to eliminate this particular phenomenon. In addition, the alkaloid compounds and plant met abolites of noni may be linked to its apparent anti-inflammatory action. Plant sterols can assist in inhibiting the inflammatory response which causes swelling and pain. In addition, the antioxidant effect of noni may help to decrease free radical damage in joint cells, which can exacerbate discomfort and degeneration.

    Immune System

    The alkaloid and other chemical compounds found in noni have proven themselves to effectively control or kill over six types of infectious bacterial strains including: Escherichia coli, salmonellatyphi (and other types) , shigella paradysenteriae, and staphylo - coccus aureaus.25 In addition, damnacanthol, was able to inhibitt he early antigen stage of the Epstein- Barr virus.

    The bioactive components of the whole plant, combined or in separate portions, have demonst rat - ed the ability to inhibit several different strains of bacteria. Anecdotal reports support this action in that noni seems particularly effective in shortening the duration of certain types of infection. This may explain why noni is commonly used to treat colds and flu. The chemical constituents found in noni and the possibility that they stimulate xeronine production— as well as initiate alkaloid therapy—may explain noni’s reputation for having immuno-stimulatory properties. Alkaloids have been able to boost phagocytosis which is the process in which certain white blood cells called macrophages attack and literally digest infectious organisms. Interestingly, the ant it umoraction of noni has been ascribed to an immune system response which involves stimulating T-cells. tropical regions during World War II learned of the fruit’s ability to boost endurance and stamina. Native cultures in Samoa, Tahiti, Raratonga and Australia used the fruit in cooked and raw forms. M. citrifolia is considered a tonic and is especially recommended for debilitated conditions.

    Antioxidant

    The process of aging bombards the body with free radicals which can cause all kinds of degenerative diseases. The xeronine theory promoted by Dr. Heinicke submit s t hat as our bodies age, we lose our ability to synthesize xeronine. To make matters worse, the presence of many environment altoxins actually blocks the production of xeronine as well. He believes that the proxeronine content of Hawaiin noni fruit juice can help to block these actions, thereby working as an antiaging compound.26 The phytonutrients found in noni assist in promot - ing cell nourishment and prot ect ion from free radicals created by exposure to pollution and other potentially damaging agents. In addition, Morinda citrifolia contains selenium, which is considered one of the best antioxidant compounds available.

    Diabetes

    While scientific studies are lacking in this particular application of noni, Hawaiians used various parts of the plant and its fruit to treat blood sugar disorders. Anecdotal surveys have found t hat noni is current ly recommended for anyone with diabetes.

    Pain Killer

    A 1990 study found that extracts derived from the Morinda citrifolia root have the ability to kill pain in animal experiments.27 Interest ingly, it was during this study that the natural sedative action of the root was also noted. This study involved a French team of scientists who noted a significant central analgesic activity in laboratory mice.28 Dr. Heinicke has stated, “Xeronine also acts as a pain reliever. A man wit h very advanced int est inal cancer was given three months to live. He began taking the proxeronine and lived for a whole year, pain-free.” 29

    Skin Healing Agent

    One of the most prevalent hist rical uses of noni was in poultice form for cuts, wounds, abrasions, burns and bruises. Using its fruit extract for very serious burns has resulted in some extraordinary healing. Because skin is comprised of protein, it immediately responds to the presence of xeronine.

    burn site throught he direct application of a noni poultice is considered quite effective by Dr. Heinicke and his colleagues, who have studied enzymatic therapy. Concerning burns, he has written: I believe that each tissue has cells which contain proteins which have receptor sites for the absorption of xeronine. Certain of these proteins are the inert for ms of enzymes which require absorbed xeronine to become active. This xeronine, by converting the body’s procol- langenase system into a specific protease, quickly and safely removes the dead tissue from burns.30

    Drug Addiction

    The xeronine link to treat ing drug addiction is based on the notion that flooding t he brain with extra xeronine can reverse the neurochemical basis for addiction. This natural alkaloid is thought to normalize brain receptors which subsequent ly results in the cessation of physiological dependence on a certain chemical like nicotine.3 1 The potential of Hawaiin noni as a natural stimulat or for t he production of xeronine may have profound implications in treating various types of addictions.

    Complementary Agents of Noni

  • cat’s claw papaya
  • kava kava
  • pau d’arco
  • bioflavonoids
  • selenium
  • germanium
  • grapeseed extract
  • echinacea
  • proteolytic enzymes
  • aloe vera
  • glucosamine
  • shark
  • cartilage

    PrimaryApplications of Noni

  • abrasions
  • arthritis
  • atherosclerosis
  • bladder infections
  • Boils bowel disorders
  • burns cancer
  • chronicfatigue syndrome
  • circulatory weakness
  • colds congest ion
  • cold sores constipation
  • depression diabetes
  • eye inf lammations fever
  • fract ures gastric ulcers
  • gingivit is headaches
  • high blood pressure immune
  • weakness
  • indigestion intestinal parasites
  • kidney disease menstrual



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=570)


    SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH ECHINACEA
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 24, 2005 03:54 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH ECHINACEA

    SPECIFIC ACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH ECHINACEA


    • Echinacea works like an antibiotic by simulating the immune system and has none of the side effects of antibiotics.
    • This herb is especially effective in treating sore throat, earaches, colds, and viral and glandular infections.
    • The action of echinacea blocks the receptor site of viruses on the surface of cell membranes which prevents the cell from becoming infected.
    • Echinacea helps the body rid itself of waste material and toxins. It can help reduce edema and water retention.
    • By activating and potentiating the immune system, echinacea can help treat infectious disease through its natural anti-viral, and antibiotic properties.
    • Studies suggest that echinacea may help to prevent certain types of cancer.
    • Echinacea has the ability to suppress the immune system when desireable. This makes it valuable in the t reatment of inflammatory diseases and allergic reactions.
    • Echinacea is an effective blood cleanser.
    • It can help relieve pain and swelling.
    • As a wash, it can treat skin disorders such as eczema, burns, psoriasis, herpes, canker sores and abscesses.
    • Echinacea stimulates the adrenal cortex, which naturally stimulates the release of cortisol, an anti-inflammatory agent.

    Combinations that Enhance Echinacea


    • Echinacea, Alfalfa, Bayberry, Capsicum. Comfrey, Ginger, Ginseng, Lobelia and Myrrh
    • Echinacea Poke Root, Golden Seal and Capsicum
    • Echinacea and Elcampane
    • Echinacea and Myrrh
    • Echinacea and Yarrow
    • Echinacea and Golden Seal
    • Echinacea and Ginseng
    • Echinacea and Licorice
    • Echinacea and Astragalus
    • Echinacea, Lapachok, Comfrey and Horsetail Primary Applications of Echinacea
    • Acne
    • Arthritis
    • Bites/Stings
    • Blood Disorders
    • Boils
    • Burns
    • Bronchitis
    • Canker Sores
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    • Colds
    • Congestion
    • Contagious Diseases
    • Diptheria
    • Ear Infections
    • Eczema
    • Fevers
    • Herpes
    • Gangrene
    • Glandular Disorders
    • Gums
    • Infections (viral and bacterial)
    • Inflammation
    • Influenza
    • Immune System Disorders
    • Kidney Infections
    • Lymph Gland Dysfunction
    • Mouth Sores
    • Mucus
    • Peritonitis
    • Prostate Disorders
    • Psoriasis
    • Rheumatism
    • Skin Disorders
    • Sore Throat
    • Tonsillitis
    • Wounds Secondary Applications
    • Allergies
    • Bronchitis
    • Cancer
    • Digestion
    • Diphtheria
    • Eczema
    • Fevers
    • Gangrene
    • Gingivitis
    • Staph Infections
    • Strep Infections
    • Syphilis
    • Typhoid Fever
    • Yeast Infections

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=418)


    Cancer and Echinacea
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 24, 2005 03:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Cancer and Echinacea

    Cancer and Echinacea

    Some experts believe that over the last 40 years, science has lost its battle with cancer. Progress has been slow and cancer mortality rates continue to rise despite the enormous amount of money spent on research. While most of us are aware of potential carcinogens which surround us at every turn, most of us do not take a preventative approach.

    In other words, even if we eat nutritiously and try to protect ourselves from toxin exposure, cancers still develop. The role of the immune system in cancer pre vention is significant to say the least. Why some people develop cancerous tumors and others do not may be linked to immune function.

    We’re all aware of the new emphasis on antioxidants today. Likewise, stimulating and strengthening the immune system may also provide significant protection against certain types of malignancy. It’s time to concentrate on why some of us don’t get cancer instead of focusing all our attention on why some of us do.

    In addition to boosting the immune system, echinacea has been shown to increase pro p e rdin levels in the body which may be responsible for its anti-cancer activity. By increasing the production and secretion of interferon, echinacea may help enable the body to neutralize carcinogens.15

    USDA researchers have found that echinacea contains a tumor inhibiting compound. This compound is an oncolytic lipid-soluble hydrocarbon. This particular substance which is found in the essential oil of echinacea, has shown its ability to inhibit lymphocytic leukemia and other types of cancers.

    One theory concerning this activity is that it probably does not involve creating a cytotoxic effect directly on cancer cells, but rather stimulates the action of anti-cancer cells such as natrual killer cells already present in the body.

    The fact that echinacea inhibits the enzyme, hyaluronidase may also be a factor. The same type of mechanism that breaks down the protective barrier around cells so that disease microbes can enter is thought to occur in the initial stages of tumor formation. Because echinacea prevents the formation of hyaluronidase, it may play a role in preventing the development of certain types of cancer.16

    Allergies and Echinacea

    German research has demonstrated echinacea’s ability to treat certain allergic reactions.17 It may be the cortisone-like activity of echinacea which accounts for its anti-inflammatory action. In the case of allergic reactions, the immuno-suppressive action of echinacea kicks in.

    An allergy occurs when the immune system becomes overly stimulated by the presence of an allergen. Each time that the allergen enters the body an allergic response is initiated. Echinacea can temper this cascade of symptoms by stabilizing mast cells, which are responsible for the histamine release which creates havoc with our bodies. This action results in a substantial reduction of allergy symptoms.

    The fact that echinacea actually suppresses the immune system is nothing less than remarkable. This herb might be referred to as “the botanical with a brain.” In other words, it can either stimulate or inhibit immune response as determined by the status of the body. Synthetic drugs do not have this ability.

    Healing Stimulation by Echinacea

    Because echinacea has antiseptic pro p e rties, it can be used both internally and externally to heal conditions such as bed sores, Boils, burns, ulcers and wounds of any kind. The inulin Echinacin B content of echinacea extracted from the rhizome gives echinacea its wound healing pro p e rties. It also accelerates the production of granulomatous tissue which is necessary for tissue healing in the body. 18

    Russian studies have shown that echinacea also helps to stimulate healing in wounds and prevents blood clotting.19

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Echinacea

    Because echinacea contains the polysaccharides inulin and echinacin it may be helpful in fighting stubborn viral infections such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Anytime the immune system becomes c o m p romised due to exhaustion, allergies, or depression, viral and bacterial invasion can occur. The chemical compounds contained in echinacea promote improved resistance to all septic or infectious conditions.20

    Prostate Disorders and Echinacea

    Echinacea is believed to be one of the best herbs in the treatment of enlarged prostate glands or other prostate disorders .21 Its anti-inflammatory properties are believed to help decrease swelling and irritation. Tests on mice have shown that using echinacea to control inflammatory responses has resulted in a decrease in edema or swelling.

    Weight Loss and Echinacea

    When combined with chickweed, echinacea has been used to promote weight loss.22 Scientifically, there is a lack of data to explain this particular effect.

    Echinacea and Skin Damage

    Any type of skin damage, whether caused by injury or infection can be treated with echinacea. One of the major actions of this herb is its ability to inhibit a specific enzyme that weakens connective tissue cells when they are exposed to certain microorganisms. This enzyme is called hyaluronidase .23 Whenever skin cells have been compromised by infectious organisms, echinacea can help prevent the spread of infection and speed the healing of the skin by preventing the break down of skin tissue at the cellular level. The anti-hyaluronidase action of echinacea, especially when applied as a poultice, can significantly prevent infection and enhance healing in burns, cuts, and abrasions.

    In addition, topical applications of echinacea are valuable in treating snake and insect bites. German research suggests that echinacea extracts and salves can benefit a variety of inflammatory skin conditions including: psoriasis, eczema, and herpes.24

    Yeast Inf ect ions and Echinacea

    Yeast infections are caused by an fungus called Candida albicans. This particular organism has been the subject of intense interest, research and controversy over the last several years. Standard medical therapies for yeast infections usually involve the use of antibiotics and antifungal drugs which can, in themselves, compromise the immune system. In laboratory tests using control groups, subjects who received echinacea we re compared to those who took standard antifungal treatments. In these cases, better results we re obtained with the echinacea.25 It is the polysaccharides contained in echinacea which seem to enhance the resistance of the immune system against the Candida fungus. This finding again stresses that echinacea may have important therapeutic applications for anyone who is in a weakened state and susceptible to opportunistic infections.26 Echinacea in both external and internal forms can be used to treat yeast infections. It has been suggested that anyone who has recurring yeast infections should consider adding echinacea extract to their repertoire of health supplements.

    Inflammation, Arthrit is and Echinacea

    Some laboratory tests have demonstrated that echinacea has certain anti-inflammatory pro p e rties which can help prevent or decrease the inflammation and swelling typically found in arthritis sufferers. Unlike the inflammatory response of the body to infections, the chronic inflammation of joint diseases such as arthritis is not desireable. In these cases, echinacea can help to inhibit chronic inflammation. Its effect is considered equal to approximately half of that resulting from steroid drugs like cortisone in arthritic patients.27

    Apparently, echinacea contains a specific factor which prevents inflammation and swelling when observed in certain laboratory tests. This particular tonic action may be quite helpful for people who suffer from chronic arthritis. Arthritis symptoms result from an immune response which creates inflammation in the joints. As is the case with allergies, when arthritis is present, echinacea inhibits the inflammatory action of the immune system.

    It is interesting to note that another component of echinacea actually boosts the inflammatory response when it is appropriate. For this reason, wounds respond well to echinacea.

    Steroids are commonly prescribed for inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. Because steroid drugs have so many negative side-effects, echinacea may prove to be an invaluable treatment for improper immune system reactions that cause conditions like arthritis.

    HIV and Echinacea

    At this writing, the possible role of echinacea on HIV has not been established. While some preliminary studies look promising, much more research is needed to determine whether or not echinacea’s stimulation of immune function will benefit AIDS patients.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=416)



  • VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.