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Men, here's a diet plan for a better memory: leafy greens, darkorange and red vegetables, berries, and a glass of OJ Darrell Miller 4/27/19
Drink hibiscus tea to naturally lower your blood pressure Darrell Miller 11/16/18
Centering Your Heart Darrell Miller 6/13/05




Men, here's a diet plan for a better memory: leafy greens, darkorange and red vegetables, berries, and a glass of OJ
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Date: April 27, 2019 10:00 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Men, here's a diet plan for a better memory: leafy greens, darkorange and red vegetables, berries, and a glass of OJ





According to a recent Harvard University study, the optimal diet for men who want to maintain strong cognitive health consists of eating leafy green vegetables, berries, orange and red vegetables, and orange juice. Researcher Changzheng Yuan studied 28,000 men over the course of 20 years, tracking their dietary habits and periodically testing their cognitive skills. The group that consumed the most vegetables, about six servings per day, performed better on thinking skills tests than the group that ate half that. There was also a positive association found between eating fruits and overall brain health.

Key Takeaways:

  • One study, centering on cognition, set out to track nearly 3000 men for two decades.
  • All the study participants were human adult, male professionals in the health field.
  • Every participant was questioned about specific food usage upon their entry and at four year intervals thereafter.

"Yuan noted that participants who ate all these fruits and vegetables at the start of the study – 20 years ago – enjoyed better cognitive and memory skills."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-05-a-diet-plan-for-a-better-memory.html

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Drink hibiscus tea to naturally lower your blood pressure
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Date: November 16, 2018 09:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Drink hibiscus tea to naturally lower your blood pressure





High blood pressure causes a number of negative aspects to the health, but it can be pretty difficult to reduce the numbers. There are medications the doctor can prescribe to treat high blood pressure, as well as special diets to follow to aid in the process. One of the additions that you should make to the menu is hibiscus tea. This special tea tastes great and has been proven to significantly improve the health, including by lowering the blood pressure.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Indian Journal of Pharmacology recently published the results of a study done in Nigeria, centering on the hibiscus.
  • The study showed that drinking hibiscus tea can naturally reduce Ace and lisinopril levels.
  • These reductions caused drinkers of hibiscus tea to experience significant drops in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

"While Western medicine advocates for the prescription of various drugs that are linked to harmful side effects, there are effective and natural ways that can help lower blood pressure, such as hibiscus tea."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-11-12-drink-hibiscus-tea-to-naturally-lower-your-blood-pressure.html

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Centering Your Heart
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Date: June 13, 2005 10:15 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Centering Your Heart

Centering Your Heart by Lisa James Energy Times, January 4, 2004

The romantic view of the human heart conjures up vivid images: The gallant lover, the committed enthusiast, the wise sage. When the romantic philosophy speaks of the heart, it speaks of things that lie at the very center of what it means to be human.

Western medical science, though, views the heart as a biomechanical pump-marvelously engineered to be sure, but a physical device amenable to surgical and pharmaceutical tinkering.

Between romance and technology lies the Eastern path. Eastern medical traditions, including Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and India's Ayurveda, see the heart as a seat of energy that must be kept in right relationship with the rest of the body.

TCM: Yin, Yang and Qi

The two great polarities of yin and yang are always shifting and rebalancing, according to Chinese philosophy, in our bodies as in everything else. Yin is dark, inward, cold, passive and downward; yang is light, outward, warm, active and upward.

The energy that keeps us alive is called qi, or life force. Organs, including the heart, are seen as places where qi resides. Organs supply and restrain each other's qi, which flows along carefully mapped meridians, or channels. Disease occurs when disturbances in qi interrupt the flow of energy so that an organ experiences either a deficiency or excess of yin/yang.

Circulatory Disturbances

According to Chinese precepts, disturbances in the heart affect the whole body. "The movement of the blood throughout the body, TCM circulation, is managed by multiple organs, which in turn interact with one another. A failure in any one part of this system can result in pathology," says Jonathan Simon, LAc, an acupuncture expert in private practice and at the Mind-Body Digestive Center, in New York.

"If there's a circulation issue, all the organ systems are going to be deprived of the nourishment supplied by the blood. The heart seems to have a dramatic effect on everything else in the body," says Ross Rosen, JD, LAc, CA, MSTOM, Dipl AC & CH (NCCAOM), of The Center for Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine P.A. in Westfield, New Jersey.

Connecting the Dots

While Western medicine probes the heart's physical functioning, TCM searches for energy imbalances by looking for patterns in a person's complaints.

"The wrong approach, in my opinion, is to try to relieve a Western ailment before you have established the proper pattern," Simon notes. "For example, I once had a 20-year-old, slim patient who came to me complaining of hypertension. She had seen several other acupuncturists before she got to my clinic, all of whom had prescribed the number-one formula for hypertension in TCM. When I interviewed her, I discerned a very different pattern from the classic one for hypertension. I gave her the formula associated with her pattern, not her symptom, and she had great relief over the next three weeks. After consultation with her Western physician, she began to cut back on her medication, and is now off of her meds."

TCM emphasizes taking a thorough medical history and using a sophisticated pulse-taking technique called the shen hammer method. Rosen calls pulse "the blueprint of one's health."

Root Causes

As in conventional Western medicine, TCM sees diet as a major culprit in heart disease. "Poor diet will cause problems depending upon on the constitution of the person," explains Simon. "For example, if one eats an excess of greasy and spicy food, that may build up and generate excess heat in the body. That may manifest itself as someone with a quick temper, red face and high blood pressure. On the other hand, a vegetarian who eats only salads may have low energy, a sallow complexion and low blood pressure. I try to tell my patients to keep balance in their diets, but to avoid cold, raw and greasy foods."

TCM also sees unsettled emotions as a source of illness. Stress "creates stagnation in qi and in the blood, eventually," Rosen says. "When stagnation is long or severe, heat starts being produced. We say that heat goes into the blood and steams the body, and heat starts to dry out the vessels. This process winds up turning into atherosclerosis-it kind of vulcanizes the vessel wall. It deprives the vessel of its moisture, which deprives it of its elasticity. Blood pressure starts to increase."

Managing one's emotions and not overworking body or mind is key, says Rosen: "The heart houses the spirit, the shen. When we see people with imbalances in emotion, the spirit starts to become agitated; once the spirit becomes agitated, the whole heart system goes out of balance."

Signs of agitation include insomnia, anxiety and an inability to feel joy, along with chest pain and heart palpitations. TCM uses nutrition, herbs and acupuncture to bring the body back into balance.

Ayurveda: Constitutional Energies

Like TCM, Ayurveda sees health as a matter of balancing the subtle energies that power our bodies. In Ayurveda, these energies exist as three doshas, or basic constitutions:

* Vata is cold, dry, light, clear and astringent. The skin of vata individuals is generally dry, thin, dark and cool, with hair that's curly, dark and coarse. Vatas change their minds readily and crave warmth.

* Pitta is sharp, light, hot, oily and pungent. Pitta people tend to have skin that's soft, fair, warm and freckled, along with fine, fair hair. Quick-witted, pittas hold strong convictions. They prefer coolness, since they tend to perspire profusely.

* Kapha is cold, heavy, oily, slow and soft. Kapha skin is pale, cold and thick, and kapha hair, which is usually brown, is thick and lustrous. Stable and compassionate, kaphas don't like the cold.

Few people are one, pure dosha. Most contain varying levels of vata, pitta and kapha (abbreviated VPK), generally with one predominating.

Doshas Unbalanced

Ayurveda views the heart as "governing emotions and circulating blood," according to Sophia Simon, MS, LAc, of the Karma Healing Center in Newtown, Pennsylvania. In Ayurveda "heart problems arise mainly due to improper diet and stressful lifestyles," which causes a "derangement of vata dosha. This leads to thickening of the arteries, resulting in angio-obstruction."

"Stress reduction is very important in heart disease," says Simon. "Meditation helps a lot with stress reduction, especially simple breathing exercises, yoga, etc." Some of Simon's recommendations have a familiar ring: Don't smoke, do exercise, eat a plant-based, low-fat diet. In addition, she says you should:

* Avoid coffee and other beverages that contain caffeine.

* Be loving and compassionate to all mankind.

* Do things in a casual way. Speak softly. Avoid anger, especially holding anger for a long time.

* Indulge in healthy, whole-hearted laughter.

In addition, Simon notes that garlic is an Ayurvedic herb "most useful for heart problems.

Keep your balance: In the great Eastern healing traditions, it is the key to keeping your heart healthy.



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