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  Messages 1-24 from 24 matching the search criteria.
Comparing the effects of turmeric and turmeric-containing herbal tablets on skin barrier function Darrell Miller 5/3/19
Hesperidin, a natural flavonoid in citrus fruit, found to prevent photoaging Darrell Miller 8/1/18
New Study to Explore Benefits of CBD for Veterans with PTSD Darrell Miller 6/28/17
health benefits of dhea and how it declines as we age Darrell Miller 11/8/16
What Are The Magnesium Malate Benefits? Darrell Miller 5/17/13
What Is the Life Span Of Human Cells And How Do Antioxidants Help? Darrell Miller 8/25/11
Hyaluronic acid and your cells, eyes, and skin Darrell Miller 12/17/10
Take Charge Of Your Health With Herbal Bio-Identical hormones Darrell Miller 11/4/07
Frequently asked Questions (FAQ) Darrell Miller 4/21/07
Hyaluronic Acid Double Strength 100mg – w/ Proline, Alpha Lipoic Acid & GrapeSeed extract. Darrell Miller 4/4/07
Lifespan Of Some Cells In The Human Body... 8 Essential monosaccharides Darrell Miller 10/26/06
California Proposition 65 (Prop 65) and Progesterone Cream Warnings Darrell Miller 2/17/06
Scientific References Darrell Miller 2/11/06
Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application Darrell Miller 11/22/05
Curcumin - Turmeric Extract Darrell Miller 8/19/05
Endnotes Darrell Miller 7/25/05
Conclusion Darrell Miller 7/25/05
HELP FOR FIBROMYALGIA? Darrell Miller 7/25/05
PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS Darrell Miller 7/25/05
WHY DO SO MANYWOMEN SUFFER FROM HORMONE IMBALANCES? Darrell Miller 7/25/05
WHY TOPICAL APPLICATION OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE? Darrell Miller 7/25/05
OTHER BIOLOGIC BENEFITS OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE Darrell Miller 7/25/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/22/05
Saw Palmetto for treating prostate related problems. Darrell Miller 5/13/05



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Comparing the effects of turmeric and turmeric-containing herbal tablets on skin barrier function
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Date: May 03, 2019 03:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Comparing the effects of turmeric and turmeric-containing herbal tablets on skin barrier function





A team from the University California, Davis recently completed a study to see what impact turmeric-containing herbal supplements have on sebum production or transepidermal water loss, and to compare this with the effects of pure turmeric supplements. The 28 volunteers who completed the full test took the turmeric-containing herbal supplement, a supplement with only turmeric, or a placebo for four weeks. While none of the treatments impacted sebum production of the skin, the turmeric-containing supplement did reduce transepidermal water loss, which suggests that it improves the skin’s barrier function.

Key Takeaways:

  • 30 individuals were used in this study and they were given either a placebo, a turmeric supplement, or a herbal supplement that contained turmeric.
  • At the beginning and the end of the study which required the participants to take supplements twice a day, the researchers evaluated facial sebum and transepidermal water loss.
  • It was found that intervention supplements did not result in any side effects but herbal supplements containing turmeric had no effect on facial sebum.

"A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food reported that turmeric-containing herbal supplements can be used to improve skin barrier function."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-29-comparing-the-effects-of-turmeric-and-turmeric-containing-herbal-tablets-on-skin-barrier-function.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6249)


Hesperidin, a natural flavonoid in citrus fruit, found to prevent photoaging
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Date: August 01, 2018 05:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hesperidin, a natural flavonoid in citrus fruit, found to prevent photoaging





Hesperidin, a natural flavonoid in citrus fruit, found to prevent photoaging

A recent study has revealed a new treatment for skin exposure to UVB rays. Hesperidin is a compound found in many common citrus fruits, like oranges, and has more health benefits besides helping with the impacts of UVB rays. According to the paper, hesperidin also has impacts on wrinkles, aging, and inflammation of the skin. All of these benefits were confirmed through initial testing on mice. Scientists are hopeful for the future of hesperidin in skincare and treatment.

Key Takeaways:

  • A recent study displayed that hesperidin, a compound in citrus fruit, can have important skin benefits.
  • Hesperidin has been shown to help with photoaging, which occurs when skin is exposed to UVB rays.
  • Hesperidin also may help with wrinkles and inflammation of the skin.

"Results showed that mice that were treated with hesperidin had improved length and depth of wrinkles, as well as inhibited the development of skin thickness and epidermal hypertrophy."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-07-30-hesperidin-prevent-photoaging.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5686)


New Study to Explore Benefits of CBD for Veterans with PTSD
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Date: June 28, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: New Study to Explore Benefits of CBD for Veterans with PTSD





There is a Cannabidiol (CBD) study that involves veterans suffering from PTSD, and the effects that the CBD has on them and their trauma. The study is taking place in Florida, under the guidance of Wes Clark jr., a veteran who is passionate about assuring veterans that they can have safe access to cannabis. It is being funded by Alternative Health. Together they hope to bring easier access to CBD as well as sharing their findings with the medical community.

Key Takeaways:

  • There is a study being done to explore the use of CBD on veterans with PTSD.
  • The study will explore alternate delivery systems such as tablets that dissolve under the tongue and transdermal patches.
  • Clinical trials are necessary to change the thinking around using CBD in medicine.

"It is unquestionable that veterans receive comfort and relief from cannabis and CBD"

Read more: http://terpenesandtesting.com/new-study-explore-benefits-cbd-veterans-ptsd/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4901)


health benefits of dhea and how it declines as we age
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Date: November 08, 2016 07:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: health benefits of dhea and how it declines as we age

The importance of DHEA to human health cannot be overlooked. Found in the bloodstream, dhea is the furthermost plentiful hormone steroid. It is secreted in the brain, testes and ovaries and produced by the adrenal glands. Adrenal glands is the major producer of DHEA hormone. This hormone is changed to other hormones essential in the body such as estrogen and androgen.

Health benefits of DHEA

  • It enhances appearance of the skin. This is because it keeps the skin hydrated, intensifies epiDermal thickness, boosts manufacture of sebum and controls facial skin coloring in old people.
  • Limits the level of cholesterol in the body
  • Facilitates proper functioning of the brain thus heightening cognitive abilities of individuals.
  • When dhea is taken orally for a couple of months, it assists in improving sexual performance in men by stimulating sexual desire, controlling erectile dysfunction and yielding sexual gratification.
  • Dhea is attributed to boosting moods by reducing levels of depression and anxiety.
  • Plays a role in formation of bones by improving bone mineral density.

How DHEA levels diminishes with age

As we age, dhea levels biologically diminish. According to research by experts, in our young years, plenty of dhea is secreted since it is vital for brain development and growth. This gradually continues until the age of 25 years after which the levels start to decline. The impact of the diminishing levels of dhea are mostly felt when we hit 40 years and above. This is manifested in terms of difficulties in remembering information, low levels of libido particularly in women, dry skin and increased anxiety.

DHEA is a hormone that is essential to human beings as it aids in counteracting the aging process, making us feel good and above all improving our overall health. Taking dhea supplements for those aged 40 years and above will help keep at bay problems associated with low levels of DHEA.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3410)


What Are The Magnesium Malate Benefits?
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Date: May 17, 2013 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Magnesium Malate Benefits?

magmalatemolicule

A combo Mineral:

Magnesium Malate is a combination of Malic acid and magnesium. Both compounds come together to form a powerful supplement that is crucial for the body. Magnesium is used in more than 300 processes in the body making it one of the most needed minerals in the body. It is also found in the bones mostly and is synthesized from the locations to aid in optimizing many bodily functions.

Malic acid is an organic ingredient mostly found in the fruits. The compound combines with compounds forming salts known as Malates. The combination of Malic acid and magnesium forms magnesium Malate which is an important compound when it comes to the generation cellular energy. It is also important when it comes to a variety of physical and muscular conditions. The compound also comes in handy to treat a number of conditions in the body when used as a supplement.

These include;

Constipation

If you are suffering from constipation, this is one to go. It is commonly used to loosen stools and induce laxative actions to clean the system. It is a perfect detox agent and is famously used in colonoscopy and bowel surgery. The Malic part of the compound is ideal for the laxative action giving relief to anyone suffering from constipation. The combination of the two compounds enhances these effects making them more potent in effectiveness.

Fibromyalgia Pain Relief

This compound is used to induce relief on patients suffering fro fibromyalgia. This condition will often cause muscle stiffness, muscoskeletal pain and chronic severe pains. These supplements are used to exponentially reduce the effects that come with the disorder. A study was done and published in the Journal of Nutritional Medicine where 15 patients were placed under observation with the treatment. All patients reported increased comfort when using the supplements in relation to fibromyalgia symptoms.

Solving Syndromes of chronic fatigue

Magnesium Malate enhances the production of energy at a cellular level increasing the condition of the individual using it. The process eliminates the chronic Fatigue syndrome and its effects allowing the individual to enjoy a wholesome life. This also deals with any accumulated stress and distraction factors that come with a tired out body. A rejuvenated body enhances performance in all aspects of life making this product one major energy and performance booster in the long run.

Other ailments

The combination can also be used to target heart related disease reducing the risk of experiencing closed valves and blood vessels. It is used to treat heart related diseases in the hospitals. Magnesium is also ideal when it comes to dealing with skin breakouts ranging from boils to skin ulcers. The compound will target many functions of the body through a domino effect. No matter how minute the effect may be on a general sense, it is important for the running of the boy functions such as the heart, nervous system and the epiDermal system. The compound is one of the most widely used supplements from a varied number of conditions producing great results.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2838)


What Is the Life Span Of Human Cells And How Do Antioxidants Help?
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Date: August 25, 2011 10:38 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is the Life Span Of Human Cells And How Do Antioxidants Help?

 Antioxidant Multi-Plex 60ctThe human body is composed of many different cells. These cells have varying functions as well as life span. The human cells, in general, are very complex. Some cells may last only within a day while others may be for life. Like for example, one blood component known as neutrophil lasts only within 24 hours. On the other hand, another blood component which is red blood cell has a life span of 120 days. One human cell which lasts for a lifetime is the stem cell. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells which are the source of blood cells. They supply the body throughout life both with red and white blood cells. Here is a brief outline of some cells of the human body with their corresponding life spans.

1. Granulocytes such as eosinophils, basophils and neutrophils – half day to 3 days

2. Stomach and colon lining cells – 2 to 4 days

3. Sperm cells – 2 to 3 days

4. Epithelial cells of the small intestines – 5 to 7 days

5. Platelets – 10 days

6. Skin epiDermal cells – 14 to 28 days

7. Lymphocytes, macrophages and endothelial cells – 2 months to a year, but may vary

8. Pancreatic cells – a year or more

9. Bone cells – 25 to 30 years

As shown above, these human cells have an expected time of death. However, if the body is exposed to harmful toxins, their life span significantly decreases. As we know for a fact, the body undergoes many biological reactions almost every second. The reaction is called oxidation process which is essential to the body. However, such reaction has harmful by – products in the form of free radicals. Free radicals can cause the body significant damage. Free radicals can cause destruction and death of the healthy cells of the body and also affect the body’s cellular division. This kind of chemicals can potentially tamper DNA replication during cell division. Once cellular division is tampered, abnormal growths would likely happen. Aside from the naturally occurring free radicals, external stressors can also cause damage to the cells of the body. Some of these include pollutants, harmful chemicals and irritants. These harmful chemicals can potentially lead to the development of certain disease conditions such as heart diseases, stroke and cancer.

Fortunately, there are many antioxidants which can greatly help in the prevention of free radical damage by protecting the cells of the body. Antioxidants are molecules which can effectively prevent the oxidation of other molecules. There are many natural antioxidants found among plants and animals. Some common antioxidants are glutathione, vitamin C and vitamin E. Other nutrients which have antioxidative property include beta – carotene, lutein, lycopene, vitamin A and selenium. Fruits and vegetables are great sources of antioxidants. Nuts, grains, meat, poultry products and fish are also good sources of such cell – protecting chemicals. In addition, dietary supplements of antioxidants are also widely available in the market. However, health experts highly suggest that before supplementation of antioxidants, medical evaluation must be done first to be completely safe.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2407)


Hyaluronic acid and your cells, eyes, and skin
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Date: December 17, 2010 10:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hyaluronic acid and your cells, eyes, and skin

Hyaluronic Acid

Discovered in 1934, hyaluronic acid can be found anywhere there is the need for connective tissue in your body. Your joints, your eyes and your heart all contain hyaluronic acid, and a shortage can lead to a wide range of bodily defects, including the appearance of accelerated aging. It is a glycosaminoglycan, a form of polysaccharide that is not only found in connective tissue and epithelial and neural cells, but is also important in the growth and renewal of body cells.

baxylWe shall discuss here how hyaluronic acid affects specific areas of your body, and what the effect of a deficiency would mean, but also keeping in mind that an excess of this polysaccharide can also have a serious impact on your health although it offers few side effects worth noting.

Hyaluronic Acid and Your Joints

The highest concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) in your body is found in the synovial fluid, the fluid lubricating contained in your joints, and it is also plays an important role in maintaining the function of cartilage in keeping your joints flexible and well cushioned. It is chemically a glycosaminoglycan that is formed from glucosamine and glucuronic acid. Its production is boosted by chondroitin, which is why glucosamine and chondroitin are commonly used supplements for the treatment of arthritis.

Specifically, HA joins with collagen and elastin to produce cartilage, and also increases the supply of synovial fluid that maintains lubricity within the joints. Without the synovial fluid your cartilage would soon become worn away and your bones would grind together, eventually seizing up. By taking hyaluronic acid orally as a supplement, you can help to maintain healthy joints by maintaining the integrity of the cartilage and the quality of the synovial fluid.

Because the cartilage contains no blood vessels, it is reliant on the synovial fluid to keep it supplied with nutrients, and specifically with HA which is a large part of its structure. Without this important polysaccharide your body would not be able to function: no mobility, dry flaky skin and poor or no eyesight.

Hyaluronic Acid and Your Skin

Hyaluronic acid occurs in the lower layers of your skin where it helps to maintain a smooth and full appearance to your skin due to its hygroscopic nature in absorbing up to a thousand times its weight of water. For this reason HA is frequently used in skin moisturizing treatments and lotions.

HA is not found inside body cells, but appears to be restricted to the extracellular regions between cells where its moisturizing properties are critical in maintaining suppleness. Elastin requires copious quantities of water to remain elastic or it would otherwise become brittle: that is why our skin looks dry and wrinkled when we age. It is due to a lack of moisture: the moisture that hyaluronic acid can bring to the table. The problem is that HA reduces with age and in order to maintain our youthful looks we have to take a supplement.

Hyaluronic acid doesn't last long in your skin: it has to be renewed constantly and each day about 50% of the HA content of your skin is lost. It takes about two weeks for the same degree of loss to occur in the synovial fluid of your joints. The look of your skin depends to a very large extent on the extracellular matrix, or what is contained between your skin cells. The more moisture there then the smoother and plumper your skin will appear.

As you age, your hyaluronic acid production drops and so your skin becomes increasingly more depleted of moisture. This causes it to dry up and wrinkle. Were there one substance that I would choose as the elixir of life it would be HA, because by taking a regular supplement your natural daily loss is replenished and your skin is given a hand to maintain its soft, moist plumpish look that helps you to keep you looking young.

Hyaluronic Acid and Your Eyes

The vitreous humor is the liquid inside your eyeball, and it contains a large amount of hyaluronic acid. It helps absorb shock and to maintain the shape of the eyeball. The HA is so important that your body has developed a special set of cells known as the hyalocytes of Balazs that are believed to promote the renewal of hyaluronic acid, and also possibly its breakdown.

There is still a lot of research going on into this but the importance of HA in the vitreous humor and other aqueous area of your body is not in question. It helps to retain water and give structure to the liquid media within your body, whether that is between the bones of your joints, in the Dermal and epiDermal regions of your skin to keep it supple, or in your eyeball. In fact, it is believed to take up 70% - 80% of your eye, and helps to keep the retina in place exactly where it has to be for your eyesight to work.

Cogent Solutions Group LLC - Baxyl 6 fl oz Syrup Because Hyaluronic acid is:

a) present between the cells in every tissues in your body, and

b) a consumable, in that it gets used up rapidly, and

c) your biochemistry's ability to regenerate it reduces with age,

a supplement is the ideal way in which to maintain its levels in your extracellular system. In some instances injections are given, particularly in expensive anti-wrinkling treatment, but studies have shown that hyaluronic acid baxyl taken as an oral supplement shows an improvement after an average of 3 months treatment.

It should be understood that the average person has around 15 grams hyaluronic acid in their body, of which 5 grams is continually degraded and synthesized daily. When you reach an age that your ability to generate HA is impaired, then an oral supplement will be less expensive than injections, the hyaluronic acid of which will also be degraded with time. It won't be long before you need more treatment, and oral supplements are less expensive than private hypodermic injections.

A Hyaluronic acid supplement baxyl can be taken to improve the suppleness and appearance of youthful skin, help maintain the integrity of your eyesight and help to reduce the symptoms of arthritis and many other conditions brought on by a reduction in the synovial fluid and hydration of the skeletal and connective tissues of your body. In other words, it helps to keep you looking younger for longer and to keep your joints and your eyesight in good health.

Have you had your daily dose of hyaluronic acid today?

Baxyl is a liquid form of hyaluronic acid that is easy to take and easily assimilated into the body because its a liquid.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2210)


Take Charge Of Your Health With Herbal Bio-Identical hormones
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Date: November 04, 2007 03:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Take Charge Of Your Health With Herbal Bio-Identical hormones

Bioidentical hormones assist women in overcoming acute menopausal symptoms, while improving skin. They help by strengthening bones, keeping the mind sharp, promoting energy and well-being, and helping to preserve vaginal tone and resist vaginal dryness. In men, these hormones add energy and vitality, while improving muscle tones and mental sharpness. Bioidentical hormones (BHRT) are exact duplicates of the hormones that are produced by the body. However, they are much more easily metabolized by the body into safe forms of estrogen than their counterparts, which stimulate toxic metabolites. When they are used in physiologic amounts, bioidenticals carry much fewer risks than synthetic hormones. However, despite the fact that research supports their use and proves them safe alternatives to prescription drugs, few physicians are actually using these hormones in their practices.

Those patients, who wish to address menopausal and andropause symptoms, or to achieve lifelong hormonal balance in order to prevent illness, often do not know where to go to find a comprehensive bioidentical hormone replacement program. Instead, they read whatever they can to formulate a plan and purchase various products that are available over the counter, often spending precious time and money on programs and products that don’t do what they’re expected to do. One of the most common errors among people is putting together a program based solely on symptoms instead of first checking hormone levels. Symptoms may overlap from one hormone pattern to another. If you try to replace or augment specific hormones without having an accurate test of the levels first, your results will seldom be good.

If your doctor is prescribing transDermal hormones, make sure to do a saliva self-test to measure your hormones levels as it is much more accurate and revealing than other types of tests. You can submit your samples to Mead Labs, where you will actually receive a telephone consultation from a health professional to interpret your results followed by a program of products prescribed especially for you from one of their medical professionals. With your own results, you can learn a lot about the exact state of your hormones instead of blindly guessing from symptoms which may be similar. For example, men may not need testosterone shots or transDermal patches, as the results may show estrogen dominance. The answer for this is not adding more testosterone, because the man could be converting testosterone into estrogen, but instead a program including special herbs and nutrients may be much more beneficial. No matter your gender, your health professional at Mead Labs will design a safe and effective program based solely on bioidentical hormones, herbs, and nutrients first. In the past years, when prescription, non-bioidentical HRT was used by any women with menopausal symptoms, there was no testing to find out what kind of imbalance was actually occurring. Proponents of BHRT are trying to ensure that this method of prescribing the same combination and amounts of medications to everyone is not used with natural hormones. Because hormone profiles and levels can vary significantly from person to person, even those people in the same gender, testing hormones levels and obtaining recommendations from a medical professional who is experienced in BHRT are the key points to ensure you benefit from this therapy.



--
Hormone Tesk Kits at Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1617)


Frequently asked Questions (FAQ)
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Date: April 21, 2007 02:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Frequently asked Questions (FAQ)

Q. What are the benefits from drinking George’s Aloe Vera liquid?

A. Aloe has been used for centuries to help promote a healthy digestion and bowel movements. Soothes digestive tract. Evidence through different studies seem to indicate that beneficial properties in the Aloe help in allowing the body to rebuild mucous membranes and promotes over-all good health.

Q. How often should I drink George’s Aloe Vera liquid?

A. For optimum results, we recommend drinking 2 ounces in the morning before breakfast and 2 ounces in the evening before bedtime.

Q. Why do you remove the polysaccharides?

A. The Aloe Vera Barbadensis Miller plant has over 200 beneficial components. Although it is believed mucopolysaccharides have beneficial elements, this molecular chain is very large making it difficult for the body to utilize. The complete mucopolysaccharide chain is also the cause of rapid spoilage and breakdown of the product, which is why most other brands contain unhealthy preservatives. We breakdown the mucopolysaccharide chain extracting the sugars in order to eliminate adding any preservatives and increasing shelf life. We also theorize, through our testing, that the mucopolysaccharides in their full form are not the only “silver bullet” in helping the body heal. Our distillate contains the naturally occurring elements found in mucopolysaccharides in a low molecular weight more easily absorbed by the body.

Q. What is a distillate?

A. A distillate is a liquid that consists of pure components of a plant in its more basic form. It is unique in that a distillate is comprised of a low molecular weight thereby enabling the body to assimilate its components in the purest form at the cellular level. This occurs both internally, and through the skin’s Dermal layers, at a much higher rate than would occur if the plant’s components were introduced in any other manner.

Q. How long should I be drinking George’s Always Active Aloe Vera before seeing any results?

A. Most people begin to see results anywhere from two weeks to one month. Remember, out bodies are continually shedding cells. It is very important to continue using even after you attain the results you are looking for.

Q. Why doesn’t Georges Aloe taste bad?

A. Most Aloe Vera products are slimy and have a very bitter taste. We remove the chemical antagonists such as the aloins and Anthraquinone that are mildly toxic. These antagonists can cause stomach cramping, diarrhea and in some cases vomiting. As a result, our product has no adverse flavor. Unlike other brands, our product is safe for pregnant women, nursing mothers and people at all ages.

Q. Is George’s Aloe Organically grown?

A. Yes! Although we do not seek the organic certification, George’s aloe is continually tested for over 50 different chemicals that may contaminate the plants. To date tests have come back negative for any contamination.

Q. Does distillation just turn it to water?

A. George’s is fractionally distilled, meaning it is broken down into various parts, with the undesirable elements removed. It is then re-assembled. Products such as Jack Daniels & Petroleum are distilled products and would never be confused with water.

Q. Is your product diluted?

A. No. It takes 23 lbs of plant to make one gallon of George’s liquid Aloe. There is no dilution, preservatives or additives.

Q. Can I take to much of George’s Aloe?

A. We have had no ill affects reported from people who have consumed more than the suggested “2 ounces twice daily.”

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1528)


Hyaluronic Acid Double Strength 100mg – w/ Proline, Alpha Lipoic Acid & GrapeSeed extract.
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Date: April 04, 2007 09:38 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hyaluronic Acid Double Strength 100mg – w/ Proline, Alpha Lipoic Acid & GrapeSeed extract.

Hyaluronic Acid has emerged as one of the most significant anti-aging supplements in the natural products industry. As a mucopolysaccharide that occurs naturally within the human body, the highest concentrations of Hyaluronic Acid are found in the skin, eyes, and articular cartilage. Hyaluronic acid works by absorbing water within the body, which in turn supports the formation of effectiveness of the gel-like matrix that protects healthy cell structures from dehydration and free radical damage. Ongoing studies continue to suggest that it may help support some of the body’s most vital functions.*

Strong, Healthy Joints

At birth and well into our youth, the human body produces ample amounts of Hyaluronic acid. These levels decline, however, based on our physical activity levels, dietary habits, and other hereditary and environmental factors. Hyaluronic acid is a key component of synovial fluid and cartilage, and serves as one of the body’s most vital natural lubricants. Joint structures lack blood vessels, and there for relay on Hyaluronic acid to transport fluids and nutrients. Many structural and articular challenges have been traced back to insufficient Hyaluronic levels.

Wrinkles and Fine Lines

Healthy, wrinkle-free skin requires a constant supply of water. Without enough, Dermal cells located deep below the skin’s surface can becomes deprived of the compounds they need, thus leaving the skin dry and dehydrated. Hyaluronic acid attracts and binds large amounts of water at the cellular level to ensure that the skin has everything it needs to remain smooth, elastic, and youthful-looking.

Wound Healing

Some published reports suggest that a child’s ability to produce abundant amounts of Hyaluronic acid may explain why they heal so quickly, often without permanent scarring. Because of the many roles it plays within the body’s connective and epiDermal tissues, Hyaluronic acid is becoming more and more accepted as a way to help encourage the body’s natural wound-healing processes.

Vision and Eye Health

In addition to cartilage and synovial fluid, the eyes contain some of the body’s highest concentrations of Hyaluronic acid. In fact, the vitreous humor (the Eye’s Core) is made up almost entirely of Hyaluronic acid. This gel-like structure absorbs shock, supports vision, and protects the retina from being damaged. It is believed that many common vision and ocular problems may be a result of poor Hyaluronic acid production during adulthood.*

Each Vcap contains 100mg of Hyaluronic acid, along with Alpha Lipoic Acid, standardized Grape Seed Extract, and pharmaceutical grade L-Proline for support. Compare Now’s 100mg formula to some 50mg formulas that do not include supporting antioxidants for the same price, and the choice is clear!



--
Let Vitanet Help you Look, Feel and Live Healthier with Hyaluronic Acid

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1504)


Lifespan Of Some Cells In The Human Body... 8 Essential monosaccharides
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Date: October 26, 2006 12:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Lifespan Of Some Cells In The Human Body... 8 Essential monosaccharides

LIFESPAN OF SOME CELLS IN THE HUMAN BODY

CELL TYPE

LIFESPAN

Granulocytes:eosinophils basophils, neutrophils

10 hours to 3 days

Stomach lining cells

2 days

Sperm cells

2-3 days

Stomach lining cells

2 days

Colon cells

3-4 days

Epithelia of small intestine

1 week or less

Platelets

10 days

Skin epiDermal cells

2 - 4 weeks

Lymphocytes

2 months - a year (highly variable)

Red blood cells

4 months

Stomach lining cells

2 days

Macrophages

months - years

Endothelial cells

months - years

Pancreas cells

1 year or more

Bone Cells

25 - 30 years

 

the 8 Essential sugars (monosaccharides) needed for optimal health!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1412)


California Proposition 65 (Prop 65) and Progesterone Cream Warnings
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Date: February 17, 2006 06:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: California Proposition 65 (Prop 65) and Progesterone Cream Warnings

Scientific Safety Information on Progesterone

California Proposition 65 (Prop 65) and Progesterone Cream Warnings Amy Kosowski, M.S., LDN

Prop 65: What is it?

Proposition 65, the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 , was enacted as a ballot initiative in the state of California in November of 1986. The Proposition was intended by its authors to protect California citizens and the State's drinking water sources from chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm, and to inform citizens about exposures to such chemicals 1.

Proposition 65 requires the Governor to publish, at least annually, a list of chemicals “known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity .” Progesterone, as well as other human hormones, appear on this list 1. Set forth below is the information that formed the bases for the addition of progesterone to the Prop 65 list by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (“OEHHA”).

Prop 65 and Progesterone - Perspective

In August of 2004, OEHHA published a document stating the rationale for the addition of Progesterone to the Prop 65 list 2. This document is a review of human, animal, and in vitro studies that used progesterone, synthetic progestins, and other progestagens (progesterone-like compounds). Experimental data from the use of all of these compounds were mixed together, along with data from studies using other steroid hormone derivatives (mainly synthetic estrogens) and many different methods of administration.

Although this review covered the existing scientific literature on progesterone and its many derivative compounds, there are many problems with the type of data analysis that was employed.

First, progesterone is endogenous to humans and necessary for bone and reproductive health while progestins and other synthetic progestagens are not. Progestins and progestagens are similar in molecular structure to progesterone, but when they bind to progesterone receptors, their effects are usually much stronger and more likely to cause abnormal physiologic responses 3, 4. Furthermore, the majority of the studies concerning the health effects of these progesterone derivatives involved combinations with synthetic estrogens 2-4.

There were very few studies mentioned in the 2004 document that used exclusively bio-identical progesterone (the kind found normally produced by humans as well as that used in progesterone creams), and those studies that did were at supra-physiologic doses (very high). The doses of progesterone ranged from 10-1000 times the dose usually recommended by manufacturers of progesterone creams 2, although in a few cases, the doses were closer to the recommended dosages.

The route of administration of progesterone is also at issue. All of the studies cited in the OEHHA document used either oral, injected, or suppository forms of hormones; none was conducted using transDermal creams. This is an important consideration because hormones absorbed through the skin are metabolized differently than hormones that are administered via other routes 5, 6.

Putting it Together

While the OEHHA Prop 65 reference document on progesterone 2 is a broad survey of the published scientific literature examining the potential effects of the pharmaceutical use of progesterone and its synthetic derivatives, it is not clear at all that these effects would be seen with the use of low-dose progesterone creams.

The OEHHA Prop 65 progesterone document evaluates a broad range of information regarding progesterone and synthetic materials that are not natural progesterone. The conclusion reached was not challenged, and it is on that basis that progesterone creams now carry the Prop 65 warning.



References:

1 California OEHHA Web Site: //www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65/p65faq.html .

2 Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Section, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency (2004) Evidence on the developmental and Reproductive Toxicity of Progesterone.

3 Campagnoli C, Abba C, Ambroggio S, Peris C (2005) Pregnancy, progesterone and progestin in relation to breast cancer risk. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 97(5):441-450.

4 Campagnoli C , Clavel-Chapelon F , Kaaks R , Peris C , Berrino F (2005) Progestins and progesterone in hormone replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer. Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 2005 96(2):95-108.

5 de Lignieres B, Dennerstein L, Backstrom T (1995) Influence of route of administration on progesterone metabolism. Maturitas 21:251-257.

6 Gompel A, et al. (2000) Progestins were also proapoptotic in normal as well as in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. Steroids 65(10-11):593-598.

7 Bu SZ ( 1997) Progesterone induces apoptosis and up-regulation of p53 expression in human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. Cancer 79(10):1944-50.

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Scientific References
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Date: February 11, 2006 09:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Scientific References

Scientific References 1. Toyoda-Ono Y, Maeda M, Nakao M, Yoshimura M, Sugiura-Tomimori N, Fukami H. 2-O-(beta-D-Glucopyranosyl)ascorbic acid, a novel ascorbic acid analogue isolated from Lycium fruit. J Agric Food Chem. 2004 Apr 7;52(7):2092-6.

2. Breithaupt DE, Weller P, Wolters M, Hahn A. Comparison of plasma responses in human subjects after the ingestion of 3R,3R'-zeaxanthin dipalmitate from wolfberry (Lycium barbarum) and non-esterified 3R,3R'-zeaxanthin using chiral high-performance liquid chromatography. Br J Nutr. 2004 May;91(5):707-13.

3. Cheng CY, Chung WY, Szeto YT, Benzie IF. Fasting plasma zeaxanthin response to Fructus barbarum L. (wolfberry; Kei Tze) in a food-based human supplementation trial. Br J Nutr. 2005 Jan;93(1):123-30.

4. Wu SJ, Ng LT, Lin CC. Antioxidant activities of some common ingredients of traditional chinese medicine, Angelica sinensis, Lycium barbarum and Poria cocos. Phytother Res. 2004 Dec;18(12):1008-12.

5. Zhao H, Alexeev A, Chang E, Greenburg G, Bojanowski K. Lycium barbarum glycoconjugates: effect on human skin and cultured Dermal fibroblasts. Phytomedicine. 2005 Jan;12(1-2):131-7.

6. Gan L, Zhang SH, Liu Q, Xu HB. A polysaccharide-protein complex from Lycium barbarum upregulates cytokine expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Eur J Pharmacol. 2003 Jun 27;471(3):217-22.

7. Gan L, Hua Zhang S, Liang Yang X, Bi Xu H. Immunomodulation and antitumor activity by a polysaccharide-protein complex from Lycium barbarum. Int Immunopharmacol. 2004 Apr;4(4):563-9.



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Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application
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Date: November 22, 2005 09:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application

Minerals provide a bounty of healing properties that have scientifically validated their use for topical applications. These applications have been shown to have powerful local and systemic effects. The health of ones skin and hair reflects inner health. Indeed, we judge the health of animals and humans alike by their outward appearance of fur or skin, respectively. The human skin is the largest organ of the body and is highly involved in the detoxification and maintenance processes of health. Skin not only excretes and eliminates toxins; it also has a tremendous capacity to absorb health supportive substances. The pharmaceutical industry frequently takes advantage of the skin’s absorptive capacity with drug therapies. Such therapies include the transDermal delivery of drugs like nicotine, hormone patches, progesterone creams and so forth. Thus, it is apparent that natural therapies can have pronounced and powerful health effects.

Clinical researchers have continued to document the clinical findings that have been observed for decades when it comes to the healing properties of topical minerals. Many of the studies on therapeutic baths have used minerals from the Dead Sea, an ancient inland sea. However, a similar and impressive array of minerals occurs in the other inland sea, the Great Salt Lake. Indeed, the high presence of magnesium from both inland seas appears to be the foremost active mineral. A comparison chart below clearly reflects the mineral analysis and similarity (see chart below). The following survey of medical research reflects a few of the many therapeutic roles for mineral salt baths. Of particular interest are the powerful effects of magnesium salts that are prevalent to both Utah’s Inland Sea and the Dead Sea that exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory disease. Arthritis:

103 patients with arthritic symptoms were treated for 1-2 weeks. They received various bath treatments with the ionic trace minerals. The study showed that the higher concentration baths offered the most impressive results. Those with the greatest physical limitation had the most pronounced improvement. Over 80 percent of the patients reported having less pain, 70 percent reported improved mobility and 60 percent were able to decrease analgesic use (i). In a different double-blind study, the use of warm mineral baths with Dead Sea salt demonstrated a lasting effect for patients suffering from degenerative arthritis. (ii)

Skin:

In a clinical trial conducted by a leading research university in Germany, patients with atopic (eczema) skin disorders immersed their arms in a magnesium chloride rich bath. The participants immersed one arm in tap water the other in the therapeutic magnesium rich bath. The findings showed that skin hydration was improved and skin roughness and inflammation was reduced. The researchers stated “magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epiDermal proliferation and differentiation and enhance barrier repair.” (iii) Another study showed that magnesium salts when exposed to both psoriatic and healthy skin cells provided an important anti-proliferative effect (iv). Yet another study showed that the effects of mineral baths from the Dead Sea had lasting effects for upwards of a month after treatment. (v) Head to Head Comparison (vi) (vii)

Utah’s Inland Sea Composition Dead Sea Composition
Magnesium Chloride 1.04% 4.03%
Potassium Chloride 0.64% 0.72%
Sodium Chloride 9% 3.87%
Calcium Chloride 0.08% 1.64%
Chloride 15.12% 21.11%
Sulfates (SO4) 2.13% 0.03%

By: Dr. Chris Meletis N. D.

References:
• (i) Dead Sea Balneoptherapy is Osteoarthritis, Dr. Machety (Hasharon Hospital, Petach-Tikva, Israel). Published in Proceedings of International Seminar on Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases. John Wright-PSG ,1932.
• (ii) Sukenik S, Mayo A, Neumann L et al., Dead Sea bath salts for osteoarthritis of the knee, Harefuah 1995; 129(3-4):100-3, 159, 158.
• (iii) Proksch E, Nissen HP et al., Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin. Int J Dermatol 2005; 44(2):151-7.
• (iv) Levi-Schaffer F, Shani J, Politi Y et al., Inhibition of proliferation of psoriatic and healthy fibroblasts in cell culture by selected Dead –sea salts. Pharmacology 1996; 52(5):321-8.
• (v) Sukenik S, Neumann L, Buskila D et al., Dead Sea bath salts for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Exp Rheumatol 1990; 8(4):353-7.
• (vi) The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Public Information Series #8, 1990.
• (vii) Gwynn, J. Wallace, The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological Public Information Series 51, 1997.

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Curcumin - Turmeric Extract
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Date: August 19, 2005 12:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Curcumin - Turmeric Extract

Curcumin

Turmeric- History and Traditional Usage

Native to Southeast Asia, Curcuma longa is a tall
tropical shrub with large oblong leaves and pale yellow flowers.
The genus “Curcuma” belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, which
includes ginger.1 The plant possesses a large root structure
with fleshy, bulbous underground parts called “rhizomes.” These
rhizomes, known as turmeric root, are harvested at maturity,
dried and cured for commercial use. Chemical analysis shows that
dried turmeric contains essential and volatile oils, with a
curcuminoid content of 2.5 to 5.0 %.2

In addition to its
popularity as a spice, turmeric is used as a dye for cloth and
coloring agent in foods and cosmetics, thanks to its rich yellow
color. Turmeric also serves as a preservative, probably owing to
the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of curcumin.
Extracts of Curcuma longa have demonstrated in vitro
antibacterial and anti-fungal effects.3

Turmeric is named in
ancient Ayurvedic and Chinese herbal texts as a traditional folk
remedy. Historically, turmeric was used externally for wounds,
and sprains, and internally for digestive complaints,
rheumatism, liver disorders, coughs and colds.4
Benefits

Protects cells and tissues by fighting free radicals.*

Supports joint function*

The numerous beneficial
effects attributed to turmeric stem in large measure from the
antioxidant properties of curcumin. Antioxidants neutralize free
radicals, which are highly unstable molecules that can damage
cellular structures through abnormal oxidative reactions.
Curcumin is a potent “scavenger” of the superoxide radical, a
free radical that initiates potentially harmful oxidative
processes such as lipid peroxidation.5 Through this activity,
curcumin has been shown to protect skin cells from the injurious
effect of nitroblue tetrazolium, a toxin that generates
superoxide radicals. Curcumin also increases survival of cells
exposed in vitro to the enzyme hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase,
which stimulates superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production.
Curcumin itself is not toxic to cells, even at high
concentrations. Pure curcumin was shown to be less protective
than a mixture of curcuminoids, indicating a possible synergism
among curcuminoids.6 Because free radicals are involved in aging
and exert harmful effects on skin, these results suggest
curcumin may help slow skin aging.

Curcumin demonstrates
several other in vitro effects linked to free radical
scavenging. Curcumin scavenges nitric oxide, a compound
associated with the body’s inflammatory response.7 Pure curcumin
and turmeric extracts protect red blood cells from lipid
peroxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide.8 Curcumin has been
shown to protect DNA from oxidative damage, inhibit binding of
toxic metabolites to DNA, and reduce DNA mutations in the Ames’
test.9 Although additional studies suggest an anticarcinogenic
effect of curcumin, through protection of DNA,10 one in vitro
study found that curcumin induced DNA damage in human gastric
mucosal cells.11 It is speculated that curcumin may act as a
pro-oxidant in the presence of transition metal ions such as
copper and iron. (This is true for other antioxidants, including
vitamin C.) Curcumin also demonstrates in vitro inhibition of
COX-I and COX-II enzymes, which are involved in the inflammatory
reaction.12 Together these results strongly suggest that
curcumin is a potent bioprotectant with a potentially wide range
of therapeutic applications.

Animal studies- In vivo protective effects

Through its free radical scavenging
properties, curcumin has shown bioprotective effects in animals.
In one study, rats were treated with isoproterenol, a chemical
that causes cardiac hypertrophy (enlargement of the heart) due
to abnormal collagen metabolism. Co-treatment with curcumin
reversed the degradation of collagen and cardiac hypertrophy
induced by isoproterenol.13 Curcumin protects mice from
detrimental effects of radiation, by stabilizing the glyoxalase
system, a biological system that regulates cell division.14
Curcumin protects livers of rats from the damaging effects of
carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a potent hepatoxin that injures the
liver via its free radical metabolite, CCl3.15,16 Curcumin
protected rats from alcohol-induced brain damage, in a study in
which oral administration of curcumin reversed lipid
peroxidation, reduced levels of free-radical metabolites and
increased levels of glutathione, a major physiologic
antioxidant.17 Curcuma longa extracts have shown
anti-inflammatory effects in rats.18

Human Trials

Curcumin exhibits free-radical scavenging ability when
administered to humans. In an open trial (uncontrolled), 18
healthy individuals ranging in age from 27 to 67 years consumed
a Curcuma longa extract, at a dose supplying 20 mg curcuminoids,
for 45 days. Before and after blood tests showed a statistically
significant decrease in lipid peroxides.19 Preliminary trials
have tested the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin, with
results that verify the traditional use of turmeric as an
anti-rheumatic herb. In a short-term double-blind, cross-over,
comparative study, 18 people received curcumin (1200 mg daily)
or phenylbutazone for two week periods. Both curcumin and
phenylbutazone produced measurable improvements in joint
flexibility and walking time. The subjects reported results only
with phenylbutazone, which may be explained by the short
duration of the trial.20 In a small placebo-controlled trial
comparing curcumin to phenylbutazone, 45 patients with
post-operative inflammation received curcumin, phenylbutazone or
placebo. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin and
phenylbutazone were comparable and superior to placebo.21
Curcumin has not been found to produce an analgesic (pain
relieving) effect.

Bioperine-Nature’s Absorption Enhancer
Boosts Curcumin Absorption*

Traditional Ayurvedic herbal
formulas often include black pepper and long pepper as
synergistic herbs. The active ingredient in both black pepper
and long pepper is the alkaloid, piperine. Experiments carried
out to evaluate the scientific basis for the use of peppers have
shown that piperine significantly enhances bioavailability when
consumed with other substances.22 Several double-blind clinical
studies have confirmed that Bioperine® increases absorption of
nutrients.23

Curcumin is poorly absorbed in the intestinal
tract, limiting its therapeutic effectiveness. Oral doses are
largely excreted in feces, and only trace amounts appear in the
blood. Concomitant administration of 20 mg of piperine with 2
grams of curcumin increases the bioavailability of curcumin by
2000%.24

Scientific References


1. Majeed, M., Badmaev,
V., Shivakumar, U., Rajendran, R. Curcuminoids. 1995.
Piscataway, NJ: NutriScience Publishers.
2. Srimal, R.C.
Turmeric: a brief review of its medicinal properties.
Fitoterapia 1997;68(6):483-93.
3. Ammon, H.P.T., Wahl, M.A.
Pharmacology of Curcuma longa. Planta Medica 1991;57:1-7.
4.
Snow, J.M. Herbal Monograph: Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae).
The Protocol Journal of Botanical Medicine, Autumn
1995:43-46.
5. Rao, N.S., Rao, M.N.A. Free radical scavenging
activity of curcuminoids. Arzneim.-Forsch./Drug Res.
1996;46(2):169-171.
6. Bonté. F. et al. Protective effect of
curcuminoids on epiDermal skin cells under free oxygen radical
stress. Planta Medica 1997;63:265-66.
7. Rao, S., Rao, M.N.A.
Nitric oxide scavenging by curcuminoids. J Pharm. Pharmacol.
1997;49:105-7.
8. Lalitha, S., Selvam, R. Prevention of
H2Os-induced red blood cell lipid peroxidation by aqueous
extracted turmeric. Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr
1999;8(2):113-14.
9. Deshpande, S.S., Maru, G.B. Effects of
curcumin on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene derived DNA adducts
in vitro. Cancer Letters 1995;96:71-80.
10. Subramanian, M., et
al. Diminution of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage by curcumin
and related antioxidants. Mutation Research
1994;311:249-55.
11. Blasiak, J., Trzeciak, A., Kowalik, J.
Curcumin damages DNA in human gastric mucosa cells and
lymphocytes. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and
Oncology 1999;18(4):271-76.
12. Ramsewak, R.S., DeWitt, D.L.,
Nair, M.G. Cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory
activities of Curcumins I-III from Curcuma longa. Phytomedicine
2000;7(4):303-308.
13. Nirmala, C. Anand, S., Puvanakrishnan,
R. Curcumin treatment modulates collagen metabolism in
isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Molecular and
Cellular Biochemistry 1999;197:31-37.
14. Choudhary, D.,
Chandra, D. Kale, R.K. Modulation of radioresponse of glyoxalase
system by curcumin. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1999;64:1-7.
15. Park, E-J. et al. Protective effect of
curcumin in rat liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride. J
Pharm. Pharmacol. 2000;52:437-40.
16. Deshpande, U.R. et al.
Protective effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract on
carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in rats. Indian
Journal of Experimental Biology 1998;36:573-77.
17.
Rajakrishnan, V. et al. Neuroprotective role of curcumin from
Curcuma longa on ethanol-induced brain damage. Phytotherapy
Research 1999;13:571-74.
18. Arora, R.B. Basu, N., Kapoor, V.,
Jain, A.P. Anti-inflammatory studies on Curcuma longa
(Turmeric). Indian J Med Res 1971;59(8):1289-95.
19.
Ramirez-Bosca, A. et al. Antioxidant curcuma extracts decrease
the blood peroxide levels of human subjects. Age
1995;18:167-69.
20. Deodhar, S.D., Sethi, R. Srimal. R.C.
Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin
(diferoyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.
21.
Satoskar, R.R., Shah, S J. Shenoy, S.G. Evaluation of
anti-inflammatory property of curcumin (diferoyl methane) in
patients with postoperative inflammation. International Journal
of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy and Toxicolgy
1986;24(12):651-54.
22. Atal, C., Zutshi, U., Rao, P.
Scientific evidence on the role of Ayurvedic herbals on
bioavailability of drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1981;4:229-232.
23. Bioperine®–Nature's Bioavailability
Enhancing Thermonutrient. Executive Summary. 1996; Sabinsa
Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.
24. Shoba, G., et al. Influence
of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and
human volunteers. Planta Medica 1998;64(4):353-6.

© 2002
Doctor's Best, Inc. Revised 8/13/02

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.



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Endnotes
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Endnotes

Endnotes


1 John R. Lee, M.D., NATURAL PROGESTERONE: THE MULTIPLE ROLES OF A REMARKABLE HORMONE, Revised. (BLL Publishing, Sebastopol, California: 1993), 4. See also U.S. Barzel, “Estrogens in the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a review.” AM J MED, (1988), 85: 847-850 and D.R. Felson, Y. Zhang, M.T. Hannan, et al., “The effect of postmenopausal estrogen therapy on bone density in elderly women.” THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE. (1993), 329: 1141-1146.
2 Darrell W. Brann, “Progesterone: The Forgotten Hormone?” PERSPECTIVES IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE. Summer, (1993), 34:4, 642. See also A.I. Csapo and B.A. Resch, “Induction of preterm labor in the rat by the antiprogesterone.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. (1979), 134:823-27.
3 Penelope Ody, THE COMPLETE MEDICINAL HERBAL. (Dorling Kindersley, New York: 1993), 52.
4 Daniel B. Mowrey, THE SCIENTIFIC VALIDATION OF HERBAL MEDICINE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1986), 112.
5 Lee, 16.
6 Ibid., 52.
7 C. Norman Shealy, M.D., DHEA THE YOUTH AND HEALTH HORMONE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1996), 34.
8 Lee, 4.
9 Ibid., 101.
10 Ibid., 50.
11 Ibid., 51.
12 Ibid., 101.
13 Ibid., 52.
14 Ibid., See also “Progesterone: Safe Antidote for PMS.” MCCALL’S MAGAZINE. October, (1990), 152-56 and Linda Carol Graham, “Do You Have a Hormone Shortage?” REDBOOK. February, (1989), 16.
15 Ibid.
16 Rita Elkins, M.A., DEPRESSION AND NATURAL MEDICINE. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 129.
17 Lee, 84.
18 Ibid., 87.
19 Ibid.
20 Alan R. Gaby, M.D., PREVENTING AND REVERSING OSTEOPOROSIS. (Prima Publishing, Rocklin, California: 1994), 150. See also John, R. Lee, M.D. “Osteoporosis reversal: the role of progesterone.” INT CLIN NUTR REV. (1990) 10:3, 384-91 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Osteoporosis reversal with transDermal progesterone.” LANCET. (1991), 336, 1327 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Is natural progesterone the missing link in osteoporosis prevention and treatment?” MED HYPOTHESES. 35, 316-18.
21 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 4.
22 Ibid., 102.
23 Ibid.
24 Shealy, 34.
25 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 71. See also R.A.Hiatt, R. Bawol, G.D. Friedman and R. Hoover, “Exogenous estrogen and breast cancer after bilateral oophorectomy.” CANCER. (1984), 54, 139-44.
26 Lee, 4. See alsoR.B. Gambrell, “The Menopause: Benefits and Risks of Estrogen-Progesterone Replacement Therapy,” FERTIL STERIL, 1983, (37, 457-74).
27 Ibid., 75
28 Ibid., 72. See also, L.D. Cowan, L.Gordis, J. A. Tonascia, and G.S. Jones. “Breast Cancer Incidence in Women with a History of Progesterone Deficiency. JOURNAL OF EPIDIMIOLOGY, 1981, (114) 209.17.
29 Schealy, 35.
30 Ibid..
31 Lee, 74.
32 Schealy, 35.
33 Lee, 102.

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Conclusion
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Conclusion

Conclusion

Natural progesterone in cream or other transDermal forms appears to be one of the most effective and safe supplements for the treatment of various hormonally related disorders. It may well be superior to estrogen replacement therapy in some cases and should be utilized and evaluated for its superior therapeutic actions. No longer the “forgotten hormone,” natural progesterone, especially in the form of wild yam extract, is nothing less than remarkable in its physiological actions. While so many women are turning to synthetic hormones, tranquilizers, and analgesics to manage PMS and postmenopausal miseries, natural progesterone may well be the best and safest alternative. Getting the word out while scientific studies continue to support the credibility of using natural progesterone is currently underway. It would be nothing less than tragic if an affordable and safe substance like wild yam extract remained unused due to a lack of knowledge. The word is spreading rapidly. Dr. Lee put it well when he stated:

I must conclude with a tribute to what I call the women’s underground communication network, the vast informal woman-to-woman communication network that spreads hormone and health information with astonishing speed and extent around the world. An informational and health revolution is underway, thanks to the networking of intelligent, concerned women.33 I consider myself most fortunate to have become acquainted with natural progesterone synthesized from wild yam. For me, the discovery of this safe and marvelous supplement has been nothing less than extraordinary. It has made what was once a life lived at the mercy of the hormonal upheavals into one that is much more even-keeled, healthier and full of optimism.

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HELP FOR FIBROMYALGIA?
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HELP FOR FIBROMYALGIA?

HELP FOR FIBROMYALGIA?

While scientific documentation on the link between natural progesterone therapy and fibromyalgia has yet to be researched, a significant number of women are finding that the pain associated with this disorder is alleviated when taking transDermal progesterone. The cause of fibromyalgia remains a mystery to medical doctors, although its connection to hormonal factors or neurochemistry has been proposed. Taking natural progesterone has resulted in alleviating insomnia in some women, which may also be beneficial for those with fibromyalgia. The pain of fibromyalgia is especially troublesome at night.

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PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:18 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS

PROGESTERONE AND OSTEOPOROSIS

At this writing, evidence points to the fact that natural progesterone may be even more effective in treating osteoporosis than estrogen replacement therapy. While this evidence is still in its initial stages, it is significant and must be considered. In 1981, Dr. John Lee conducted a landmark study evaluating the effectiveness of using natural progesterone for osteoporosis.20 His study indicated that it is the cessation of progesterone production in postmenopausal women which causes the development of osteoporosis. Contrary to current trends, progesterone replacement, not estrogen, in fact may be the answer to preventing and treating osteoporosis. Dr. Lee’s study has profound implications for all women.

In his practice, Dr. Lee applied a natural progesterone cream on one hundred postmenopausal women and eliminated their usual dose of oral Provera (a synthetic progestin). The majority of these women were in varying stages of osteoporosis. Each participant used the natural progesterone cream for several consecutive days each month over a period of three years. The results were dramatic, to say the least. In addition to preventing further height loss and eliminating aches and pains, the bone mineral density of the spine was preserved in 63 of the women. In other words, these women not only stopped the bone loss associated with osteoporosis but actually experienced an increase in bone mass which, in many cases was more dramatic than had been seen with other therapies. In addition, the incidence of bone fractures actually dropped to zero. Dr Lee’s study found that estrogen was not the panacea for bone density previously assumed. He discovered that the women who took estrogen in combination with the progesterone were not better off than those who took progesterone alone. What was even more impressive was discovering that osteoporosis is a reversible condition with progesterone therapy. Concerning the use of progesterone for osteoporosis, Dr. Lee writes:

. . . when my 40 year old housewives had become 60-year olds with osteoporosis and I learned of transDermal natural progesterone (being sold as a skin moisturizer), I started adding it to my therapeutic regimen for osteoporosis, at first only to those for whom estrogen was contraindicated. To my surprise, serial bone mineral density tests showed a significant rise without a hint of side effects. With this obvious success, my use of natural progesterone spread to osteoporosis patients who were not doing all that well on estrogen alone. Again, it proved successful.21

Apparently, women who had the lowest bone densities experienced the greatest increases, implying that age and the progression of the diseases does not affect the beneficial therapeutic action of natural progesterone.

This study is profoundly significant in that it strongly suggests that women who take estrogen to prevent or treat osteoporosis may be better off using natural progesterone. As a result of Lee’s findings, several physicians began to use natural progesterone cream for their pre- and postmenopausal patients.

The most striking implication of Dr. Lee’s work with natural progesterone is that contrary to current medical opinion, osteoporosis may be more a manifestation of a progesterone deficiency than a lack of estrogen. In addition, the disease may be initiated long before menopause when estrogen levels are still high.22 Moreover, continued estrogen therapy for women with osteoporosis often caps out whereas progesterone therapy continually promotes the production of new bone.23 Dr. C. Norman Shealy, M.D. states: I believe that natural progesterone cream derived from wild yam extract should be used by almost every mature adult . . . The most common cause of death in elderly women is from the complications of fracture of the hip from osteoporosis. Such fractures are also remarkably common in men. I believe that progesterone cream could do more to preserve health and well-being in elderly people than all the drugs in the world.24

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WHY DO SO MANYWOMEN SUFFER FROM HORMONE IMBALANCES?
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: WHY DO SO MANYWOMEN SUFFER FROM HORMONE IMBALANCES?

WHY DO SO MANYWOMEN SUFFER FROM HORMONE IMBALANCES?

The question of why so many women, young and old, suffer from a hormonal imbalance persists. Today’s environment and life style are certainly significant causal factors and explain, to a great degree why even young, seemingly healthy women may experience a lack of progesterone.

Dr. Peter Elliston of the Harvard Anthropology Department found through one of his studies of 18 women who all had regular menstrual cycles that seven of them did not experience a mid cycle increase in progesterone levels, suggesting that ovulation did not actually occur.12 Dr. Lee cites this as yet another example of the widespread incidence of anovulatory cycles occurring in young women throughout this country, a fact which is undoubtedly linked to rising infertility rates in the United States. Eating disorders, poor nutrition, widespread use of birth control pills, stress, pollution, etc., contribute to hormonally-related disorders and most certainly affect progesterone production, the ability to conceive and menopausal transitions.

CAUSES OF HORMONE IMBALANCES

  • • stress
  • • environmental pollution
  • • ingested toxins
  • • nutritional deficiencies
  • • birth control pills
  • • synthetic hormones
  • • menopause
  • • xenoestrogens (substances which act like estrogen in the body such as
  • • (certain pollutants)

  • • hormonal residue in animal meats It’s relatively easy to determine if your hormones are out of balance and if you are lacking progesterone. One of the key symptoms of a progesterone deficiency is the presence of PMS. Even a young, relatively healthy woman can suffer from a lack of progesterone. In addition, we live in a world full of toxins, food additives and hormonally fattened meats.

    Dr. Lee believes that widespread use of the birth control pill has caused the ovaries to be compromised, possibly playing a role in the development of PMS that would normally not exist.13 Documented results from using natural progesterone have been impressive but remain relatively unknown by the majority of women. Progesterone therapy can help relieve the following PMS symptoms: breast engorgement, breast tenderness, irritability, headaches, depression, moodiness, fatigue, anxiety, bloating, water retention, cramps, and irregular periods.

    Dr. Joel T. Hargrove of Vanderbilt University Medical Center has had some very impressive results using natural progesterone to treat his patients with PMS. He has had a 90 percent success rate using this form of progesterone.14 Interestingly, he used oral progesterone which had to be administered in a much heavier dose to achieve the same results Dr. Lee obtained with transDermal progesterone.15

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=665)


    WHY TOPICAL APPLICATION OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE?
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    Date: July 25, 2005 10:00 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: WHY TOPICAL APPLICATION OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE?

    WHY TOPICAL APPLICATION OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE?

    Progesterone is a fat soluble compound which maintains its integrity much more readily when absorbed transDermally (through the skin) than when taken my mouth. When progesterone is ingested orally, it is subject to rapid breakdown (metabolism) in the liver, making it considerably less effective. Medical practitioners have used synthetic progesterone in a variety of forms ranging from capsules to injections to vaginal and rectal suppositories. Originally, orally administered progesterone or progestins were not efficiently absorbed through the intestinal wall and had to pass through liver tissue before entering the bloodstream. Consequently, much of the absorbed progestins were metabolized by the liver into inactive compounds. Up to 80 percent of the effectiveness of progesterone can be lost when taken orally.6 By contrast, progesterone is very nicely absorbed transDermally (through the skin) and much more of its biochemical activity is retained. I believe that natural progesterone cream derived from wild yam extract should be used by almost every mature adult . . . I believe that progesterone cream could do more to preserve health and well-being in elderly people than all the drugs in the world.7

    Dr. Lee reiterates that “. . . natural progesterone is efficiently absorbed transDermally, a fact that enhances patient’s acceptance of its use and greatly reduces the cost of therapy.”8

    Salivary hormonal lab tests are becoming more common and have further supported the effectiveness of natural progesterone absorption through the skin by monitoring levels.9 These tests have proven that progesterone levels rise when wild yam extracts are applied to the skin.

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    OTHER BIOLOGIC BENEFITS OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE
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    Date: July 25, 2005 09:58 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: OTHER BIOLOGIC BENEFITS OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE

    OTHER BIOLOGIC BENEFITS OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE

    While natural progesterone has been referred to as a progestin because it maintains the lining of the uterus, it is technically separate and totally different from synthetic progestins. In addition, natural progesterone provides a number of biological actions which progestins do not. Some additional benefits reported with the use of natural progesterone include:

  • • reduction in joint pain and swelling
  • • enhanced skin moisturization
  • • fading of liver spots
  • • faster healing of wounds
  • • reduction of yeast infections
  • • supports the immune system
  • • protects against the side effects of unopposed estrogen
  • • tranquilizing
  • • sleep promotion

    THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS OF NATURAL PROGESTERONE

  • • necessary for the survival and development of the fetus
  • • helps to prevent osteoporosis
  • • needed for the proper production of adrenal hormones
  • • works to stabilize blood sugar
  • • has a natural diuretic action
  • • prevents salt retention
  • • acts as an antidepressant
  • • helps prevent the formation of fibrocystic breasts
  • • enhances thermogenesis (the burning of fat)
  • • contributes to regulating the thyroid gland
  • • enhances libido
  • • helps protect the uterus and breasts from malignancies
  • • contributes to blood clotting mechanisms
  • • precursor of corticosterones
  • • helps to protect against breast cancer
  • • normalizes zinc and copper levels
  • • maintains the secretory endometrium

    Note: Using natural progesterone in cream, oil or other transDermal form is also very hydrating to the skin.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=661)


    REFERENCES
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 22, 2005 09:57 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: REFERENCES

    REFERENCES


    1. Interview with Dr. Michael Pariza, July 3, 1997.
    2. “Effects of Temperature and Time on Mutagen Formation in Pan-Fried Hamburger,” by M. Pariza, Samy Ashoor, Fun Chu and Daryl Lund, March 10, 1979, Cancer Letters, 7 (1979) 63-69.
    3. “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, August 25, 1987. IRL Press limited, Oxford, England.
    4. Interview with Dr. Mark Cook, July 3, 1997.
    5. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Cancer Prevention Research: A Report of Current Status and Issues,” A special report prepared for the National Live Stock and Meat Board, Ip, Clement, Ph.D., May 1994. See also “Conjugated linoleic acid, a newly recognised nutrient” in the June 17, 1997, issue of Chemistry and Industry by M. Pariza, pp. 464-466.
    6. Op.Cit. Pariza, Chemistry and Industry.
    7. Op. Cit. Ip, National Live Stock and Meat Board. See also, “Conjugated Linoleic Acid (9,11 and 10,12-Octadecadienoic Acid) is Produced in Conventional by Not Germ-Free Rats Fed Linleic Acid,” Sou F. Chin, Et. Al, Dec. 16, 1993, Journal of Nutrition 124: 694-701 1994.
    8. Ibid.
    9. Interview with Cook. 10. Op. Cit. Ip, National Live Stock and Meat Board.
    11. Ibid.
    12. Op. Cit., interview with Pariza., and “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L. Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, Aug. 25, 1987, IRL Press Limited, Oxford England.
    13. “Conjugated linoleic acid: An anticarcinogenic fatty acid present in mile fat,” by Peter Parodi, Australian Journal of DairyTechnology. Nov. 1994, 49 p. 93-94.
    14. The Washington Post “Now We’re a Nation of Lite Heavyweights,” Sept. 1, 1994, Sec. B. P. 10.
    15. “A beef-derived mutagenesis modulator inhibits initiation of mouse epiDermal tumors by 7, 12 dimethylbens[a]anthracene,” by M. Pariza and W. Hargraves, Jan. 2, 1985, Carcinogenesis, vol 6., no. 4 pp. 591-593, 1985, IRL Press, Limited, Oxford, England.
    16. Op. Cit. Pariza, Chemistry and Industry.
    17. “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L. Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, Aug. 25, 1987, IRL Press Limited, Oxford England.
    18. “Mammary Cancer Prevention by Conjugated Dienoic Derivative of Linoleic Acid,” Clement Ip, Sou Fe Chin, Joseph Scimeca and Michael Pariza, Cancer Research, 51, 6118-6124, Nov. 15, 1991.
    19. “Refiguring the Odds: What’s a woman’s real chance of suffering breast cancer?” Facklemann, K.A., Science News 144 (1993) 76-77.
    20. “Inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene-induced mouse forestomach neoplasia by conjugated dienoic derivatives of linoleic acid.” Ha, Y.L, Storkson, J., Pariza, M.W. Cancer Research 50: 1097-1101; 1990.
    21. “Protection of Conjugated linoleic acid against 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline-induced colon carcinogenesis in the f344 rat: a study of inhibitory mechanisims,” Liew, C.; Schut, H.A.J., chin, S.F., Pariza, M.W., and Dashwood, R.H. (1995), Carcinogenesis 16, 3037-3044.
    22. Op. Cit., Ip, Cancer Research, 1991.
    23. “Potential of Food Modification in Cancer Prevention,” Ip, C.; Lisk, Donald J. and J. Scimeca, Cancer Research, 54, 1957-1959, April 1, 1994.
    24. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA), A Newly Re c o g n i ze d Anitcarcinogenic Nutrient,” unpublished paper by Michael Pariza.
    25. “Effects of conjugated dienoic linoleic acid on lipid metabolism in mouse liver,” Belury, M.A. and Vanden Heuvel, J.P. (1996), Proc. Am. Assoc. Cancer Res. 37: 1918.
    26. “Protection Against Cancer and Heart Disease by Dietary Fatty Acid, Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Potential Mechanisms of Action,” Belury, M.A.; Vanden Heuvel, J.P; Submitted to Nutrition and Disease Update Journal, Sept. 28, 1996.
    27. Interveiw with Pariza.
    28. Op. Cit., Pariza, Cancer Research, 1990.
    29. “Fatty Acids that Inhibit Cancer,” unpublished paper by M. Pariza.
    30. Op. Cit. Liew.
    31. “Reinvestigation of the antioxidant properties of conjugated linoleic acid,” van den Berg J.J.; Cook, N.E.; Tribble D.L.; Lipids, 73, 1995, Jul 30 (7), 595-598.
    32. “Furan Fatty acids detrmined as oxidation products of conjugated octadecadienoic acid,” Yurawecz, M.P., Hood, J.K., Mossoba, MM., Roach, J.A.G., and Ku, Y. Lipids 30, 595-598.
    33. Interview with Pariza.
    34. “Vital Statistics of the United States” from the Centers for Disease Control for 1989.
    35. “Conjugated linoleic acid and atherosclerosis in rabbits.” Lee, K.N., Kritchevsky, D. And Pariza, M.W.; Atherosclerosis 108, 19-25.
    36. Interview with Pariza.
    37. “Dietary conjugated linoleic acid reduces aortic fatty streak formation greater than linoleic acid in hypercholesterolemic hamsters,” Nicolosi, R.J., and Laitinen, L. (1996), FASEB J. 10 A477.
    38. “Ionic Basis of Hypertension, Insulin in Resistance, Vascular Disease and Related Disorders. The Mechanism of ‘Syndrome X”, Resnick, LM, American Journal of Hypertension. 1993 (4Suppl) 123S-134S.
    39. “Protection by coenzyme Q10 from myocardial reperfusion injury during coronary artery bypass grafting,” Chello-M, et. Al, Ann-Thorac. Surg., 1994, Nov; 58(5): 1427-32.
    40. “Immune Modulation by Altered Nutrient Metabolism: Nutritional Control of Immune-Induced Growth Depression,” M.E. Cook, C.C. Miller, Y. Park and Ma Pariza, Poultry Science 72: 1301-1305 (1993).
    41. “Feeding Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Animals Partially Overcomes Catabolic Responses Due to Endotoxin Injection,” Miller, C.C., Park, Y., Pariza, M, and Cook, M. Feb. 15, 1994, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, pages 1107-1112.
    42. Op. Cit. Cook, Poultry Science, 1993.
    43. Interview with Cook.
    44. Ibid.
    45. Op. Cit. Washington Post.
    46. “Obesity, Pathogenesis & Treatment, a series of reports on obesisy issues edited by G. Enzi, et. Al, 1981, Academic Press.
    47. William Howard Taft: The President who became Chief Justice, by Severn, Bill 1970, David McKay company.
    48. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduces Body Fat,” abstract only of a speech g i ven at En v i ronmental Bi o l o g y, 96. See also U.S. Patent Nu m b e r 5,554,646, dated Sep. 10, 1996.
    49. Interveiw with Cook.
    50. Information of Dr. Parizi provided to PharmaNutrients, Inc.
    51. Interview with Cook.
    52. Op. Cit. Parodi.
    53. Obesity & Weight Control: The Health Pro f e s s i o n a l’s Guide to Understanding & Treatment. Edited by Frankle, R. T. 1988.
    54. Ibid.
    55. Op. Cit. The Washington Post.
    56. Interview with Pariza.
    57. Pariza in information to Pharmnutrients, Inc., indicates a Dr. Reid studied content in 1963 of milk fat.
    58. Op Cit. Parodi.
    59. Bill Phillips, Supplement Review, 3rd Edition.
    60. Interview with Pariza.
    61. Interview with Cook.
    62. Interviews with Cook, Pariza.
    63. Research conducted by Medstat Research Ltd., Lillestrom, Norway for the Herbal Marketing Group, HMG, Ltd., Oslo, Norway. “A pilot study with the aim of stydying the efficacy and tolerability of CLA (Tonalin) on the body composition in humans.) by Erling Thom Ph.D., Medstate Research Ltd., Liilestrom, Norway, July 1997.



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    Saw Palmetto for treating prostate related problems.
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 13, 2005 06:09 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Saw Palmetto for treating prostate related problems.

    SAW PALMETTO BERRY EXTRACT INHIBITS CELL GROWTH AND COX-2 EXPRESSION IN PROSTATIC CANCER CELLS

    Cell Biology International 2001, Vol. 25, No. 11, 1117–1124 doi:10.1006/cbir.2001.0779

    "Formulations based on Saw Palmetto berry extract (Serenoa repens) (SPBE) have traditionally been used for treating prostate related problems, and clinical research has supported the application of SPBE in the fight against benign prostatic hyperplasia BPH (Wilt et al., 1998; Plosker and Brogden, 1996; DiSilverio et al., 1998; McKinney, 1999; Lowe and Ku, 1996). The combination of this extract with other herbs has been shown to lower not only testosterone concentrations but also the concentration of prostatespecific antigens (DiPaola et al., 1998). Researchers have further demonstrated in animal studies that SPBE inhibits the binding of dihydrotestosterone DHT to its receptor (Carilla et al., 1984; Sultan et al., 1984) and blocks the conversion of testosterone to DHT by inhibiting the activity of 5-- reductase. So far the mechanism of action is not known for this phytotherapy but it may include an anti-oestrogenic, anti-androgenic, anti-spasmolytic, or anti-inflammatory effect, or the inhibition of 5--reductase, since all of these activities have been documented for it in in vitro experiments (Stoner, 1996; Carraro et al., 1996). In the present study, we investigate the role of SPBE in prostate cancer by comparing the growth of prostatic cancer cell lines in the presence and absence of SPBE. The data presented here demonstrate that SPBE inhibits the growth of a normal prostatic derived cell line and two prostatic carcinoma cell lines. The results may suggest an ‘operating mechanism’ involving growth inhibition via alterations in the expression of Bcl-2 and prevention of prostate carcinoma development through the inhibition of expression of Cox-2. "

    " [Note: The ‘mechanism of action’ of SPBE is reported to be its ability to inhibit the conversion of testosterone to DHT (Bayne et al., 1999; Iehle et al., 1995; Delos et al., 1994). SPBE also inhibits the binding of DHT to its receptors (Sultan et al., 1984; Carilla et al., 1984). Further, it has been suggested that too much DHT could cause prostate cells to divide at an abnormal rate leading to enlargement of the prostate gland. Other effects of SPBE are anti-inflammatory (Di Silverio et al., 1992) and anti-estrogenic (Di Silverio et al., 1992; Briley et al., 1983). In conclusion, SPBE is a well-tolerated drug that has an efficacy similar to Finasteride in improving symptoms in men with BPH (Plosker and Brogden, 1996; Gerber et al., 1998). An additional effect of SPBE is the inhibition of growth factor-induced proliferation of human prostate cell-cultures (Paubert-Braquet, 1998). This drug also induces a significant reduction in DHT and epiDermal growth factor concentrations in human BPH following three months of treatment (Di Silverio, 1998). Amongst other effects suggested for how SPBE functions, is the inhibition of signal transduction through the prolectin receptor (Vacher et al., 1995)]."

  • Saw Palmetto 320mg Standardized 60sg Vegetarian Formula
  • Saw Palmetto 320mg Standardized 120sg Vegetarian Formula
  • Saw Palmetto Berry Extract 60sg
  • Saw Palmetto Berry Extract 120sg


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