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What Is The Difference Between DGL Licorice and Regular Licorice? Darrell Miller 2/13/12
ChewyZymes Darrell Miller 6/5/08
Best Bread ... Darrell Miller 6/13/05



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What Is The Difference Between DGL Licorice and Regular Licorice?
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Date: February 13, 2012 07:35 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is The Difference Between DGL Licorice and Regular Licorice?

Manypeople these days have heard of the name “Licorice” because of the various CHEWY rope-like flavored confectionaries or candies that are widely available these days and taste amazingly sweet. However, most of these people have never paid attention to what these candies are made of. The fact is that these candies contain the extract from Licorice roots. The Licorice roots are yielded from the Licorice or the Glycyrrhiza glabra plant. The extract from these roots has been used from quite a long time, both as a food ingredient and as an herbal remedy.

However, the Licorice root also has a derivative form known as deglycyrrhizinated or DGL Licorice. Both of these products offer numerous benefits and when taken under medical supervision they can effectively help in treating a variety of medical ailments.

Licorice plants originate from the Middle East, where harvesters peel the root out of the plant, dry them, cut them and eventually the Licorice roots arrive in other countries. Glycyrrhetic acid, cumestan derivatives, hydroxycoumarins, isoflavonoids, triterpene saponins, etc. are some of the active constituents contained in regular Licorice roots. One problem with using Licorice roots was that it was generally recommended that people use the extract from the root only under medical supervision. This was mostly because of the Glycyrrhetic acid contained in the root.

Thus, while DGL Licorice is indeed derived from Licorice root, however, glycyrrhetic acid is removed during the preparation of DGL. Therefore, this form of Licorice can be consumed much more safely without any worries. Furthermore, ulcers the esophagus, in the mouth and the stomach lining in the small intestine are more effectively treated with this derivative form of Licorice. DGL Licorice is presently widely available as chewable tablets, mouthwashes and even teas; therefore, people have a few choices as to how they want to take the derivative extract that comes from the root of the Licorice herb.

DGL is actually an effective treatment for digestive problems like heartburn and GERD or gastroesophageal reflux disease, ulcer, etc. What makes this derivative extract so beneficial is that the protective factors of the digestive system are accelerated and/or stimulated by its mechanism as a result of which the internal lining of the intestines in the stomach are protected against the formation of ulcer. Unlike typical antacids and anti-inflammatory drugs that basically neutralize or suppress gastric acid, the DGL extract functions quite differently.

Apart from helping treat the mentioned digestive problems, even minor skin conditions such as carbuncles, eczema, minor cuts and wounds can also be effectively treated by applying ointments that contain DGL. Apart from being better than the regular extract obtained from the Licorice root, the DGL derivative is also far more effective anti-ulcer compound in comparison to the typical medications that are available these days. It is usually advised that DGL should be taken at least twenty minutes before meals. And usually 2 to 4, 400 mg tablets are the standard dose of DGL that can be taken for chronic cases of ulcer. Therefore, those who are considering using Licorice root extract should instead go for DGL Licorice.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2574)


ChewyZymes
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Date: June 05, 2008 04:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CHEWYZymes

Positioning purpose: As the body’s biological workforce, enzymes are fundamental to healthy digestion and metabolism, energy production, and immune system balance. Unfortunately, very few people actually consume an adequate amount of enzymes from their day-to-day modern diets. As the body ages, it produces fewer enzymes with each passing year. Over time, the system-wide effects of insufficient enzymes can manifest in a number of unsuspected ways. Hormone and neurotransmitter production can decline, wounds may not heal as fast, fatigue can become a more regular occurrence, digestion may suffer, and the body may become more susceptible to infection.

Product Description: CHEWYZymes™ utilizes National Enzyme’s BioCore system, a broad spectrum digestive enzyme formulation in a natural berry-flavored, vegetarian chewable tablet that is perfectly suitable for both adults and children. It is designed to support improved digestion of meals. Digestive enzymes are essential to the body’s absorption and full use of food. The enzymes in this product are non-GMO. They have been proven in a controlled laboratory study by TNO Nutrition and Foods Research to have efficacy throughout the entire pH range of the digestive system and to not be degraded by acid in the stomach.* Each serving (2 lozenges) is equal to 1 capsule of our popular Optimal Digestive System.

Ingredients:

Ideal Users: Ideal for healthy adults and children who may benefit from additional enzymes in their diet.

Complementary Products: Consider taking this product with NOW® BerryDophilus, Kid Vits, or Chewable C.

Recommended Use: Adults: Chew 2 lozenges before a meal. Children: Chew 1 lozenge before a meal. Supporting Science
Rachman D. Unique Features and Application of Non-Animal Derived Enzymes. Clinical Nutrition Insights 1997;5(10):1-4.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure any disease.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1811)


Best Bread ...
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Date: June 13, 2005 07:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Best Bread ...

Best Breads by Jane Lane Energy Times, December 9, 1999

Few of us can resist the seductions of freshly baked bread, warm and fragrant, poised on the edge of a steaming bowl of soup or painted with an aromatic swath of rosemary scented oil. Even those of us from the most culinary challenged households can recall the pleasures of the simple plump white dinner roll or flaky biscuit piled in a basket on the dinner table.

Bread has blossomed from sideshow status beside the dinner plate to a full-scale mealtime headliner, a scrumptious star enriched by nutritious grains, herbs, fruits and vegetables.

Contemporary cooks build meals around crunchy cornbread or CHEWY focaccia, presenting soups or salads as satisfying counterpoints. Want to jump into the bread baking basket or hone your skills? Two top vegetarian chefs shared with Energy Times their passion for bread and their expertise in baking. See if you don't find that ardor contagious.

Nancy Lazarus is a chef at the famed Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, New York, established in 1973 to serve up natural fare with a homecooked, vegetarian emphasis. The bill of fare changes daily at Moosewood, but there's one constant: a cup or bowl of soup, a salad and a thick slice of bread. Some loyal customers have ordered the daily special for 20 years.

That's why bread occupies a cherished spot at Moosewood. Nancy Lazarus tells why and offers some of Moosewood's favorite bread recipes: "Cooking is like art; baking is like science; bread is like magic. No matter how much science you apply, you'll never have complete control: It'll do its own thing on some level, which is part of its charm, if you're charmed by that sort of thing. Breads come out differently depending on heat and humidity, the heat of the oven; yeast is a variable that can be slower or faster acting.

"There are bread machines, of course, and they work. But they're not as satisfying as the real thing, the kneading, which can be almost therapeutic, and the control over the ingredients to your own specifications.

"Bread is not that difficult. Know your own oven, to begin: Good insulation is important and how the heat travels around inside. Convection ovens are a wonderful thing.

"There are difficult breads we recommend you buy at a good bakery: baguettes, Italian, French and Cuban that are crusty outside and soft inside.

"But focaccia is easy. It's a yeasted bread that's better to make at home than buy because it's so fresh and you can control the toppings. It only requires one slow and one quick rising but you have to be there for a while.

"Then there are quick breads that use baking soda or powder, like cornbread. If you want a good meal at home and can make only one thing, make a quick bread. They're satisfying and delicious warm from the oven; and the aroma of bread fills the house. A corn bread with tomato soup for supper is a nurturing meal good for vegans.

"Popovers are fast and simple, a middle American 50s treat, but you do need a hot oven and 45 minutes. Also easy to make: sweet breads- carrot, banana, zucchini-and biscuits.

"To reduce the fat in denser quickbreads and cakes, use applesauce. It gives body and moistness.

"The number of wheat-sensitive people is rising dramatically. A theory I think makes sense is that in the last 30 years the varieties of wheat grown has been reduced to 1 or 2 that are more easily cultivated and harvested with the machinery available. People are overloaded with one type of wheat.

"Gluten is the offending substance in wheat and some oats; try rice, tapioca and potato flours, which are denser and more fine and don't produce a good crust. Improve the crust by baking in a preheated cast iron skillet.

"Also investigate chickpea flour. You don't make a loaf of bread with it- use it for flatbreads like papadam, which is in Indian cookbooks. And it's good for batter for vegetables.

"Spelt is the closest to wheat flour in consistency but some people can be sensitive to it.

"Visit a natural food store to check out the flours. The mills sometimes print handouts with recipes and a lot of those are real good, especially for what works with their flour. Or you may run into a baker who will whet your appetite with ideas and recipes.

"Bread is the supreme comfort food. It can speak to us, and reassure us. The magic of bread and how it varies: There's something appealing in that. In today's world, food is predictable, and that's reassuring to some people. At Moosewood, things are always different, and that's good."

Claire Criscuolo puts an intensely personal spin on the eclectically ethnic style of cooking at her esteemed vegetarian restaurant, Claire's Corner Copia. That 25-year-old institution in New Haven, Connecticut, reflects her zest for the freshest ingredients, robust flavors and inspired combinations. Claire, a teacher and advocate for healthful cuisine, pours her passion into her breadmaking as well:

"Healthy bread is like anything else-it has healthy ingredients. We use the best organic unbleached flour and yeast, pure vanilla, whole eggs (not dried and powdered), whole milk and organic sour cream. You want to use good, fresh ingredients. It's the essence of healthy cooking. "I tell my staff, 'Don't use your soup pot as a garbage pail. Bread is the same. If the ingredients aren't at their freshest for serving, then they aren't right for other uses in the kitchen.

"Our bread is very important at Claire's. We make a country white and a honey wheat in a pinwheel loaf-400 a day-and challah for the morning French toast with sauteed bananas or as buns for veggie burgers. "It's not practical to bake bread every day. We let our bread rise several times, punching it down again and again. For the home cook, it's time consuming. Even I'm happy to buy a good loaf of bread. "But anybody can bake bread. Combine flour, water and yeast and watch it grow! It's delights all your senses. And it a gratifies and satisfies. I was kneading it all by hand until we got up to 12 loaves a day.

"I love a good oatmeal molasses bread; a whole wheat bread with walnuts, rosemary and finely chopped sweet onion sauteed in olive oil for a roasted vegetable sandwich; or an anadama bread with split pea soup.

"Bread is part of a meal. It requires time and effort, but I can't think of many things worthwhile that don't."



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