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  Messages 1-15 from 15 matching the search criteria.
Sunflower Lecithin: Brain-Boosting Supplement or UnhealthyAdditive? Darrell Miller 12/18/18
Sooth Diverticulitis Marshmallow Root Darrell Miller 9/27/16
Natural Skin Care Products - Kukui Nut Oil Darrell Miller 5/17/14
What Are The Benefits Of Pure Hempseed Oil? Darrell Miller 3/18/13
Fenugreek Seed Darrell Miller 11/25/09
Flaxseed Darrell Miller 10/23/09
Plantain Herb Darrell Miller 10/8/09
Jojoba Oil Darrell Miller 8/28/09
Marshmallow Root Herb Darrell Miller 8/12/09
Slippery Elm Bark Darrell Miller 7/23/09
ChickWeed Darrell Miller 6/16/09
Barley Grass Darrell Miller 5/14/09
HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia) Darrell Miller 7/11/05
Pep Up and Go! Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin Darrell Miller 6/6/05



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Sunflower Lecithin: Brain-Boosting Supplement or UnhealthyAdditive?
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Date: December 18, 2018 04:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sunflower Lecithin: Brain-Boosting Supplement or UnhealthyAdditive?





Sunflower Lecithin might be part of the reason some may view it as a super food: it is a fatty natural additive that improves many foods, boosts many parts of physical health(such as digestive health and brain health) and has many vitamins and minerals in it. It has been used in traditional medicine for a long time and can even be used in a vegan diet(unlike other forms of lecithin). Be careful though: overloading on it can cause digestive distress.

Key Takeaways:

  • Lecithin occurs naturally in your body, and can also be found in egg yolks, soy products, sunflower, meat and other dietary sources
  • Lecithin can bring relief to symptoms of gastrointestinal maladies such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s Disease by supporting the mucus layer in the gut.
  • Lecithin from sunflowers can help boost choline, an important neurotransmitter associated with memory, cognition and learning.

"Commonly used as an emulsifier and emollient in both processed foods and cosmetics alike, sunflower lecithin has also begun gaining traction in the supplement world thanks to its powerful health-promoting properties."

Read more: https://draxe.com/sunflower-lecithin/

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Sooth Diverticulitis Marshmallow Root
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Date: September 27, 2016 05:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Sooth Diverticulitis Marshmallow Root

Diverticulosis occurs when pouches form along the wall of the gastrointestinal wall, especially in the colon. Diverticulitis refers to the inflammation or infection of the pouches. The cause of diverticulosis is not yet clear, but medical experts suggest that it may result from the lack of sufficient fiber in the body. Due to insufficient fiber, the colon has to strain to push its contents forward, the pressure from the strain results in weak spots in the colon wall. The bacterial growth in the weak spots is thought to be the cause of the inflammation and infection.

Management of Diverticulitis with Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow root is obtained from Althaea Officinalis. It has both demulcent and Emollient effects. The herbal remedy works by gelling and soothing the inflammation experienced in the colon wall.

Marshmallow root also has several other health benefits including:

  1. It is used in the management of respiratory conditions such as asthma and bronchitis.
  2. It is used for external topical applications due to its anti-inflammatory effects. Several skin conditions such as burns boils and other skin irritations can be managed using the herb.
  3. It is employed in the formulation of beauty products such as cosmetics. It is also included in shampoos due to its ability to detangle hair.



References

//www.diverticulitisinfo.com/blog/?p=638

//www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/diverticulitis-topic-overview

//umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/condition/diverticular-disease

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Natural Skin Care Products - Kukui Nut Oil
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Date: May 17, 2014 01:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Skin Care Products - Kukui Nut Oil

kukui nut treeWhat is kukui nut tree?

The Kukui Nut tree is a blooming tree that develops all around the tropics and was initially acquainted with Hawaii by right on time Polynesian pilgrims. On Hawaii, the tree immediately flourished is presently a national state symbol. The tree is occasionally alluded to as the Candlenut tree, Candleberry, Indian walnut tree and additionally the varnish tree. A few parts of the tree have the same number of employments, as the tree has been given names. The blossoms and bark are utilized within Hawaii to make the acclaimed Lei wreath and the tree trunk has utilized for 2 centuries now to make customary kayaks.

Generally, kids in Hawaii have been anointed with the kukui nut oil to secure them from the components and, likewise, the oil was found to have critical medicinal properties for skin disturbances, blazes, and wounds. The oil additionally has utilization as the premise for oil candles, henceforth where the names Candlenut and Candleberry are shaped. The scorched kukui nuts can likewise be utilized as the premise for tattoo ink and the oil is additionally utilized broadly as a part of Hawaii as a varnish and wood medications.

kukui productBenefits of kukui nut oil

In the nineteenth century, the tenants of Hawaii uncovered that applying the kukui oil to the skin helped ensure it from the sun and likewise recuperate the harming impacts of the sun, wind and salt water. Current clinical studies have discovered that Kukui Oil holds a few common fixings that give noteworthy characteristic profits to the skin. It gives a wellspring of a-linolenic corrosive, which helps the phone structure of the epidermis layer of the skin. The Kukui nut oil has been discovered to be exceptionally alleviating for gentle sunburn and is likewise demonstrated in giving easing from psoriasis and skin inflammation.

Also alleviating and recuperating, broke and dry skin, the kukui oil saturates, relaxes, and has been utilized for quite a while as a part of Hawaii to help revive dry skin and reduce the appearance of almost negligible differences and wrinkles on the face. At the point when purchasing kukui nut oil skin health management items, search for items that are supplemented with Vitamins A, C and E and remember it that kukui does not give as defensive a sun boundary as cutting edge creams and salves so don't utilize these items for skin assurance, they are more for utilization as an after-sun medicine and lotion.

Other intriguing skin health management items leaving Hawaii are the lip mind demulcents, made up of a compound of Kukui Nut, beeswax, and Mango Butter and arrive in a reach of flavors, for example, sugar stick, coconut or simply unadulterated. A percentage of the unscented Emollients can likewise obviously be utilized on dry noses, broke fingernail, skin, and mosquito chomps. At the point when purchasing kukui nut oil items it is fitting to watch that you are purchasing from a trustworthy merchant, ideally one situated in Hawaii who should have the capacity to give some insurance as to the degree of the genuine and nature of the oil.

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What Are The Benefits Of Pure Hempseed Oil?
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Date: March 18, 2013 04:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Benefits Of Pure Hempseed Oil?

Hempseed oil is oil that is obtained from hemp seeds. Unrefined Hempseed oil that is cold pressed is green in color and dark to clear light. It also has a nutty pleasant flavor. If the Hempseed oil has a dark the color then the flavor becomes more grassier. Refined hemp oil is colorless and clear with little flavor. It lacks antioxidants and natural vitamins.

Refined Hempseed oil is used primarily to manufacture products of body care. Industrial Hempseed oil is used to produce paints, lubricants, inks, plastic and fuel. This oil has also found some limited use in industries that produce shampoos, detergents and soaps.

Hempseed has had a good relationship with humanity.

Hempseed high in fatty acids

Studies that have been conducted recently shows that it contains essential fatty acids and amino acids that are necessary for human life. It also has a rare protein referred to as globule Edestins that is similar to Globin that is fond in blood plasma of humans.

Pure Hempseed oil has high nutritional value because it consist 1:3 ratio of omega 3 to omega 6 essential fatty acids .This ratio matches with the balance that human body requires. In recent years, it has received attention as possible feed stock for large scale production of bio-diesel. This oil makes incredible cosmetic grade oil and quality dietary oil that are superior because of its high nutritional value.

It is used also as a skin care recipes because it has base ingredients that helps the skin to regenerate and heal. Pure Hempseed oil is highly Emollient and this property makes it to be used to regenerate and nourish the skin directly. Hempseed oil is capable of penetrating the skin deeply unlike other oils that sits on top of the skin. Its deep penetrative property prevent the skin from aging because it allows essential fatty acids to penetrate the outer layer of skin fully thus encouraging a healthy moisture balance.

Hempseed oil contains a rich balance of essential oils

Pure Hempseed oil contains one of the richest and balanced natural sources of essential oils that are good for human consumption. The essential fatty acids help to restore wasting bodies and also improve immune system that is damaged. It is therefore not a surprise that modern researchers have studied this oil in relation to modern immune that attacks AIDS virus.

Hempseed oil is surely nature's oil that is most balanced for human nutrition (1:3 LNA to LA ratio) and it can be digested easily. In fact, modern research indicates that this oil can provide all our essential fatty acid requirements for life. 

Rich in Omega-3

This is made possible because it has a balanced 80 percent essential fatty acid content of the oil. Omega 3, a component that is found in Hempseeds helps to prevent: growth retardation, motor in coordination, tingling in legs and arms, behavioral changes, visual impairment and learning inability, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, tissue inflammation, dry skin, edema, low metabolic rate, sticky platelets and other kinds of immune dysfunctions. 

Rich in Omega-6

Omega 6 a component that is also found in Hempseeds helps in preventing: loss of hair ,skin eruptions ,liver degeneration ,kidney degeneration ,behavioral disturbances, drying up of glands excessive water loss from the skin that is accompanied by thirst, failure of wound healing ,susceptibility to infections ,growth retardation sterility in males ,arthritis like conditions, miscarriage in females, circulatory and heart problems. Prolonged absence of both omega 3 and 6 in your diet can be fatal and should be avoided.

Pure Hempseed oil is is ideal to be used in mayonnaise, dips and salad dressing because of its nutty pleasant flavor .It can be taken as an additional supplement for well being and general health. However it is not suitable to be used for frying because its benefits are reduced.

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Fenugreek Seed
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Date: November 25, 2009 03:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fenugreek Seed

fenugreek leavesFenugreek is one of the oldest herbal remedies, used for both a cooking spice and a medicinal remedy. Fenugreek is a plant that can be found in the family Fabaceae. This plant is used both as an herb and as a spice. The leaves of the plant are used as an herb, while the seeds of the plant are used as a spice. Fenugreek is cultivated worldwide as a semi-arid crop. Frequently, fenugreek can be found as a main ingredient in curry. Originally native to southwestern Asia, this herb was used for inflamed bowels and stomach problems because of its bowel-lubricating abilities. Fenugreek was used by the Greeks for respiratory problems. Additionally, fenugreek was used in both the East and West and thought of as one of the most effective medicinal herbs. Often, fenugreek plants were fed to sick animals to improve their health.

This herb has a reputation of being able to dissolve hardened masses of accumulated mucus in the body. Fenugreek helps to rid the lungs of mucus and the bronchial tubes of phlegm. Often, it is combined with lemon juice and honey to help expel waste through the lymphatic system. Fenugreek is known for the antiseptic properties that it contains, which help kill infections in the lungs. Additionally, this herb is recommended for treating an inflamed gastrointestinal system. This herb contains thirty percent mucilage, which may be used as a poultice on wounds, inflammations, boils, and skin ailments. Formulas containing fenugreek are often touted as the miracle medicine for all gynecological problems. Some studies have found that fenugreek simulates the uterus and contains diosgenin, a constituent similar to estrogen. fenugreek leaves Research on diabetic animals has found that Fenugreek seeds are able to reduce urinary glucose levels. The active ingredient seems to be the defatted portion of the seed, which possesses the alkaloid trogonelline, nicotinic acid, and coumarin. When the defatted seeds were added to insulin treatment of diabetic dogs, it was noted that insulin dose was decreased. Fenugreek contains choline and liptropic, which aid in dissolving cholesterol and lowering cholesterol levels. Animal studies have shown beneficial results in lowering serum cholesterol levels. Fenugreek helps reduce mucus in cases of asthma and sinus and bronchial congestion. Evidence of anti-inflammatory activity has been show in some studies, which may explain why some individuals with arthritis have been helped by fenugreek.

The seeds of the fenugreek plant are used to provide alterative, anti-catarrhal, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, astringent, bitter, demulcent, Emollient, expectorant, febrifuge, galactagogue, mucilant, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are choline, iron, lecithin, minerals, protein, and vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, and D. Primarily, fenugreek is extremely beneficial in treating allergies, loss of appetite, bronchial catarrh, high cholesterol, diabetic retinopathy, gas, gastric disorders, lung infections, excessive mucus, and sore throat.

Additionally, the herb is very helpful in dealing with abscesses, anemia, asthma, body odor, boils, bronchitis, cancer, swollen eyes, fevers, gallbladder problems, heartburn, inflammation, sinus problems, ulcers, uterine problems, and water retention. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by fenugreek, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Flaxseed
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Date: October 23, 2009 11:10 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Flaxseed

flax seedsSince the beginning of civilization, flax has been around. The early Swiss used the fibers for weaving, while Egyptians decorated their tombs with carvings of the flax plant and wrapped mummies in linen due to the high esteem they had for this plant. The fibers of the flax plant were a main source of clothing in biblical times, with even Christ being believed to have been buried in linen. The use of flaxseed oil was recommended by Hippocrates for inflammations of the mucous membranes. Charlemagne required his subjects to eat the seeds to remain healthy during the early eighth century in France.

Flaxseed has many medicinal properties, as the oil has been used as a remedy for colds, coughs, sore throats, mucus, congestion, lung conditions, and as an expectorant. The herb is soothing to the mucous membranes and has been used to treat asthmatic conditions.

Additionally, this herb is a mild, natural laxative, providing roughage to aid the body when constipation is a problem. It is also healing on the stomach and intestines. Flaxseed oil can be very beneficial for gastritis, ulcers, and heartburn, while the tea can be used to help detoxify the liver and purify the blood. This herb is also believed to aid in reducing the clotting tendency of blood, potentially lowering the risk of heart attacks and reducing cholesterol levels in blood. It is also used for reducing inflammation and for urinary tract irritations. Crushed flaxseed, made into a poultice, is often used to treat sprains or bruises.

Unrefined, cold-pressed flax oil is considered to be the richest vegetable source of omega-3 and 6 oils, which are essential fatty acids. These oils are useful for balancing the hormones in the body and helping in the weight-loss process. Essential fatty acids help to improve the function of the glands, which in turn helps weight loss. Those individuals on low or no-fat diets often experience symptoms of fatigue and no weight loss which is partly due to the absence of essential fatty acids in the diet. A small amount of essential fatty acids actually helps one to lose weight. flax seeds This herb also contains lignans, which are a type of fiber that has anti-estrogenic activity. A study done at the National Cancer Institute followed vegetarian women. The study indicated a correlation between a high amount of lignans in the blood and a lower risk for breast cancer. It has also been discovered that people living in countries where flaxseed is consumed in high amounts have a lower risk for developing both breast and colon cancer. It should be noted that stabilized flaxseed has a higher content of lignans than any other food.

Flaxseed can also be helpful in preventing heart disease and lowering cholesterol. One study found that ground flaxseed, when added to the diet, can reduce the incidence of heart disease.

The seeds of the flaxseed plant are used to provide anti-neoplastic, demulcent, Emollient, expectorant, mucilant, mild purgative, and vulnerary properties. Primarily, flaxseed is extremely beneficial in dealing with arthritis, cardiovascular health, high cholesterol, constipation, immune disorders, multiple sclerosis, and skin disorders.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating bronchitis, cancer, colds, gallstones, weak heart, jaundice, liver, lung disorders, muscular rheumatism, and tumors. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by flaxseed, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Plantain Herb
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Date: October 08, 2009 01:20 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Plantain Herb

Plantain is one of the most commonly used plants found throughout the world. The herb is generally used for cooking and is lower in sugar content than general bananas. Plantain was known for its medicinal properties from England to the New World. Its popularity continues to grow to this day. The seeds of this herb are related to psyllium seeds. They are often used for the same purposes.

The outer layer of the seeds of plantain contain mucilage. This is a product that swells up when moist. These seeds are responsible for helping to lower cholesterol. However, plantain is most known for its gastric benefits. This herb is responsible for both neutralizing stomach acids and normalizing stomach secretions. Fresh plantain juice has been used to treat mild stomach ulcers. This herb helps to absorb toxins from the bowels and promotes normal bowel function. Plantain is a bulk laxative and increases in mass when it is mixed with water. Research has determined the value of plantain as a mild laxative. The intestinal transit time was decreased in those subjects who were tested.

Along with intestinal use, plantain can help with bladder infections and kidney problems. It can also help with bed-wetting in children. This herb is great as an expectorant. Plantain ingested in tea-form clears the head and ears of congestion. The tea is also helpful in treating chronic lung problems in children.

Plantain is known for its ability to neutralize poisons in the body. Those patients who had poison ivy were treated topically with crushed plantain leaves. Itching was eliminated and the condition was prevented from spreading in those who were treated. Additionally, the leaves were able to stop hemorrhaging when they were applied to the bleeding surface. The astringent properties that are found in this herb are helpful in stopping bleeding and promoting the healing of wounds.

Plantain works as an anti-inflammatory to help with problems like edema and hemorrhoids. Other conditions that plantain has been included for include nerve problems, fevers, burns, eye pain, and jaundice.

The leaves and seeds of the plantain plant are used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antivenomous, astringent, blood purifier, demulcent, diuretic, Emollient, expectorant, febrifuge, mucilant, parasiticide, gentle purgative, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, potassium, sulfur, trace minerals, and vitamins C, K, and T. Primarily, plantain is extremely beneficial in treating bed-wetting, snake bites, cystitis, diarrhea, intestinal problems, kidney problems, chronic lung disorders, neuralgia, blood poisoning, poison ivy, sores, ulcers, urinary incontinence, and wounds.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with insect bites, bronchitis, burns, high cholesterol, colitis, coughs, cuts, dysentery, edema, epilepsy, sore eyes, fevers, gas, external hemorrhages, hemorrhoids, infections, jaundice, leucorrhea, excessive menstruation, respiratory problems, primary tuberculosis, skin conditions, and stings. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medication. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by plantain, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Jojoba Oil
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Date: August 28, 2009 01:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Jojoba Oil

Jojoba is a shrub that is native to the Sonoran and Majoave desserts of Arizona, California, and Mexico. It is the only species in the family SImmondsiaceae. Sometimes, it is also placed in the box family, Buxaceae. This herb is also known as goat nut, deer nut, pignut, wild hazel, quinine nut, coffeeberry, and gray box bush. The jojoba plant grows one to two meters tall and has a broad, dense crown. The leaves are opposite, oval in shape, and approximately two to four centimeters in length and 1.5 to 3 centimeters wide. The leaves are thick, waxy, and gray-green in color. The flowers are small and greenish-yellow in color. They have five to six sepals and no petals. Each plant is neither male or female. Hermaphrodites in this species are extremely rare. The fruit of the jojoba plant is an acorn-shaped ovoid that is one to two centimeters long. The mature seed is a hard oval, dark brown in color, and contains about fifty-four percent oil.

Jojoba foliage gives a year-round food opportunity for many animals. Among these include deer, jaelina, bighorn sheep, and livestock. The nuts are often eaten by squirrels, rabbits, other rodents, and larger birds. The only animal known to be able to digest the wax that is found inside the jojoba nut is the Bailey’s Pocket Mouse. The seed meal is toxic to many mammals when taken in large quantities. The indigestible wax often acts as a laxative in humans.

Native Americans in Arizona, California, and northern Mexico used jojoba for the hair and as a tonic for the body. The herb is a valuable crop for some Native American tribes in those areas. This herb can be found in shampoos, conditioners, moisturizers, and sunscreens.

Jojoba oil, which is made from the seeds of the plant, has been used traditionally by Native Americans. They use this herb to promote hair growth and relieve skin problems. Jojoba helps to remove the sebum deposits that are responsible for causing dandruff and scalp disorders. This herb is responsible for making the scalp less acidic.

One study found the wax that is in the jojoba oil to treat acne and psoriasis. This herb has traditionally been used successfully for this purpose. In addition, it is used to heal minor skin irritations. A study on rabbits found that those who were fed jojoba oil had a reduction of forty percent in their blood cholesterol levels. The reason or component that is responsible for this activity still remains unknown.

The oil of the jojoba plant is used to provide Emollient properties. The primary nutrients found in jojoba are chromium, copper, iodine, silicon, vitamins E and B complex, and zinc. It is important to consult your health care provider before consider using this or any other supplement while on prescription medications. Primarily, jojoba is very beneficial in treating dandruff, hair loss, psoriasis, and dry scalp.

Additionally, this herb is extremely helpful in dealing with abrasions, acne vulgaris, athlete’s foot, cuts, eczema, pimples, seborrhea, mouth sores, warts, and wrinkles. For more information on the many benefits provided by jojoba, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Marshmallow Root Herb
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Date: August 12, 2009 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Marshmallow Root Herb

The marshmallow plant can be found in southern and western Europe, western Asia, and the northeastern region of North America. The plant originally grew in salty soils, but now it thrives in moist, uncultivated ground. The fleshy, upright stems of the marshmallow plant reach a height of three to four feet. The pale yellow roots are tapered, long, and thick. They have a tough, yet flexible, exterior. The short-stemmed leaves are round, with irregularly toothed margins and three to five lobes. The leaves and stem are covered with a soft and velvety down. The flowers have five reddish-white petals. The whole plant, especially the root, is filled with a mild mucilage.

Since ancient Egyptian times, marshmallow has been used as food and medicine. One of the herbs found in the grave of a Neanderthal man in a cave in Iraq was marshmallow. This herb was used anciently for irritated throats and intestinal tracts. The Europeans used marshmallow for bronchitis, colds, and coughs. This was because of its soothing and healing properties. Native Americans also used marshmallow to treat snakebites and wounds.

This herb is responsible for helping to expel phlegm and relax the bronchial tubes while soothing and healing. The herb aids in healing lung ailments such as asthma and inflammation. The soothing and healing properties that are found in the mucilage in marshmallow make it a valuable herb for many lung ailments. Also, it is useful on sore throats, infections, diarrhea, dysentery, skin irritations, and for coughs. This herb is a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant. This fact makes it good for both the joints and the gastrointestinal tract. Marshmallow is used as a poultice with cayenne, which allows it to help with gangrene, blood poisoning, burns, bruises, and wounds.

Studies have found that the mucilaginous properties of marshmallow yield a soothing effect on the mucous membranes. A study that was done on animals showed some indication of a reduction in blood sugar levels and hypoglycemia activity. This may be beneficial for diabetics.

The root of the marshmallow plant are used to provide alterative, anticatarrhal, anti-inflamamtory, antilithic, demulcent, diuretic, Emollient, expectorant, galactagogue, lithotriptic, mucilant, nutritive, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iodine, iron, pantothenic acid, sodium, and vitamins A and B-complex. Primarily, marshmallow is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, bed-wetting, bleeding, boils, bronchitis, emphysema, kidney problems, lung congestion, nervous disorders, pneumonia, urinary incontinence, urinary problems, uterine problems, whooping cough, and wounds. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with allergies, breast problems, burns, constipation, coughs, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery, sore eyes, gangrene, gastric disorders, glandular problems, inflammation, intestinal problems, kidney stones, absent lactation, liver disorders, irritated membranes, excessive mucus, and skin disorders.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by marshmallow, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Slippery Elm Bark
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Date: July 23, 2009 10:35 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Slippery Elm Bark

The slippery elm plant can be found natively growing in eastern North America. It is similar to the American elm in general appearance, but it is more closely related to European Wych Elm. Other common names for this plant are Red Elm, Gray Elm, Soft Elm, Moose Elm, and Indian Elm.

The Greek physician Dioscorides used slippery elm in ancient times to help speed up the healing of broken bones. A seventeenth-century herbalist, Nicholas Culpeper, also recommended this herb for healing broken bones, balding, and burns. This herb was known as a survival food by Native Americans and early colonists. These people considered this herb to be extremely valuable. They used the inner bark of slippery elm as a salve and applied externally for burns and wounds. Slippery elm bark was also used for colds, coughs, sore throats, wounds, as a poultice to bring boils to a head, and also for bowel complaints. This herb was considered to be one of the most valuable remedies in herbal practice by Dr. Edward Shook.

This herb contains about the same amount of nutrition as oatmeal. It is responsible for providing a wholesome and sustaining food for those people for young children and invalids. Slippery elm is mainly used to treat gastrointestinal problems. Like stomach and intestinal ulcers, soothing the stomach and colon, indigestion, acidity, and to lubricate the bowels. The mucilage content that is found in this herb is believed to help in healing ulcers and ulcerated colons. The herb has also been used for asthma, bronchitis, colitis, colon problems, and all lung problems. Slippery elm is also a mild purgative, which helps to assist with elimination.

Research done on slippery elm has found that it is an excellent demulcent. It is also beneficial for diarrhea, coughs, stomach problems, colitis, and lung problems. The bark of slippery elm contains mucilage which is responsible for swelling in water. This swelled mixture can then be applied to wounds or taken internally to soothe and heal. Some lozenges for throat irritations have powdered bark included in them to help soothe the throat and promote healing.

In short, the inner bark of the slippery elm plant is used to provide antacid, antineoplastic, astringent, demulcent, Emollient, expectorant, mucilant, and nutritive properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, copper, iodine, iron, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, vitamins A, F, K, and P, and zinc. Primarily, slippery elm is extremely beneficial in treating abscesses, asthma, bronchitis, burns, colitis, colon problems, constipation, coughs, diaper rash, diarrhea, gastric disorders, and lung problems.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with appendicitis, bladder problems, boils, cancer, croup, diphtheria, dysentery, eczema, eye ailments, fevers, flu, hemorrhoids, herpes, inflammation, kidney problems, pain, phlegm, pneumonia, sores, syphilis, sore throat, tuberculosis, tumors, ulcers, uterine problems, vaginal irritations, warts, worms, wounds, and whooping cough. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by slippery elm, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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ChickWeed
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Date: June 16, 2009 09:46 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ChickWeed

Chickweeds are an annual herb that can be found growing in temperate zones, artic zones, and throughout. The most likely origin of this plant, although not known for sure, is Eurasia. Chickweeds have established themselves all over the world, as they may have been carried by clothes and shoes of explorers. Chickweed plants are as numerous in species as they are in region. Most species are succulent with white flowers. All of the species have practically the same edible and medicinal values.

This plant exhibits an interesting trait, as it folds its leaves over its buds and the new shoots every night. This event is known as the sleeping of the plant. Cultivating this plant is not exactly necessary, as it is abundant and easy to find. The plant can be gathered fresh and edible between May and July, as soon as the flowers appear. Not only can the plant be used fresh, it can also be dried for later herb use.

Chickweed can be found growing abundantly in areas of Europe and North America. The Ojibwe and Iroquois Native American tribes used chickweed as eyewash. They also used it in poultice form to heal wounds. It has recently been studied for its abilities in helping to prevent cancer.

Chickweed is extremely valuable in treating blood toxicity, fevers, and inflammation. Its mucilage elements are known to help with stomach ulcers and also inflamed bowels. Chickweed is great for helping to dissolve plaque in blood vessels as well as other fatty substances that can be found in the body. Chickweed acts as an antibiotic in the blood, as it may be recommended as an anticancer treatment. Some people have used chickweed to treat tumors.

Chickweed can be used as a poultice for boils, burns, skin diseases, sore eyes, and swollen testes. Chickweed is also recommended to aid in weight loss and to break down cellulite. This herb is mild and has been sued as a food as well as a medicine.

Chickweeds are very nutritious and high in vitamins and minerals. They can be added to salads or cooked as a pot herb. The plant tastes somewhat like spinach. The whole plant can be taken internally as a postpartum depurative, emmenagogue, glactogogue, and cirucaltory tonic. A decoction can also be used externally to treat rheumatic pains, wounds, and ulcers. Chickweed can be applied as a medicinal poultice to relieve any kind of roseola. It is effective wherever there are fragile superficial veins or itching skin conditions.

The entire chickweed herb is used to provide alterative, anorectic, antineoplastic, blood purifier, demulcent, diuretic, Emollient, expectorant, febrifuge, mucilant, nutritive, pectoral, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, copper, iron, manganese, phosphorus, sodium, vitamins C, D, and B-complex, and zinc. Primarily, this herb is extremely beneficial in dealing with excessive appetite, bleeding, blood impurities, convulsions, obesity, skin rashes, and ulcers. Additionally, chickweed can be extremely helpful in treating arteriosclerosis, asthma, bronchitis, bruises, bursitis, colitis, constipation, cramps, eye infections, gas, hemorrhoids, lung congestion, excessive mucus, pleurisy, blood poising, swollen testicles, inflamed tissue, water retention, and wounds. For more information the many beneficial affects of chickweed, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

Chickweed is available in capsule and tablet forms at your local or internet health food store. Look for name brands like Solaray, Natures Answer, and Natures Herbs to ensure quality and purity of the products you purchase.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Chickweed is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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Barley Grass
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Date: May 14, 2009 01:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Barley Grass

Barley is a cereal grain that is derived from the annual grass known as Hordeum vulgare. This nutrient serves as a major animal feed crop, but also is used for malting and in health food. Barley is also used in the making of beer and whisky. In a 2005 ranking of cereal crops in the world, barley was ranked number four in both quantity produced and area of cultivation. It is still used as a major food in the middle east. Barley is a member of the grass family, descending from and inter-fertile with wild barley. For this reason, the two forms are often treated as one species. The main difference between the two forms is the brittle spike on the seeds of the wild barley, which help with dispersal.

Barley tends to be more tolerant of soil salinity than wheat, which potentially explains the increase of barley cultivation in Mesopotamia from the 2nd millennium BC and forward. Although barley is not as cold tolerant as the winter wheat, fall rye, or winter triticale, it can be planted as a winter crop in warmer areas of the world like Australia. It is important to note that barley not only as a short growing season, but it is also relatively drought tolerant, making it an easier plant to grow.

Barley was valued by the ancient Egyptians and Greeks for its immense health benefits. Because of this, it was cultivated. Hippocrates even wrote of the benefits of gruel that is made from barley. New World settlers planted barley in order to sustain both health and vitality. Barley juice contains antiviral properties that help to strengthen the immune system. This herb can help cleanse the body on a cellular level. It can also normalize metabolism and neutralize heavy metals in the body, such as mercury. Barley can benefit the body by lowering cholesterol levels, aiding digestion, and relieving constipation. This herb also strengthens the entire body as a whole.

One study done in Japan separated a new antioxidant that has been found in barley leaves called 2-0-GI. This antioxidant was found to be effective in the preservation of food. 2-0-GI was also found to have anti-inflammatory and antiallergenic activity. Another Japanese study found beneficial results in barley’s ability to inhibit the AIDS virus.

Both the juice and powder made from the young leaves and grass of barley are helpful in producing adaptogen, alterative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, blood purifier, demulcent, Emollient, immunostimulant, nutritive, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients in this herb include calcium, chlorophyll, iron, live enzymes, magnesium, potassium, protein, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and vitamins B1, B2, and C with bioflavonoids. Primarily, barley is beneficial in helping to treat anemia, arthritis, and impurities in the blood, boils, cancer, and metal poisoning. However, this nutrient also offers great benefits with acne, AIDS/HIV, allergies, hay fever, bronchitis, candidiasis, eczema, herpes, infection, kidney problems, leprosy, liver disorders, lung disorders, psoriasis, skin conditions, syphilis, tuberculosis, and ulcers. For more information on the many benefits that barley has to offer, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Barley is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

--
Buy Barley Grass At Vitanet ®, LLC

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HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)
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Date: July 11, 2005 08:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)

INTRODUCTION

In a time when we are more concerned than ever with issues of health, a tried and true tropical herb called noni needs t o be added t o our list of the best natural remedies. It susage over hundreds of years supports it s description as a veritable panacea of therapeutic actions. At this writing, noni continues to accrue impressive medicinal credentials, and its emergence as an effective nat ural healing agent is a timely one. Amidst rising cancer rates, the high incidence of degenerative diseases like diabetes, and the evolution of ant ibiotic resist ant bacteria and new viral strains, herbs like noni are sought after for their natural pharmaceutical properties. Unquest ionably, all of us want to know how to:

  • • protect ourselves f rom toxins and pollut ants
  • • prevent t he premature onset of age-related diseases such as arthritis, heart disease, diabetes and stroke
  • • boost our immune defenses to protect ourselves from new viral and bacterial strains that have become antibiotic-resist ant
  • • reduce our risk of developing cancer
  • • better digest our food for proper assimilation and purge the intestinal system wit hout the dangerous side effects of harsh drugs. Its actions are multifaceted and must be considered when assessing natural treatment s for disease or injury. It s impressive and widespread use among various native cult ures of t ropical island regions supports the notion that it does indeed possess valuable, therapeutic compounds.

    Genus Rubiaceae

    Common Names

    Indian Mulberry (India), Noni (Hawaii), Nono (Tahiti and Raratonga), Polynesian Bush Fruit, Painkiller Tree (Caribbean islands), Lada (Guam), Mengkudo (Malaysia), Nhau (Southeast Asia), Grand Morinda (Vietnam), Cheesefruit (Australia), Kura (Fiji), Bumbo (Africa) Note: This is only a small sampling of vernacular names for Morinda citrifolia. Almost every island nation of the South Pacific and Caribbean has a term for this particular plant . This booklet will refer to the herb mainly as “ noni” or M. citrifolia, and is referring primarily to Hawaiin noni.

    Parts Used

    The parts of the noni plant most used for their medicinal and nutritional purposes are the fruit, seeds, bark, leaves, and flowers. Virtually every part of the noni plant is utilized for its individual medicinal properties; however, it is the fruit portion that is regarded as its most valuable. The seeds have a purgative action, the leaves are used to treat external inflammations and relieve pain, the bark has strong astringent properties and can treat malaria, the root extracts lower blood pressure, the flower essences relieve eye inflammations and the f ruit has a number of medicinal actions.

    Physical Description

    Morinda citrifolia is technically an evergreen shrub or bush, which can grow to heights of fifteen to twenty feet . It has rigid, coarse branches which bear dark, oval, glossy leaves. Small white fragrant flowers bloom out of cluster-like pods which bear creamy-white colored fruit. The fruit is fleshy and gel-like when ripened, resembling a small breadf ruit . The flesh of the fruit is characterist ically bitter, and when completely ripe produces a rancid and very dist inctive odor. Noni has buoyant seeds that can float formont hs in ocean bodies. The wood of the inflammatory, astringent, Emollient, emmenagogue, laxative, sedative, hypotensive (lowers blood pressure) , blood purif ier, and tonic.

    Chemical Constituents

    Noni has various chemical constituents. First, it has an impressive array of terpene compounds, three of which—L. Asperuloside, aucubin, and glucose— have been identified by their actyl derivatives. Both caproic and caprylic acids have been isolated.1 Second, bushfruits, a category of which noni fruit is a member, are also considered a good source of vit - amin C.2 Third, Hawaiin noni has been linked to the synthesis of xeronine in the body which has significant and widespread health implications. Last , the alkaloid cont ent of the noni fruit is thought to be responsible for its therapeutic actions. Alkaloids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological and biological act ivitiesin the human body. They are nitrogencontaining organic compounds which can react with acids to form salts and which are the basis of many medicines. The following is an in-depth chemical analysis of each plant part and it s chemical constituents.

  • • amino acids (which include alanine, arginine, asparticacids, cysteine, cystine, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan tyrosine, and valine)
  • • anthraquinones
  • • glycosides
  • • phenolic compounds
  • • resins
  • • B-sitosterol
  • • ursolic acid

    FLOWER

  • • acacet in 7-0-D (+) -glucophyranoside
  • • 5,7,-dimet hylapigenin-4-0-8-D(+) -galactophyranoside
  • • 6,8,-dimet hoxy-3-methyl anthroquinone-1-0-8-rhamnosyl glucophyranoside

    FRUIT

  • • antioxidant
  • • alizarin
  • • anthraquinones
  • • caproic and caprylic acids

    discovered an alkaloid in the Hawaiin noni fruit which he calls proxeronine and which he believes has appreciable physiological actions by acting as a precursor to xeronine, a very crucial compound (see later sections) . In addition, a compound found in the fruit called damnacanthol is believed to help inhibit cert ain viruses and cellular mutations involved in cancer.

    ROOT AND ROOT BARK

  • • carbonate
  • • chlorubin
  • • rubicholric acid
  • • soranjidol
  • • chrysophanol
  • • phosphate
  • • magnesium
  • • ferric iron
  • • sodium
  • • glycosides
  • • morinadadiol
  • • morindine
  • • resins
  • • rubiadin
  • • sterols4

    Pharmacology

    Recent surveys have suggested that noni fruit exerts antibiotic action. In fact, a variety of compounds which have antibacterial properties (such as aucubin) have been identified in the fruit.5 The 6-Dglucopyranose pentaacet ate of the fruit extract is not considered bacteriostatic.6 Constituents found in the fruit portion have exhibited ant imicrobial action against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi (and other types) , Shigella paradysenteriae, and Staphylococcus aureaus. Compounds found in the root have the ability to reduce swollen mucous membrane and lower blood pressure in animal studies. Proxeronine is an alkaloid constituent found in Hawaiin noni fruit which may prompt the production of xeronine in the body. It is considered a xeronine precursor and was discovered in noni fruit by Dr. Ralph M. Heinicke. He has theorized that this proenzyme can be effective in initiating a series of beneficial cellular reactions through its involvement with the integrity of specific proteins. He points out that tissues contain cells which possess certain recept or sites for xeronine. Because the reactions that can occur are so varied, many different therapeutic actions can result when xeronine production escalates, explaining why Hawaiin noni is good for so many seemingly unrelated disorders. Damnacanthol is another compound contained in the fruit of the Hawaiin noni plant which has shown the ability to block or inhibit the cellular function of RAS cells, considered pre-cancerous cells.

    Body Systems Targeted

    The following body systems have all been effec-freeze-dried capsules, dehydrated powder or fruit, and oil. Noni plant constituents are sometimes offered in combination with other herbs. Some products contain a percent age of the fruit, bark, root and seeds for their individual therapeutic properties.

    Satety

    Extracts of M. citrifolia are considered safe if used as directed; however, pregnant or nursing mothers should consult their physicians before taking any supplement . High doses of root extracts may cause constipation. Taking noni supplements with coffee, alcohol or nicotine is not recommended.

    Suggested Uses

    Ideally, noni extracts should be taken on an empty stomach prior to meals. The process of digesting food can interfere with the medicinal value of the alkaloid compounds found in Hawaiin noni, especially in its fruit . Apparently, stomach acids and enzymes destroy the specific enzyme which frees up the xeronine compound. Take noni supplements without food, coffee, nicotine or alcohol. Using supplements that have been made from the semi-ripe or light - green fruit is also considered preferable to the ripe, whit ish fruit .

    NONI: ITS USE AND HISTORY

    Noni is a tropical wandering plant indigenous to areas of Australia, Malaysia and Polynesia. It is considered native to Southeast Asia although it grows from India to the eastern region of Polynesia. Morinda citrifolia has a long history of medicinal use throughout these areas. It is thought to be the “most widely and commonly used medicinal plant prior to the European era.” 7 Centuries ago, the bushfruit was introduced to native Hawaiians, who subsequently called it “noni” and considered its fruit and root as prized medicinal agents. Among all Polynesian botanical agents of the 19th and 20th centuries, Hawaiin noni has the widest array of medical applications. Samoan and Hawaiian medical practitioners used noni for bowel disorders (especially infant diarrhea, constipation, or intestinal parasites) , indigestion, skin inflammation, infection, mouth sores, fever, contusions and sprains. Hawaiians commonly prepared noni tonics designed to treat diabetes, stings, burns and fish poisoning.8 The herb’s remarkable ability to purge the intestinal tract and promote colon health was well known among older Hawaiian and Tahitian natives and folk healers. Interestingly, field observations regarding its repu-remarkable healing agent .

    Wonder Herb of Island Folk Healers

    Common to t he thickets and forests of Malaysia and Polynesia, and the low hilly regions of the Philippine islands, noni has been cultivated throughout communities in the South Pacific for hundreds of years. Its Hawaiian use is thought to originate from inter-island canoe travel and settlement dating to before Christ . Its hardy seeds have the ability to float which has also contributed to its distribution among various seacoasts in the South Pacific region. Historical investigation has established the fact that some of Hawaii’s earliest settlers probably came viaTahiti. For this reason, Tahitian herbal practices have specific bearing on the herbal therapeutics of islands to the nort h. The very obvious similarities between the Hawaiian vernacular for herbal plants like noni and Tahitian names strongly suggests the theory of Polynesian migrations to Hawaii. Cultures native to these regions favored using Morinda citrifolia for treating major diseases and ut ilized it as a source of nourishment in times of famine.9 Noni fruit has been recognized for centuries as an excellent source of nutrition. The peoples of Fiji, Samoa and Rarat onga use the fruit in both its raw and cooked forms.10 Traditionally, the fruit was propicked before it was fully ripe and placed in the sunlight . After being allowed to ripen, it was typically mashed and its juice extracted through a cloth. Noni leaves provided a veget able dish and their resiliency made them desirable as a fish wrap for cooking.

    Noni’s Medical Reputation

    Elaborate traditionalrituals and praying rites usually accompanied the administration of noni. Int erestingly, cultures indigenous to the Polynesian islands had a significant understanding of their flora. For example, native Hawaiians maint ained a folkmedicine taxonomy t hat was considered second to none.11 Noni was not only used for medicinal purposes but for its food value, for clot hing and for cloth dyes as well. Research indicates that noni was among the few herbal remedies that islanders considered “ tried and true.” In Hawaii, trained herbal practitioners reserved the right to prescribe plant therapies.12 Records indicate that Hawaiian medical practices were based on extensive and very meticulous descriptions of symptoms and their prescribed herbal treatments. Dosages were controlled and the collection and administration of plant extracts was carefully monitored.13 In addition to Morinda, it was not uncommon for these herbal doctors to also recommend using In regard to its application for common ailments, Hawaiians and other island communities traditionally prescribed noni to purge the bowel, reduce fever, cure respiratory infections such as asthma, ease skin inflammations, and heal bruises and sprains. In other words, noni was widely used and highly regarded as a botanical medicine.

    A Timely Reemer gence

    Today, the natural pharmaceutical actions of the chemical constituents contained in noni are scientif-ically emerging as valuable bot anical medicines. Tahitian “nono” intrigued medical practitioners decades ago; however, due to the eventual emergence of synthetic drugs, interest in this island botanical diminished until recent years. Ethnobot anists are once again rediscovering why Hawaiian people havet reasured and cultivat ed Morinda citrifolia for generations. Noni is now finding its way into western therapeutics and is referred to as “ the queen” of the genus Rubiaceae. Its ability to reduce joint inflammation and target the immune system have made it the focus of the modern scientific inquiry. Dr. Ralph Heinicke has conducted some fascinating studies on the chemical constituents of the Hawaiin noni fruit. His research centers on the proxeronine content of the fruit juice and how it profoundly influences human physiology. In addition, scientific studies investigating noni as an anti-cancer agent have been encouraging. It s conspicuous attributes and varied uses have elevat edits status to one of the best of the healing herbs. Today Morinda citrifolia is available in liquid, juice, freezedried capsules, or oil forms, and is considered one of nature’s most precious botanicals.

    TRADITIONAL USES OF NONI

    Throughout tropical regions, virtually every part of Morinda citrifolia was used to treat disease or injury. Its curative properties were well known and commonly employed. PatoaTama Benioni, a member of the Maoritribe from the Cook Islands and a lecturer on island plants explains: Traditionally Polynesians use noni for basically everything in the treatment of illness. Noni is a part of our lives. Any Polynesian boy will tell you he’s had exper ience with it . We use juice from its roots, its flowers, and its fruit... my grandmother taught me to use noni from the roots and the leaves to make medicine for external as well as internal use, and for all kinds of ailments, such as coughs, boils, diseases of the skin, and cuts.15

    decoctions to stimulate delayed menst ruation.

  • • Noni was frequently utilized for its antiparasitic activity.
  • • Respiratory ailments, coughs, and colds were treated with noni.
  • • A juice made from pounding noni leaves, roots and fruit mixed with water was administered for diarrhea.
  • • Dried and powdered forms of the bark mixed with water and administ ered with a spoon treated infant diarrhea.
  • • Small pieces of fruit and root infused with water were given to kill intestinal parasites.
  • • Boiled bark decoctions were given as a drink for stomach ailments.
  • • Coughs were treated with grated bark.
  • • Charred unripe fruit was used with salt on diseased gums.
  • • Pounded fruit combined with kava and sugar cane was used to treat tuberculosis.
  • • Babies were rubbed with fresh, crushed leaves for serious chest colds accompanied by fever.
  • • Eye washes were made from decoctions for eye complaint s from flower extracts.
  • • Leaf infusions were traditionally taken to treat adult fevers.
  • • A mouthwash consisting of crushed ripe fruit and juice was used for inflamed gums in young boys.
  • • Pounded leaf juice was used for adult gingivitis.
  • • Sore throats were treated by chewing the leaves and swallowing the juice.
  • • Skin abscesses and boils were covered with leaf poultices.
  • • Swelling was controlled with leaf macerations.
  • • Heated leaves were often used for arthritic joins and for ringworm.16

    XERONINE: THE SECRET OF NONI?

    One informed professional on the subject of noni is Dr. Ralph Heinicke, a biochemist who has researched the active compounds of noni fruit for a number of years. He discovered that the Hawaiin noni fruit contains an alkaloid precursor to a very vital compound called xeronine. Wit hout xeronine, life would cease. In Dr. Heinicke’s view, noni fruit provides a safe and effective way to increase xeronine levels, which exert a crucial influence on cell health and protction. His research suggests that the juice from the M. citrifolia fruit contains what could technically be considered a precursor of xeronine—proxeronine. This compound initiates the release of xeronine in the intestinal tract after it comes in contact with a specific enzyme which is also contained in the fruit .

    Because proteins and enzymes have so many varied roles within cell processes, the normalization of these proteins with noni supplemenation could initiate avery wide variety of body responses and treat many disease condit ions. Proteins are the most important catalysts found in the body. The beauty of obtaining a precursor to xeronine from the noni fruit is that the body naturally decides how much of this precursor to convert to xeronine. Disease, stress, anger, trauma and injury can lower xeronine levels in the body, thus creat ing a xeronine deficit . Supplementing the body with noni fruit is considered an excellent way to safely and naturally raise xeronine levels. It is the research and theories of Dr. Heinicke which have made the juice of the Hawaiin noni fruit a viable medicinal substance. He writes: Xeronine is analkaloid, a substance the body produces in order to activate enzymes so they can function properly. It also energizes and regulates the body. This par-ticular alkaloid has never been found because the body makes it, immediately uses it, and then breaks it down. At no time is there an appreciable, isolable amount in the blood. But xeronine is so basic to the functioning of proteins, we would die without it . Its absence can cause many kinds of illness.17 Because so many diseases result from an enzyme malfunction, Dr. Heinicke believes that using the noni fruit can result in an impressive array of curative applications. Interestingly, he believes that we manufacture proxeronine while we are sleeping. He proposes t hat if we could constantly supply our bodies wit h proxeronine from other sources, our need to sleep would diminish.18

    NONI PROCESSING

    How an herb is processed is crucial to how beneficial it is: this is especially true of noni, with its unique enzymes and alkaloids. Morinda citrifolia should be picked when the fruit is turning from its dark green immature color to its lighter green color, and certainly before it ripens to its white, almost translucent color. Once picked, noni, like aloe, will denature extremely quickly due to its very active enzymes. After harvesting, it should swiftly be flash frozen. This is similar to what is done to fish caught at sea to keep them f esh. This stops it from losing its potency while not damaging any of its constituents. To process noni, freeze-drying is recommended. This removes only the water without damaging any of this miracle plant’s vital enzymes and other phytonutrients like xeronine and proxeronine. This pure high-quality noni fruit juice powder is then encapsu-has a very harsh taste and an extremely foul smell, similar to the fruit it self . Other methods of processing include thermal processing, dehydrat ion and air drying. Thermal processing is generally found in liquids, while the dehydrat ed noni is then milled and encapsulated. Unfortunately both methods utilize high heat (110+°F) , which can deactivate many of the vital compounds that make noni so import ant . Air-drying is effect ive without using damaging heat but has serious quality control problems for commercial production.

    MODERN APPLICATIONS OF NONI

    Overview

    Noni possesses a wide variety of medicinal properties which originat e from its differing plant component s. The fruit and leaves of the shrub exert antibacterial activities. Its roots promote the expulsion of mucus and the shrinkage of swollen membranes making it an ideal therapeutic for nasal congest ion, lung infect ions, and hemorrhoids. Noni root compounds have also shown natural sedative properties as well as the ability to lower blood pressure.

    Leaf extracts are able to inhibit excessive blood flow or to inhibit the formation of blood clots. Noni is particularly useful for its ability to treat painful joint conditions and to resolve skin inflammations. Many people drink noni fruit extracts in juice form for hypert ension, painful menstruation, arthritis, gastric ulcers, diabetes, and depression. Recent studies suggest that its anticancer activit y should also be considered. Concerning the therapeutic potential of the Hawaiin noni fruit, Dr. Heinicke writes: I have seen the compound found in noni work wonders. When I was still investigating its possibilities, I had a friend who was a medical research scientist administer the proxeronine to a woman who had been comatose for three months. Two hour safter receiving the compound, she sat up in bed and asked where she was. . . . Noni is probably the best source of proxeronine that we have today.19 Studies and surveys combined support the ability of noni to act as an immunost imulant, inhibit the growth of certain tumors, enhance and normalize cellular function and boost tissue regeneration. It is considered a powerful blood purifier and contributor to overall homeostasis.

    xeronine, which appears to be able to regulate the shape and integrity of cert in proteins that individually contribute to specific cellular activities. Interestingly, this effect seems to occur after ingestion, inferring that the most active compound of noni may not be present in uneaten forms of the fruit or other plant parts. Some practitioners believe that xeronine is best obtained from a noni fruit juice precursor compound. The enzymatic reactions that occur with taking the juice on an empty stomach are what Dr. Heinicke believes set cellular repair intomotion.

    Cancer

    A study conducted in 1994 cited the anticancer activity of Morinda citrifolia against lung cancer. A team of scientists from the University of Hawaii used live laboratory mice to test the medicinal properties of the fruit against Lewis lung carcinomas which were artificially transferred to lung tissue. The mice that were left untreated died in nine to twelve days. However, giving noni juice in consistent daily doses significantly prolonged their life span. Almost half of these mice lived for more than fifty days.20 Research conclusions state that the chemical constituents of the juice acted indirectly by enhancing the ability of the immune system to deal with the invading malig-nancy by boosting macrophage or lymphocyte activit y. Furt her evaluation theorizes that the unique chemical constituents of Morinda citrifolia initiate enhanced T-cell activity, a reaction that may explain noni’s ability to treat a variety of infectious diseases. 21

    In Japan, similar studies on tropical plant extracts found that damnacanthol, a compound found in Morinda citrifolia, is able to inhibit the function of KRAS- NRK cells, which are considered precursors to certain types of malignancies.22 The experiment involved adding noni plant extract to RAS cells and incubating them for a number of days. Observation disclosed that noni was able to significantly inhibit RAS cellular function. Among 500 plant extracts, Morinda citrifolia was determined to contain the most effective compounds against RAS cells. Its damnacanthol content was clinically described in 1993 as “a new inhibit or of RAS function.” 2 3 The xeronine fact or is also involved in that xeronine helps to normalize the way malignant cells behave. While they are still technically cancer cells, they no longer function as cells with unchecked growth. In time, the body’s immune system may be able to eradicate these cells.

    Arthritis

    with arthritic disease. One link to arthritic pain may be the inability to properly or completely digest proteins which can then form crystal-like deposits in the joints. The ability of noni fruit to enhance protein digestion through enhanced enzymatic function may help to eliminate this particular phenomenon. In addition, the alkaloid compounds and plant met abolites of noni may be linked to its apparent anti-inflammatory action. Plant sterols can assist in inhibiting the inflammatory response which causes swelling and pain. In addition, the antioxidant effect of noni may help to decrease free radical damage in joint cells, which can exacerbate discomfort and degeneration.

    Immune System

    The alkaloid and other chemical compounds found in noni have proven themselves to effectively control or kill over six types of infectious bacterial strains including: Escherichia coli, salmonellatyphi (and other types) , shigella paradysenteriae, and staphylo - coccus aureaus.25 In addition, damnacanthol, was able to inhibitt he early antigen stage of the Epstein- Barr virus.

    The bioactive components of the whole plant, combined or in separate portions, have demonst rat - ed the ability to inhibit several different strains of bacteria. Anecdotal reports support this action in that noni seems particularly effective in shortening the duration of certain types of infection. This may explain why noni is commonly used to treat colds and flu. The chemical constituents found in noni and the possibility that they stimulate xeronine production— as well as initiate alkaloid therapy—may explain noni’s reputation for having immuno-stimulatory properties. Alkaloids have been able to boost phagocytosis which is the process in which certain white blood cells called macrophages attack and literally digest infectious organisms. Interestingly, the ant it umoraction of noni has been ascribed to an immune system response which involves stimulating T-cells. tropical regions during World War II learned of the fruit’s ability to boost endurance and stamina. Native cultures in Samoa, Tahiti, Raratonga and Australia used the fruit in cooked and raw forms. M. citrifolia is considered a tonic and is especially recommended for debilitated conditions.

    Antioxidant

    The process of aging bombards the body with free radicals which can cause all kinds of degenerative diseases. The xeronine theory promoted by Dr. Heinicke submit s t hat as our bodies age, we lose our ability to synthesize xeronine. To make matters worse, the presence of many environment altoxins actually blocks the production of xeronine as well. He believes that the proxeronine content of Hawaiin noni fruit juice can help to block these actions, thereby working as an antiaging compound.26 The phytonutrients found in noni assist in promot - ing cell nourishment and prot ect ion from free radicals created by exposure to pollution and other potentially damaging agents. In addition, Morinda citrifolia contains selenium, which is considered one of the best antioxidant compounds available.

    Diabetes

    While scientific studies are lacking in this particular application of noni, Hawaiians used various parts of the plant and its fruit to treat blood sugar disorders. Anecdotal surveys have found t hat noni is current ly recommended for anyone with diabetes.

    Pain Killer

    A 1990 study found that extracts derived from the Morinda citrifolia root have the ability to kill pain in animal experiments.27 Interest ingly, it was during this study that the natural sedative action of the root was also noted. This study involved a French team of scientists who noted a significant central analgesic activity in laboratory mice.28 Dr. Heinicke has stated, “Xeronine also acts as a pain reliever. A man wit h very advanced int est inal cancer was given three months to live. He began taking the proxeronine and lived for a whole year, pain-free.” 29

    Skin Healing Agent

    One of the most prevalent hist rical uses of noni was in poultice form for cuts, wounds, abrasions, burns and bruises. Using its fruit extract for very serious burns has resulted in some extraordinary healing. Because skin is comprised of protein, it immediately responds to the presence of xeronine.

    burn site throught he direct application of a noni poultice is considered quite effective by Dr. Heinicke and his colleagues, who have studied enzymatic therapy. Concerning burns, he has written: I believe that each tissue has cells which contain proteins which have receptor sites for the absorption of xeronine. Certain of these proteins are the inert for ms of enzymes which require absorbed xeronine to become active. This xeronine, by converting the body’s procol- langenase system into a specific protease, quickly and safely removes the dead tissue from burns.30

    Drug Addiction

    The xeronine link to treat ing drug addiction is based on the notion that flooding t he brain with extra xeronine can reverse the neurochemical basis for addiction. This natural alkaloid is thought to normalize brain receptors which subsequent ly results in the cessation of physiological dependence on a certain chemical like nicotine.3 1 The potential of Hawaiin noni as a natural stimulat or for t he production of xeronine may have profound implications in treating various types of addictions.

    Complementary Agents of Noni

  • cat’s claw papaya
  • kava kava
  • pau d’arco
  • bioflavonoids
  • selenium
  • germanium
  • grapeseed extract
  • echinacea
  • proteolytic enzymes
  • aloe vera
  • glucosamine
  • shark
  • cartilage

    PrimaryApplications of Noni

  • abrasions
  • arthritis
  • atherosclerosis
  • bladder infections
  • boils bowel disorders
  • burns cancer
  • chronicfatigue syndrome
  • circulatory weakness
  • colds congest ion
  • cold sores constipation
  • depression diabetes
  • eye inf lammations fever
  • fract ures gastric ulcers
  • gingivit is headaches
  • high blood pressure immune
  • weakness
  • indigestion intestinal parasites
  • kidney disease menstrual



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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    Pep Up and Go!
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    Date: June 14, 2005 05:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Pep Up and Go!

    Pep Up and Go!

    by Harris Parker Energy Times, February 2, 2000

    Feel your energy flagging?

    You've lost count of the number of phone calls you fielded all afternoon-the last was from your son, who missed the late bus home from school-and colleagues needing your decision are lined up outside your office. Your husband has invited clients home for dinner. You wilt like a new hairdo on a damp August day and pray for a miracle to jump-start your engine.

    Your pep quotient depends on three essential ingredients: nutrients you consume through your diet and supplements, how much you exercise and your sleep schedule.(Of course, if you're troubled by any kind of disabling, ceaseless fatigue accompanied by mental fuzziness, joint pain, sore throat, swollen glands, headaches and other chronic distress, consult your health practitioner.)

    Vitamins and Energy

    Certain nutrients are called vitamins because scientists consider them to be crucial for vitality. They generally function as coenzymes, partnering with the enzymes that are catalysts for the chemical reactions constantly taking place in our bodies. Our need to replenish our store of vitamins, which may merge with cell, muscle, enzyme, hormone, blood and bone structure once they have been absorbed, depends on their rate of utilization, according to The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery) by Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning.

    While a low-fat diet rich in raw fruits and vegetables helps supply important nutrients, a B complex supplement and a balanced multivitamin can guarantee daily vitamin levels.

    Be Energetic with B Vitamins

    Vitamins, especially the B vitamins, play extremely important roles in producing cellular energy. The chart on page 39 lists the key vitamins and describes their effects as well as the consequences of not getting enough of them. Their benefit is felt most profoundly in the energy producing process known as the Krebs cycle (which we'll explain in a moment).

    Vitamins B2 and B3, for example, supply the major building blocks for substances that are called flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and FADH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD and NADH), which are critical elements of energy production in the Krebs cycle as well as a process called oxidative phosphorylation.

    Hundreds of Reactions

    Even though you may never have heard of NAD and NADH, these molecules are found in very many places throughout your body; they play a role in hundreds of biochemical reactions in all kinds of cells. B vitamins also combine with other materials to build coenzymes, chemicals which help form other chemicals necessary for cellular energy. B vitamins are crucial: miss out on one or more and you may break these metabolic chains necessary for peak energy.

    Energy to Spend

    The main energy currency of every cell single cell is ATP: a chemical called adenosine triphosphate. This material is used by cells for every imaginable task including reproduction, growth, movement and metabolism. Specialized metabolic cycles within the cell are designed to generate ATP.

    Consequently, the more ATP our cells create, the more energy can be generated. The raw materials used to make cellular energy are glucose (blood sugar) and "free" fatty acids. The best way to supply your cells with the sugar they need is to consume complex carbohydrates which also supply fiber and other nutrients. When you eat carbohydrates, they are made into glucose which is stored as a starch called glycogen in muscles and the liver. Your body can rapidly turn glycogen into glucose for extra energy. (The process of making energy from glycogen yields carbon dioxide and water as well as ATP.)

    Making Energy

    The first step in making glucose into energy is called glycolysis. This complicated process requires nine different steps. During these steps, glucose is made into a substance called pyruvate. The process of glycolysis requires ATP, but yields twice as much ATP as is present when it starts.

    From here, the process gets a little more complicated as pyruvate enters into a complex chain of events in tiny cellular structures called mitochondria. (Many metabolic events take place in the mitochondria.) The pyruvate molecules are converted to a molecule known as acetyl coenzyme A and eventually made into carbon dioxide, water and more ATP.

    This process is known as the Krebs cycle or citric acid cycle. It also involves a series of events known as oxidative phosphorylation in which NADH formed during the Krebs cycle is oxidized to form ATP.

    Why is fat such a concentrated source of energy? Free fatty acids enter the Krebs cycle to help generate ATP much more efficiently than glucose - producing roughly six times more energy per gram than glucose.

    And Don't Overlook. . . . . .other supplements that may aid energy production: • Alpha Lipoic Acid, an antioxidant that works in the fatty tissues of cell membranes and in cells' watery interiors • Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone as it exists everywhere in the body, acts like a vitamin because it stimulates some reactions. CoQ10 protects cell membranes, especially of the heart, against oxidation and toxins.

    Ginsengs: Energy Generators

    With their legendary and slightly mysterious characteristics, the ginsengs are greatly respected natural energy boosters. " Perhaps no herb has excited so much interest in medical circles as ginseng, and yet, strangely, it does not actually 'cure' any one particular ailment," reports Michael Hallowell, the author of Herbal Healing (Avery) and a frequent lecturer on botanic medicine. "Rather, its virtue lies in its tremendous power as a tonic and invigorator. Russian athletes are prescribed large amounts of ginseng because researchers in Moscow have shown that it not only improves stamina, but also increases the efficiency with which blood is pumped to the muscles."

    What are the physiological mechanisms that allow ginseng to bolster your get up and go? In order to unravel the legend and lore of ginseng, the first step is understanding the intricacies of the three types: • Asian (Panax ginseng), which produces the strongest and most profound stimulation; • American (Panax quinquefolium), which soothes at a more subtle level; • Siberian (Eleutherococcus senticosus), a stamina booster embraced by a wide range of athletes. All three varieties are treasured for their ability to help people adjust to stress.

    Biologically Active

    The ginsengs are adaptogens, "biologically active substances found in certain herbs and plants that help the body and mind adapt to the changes and stress of life," says Stephen Fulder, MD, author of The Book of Ginseng and Other Chinese Herbs for Vitality (Inner Traditions). "Stress is not an illness in itself. Stress is change, our ability to adapt to all the changes that occur in life, emotional or physical, from exercise, work, chemicals, drugs, food, radiation, bacteria, disease, temperature, or simply too many late nights or too much fun."

    The body reacts to stress by producing the hormone adrenaline, which throws the whole body into a state of alert. Metabolism, blood pressure and circulation accelerate; immunity and resistance drastically decline; performance suffers.

    Top-Notch Tonics

    Enter the ginsengs, with their varied, subtle tonic qualities. The Greek name for this herb, "panax," means "panacea" or cure-all. But the Chinese, who first referred to it 2,000 years ago, more literally called it "ren shen" or "person root," in reference to its physical resemblance to a miniature human form.

    " Most exhibit medicinal properties, but each species has a different chemical makeup and has a unique application in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)," says Kim Derek Pritts, author of Ginseng: How to Find, Grow and Use America's Forest Gold (Stackpole). "In general, all true ginseng contains biologically active saponins (chemicals similar to human hormones), essential oils, carbohydrates, sugars, organic acids, nitrogenous substances, amino acids, peptides, vitamins and minerals."

    Building Vital Energy

    All the ginsengs strengthen, nourish and build Qi, the TCM concept describing basic vital energy circulating through our bodies. Every physical and mental function, from breathing, thinking, nutrition and circulation, is regulated by Qi. Although many of the Native American tribes used the abundant, indigenous Panax quinquefolium ginseng extensively, particularly to increase mental acuity and boost fertility, the herb never has been as popular in North America as it is in Asia. American ginseng traditionally has been a lucrative export crop to China, where the wild native variety suffers from overharvesting. Even today, according to Paul Bergner in The Healing Power of Ginseng & the Tonic Herbs (Prima), 95% of the American ginseng crop is exported to China, where XiYang Shen, or "western sea root," as it is called, is immensely valued and costs double what it does here.

    Energy Boost

    Jacques MoraMarco, author of The Complete Ginseng Handbook: A Practical Guide for Energy, Health and Longevity (Contemporary), as well as a licensed acupuncturist and doctor of Eastern medicine, suggests American ginseng for a slight energy boost. The moderate effect of American ginseng is considered a more appropriate tonic to the intensity of our pace and diet.

    Variations on a Theme

    In TCM terms, American ginseng cools and moistens, as well as lubricates and strengthens the body. It is reputed to reduce fevers and night sweats and alleviate hot, dry lung problems like smoker's cough. With its Emollient qualities, American ginseng is considered to treat dry, wrinkled skin effectively.

    The Bolder Energizer

    Asian ginseng, which includes red Korean panax, is a bolder energizer taken by those who feel depleted from anemia, blood loss, cardiovascular weakness, injury, shock or trauma, as well as the disabling effects of age. In general, Asian ginseng is warming and stimulating, urging the body to run faster.

    Siberian ginseng, though botanically not a true ginseng, still acts similarly to Asian ginseng in its reputed power to control stress, boost energy, support the immune system, enhance performance and increase longevity. Called Wu Cha Seng in Chinese, Siberian ginseng is perceived by natural practitioners as an ideal herb for the healthy who want to lift both stamina and endurance. Experts believe it counteracts the effects of cortisol, the stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands in response to injury, pain or emotional turmoil.

    Natural Energy Boosters

    The herbal pharmacopeia includes several other natural energy boosters available in various forms-shakes and bars for those on the run-loaded with nutrition absent from commercial snacks. Some choices: • Ginkgo biloba-used in Chinese medicine to heat the body and increase sexual energy. Ginkgo enthusiasts take this herb to increase the supply of oxygen to the brain and generally increase circulation. • Gotu kola-may stimulate the central nervous system and help eliminate excess fluid, thereby reducing fatigue. • Astragalus-a Chinese herb that enhances energy and builds the immune system. It is credited with strengthening digestion, improving metabolism, increasing appetite, combating diarrhea and healing sores. • Schisandra-also a Chinese herb, treats respiratory illness, insomnia and irritability and rejuvenates sexual energy. Its mild adaptogens help the body to handle stress. • Licorice-is a favored endocrine toner in Chinese medicine. It is reputed to support the adrenals, the pair of small glands directly above the kidneys that secrete steroidal hormones, norepinephrine and epinephrine, the "fight or flight" hormones. People with high blood pressure or edema, or pregnant women, should avoid it. • Ashwagandha-an Ayurvedic herb used for thousands of years in the traditional healing of India as a potent strength builder for men and women.

    Experienced herbal practitioners acquire an impressive and fascinating store of knowledge and experience-you'll find it helpful to visit one as you begin your course of ginseng or other energy-boosting herbs.

    TCM Visitation

    When you visit a TCM practitioner, you'll notice that she evaluates your body's condition through an extremely careful examination of all the different systems: Several pulse points are felt in order to ferret out and detect troubling abnormalities. The condition and color of the tongue is observed to decipher digestive disorders. In addition, your urine may be examined to determine other imbalances and specific health problems.

    In many cases, your TCM practitioner will recommend ginseng as an adaptogen that can give you an overall boost. When taking ginseng, follow the directions on the package. Note: in some cases, you may want to consume a little bit less if you suffer headaches, insomnia or high blood pressure. Consult your health practitioner if you are afflicted with either acute inflammatory disease or bronchitis.

    Then take comfort in the eternal soothing wisdom of Chinese Traditional Medicine. In the first century A.D., the Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing (The Divine Husbandman's Classic of the Materia Medica) effusively described ginseng and the tonic herbs in this beguiling and intriguing manner: "The first class of drugs...are considered to perform the work of sovereigns. They support human life and they resemble heaven. They are not poisonous regardless of the quality and duration of administration."



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin
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    Date: June 06, 2005 08:45 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin

    Skin Eternal

    Source Naturals is proud to introduce our new SKIN ETERNAL Cosmetic Line. Our advanced skin care products recharge and revitalize your skin. Each product features scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin. You can nourish your skin with Source Naturals’ richly Emollient SKIN ETERNAL CREAM smoothed under your eyes or on your neck. Or use our light, aqueous SKIN ETERNAL SERUM. Both products gently addresses imbalances and infuse skin with visible radiance. For a luxuriant, moisturizing bath, simply add SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL under warm running water. Whatever your individual preference, Source Naturals has a SKIN ETERNAL product that will leave your skin looking refreshed and energized.

    Now available from Source Naturals®: a variety of elegant cosmetics to moisturize, smooth and tone your skin.

    Your skin is a reflection of your health and well-being. To attain skin that looks truly alive, energized and refreshed, we believe a holistic approach is necessary. This includes nourishing your body with fresh, organic foods, exercising every day to motivate your mind and spirit, and eliminating unhealthy lifestyle choices. As part of this holistic approach, the Skin Eternal™ cosmetic line feeds your skin cells with scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ CREAM

    Apply this rich and luxurious blend under and around your eyes or massage it with upward strokes onto your neck—your skin will immediately feel the difference! SKIN ETERNAL CREAM features nutrients, natural oils and plant extracts. Included are alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, jojoba oil, MSM, squalane, tocotrienols, and vitamin C-ester, as well as extracts of grape seed, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, sage, marigold, and grapefruit seed.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ SERUM

    SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is an aqueous moisturizing serum that contains a rich blend of nutrients and plant extracts. It is easily absorbed, and immediately makes skin feel softer and replenished. SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils, and contains nutrients and herbs unavailable in other topical preparations. These include aloe vera, alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, MSM, vitamins A, C-ester, D-3 and E, and chamomile. Source Naturals also offers SKIN ETERNAL DMAE SERUM.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ BATH OIL

    OUR NEW SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL adds to your skin’s hydrolipic film, lightly coating your skin with nutrients. It holds moisture inside and protects your skin. Its unique formula is rich in alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, essential fatty acids, vitamins C-ester and E, plus other nutrients and plant extracts. SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils. And it is hypoallergenic and contains no alpha hydroxy acids—so it can be used even on delicate, sensitive skin.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Skin: A Strategy for WellnessSM

    Eat a Healthy Diet Low-nutrient foods, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates, will not provide the vitamins and minerals your skin needs. Choose unprocessed organic foods, high in antioxidants such as beta carotene (carrots, apricots, and squash), vitamin C (oranges and peppers), vitamin E (cold-pressed oils, nuts and seeds), selenium (tuna, garlic, onions and broccoli) and zinc (whole grains, most seafood, and onions). Essential fatty acids, such as those in oily fish, flaxseed and olive oil, are important for skin repair. Eat high-fiber fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals, and brown rice. Restrict excess sodium intake.

    Take Supplements

    Key nutraceuticals can help radiate beauty from within, by supporting body systems involved with healthy, radiant skin. These nutraceuticals include alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, ascorbyl palmitate (vitamin C-ester), vitamin E and grapeseed extract. Source Naturals offers you SKIN ETERNAL™ tablets with these five ingredients, to protect against free radical damage and provide cofactors for healthy skin tissue. Source Naturals SKIN ETERNAL PLUS is a Bio-Aligned Formula™, which includes these key nutraceuticals plus 30 more! It is designed to support multiple body systems: antioxidant defense, connective tissue, cell membranes, cell renewal, blood and liver cleansing, muscle and nerve function, and stress response. It is also useful to supplement with essential fatty acids, such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, flaxseed and primrose oil.

    Drink Water

    Our bodies are made up of 50-70% water, so it’s important to drink at least 1.5 liters daily. Water flushes out wastes, and acts as an internal moisturizer, keeping skin hydrated and supple. Spring water is beneficial since it contains trace minerals vital to healthy skin.

    Protect Your Skin from the Sun

    Avoid direct sun from 10 am to 4 pm, when ultraviolet radiation is strongest. Use sunscreen even during winter and on cloudy days. Wear a broad-brimmed hat and sunglasses with full UV protection.

    Get Plenty of Sleep

    Research has shown that skin regenerates itself between 1-3 am; lack of sleep during those hours can cause skin to look dull or puffy. Taking a melatonin supplement can be helpful in supporting your body’s normal sleep cycle.

    Exercise Regularly

    Exercise increases circulation, which delivers nutrients necessary for a clear, glowing complexion. It also burns off fat, helps eliminate toxins, and is a great stress reliever. Exercise three to five times a week until you are perspiring freely and breathing deeply.

    Avoid Excessive Alcohol and Coffee

    Alcohol weakens the immune system and depletes nutrients. It causes dehydration, depriving skin of moisture, and overtaxes the liver, which helps keep impurities from reaching other organs. Alcohol consumption can lead to broken or distended capillaries, especially over the nose and cheeks. Caffeine-rich beverages like coffee promote dehydration, leaving skin flaky and dry. Substitute herbal or green tea for coffee.

    Stop Smoking

    Smoking slows healing and regeneration, causes carbon monoxide to increase in blood, and induces free radical formation. Nicotine constricts blood vessels and reduces blood flow to skin. The benzopyrene in cigarette smoke inhibits absorption of vitamin C, which is important for collagen synthesis.



    --
    VitaNEt ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

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