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  Messages 1-27 from 27 matching the search criteria.
Caraway Uses – What To Do With Caraway Plants Darrell Miller 3/21/19
6 Ways to Use Spring Herbs as Healthy Greens Darrell Miller 3/11/17
6 Ways to Use Spring Herbs as Healthy Greens Darrell Miller 3/11/17
Demand for CBD still outstrips supply despite production expansion, hemp grower says Darrell Miller 1/19/17
How to eat to get lean Darrell Miller 1/4/17
Sitting at your desk doesn’t have to be a pain in the neck Darrell Miller 12/25/16
Diet soda harms your body, does far more harm than good Darrell Miller 11/6/16
Wintergreen Oil- Used For Pain, Arthritis, Headaches and More Darrell Miller 2/26/14
Reduce Inflammation, Nasal Drip, And Respiratory Infection With Natural Andrographis Darrell Miller 8/11/11
What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea? Darrell Miller 7/6/11
If You Are Having Trouble With Night Driving, Bilberry Extract Could Help Darrell Miller 2/2/11
Corn Silk Darrell Miller 10/16/09
Cinnamon Bark Darrell Miller 10/15/09
Periwinkle - Vinpocetine Darrell Miller 10/9/09
Eyebright Herb Darrell Miller 9/25/09
Borage Seed Oil (GLA) Darrell Miller 6/10/09
BoneSet For Fevers Darrell Miller 6/9/09
Aloe Vera Darrell Miller 4/8/09
The Power Plant of the Amazon Darrell Miller 3/2/07
How to deal with Stress and Cortisol... Darrell Miller 8/30/06
Staying on Your Diet throughout the Holidays Darrell Miller 1/18/06
Guys should forget the six-pack abs and just lose the beer belly. Darrell Miller 9/24/05
HISTORY Darrell Miller 7/12/05
THE GINSENG PLAN Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Some Final Thoughts Darrell Miller 6/22/05
Prostate Health Naturally Darrell Miller 6/16/05
Acupuncture nutrient Connection Darrell Miller 6/12/05



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Caraway Uses – What To Do With Caraway Plants
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Date: March 21, 2019 01:25 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Caraway Uses – What To Do With Caraway Plants





Caraway — a relative of such culinary staples as cumin, fennel and dill — has a number of different applications in the kitchen and beyond. Caraway typically grows from Europe to parts of Western Asia, and is a biennial herb with a natural sweetness to it. Widely associated with rye bread, caraway seeds can be used to flavor a variety of pork, fish and vegetable dishes, including sauerkraut. The leaves and roots can be eaten as well, and the essential oil can be added to cosmetics.

Key Takeaways:

  • This biennial herb is a plant that originated from Europe as well as Western Asia.
  • The leaves of the caraway are eight inches in length, and they somewhat resemble carrots.
  • The flavor of the caraway plant is regarded as sweet and almost like tasting licorice.

"There are a plethora of caraway uses, primarily for use in cooking but also to cure medical woes."

Read more: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/caraway/what-to-do-with-caraway-plants.htm

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6087)


6 Ways to Use Spring Herbs as Healthy Greens
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Date: March 11, 2017 06:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 6 Ways to Use Spring Herbs as Healthy Greens





Greens are healthy but not everyone likes the traditional lettuce. Many find it too bland. This gives ideas for using spring herbs in its place. This will make your salads more flavorful so you'll actually want to eat greens. This also allows you to broaden your eating horizons in general. Take these ideas and expand on them to create even more.

Key Takeaways:

  • Delicate flecks of green parsley do more than make plates look pretty as a garnish.
  • Parsley, basil, mint, arugula, and other herbs are rich in antioxidants that have many health benefits.
  • Read on to learn six easy and delicious ways to incorporate these antioxidant-rich herbs into your diet.

"Using handfuls of herbs instead of pInches can pack more nutrition onto your plate."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//blog.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats/2017/03/09/6-ways-to-use-spring-herbs-as-healthy-greens/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjBhMmIxOTgxN2IyMDM3NjI6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNGAvZSBvGdsvgqsbzwcO-VdmeedWA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4103)


6 Ways to Use Spring Herbs as Healthy Greens
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Date: March 11, 2017 05:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 6 Ways to Use Spring Herbs as Healthy Greens





Greens are healthy but not everyone likes the traditional lettuce. Many find it too bland. This gives ideas for using spring herbs in its place. This will make your salads more flavorful so you'll actually want to eat greens. This also allows you to broaden your eating horizons in general. Take these ideas and expand on them to create even more.

Key Takeaways:

  • Delicate flecks of green parsley do more than make plates look pretty as a garnish.
  • Parsley, basil, mint, arugula, and other herbs are rich in antioxidants that have many health benefits.
  • Read on to learn six easy and delicious ways to incorporate these antioxidant-rich herbs into your diet.

"Using handfuls of herbs instead of pInches can pack more nutrition onto your plate."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//blog.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats/2017/03/09/6-ways-to-use-spring-herbs-as-healthy-greens/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjBhMmIxOTgxN2IyMDM3NjI6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNGAvZSBvGdsvgqsbzwcO-VdmeedWA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4102)


Demand for CBD still outstrips supply despite production expansion, hemp grower says
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Date: January 19, 2017 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Demand for CBD still outstrips supply despite production expansion, hemp grower says





Industrial hemp is an industry that is apparently booming both in supply and demand. A grower based company in Kentucky reported that about two million dollars was paid to growers for the 2016 crop. But despite this, the demand for industrial hemp still far exceeds the supply, according to an officer from the company.

Key Takeaways:

  • The supply of industrial hemp is ramping up quickly, as a company formed by growers in Kentucky reported $2 million in payments to farmers for the 2016 crop. But demand for CBD still far outstrips supply, a company officer said.
  • The company, called Atalo Holdings Inc. a diversified industrial hemp research and production company in WInchester, KY., announced the payouts to their growers’ group yesterday. The company’s officers are all also growers themselves.
  • Atalo claims to be one of the largest hemp companies operating in the US. For the 2016 growing year, the company has 58 growers enlisted in the program with 2,466 acres approved for hemp production.

"Potential efficacy of the cannabinoids, which have been researched for a variety of benefits including as analgesics and in seizure amelioration"



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Suppliers2/Demand-for-CBD-still-outstrips-supply-despite-production-expansion-hemp-grower-says&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmMzNTEwZjgyOWIxNGI2ODg6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNHTFLxMjTyH2pVok8A3oxVX3Ztbyw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3801)


How to eat to get lean
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Date: January 04, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to eat to get lean





Do you love food but want to lose some Inches off your waistline? Let me tell you, this is the article for you. Whether you want to lose fat or build muscle, this article will provide you some insight as to how to accomplish your goals without sacrificing your love of food.

Key Takeaways:

  • Drink water like a fish. Drinking water is associated with faster fat loss and decreased hunger. Even a small level of dehydration can decrease physical and mental performance.
  • Multiply your current body weight in pounds by 10. That is the healthy calorie deficit for most moderately active guys.
  • A study last year in PLOS Medicine found the most beneficial vegetables for weight loss were the non-starchy kinds such as lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, spinach, peppers, and tomatoes.

"We’re going to shoot it straight: Cutting calories is going to really suck for the entire first week."



Reference:

//www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what-to-eat/how-eat-get-lean

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3739)


Sitting at your desk doesn’t have to be a pain in the neck
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Date: December 25, 2016 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sitting at your desk doesn’t have to be a pain in the neck





Sitting all day at the desk may be what is necessary for your job, but it may cause pain. This does not have to be how it is, there can be a healthy way to sit at the desk and not feel the constant ache and pain. Read on to see the tips.

Key Takeaways:

  • Working at a desk is a common cause of back and neck pain, often because you accommodate to your workstation rather than the other way around.
  • Raise or lower the monitor or your chair so your eyes are level with the top of the screen. If you wear bifocals, you may need to lower the monitor another 1 to 2 Inches.
  • Lower your desk height or raise your chair so that your forearms are parallel to the floor or pointed slightly downward and your wrists are not pointing either upward or downward.

"In addition to straining joints and muscles in your neck and shoulders, the pressure affects your breathing and mood."



Reference:

//www.mayoclinic.org/sitting-at-your-desk-doesnt-have-to-be-a-pain-in-the-neck/art-20269947

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3700)


Diet soda harms your body, does far more harm than good
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Date: November 06, 2016 01:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Diet soda harms your body, does far more harm than good



The debate over diet soda continues but now, facts show that it is actually more harmful to the body than it is good. If you consume these diet drinks, even periodically now is the time to switch your drink of choice. This article provides more information about the devastating effects of diet soda to your body.

Key Takeaways:

  • From adding Inches to your waist to increasing the risk of diabetes, diet soda doesn't score any better in terms of health than regular sugary drinks.
  • The sweet taste of artificial sweeteners in diet soda tricks the body into believing it is getting a proper meal. This, however, creates confusion. While it is expecting calories and energy, it gets a useless chemical instead.
  • Furthermore, the review highlighted the fact that diet soda drinkers who maintained a healthy weight still had a significantly increased risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes – the top three killers in the United States.

"From adding Inches to your waist to increasing the risk of diabetes, diet soda doesn't score any better in terms of health than regular sugary drinks."



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/055851_diet_soda_artificial_sweeteners_side_effects.html


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3397)


Wintergreen Oil- Used For Pain, Arthritis, Headaches and More
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Date: February 26, 2014 09:06 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Wintergreen Oil- Used For Pain, Arthritis, Headaches and More

What is wintergreen

wintergreen plantWintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens) is in the heather family of organic plants and is local to North America. It is a little evergreen herb that develops just something like 6 Inches high with thin crawling stems. It has hanging white blossoms which are accompanied via red berries. Local Americans used to bite the stems to build respiratory limit. Early American pilgrims had their youngsters bite the leaves for some weeks each one spring to avoid tooth rot and throughout the American Revolution, it was a substitute for Black Tea. They so reveled in the essence that it has proceeded right up 'til today as the character of root brewskie, mulling over gum and toothpaste. The oil hails from steam refining of the leaves and produces an in number, entering fragrance. The science of wintergreen is very nearly indistinguishable to that of birch .

Benefits of wintergrren

Generally wintergreen has been utilized for respiratory conditions however the essential utilize as of late has been as a part of liniments and treatments for bulky issues, for example, lumbago, sciatica, neuralgia, myalgia, and so on it is known for its capability to diminish bone agony.

By what method Can We Use Wintergreen Oil for our Health Today?

Wintergreen is an anticoagulant, antispasmodic, mitigating, vasodilator, pain relieving, analgesic, and it lessens circulatory strain. It is utilized for joint inflammation and stiffness, muscle and nerve torment, hypertension, arteriosclerosis, hepatitis and greasy liver. It invigorates and increments cognizance in all levels of the tactile framework. This is one of the oils utilized as a part of the Raindrop Technique particularly for its antispasmodic and vasodilator qualities.

Wintergreen might be weakened one part fundamental oil with two parts blending oil or it could be utilized flawless (undiluted) on the form. It might be straightforwardly breathed in, diffused or taken as a dietary supplement. British model of fragrant healing does not utilize wintergreen however does use birch rather which is dependably engineered. Wintergreen blends well with calamus, vanilla, lavender, rosemary, sage, birch, fir, mints, juniper, eucalyptus, and ylang. Concerning wellbeing, it is best kept away from with epileptics and ought not be utilized by those affected by ibuprofen. The anticoagulant lands could be improved when utilized with Warfarin or ibuprofen.

Need to take in more about the mending lands of wintergreen and other crucial oils? Think about turning into an ensured aromatherapist. Instructive courses in recuperating vigor and fragrance based treatment can help you see how fundamental oils recuperate the body/mind/spirit. The Institute of Spiritual Healing & Aromatherapy is showing courses all around the United States on key oils and their recuperating lands including wintergreen.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3038)


Reduce Inflammation, Nasal Drip, And Respiratory Infection With Natural Andrographis
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Date: August 11, 2011 01:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Reduce Inflammation, Nasal Drip, And Respiratory Infection With Natural Andrographis

Can Andrographis Help Improve Respiratory Health?

Andrographis is an herb noted for its health effects on the respiratory tract. It has been recognized as an effective treatment for the common cold in several countries all over the world, though it is most popular in China and India. Practitioners of natural remedies have ascribed a number of medicinal properties to andrographolide, which is the major phytochemical constituent of this herbaceous plant.

Andrographis paniculata is a plant species that belongs to the family of plants native to the tropical regions of the Old World. It is found in large concentrations in Southern Asia, but it is also cultivated in the Americas. It grows up to 40 Inches in height. It prefers shady places that retain a fair amount of moisture, but survives in open spaces, such as hills, farms, roadsides, wastelands, and even coastlines.

Alleviates Nasal Secretions

Rhinitis is a medical term that refers to the irritation of the nasal cavity. Otherwise known as stuffy nose, it often leads to uncontrolled nasal dripping. Excessive release of mucus characteristic of a congested nose or runny nose stems from the irritation caused by infections, or allergens in the case of allergic rhinitis. It is one of the most visible symptoms of hay fever and cold infections.

Andrographis has been utilized as an all natural remedy for excessive nasal secretions for centuries. In particular, it is an essential ingredient in herbal preparations associated with Ayurvedic Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Recent studies have shown that it produces a drying effect on the nose of participants suffering from colds after they took extracts of the plants in less than a week’s time.

Inhibits Inflammatory Mediators

Nasal dripping is tied to inflammatory responses in the employ of the immune system. Pathogenic microbes, such as viruses, bacteria, or even allergens, trigger immune responses that make use of endogenous chemicals known as inflammatory mediators. The process of inflammation attempts to contain infection, alerting immune cells. Production of mucus increases in the process.

The bitter taste of andrographis has been attributed to an organic compound called andrographolide, which is a natural diterpenoid now under investigation due to its pharmacological activity in vitro. It has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory action that even works as an antipyretic. It suppresses mediators of inflammation in the respiratory tract and allays fever tied to flu.

Combats Respiratory Infections

Modern herbalists have dubbed andrographis an immune booster. Indeed laboratory studies have documented that the organic compounds found in this plant prompt immune responses and modulate the disease fighting capacity of immune cells. Due to promising results of preliminary studies, it has often been linked to the amelioration of infections of the upper respiratory tract.

Andrographis is now becoming increasingly popular as an alternative treatment for sinusitis, cough, colds, and even flu. While it has been in use throughout the centuries, its efficacy remains under scrutiny. On the other hand, it is generally considered safe, and no side effects have been noted so far.

Grab some andrographis today and feel the difference!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2393)


What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?
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Date: July 06, 2011 10:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?

Echinacea Health Benefits

Echinacea is a group of plant species that belongs to the same family as dandelion, sunflower, and daisy. These flowering shrubs are best known as ornamental plants in gardens. Also, they are widely recognized as medicinal herbs in alternative medicine. Modern herbalists have attributed a diverse variety of healing properties to this herb, drawing on its traditional uses among the Native Americans.

Echinacea angustifolia

Elk root, black samson echinacea, or narrow-leaved purple cornflower refers to Echinacea angustifolia. Its native range stretches from Manitoba in the north to Texas in the south. It is an herbaceous plant, as all species of echinacea are. It grows up to 28 Inches in height, extending from a branched taproot. Its stems and leaves are hairy while other species are smooth. Its flowers resemble a cone in shape.

Echinacea angustifolia is so named in the vernacular due to the fact that elks knowingly consume the plant when sick or wounded. Elk root is an herb important to folk medicine practices of Plain Indians, such as the Cheyenne and Apache. It displays analgesic properties, and thus has been in use as a pain reliever for external wounds and internal inflammation, including allergies, rheumatism, and arthritis.

Research on elk root has been promising. It is one of the species of echinacea believed to enhance the immune system and improve immune responses. In particular, it is good for the respiratory system. It has been used in the treatment of the common cold, sore throat, and nasal congestion. In addition, it exhibits antimicrobial properties, which effectively wards off infections of the respiratory tract.

Echinacea purpurea

Eastern purple cornflower, or simply purple cornflower, refers to Echinacea purpurea. It enjoys a wide distribution in North America, though they thrive in large concentrations in the wild in regions close to the east coast. Unlike all other species of echinacea, it grows from a woody base with fibrous roots instead of a taproot. Its flowers are arranged in a cone, sitting atop a stem that grows up to 40 Inches.

Echinacea purpurea is arguably the most extensively studied of all species of echinacea. Traditionally, it has been utilized by many different tribes in North America as a cure-all medicinal herb. Clinical trials have shown that juice extracts obtained from this plant species are useful for the short term treatment of cold infections, though contraindications in children and pregnant women were noted.

Echinacea purpurea displays chemopreventive potential. Laboratory studies have discovered that it contains alkamides, which bind to cannabinoid receptors and inhibit tumor growth and pain chemicals in the process. Also, it has been linked to immunotherapy largely owing to its properties that appear to increase the activity of immune cells. It shows promise as an adjunct treatment for cancer.

Either way, Echinacea can help boost the body so the body can fight back against disease. Make sure you have some in your medicine cabinet just in case you feel a cold coming on!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2362)


If You Are Having Trouble With Night Driving, Bilberry Extract Could Help
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Date: February 02, 2011 10:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: If You Are Having Trouble With Night Driving, Bilberry Extract Could Help

Night blindness is very common nowadays. According to statistics, a lack of vitamin A is the primary cause of night blindness or inability to see at night or in dim light. The treatment of this eye condition will depend upon the cause. Treatment may be as simple as getting a new eye glasses prescription. But invasive procedures may also be required most especially those that are caused by cataracts. Fortunately, Bilberry extracts may help night blindness. bilberryleafplant

Bilberry is a low – growing perrenial shrub growing approximately 15 to 20 Inches in height. It is a member of the family Ericaceae in the genus Vaccinium. Its branches are green with sharp edges. It bears edible berr that is seemingly wrinkled and black. Bilberry is a comparative to the common berries known as blueberry and cranberry. The active compounds in bilberry fruit are known as anthocyanosides. Bilberry extract has a deep bluish purple tone which contains the majority of the active substance of the fruit known as anthocyanidin. Anthocyanidin is a component of anthocyanosides. It can help increase the formation of rhodopsin. According to studies, rhodopsin is formed from an aldehyde form of vitamin A called retinaldehyde, or retinal as commonly used. It is then bound to the protein opsin. This compound consisting of retinal and opsin is stored in photoreceptors of the retina of the eye known as rods and cones. Rhodopsin is the compound in the eye that is responsible for adjusting eye perception to light variations.

This plant extract is also commonly used for treating eye problems like cataracts and retinal disorders particularly retinopathy. Scientists found out that anthocyanosides help protect the retina. Since bilberry improves the formation of rhodopsin, adequate levels of rhodopsin can significantly improve night vision and reduce visual fatigue. This eye pigment could help those individuals who are having trouble driving at night because of its rhodopsin regenerating property.

Aside from supporting a healthy eye function, bilberry has many other health benefits. It has an antioxidant, anti – inflammatory, collagen stabilizing and vasoprotective properties. Generally, anthocyanosides are considerably beneficial to the overall health of the body. It can improve circulation by preventing blood clumping by reducing platelet aggregation. It can also prevent or reduce the amount and extent of damage to cells caused by free radicals.

Further clinical studies are being done to be able to get concrete evidence on the fruit’s benefits especially to the eyes. Preliminary results show that bilberry decreases eyestrain after an excessive use of computers, protects against glaucoma by improving blood vessel integrity in the eyes, reduces the occurrence of cataracts by maintaining the integrity of connective tissues in the eyes and lessens the risk of retinopathy among diabetic patients. Preparations of bilberry extracts include teas, capsules or tablets.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2227)


Corn Silk
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Date: October 16, 2009 03:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Corn Silk

Corn cob and silk with huskCornsilk is an herbal remedy that is made from stigmas, which are the yellowish thread-like strands, found inside the husks of corn. Stigmas are found on the female flower of corn and are a member of the grass family. This part of the corn plant measurers four to eight Inches long and is collected for medicinal use before the plant is pollinated. Cornsilk can also be removed from corn cobs for use as a remedy. If fertilized, the stigmas will become dry and brown, with yellow corn kernels develop. Native to North America, corn now grows around the world in warm climates. Cornsilk is also known as mother’s hair, Indian corn, maize jagnog, Turkish corn, yu mi xu, and stigmata maydis.

Once used by the Inca tribe, cornsilk is thought to have originated in Central America. Traditionally, this herb was used to treat urogenital infections. Cornsilk is also used for bladder complaints, as it has a great cleansing effect on the urea as it circulates. This herb is also extremely valuable for the treatment of renal and cystic inflammation. Cornsilk helps with kidney problems, inflamed bladder, and prostate gland problems. This herb may be helpful for bed-wetting that is caused by an inflamed bladder. Additionally, it works to rid the body of morbid deposits by using the antiseptic properties that it is equipped with. Cornsilk has been used by physicians as a diuretic for conditions of cystitis.

Some herbalists believe that cornsilk is best when it is used fresh. However, it also can be found in dried forms. Although cornsilk is typically collected from the female flower or from corn cobs, cornsilk is available commercially in powdered and capsule form and as an extract. Cornsilk is often brewed as a tea and is considered to be very soothing as a beverage. This tea or infusion can be made by pouring one cup of boiling water over two teaspoons of dried cornsilk. Then, the mixture is covered and steeped for ten to fifteen minutes. It is recommended that this tea be consumed three times each day. Additionally, a tincture of one teaspoon of cornsilk can be taken three times each day. This tincture can be purchased over the counter or made at home. At home, it is made by mixing the herb with water or alcohol at a ratio of 1:5 or 1:10. Cornsilk can also be purchased in capsule form with the usual dosage for 400-mg capsules being two capsules with meals three times daily. Corn silk and husk

The silk of cornsilk is used to provide alterative, antilithic, antiseptic, cholagogue, diuretic, demulcent, lithotriptic, mucilant, and mild stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are silicon, PABA, and vitamins K and B. Primarily, this herb is extremely beneficial in dealing with heart conditions, kidney problems, urinary incontinence, and urinary problems.

Additionally, this cornsilk has been proven to be extremely helpful in treating arteriosclerosis, bed-wetting, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cystic irritations, gonorrhea, obesity, and prostate problems. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by cornsilk, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2103)


Cinnamon Bark
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Date: October 15, 2009 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cinnamon Bark

cinnamon treeThe cinnamon plant is a small evergreen tree that grows between thirty two and forty nine feet tall. This plant belongs to the Lauraceae family and is native to Sri Lanka. The leaves of the plant are ovate oblong in shape and approximately two to seven Inches in length, while the flowers, which have a distinct odor, are greenish in color. The fruit is a purple berry about one-centimeter and contain a single seed. The flavor of cinnamon is the result of an essential oil which makes up about 1/2% to 1% of its composition. This oil can be prepared by roughly pounding the bark, macerating it in seawater, and quickly distilling the whole. The oil is of a golden-yellow color, with the characteristic odor of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste.

Cinnamon has been known from ancient times, with the first mention of particular spice in the Old Testament being of cinnamon. In this, Moses commanded the use of sweet cinnamon and cassia in the holy anointing oil. Additionally, cinnamon is also mentioned elsewhere in the bible. This herb was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was often looked upon as a gift fit for even God. Cinnamon was imported to Egypt as early as 2000 B.C. The herb is also alluded to by Herodotus and other classical writers. Cinnamon was too expensive to be commonly used in funerals of ancient Rome. However, the Emperor Nero is said to have burned a year’s worth of the city’s supply at the funeral for his wife in 65 A.D.

Cinnamon can be harvested by growing the tree for two years and then coppicing it. About a dozen shoots will form from the roots in the next year. These shoots are then stripped of their bark and left to dry. Only the thin inner bark is used, while the outer woody portion is removed. Each dried strip of cinnamon are then cut into lengths of about five to ten centimeters for sale.

Cinnamon has been around for thousands of years. It is revered as a spice and also as a healing agent. Cinnamon was included in embalming oils by the Egyptians. This herb was used in China to treat fever, diarrhea, and menstrual problems dating as far back as 2000 BC. Cinnamon was a major trade commodity during the ancient times. Cinnamon grew in the southern regions of Asia originally. cinnamon tree This herb is used to help relieve upset stomachs, reduce milk flow, stop excessive menstrual flow, and alleviate back pain. Research has also determined that cinnamon contains components that possess antifungal and antibacterial capabilities. This herb is found in some toothpaste, which allows it to help some decay-causing bacteria. Cinnamon is also helpful for promoting healthy blood sugar levels.

The dried bark of the cinnamon plant is used to provide alterative, analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, sedative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. Primarily, cinnamon is beneficial in treating abdominal pain, candida, diarrhea, gas, gastric disorders, and indigestion.

Additionally, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with arthritis, asthma, backaches, bloating, bronchitis, cholera, coronary problems, fevers, excessive menstruation, nausea, nephritis, parasites, psoriasis, rheumatism, upset stomach, vomiting, and warts. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by cinnamon, please contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2102)


Periwinkle - Vinpocetine
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Date: October 09, 2009 10:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Periwinkle - Vinpocetine

periwinkle colorsPeriwinkle can be found natively growing in North America, Europe, China, and India. The plant is a semi woody evergreen perennial. It is known by three names: Vinca, Periwinkle, and Myrtle. Typically, the plant is grown as an annual. It has a woody stem that can be found near the base and grows two to three feet tall and spreads out just as wide. The plant has a long life span of approximately twenty years. It also has a moderate growth rate. The plant has dark green foliage and bright blue flowers. The leaves are retained from year to year and are about two to three Inches in length. This plant is very easy to grow, requiring little or no attention. Typically, it does best in poor, well drained soils. The flowers will suffer if the soils are too fertile. The periwinkle plant needs full sun or partial shade. It should be watered moderately during the growing season, but it is relatively drought resistant once it is established. The plant does not tolerate over watering. Fungus problems can occur in humid or wet weather.

For centuries, periwinkle has been used in different areas of the world to treat a variety of conditions. This herb grows in temperate climates and is often grown as an ornamental plant. Periwinkle juice from the leaves of the plant is used in India and applied to bee stings and bug bites. The plant grows well in Hawaii. The extract has been applied to wounds to stop bleeding. This herb can be found growing in South America and has been used for a wide variety of medicinal purposes. Periwinkle was used by native healers in Madagascar for cancer. Vincristine sulfate and vinblastine sulfate, two anticancer drugs, were developed from the periwinkle plant after the herbal healers in Madagascar were studied.

Periwinkle is considered to be a good binder. It can be chewed to stop bleeding in both the nose and mouth. It has been used historically for female complaints including excessive menstrual bleeding and uterine discharge. It also helps in aiding blood coagulation in wounds. This herb is effective in treating colitis, diarrhea, hemorrhoids, high blood pressure, headaches, migraines, nervous conditions, and diabetes.

Studies have found that periwinkle possesses anticancer attributes. Anticancer agents in periwinkle have been used to treat Hodgkin’s disease, leukemia, and cancer of the lungs, liver, and kidneys, along with other types of cancer. periwinkle More Periwinkle can be found natively growing in North America, Europe, China, and India. The plant is a semi woody evergreen perennial. It is known by three names: Vinca, Periwinkle, and Myrtle. Typically, the plant is grown as an annual. It has a woody stem that can be found near the base and grows two to three feet tall and spreads out just as wide. The plant has a long life span of approximately twenty years. It also has a moderate growth rate. The plant has dark green foliage and bright blue flowers. The leaves are retained from year to year and are about two to three Inches in length. This plant is very easy to grow, requiring little or no attention. Typically, it does best in poor, well-drained soils. The flowers will suffer if the soils are too fertile. The periwinkle plant needs full sun or partial shade. It should be watered moderately during the growing season, but it is relatively drought r

The entire periwinkle plant is used to provide antineoplastic, astringent, hemostatic, nervine, and sedative properties. Primarily, periwinkle is extremely beneficial in dealing with cancer, diabetes, hemorrhoids, nervousness, and ulcers. Vincamine is an alkaloid found in this plant has been studied and found to support cerebral blood flow, and oxygen and glucose utilization. It may also support cognitive function and enhance memory and concentration when taken regularly.

Additionally, the herb is very helpful in treating bleeding, congestion, chronic constipation, cramps, dandruff, chronic diarrhea, internal hemorrhages, leukemia, menstrual bleeding, excessive mucus, nightmares, skin disorders, sores, and toothache. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by periwinkle, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Eyebright Herb
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Date: September 25, 2009 10:56 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eyebright Herb

The eyebright plant is elegant and small, growing between two and eight Inches high. This plant is an annual, commonly growing on heaths and other dry pastures, especially on chalky soil. The plant flowers from July to September and has deeply cut leaves and small, white or purplish flowers. The stem is erect and wiry. It comes in either unbranched, small specimines, or with many opposite branches. The leaves are tiny, about 1/6 to ½ Inches in length and opposite to one another on the lower portion of the stem. The flowers, which are white or lilac, have purple veins and terminal spikes. The structure of the flower places the plant in the Scrophulariaceae family. The seeds in this flower are produced in tiny, flattened capsules, and are numerous and ribbed.

When a bee visitor comes in search of the honey lying around the ovary at the bottom the petal tube, it knocks against the anther spurs, setting the pollen free so that it falls on the insect’s head. When visiting the next flower, the bee will then rub its head against the outstanding stigma, in which cross-fertilization takes place.

The eyebright plant has white petals that have a red or purple tinge, resembling bloodshot eyes. It is this appearance that is thought to be the reason for the use of eyebright in treating eye irritations as far back as the Middle Ages. Topical applications of this herb were prescribed by Dioscorides and Theophrastus for eye infections.

The eyebright plant will not grow readily in a garden if it is transplanted unless it is protected by grass. The reason for this is that it is a semi-parasite and relies on its nourishment on the roots of other plants. Above ground, the plant appears to be a perfectly normal plant, with flowers and bright green leaves. But below the surface, suckers from its roots spread around and lie on the rootlets of the grass plants surrounding it. The grass preyed upon does not suffer very much. The eyebright plant, being an annual, renews itself each year. For centuries, eyebright has been the herb of choice for treating eye irritations. It is extremely helpful in conditions that involve the mucous membranes. This herb can help to relieve eye irritations or eyestrain when used as eyewash. The herb’s antiseptic properties allow it to help fight eye infections. Traditional uses of eyebright include eye problems such as failing vision, eye inflammation, eye ulcers, conjunctivitis, and eyestrain. This herb is able to strengthen all parts of the eye and provide elasticity to the nerves and optic devices that are essential for sight. Additionally, eyebright is stimulating to the liver, as it helps cleanse the blood.

The entire eyebright plant is used to provide alterative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, bitter, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are copper, iodine, iron, silicon, vitamins A, B, B-complex, C, D, and E, and zinc. Primarily, eyebright is extremely beneficial in dealing with blood impurities, cataracts, colds, conjunctivitis, eye disorders and infections, eyestrain, and glaucoma.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating black eyes, sinus congestion, coughs, hay fever, headaches, hoarseness, memory loss, and sties. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by this herb, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Borage Seed Oil (GLA)
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Date: June 10, 2009 11:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Borage Seed Oil (GLA)

Borage, often referred to as starflower, is an annual herb that originated in Syria. However, it was naturalized throughout the Mediterranean region and in Asia Minor, Europe, North Africa, and South America. The plant grows to a height of two to three feet, having a bristly hair all over the stems and leaves. The leaves are alternate, simple, and ranging from two to six Inches in length, while the flower are complete with five narrow, triangular-pointed petals. The borage flower is most often blue in color, but occasionally pink flowers are observed. White flowers can also be cultivated. The plant has an indeterminate growth habit, which may lead to prolific spreading. In milder climates, borage will bloom for most of the year continuously.

Borage was often used to flavor wine drank by ancient Celtic warriors before going into battle because it held the reputation of enhancing both courage and strength. During the middle Ages, the leaves and flowers of the borage plant were combined with wine to relieve melancholy. The Roman scholar Pliny believed that this herb was useful for treating depression and lifting the spirits. John Gerard, a sixteenth-century herbalist, thought of borage as an herb to comfort the heart and increase joy.

In addition to its mood-boosting properties, borage is often used to treat bronchitis. This is because of its soothing effect and its ability to reduce inflammation and detoxify the body. Borage is known to help heal the mucous membranes of the mouth and throat and to stimulate activity in the kidneys and adrenal glands to rid the body of catarrh.

Also, borage is useful for restoring vitality during recovery from an illness. This herb is helpful for treating problems of the digestive system and has been used to increase quantity and quality of mother’s milk. Borage was traditionally cultivated for culinary and medicinal uses, but today it is commercially cultivated as an oilseed. The seed oil provides a desired source of GLA, for which borage is the highest known plant-based source. Virgin borage oil contains essential fatty acids, especially when they are in concentrations with gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). This fatty acid can account for as much as 26 percent of the oil’s content. It is best known for its source of concentrated GLA. The borage plant is known to stimulate the adrenal glands to help the body during stressful times.

Borage includes use as either a fresh vegetable or a dried herb. As a fresh vegetable, borage has a cucumber-like taste and is often used in salads or as a garnish. The flower has a sweet honey-like taste and is one of the few truly blue-colored things that are edible, making it popular for the decoration of dessert.

The leaves of the borage plant are used to provide blood purifier, diaphoretic, febrifuge, galactoagogue, and purgative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb include calcium and potassium. Primarily, borage is most beneficial in dealing with bronchitis, congestion, inflammation of the eyes, fevers, heart problems, absence of lactation, excessive mucus, PMS and rashes. Additionally, this herb is extremely helpful in treating blood impurities, colds, gastric disorders, insomnia, jaundice, lung disorders, nervous disorders, pleurisy, ringworm, and urinary problems.

Borage oil is available in softgel or bulk liquid forms at your local or internet health food store. Always purchase name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase. For more information on the beneficial effects of borage, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

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BoneSet For Fevers
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Date: June 09, 2009 12:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: BoneSet For Fevers

Boneset was used by Native Americans for a valuable remedy against colds, flu, and fevers. Other common names that boneset is identified by include: thoroughwort, vegetable antimony, feverwort, agueweed, Indian sage, sweating plant, eupatorium, crossword, thoroughstem, thoroughwax, and wild Isaac. In most cases, boneset has been used primarily to treat fevers. They introduced boneset to the settlers in the New World. From 1820 through 1916, boneset was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. This herb was also listed in the National Formulary from 1926 through 1950. Boneset has been used to restore strength in the stomach and spleen. It has also been used as a tonic for acute and chronic fevers. Dr. Edward E. Shook actually felt that boneset was beneficial for every kind of fever humans are subjected to. He also believed that it had never failed in overcoming influenza.

Recent research has found that boneset contains antiseptic properties that help to promote sweating. These properties also help in cases of colds and flu. Boneset has also been shown to contain antiviral properties and strengthen the immune system by enhancing the secretion of interferon. Additional studies have found that boneset is effective against minor viral and bacterial infections by stimulating white blood cells. Additionally, this herb has been used to treat indigestion and pain and may also contain some mild anti-inflammatory agents to help with conditions like arthritis.

Boneset is a perennial herb that has an erect stout and a hairy stem. It grows from two to four feet high, with branches at the top. The leaves of the boneset plant are large, opposite, united at the base, and lance-shaped. They grow anywhere between four to eight Inches in length and taper into a sharp point. The edges of these leaves are finely toothed, with prominent veins. These leaves help to distinguish this plant species at first glance. The flower heads of the boneset plant are terminal and numerous, being large, and having anywhere from ten to twenty white florets. The plant possesses an aromatic odor, with an astringent and strongly bitter taste. This plant species varies considerably in size, hairiness, form of leaves, and inflorescence. It can typically be found flowering from July to September.

The entire herb is used to provide alterative, anti-inflamamtory, antiperiodic, antiviral, diaphoretic, emetic, febrifuge, purgative, nervine, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in boneset include calcium, magnesium, PABA, potassium, and vitamins C and B-complex. Primarily, boneset has been shown to be extremely helpful in dealing with chills, colds, coughs, fever, flu, malaria, pain, rheumatism, typhoid fever, and yellow fever. Additionally, this herb is beneficial in treating bronchitis, catarrh, jaundice, liver disorders, measles, mumps, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, scarlet fever, sore throat, and worms. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by boneset, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

Although there is no recent clinical evidence that guides the dosage of boneset, traditional use of the herb suggests that a dose be about two grams of leaves and flowers. The internal use of this herb should be tempered by the occurrence of hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in this plant. For those women who are pregnant or lactating, this herb should not be used, as there have been documented adverse effects on those women who are pregnant and/or lactating.

Boneset is available in capsule, tablet, and liquid extract forms at your local or internet health food store. Look for name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

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Aloe Vera
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Date: April 08, 2009 07:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Aloe Vera

There have been few herbs throughout history that have been valued as highly as the aloe vera plant. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years because of its medicinal value and therapeutic benefits. Today, it is widely used and cultivated all over the world. The aloe vera plant is a member of the lily family. However, it looks much more like a cactus plant. This perennial produces yellow flowers and has tough, stiff, spiny, and triangular leaves. This plant may grow up to twenty Inches long and five Inches across, while the leaves grow in a rosette with three layers.

Historically, aloe has been used by many people. This includes the Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Hebrews, Chinese, Indians, Algerians, Moroccans, Tunisians, and Arabians. Records of folklore have indicated many medicinal uses of aloe, with recent research adding validity to the many beneficial uses of the aloe plant.

Traditionally, aloe vera has been used to treat wounds, frostbite, burns, radiation burns, and external pain. This herb also aids in digestion and combats constipation, inflammation, ulcers, kidney stones, and tissue damage from X-ray exposure and other forms of radiation. Aloe vera can prevent scarring and heal minor scars because it contains enzymes, saponins, hormones, and amino acids that can be absorbed into the skin. Aloe vera can also promote the growth of living cells. Aloe contains many substances that are referred to as uronic acids. These uronic acids are natural detoxicants which take part in the healing process by stripping toxic materials of their harmful effects.

Aloe vera is best known for its soothing and external healing effect on burns, wounds, and rashes. According to modern research, when aloe is applied externally, it can help speed healing and restore skin tissue. This is primarily because of the plant’s moisturizing effects. Aloe is easily absorbed into the skin, preventing the air from drying damaged skin tissue and helping to relieve the pain that is associated with both burns and wounds.

Many studies have found the positive effects that are linked to the use of aloe juice in the digestive process. Used in the digestive process, this herb can treat stomach disorders, ulcers, colitis, constipation, and other colon-related problems. Aloe can also help to soothe, reduce inflammation, and heal the digestive tract. One study found that ulcer patients can be completely healed with the use of aloe juice just as effectively as anti-ulcer drugs and without the chance of toxic side effects.

Aloe gel is made up of acemannan, which is a complex carbohydrate that possesses immune-stimulating and antiviral properties. The acemannan in aloe has shown antiviral activity against HIV-1, as it inhibits the reproduction of HIV-1. Aloe gel has also been found to be effective in fighting the spread of some viruses, like herpes, measles, and rhinotracheitis.

The primary applications of aloe vera are to treat insect bites, burns and scalds, hemorrhoids, body odor, gastric disorders, and scar tissues. However, aloe vera has also been shown to be extremely beneficial in dealing with abrasions, acne, anemia, constipation, heartburn, poison ivy/oak, psoriasis, ringworm, sores, sunburn, tapeworm, tuberculosis, wrinkles, leg ulcers, and peptic ulcers.

Aloe vera is available in capsule, tablet, liquid and powder forms. Always purchase a liquid form to ensure freshness. When looking to purchase this product, always stick to name brands that you can find in your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Aloe vera is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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The Power Plant of the Amazon
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Date: March 02, 2007 11:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Power Plant of the Amazon

Enzymatic Therapy Amazon Herbs

It may surprise most Americans to know that rainforest plants are the original source for one-fourth of the chemotherapy medications used today. Plants offer a plethora of beneficial compounds, and rainforests contain a superabundance of beneficial plants.

In fact, plant medicines are the most widely used medicines of all types in the world. Over eighty-five percent of the world’s population uses plant and herbal medicines as their primary medicines. That’s 5.1 billion (5,100,000,000) people worldwide! While Americans overwhelmingly use synthetically manufactured pharmaceuticals to cure their ills, the vast majority of Earth’s inhabitants use healing plant medicines instead.

One of the most powerful healing rainforest plant medicines is cat’s claw, or Uncaria tomentosa. This high climbing woody vine grows at the base of tall trees in the Peruvian rainforest. The plant’s claw-shaped thorns latch onto the trees and spiral further upward, nourished by the lush rainforest environment. For over 2,000 years, the Ashaninka, a tribal people of the Peruvian rainforest, have used the root of U. tomentosa to treat illnesses in the tribe, including asthma, bladder infections, infected wounds, arthritis, bone pain, bowel inflammation, and cancer.

Q. I’ve heard about cat’s claw, but what does it do and how do I know which one is right for me?

Cat’s claw might be one of the most confusing (and most effective!) nutritional supplements available in health food stores today. One reason that it’s so confusing is there are so many kinds of cat’s claw supplements-there are cat’s claw leaves, cat’s claw bark, and even cat’s claw twigs. While each of these supplements claim to help the immune system, it is the root of Uncaria tomentosa that is proven to impart the true cat’s claw health benefits.

Scientists, who have extensively studied every part of the plant, discovered that extracts made from selected cat’s claw roots possess the healing power to treat and prevent diseases like cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcers and degenerative diseases. In addition, it demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anti-viral and anti-microbial benefits.

Adding to the confusion is the fact that not all Uncaria tomentosa roots actually contain healing properties.

Healers in the Ashaninka tribe attribute the healing properties in cat’s claw to the “good spirits” that live in the plant’s roots. The Ashaninka healers, or sancoshi, are able to actually “see” the good spirits hidden inside the root of the plant before they harvest them.

Some cat’s claw plant roots have the good spirits. Some don’t. If the good spirits are mixed with any cat’s claw root without good spirits, the healing power is lost. While there are no apparent differences in the plants or the roots to the untrained eye, only certain cat’s claw roots possess the power to heal. And, for a very long time, only the Ashaninka tribal healer seemed to be able to identify them. They call the good spirit cat’s claw Saventaro, or “powerful plant”.

However, scientists who were given cat’s claw roots by the Ashaninka to study in the laboratory discovered that they could “see” the good spirits, too! Using high performance liquid chromatography, or HPLC, a laboratory process that identifies various chemical compounds, the good spirits of cat’s claw roots were revealed to be important medicinal compounds called pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POAs). Research has learned that POAs provide powerful benefits for the human immune response.

Q. Why are good spirits, or POA’s, good for the immune system?

Cat’s claw POAs work to keep us healthy by directly interacting with white blood cells, the backbone of our immune system. Our white blood cells are the disease fighting cells of the human body. These highly specialized cells fight diseases we catch, such as colds and flu, as well as diseases that start within our own cells, such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. There are many kinds of white blood cells; each has a specific job to do in fighting diseases.

Certain POAs help white blood cells called macrophages work faster. The macrophages’ job is to engulf and digest foreign material. This means that macrophages can ingest m ore bacteria and disease causing microbes when they are exposed to POAs. The scientists also discovered that POA cat’s claw extract increases the production of a chemical protein called interleukin that is secreted by macrophages. This macrophage-secreted interleukin (IL-1) has important immune enhancing properties. IL-1 alerts resting white blood cells and spurs them into action. It also helps make other biochemicals that are essential to an activated immune system.

POAs also help B cells. B cells are white blood cells that make antibodies that kill germs. Each B cell is programmed to make one specific antibody that is effective against one specific germ (such as a bacteria, virus, or fungus). When scientists looked at the number of B cells after they were exposed to POA cat’s claw root extract, they found that the B cells had increased significantly, resulting in an increased supply of antibodies. And perhaps most importantly as they relate to cancer, the POAs in cat’s claw root extract help increase the number of T cells, the true soldiers of the immune system. There are many different kinds of these white blood cells, including Helper T cells, Suppressor T cells, and Killer T cells. Increased Helper, Suppressor, and Killer T-cells can more effectively destroy cancer cells. Increasing the number of circulating T-cells is very important in a disease like AIDS as well.

Q. Can cat’s claw and other plants in the rainforest really cure diseases? Isn’t that just folklore?

It’s folk use and modern science combined-plants have long been known for their ability to kill cancer cells. In fact, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has identified over 3000 plant extracts that can kill cancer cells. More than 70 percent of these plants are found only in the rainforest.

Q. What is it about the rainforest that gives plants like cat’s claw these cancer killing compounds?

Most of the time when we talk about rainforests, we’re talking about the tropical rainforests. While other forests, like the old-growth temperate forests of the Pacific Northwest, also have high rainfalls and tall trees, the tropical rainforests located near the equator are where most plant medicines come from.

The Amazon rainforest in South America is the world’s largest, covering an area about two-thirds the size of the continental United States. Depending on the elevation and distance to the equator the Amazon rainforest receives between 160 and 400 Inches of rain per year. The rain is spread pretty evenly from January to December-it’s always the rainy season-and the temperatures remain between 75-80 degrees Fahrenheit all year.

This fertile environment continually recycles itself. When leaves fall from the trees, flowers wilt, and animals die in the rainforest-all of the nutrients are recycled back into the roots of the trees and plants. Because the rainforest reuses almost everything that falls to the ground, the plant growth is amazingly rich in alkaloids and other medicinal compounds. Researchers think these compounds and alkaloids, like POAs, protect the plants from illness and insect attacks. These are the very same compounds that protect us from disease.

Q. When the Ashaninka harvest the cat’s claw roots, does it impact the rest of the plant?

No. The Ashaninka work intelligently to keep rainforest cat’s claw plants perpetually healthy. The Ashaninka employ responsible and innovative harvesting techniques to keep the plants alive and tribal members healthy. Individual cat’s claw plants are never completely harvested. Only one third of the lateral roots are collected at any one time to allow re-growth by the remaining root. Once a plant’s lateral roots have been partially harvested, that plant is left to regenerate, and no more root is harvested from it for 10 years.

Q. Why are the Ashaninka willing to share their cat’s claw?

They are generous people. The Ashaninka see no benefit in hoarding cat’s claw for themselves alone. They also want to make sure that the plant’s healing properties continue on. As their homelands continue to be destroyed by deforestation, rainforest peoples are also disappearing. There were an estimated ten million tribal and indigenous peoples living in the Amazonian Rainforest in 1510. Today there are less than 200,000.

Since the 1900’s more than 90 indigenous tribes have died out and disappeared. Each time a rainforest medicine man or woman dies without passing their arts on to the next generation, the tribe and the world loses thousands of years of irreplaceable knowledge about medicinal plants. With them, centuries of accumulated knowledge of the medicinal value of rainforest species have been lost.

A good example of the impact of this loss can be seen in cat’s claw. When European explorers began venturing into the Amazon River basin, t hey were skeptical of the stories the Ashaninka people told them of U. tomentosa’s amazing healing powers. But when the explorers became sick with colds, flu, or other illnesses, they harvested cat’s claw root for themselves and gave the plant a try. Sometimes the explorers got better when they used the cat’s claw root, sometimes they stayed the same.

Q. Why didn’t the cat’s claw root help all the explorers?

Because some cat’s claw plant roots have good spirits-POAs-and some cat’s claw plant roots have tetracyclic oxindole alkaloids, or TOAs. While the POAs have very powerful effects in the immune system, the TOAs have different effects in the body, none of which help the immune system cells at all. All U. tomentosa plants look virtually identical, so it’s hard to tell if they have the healing POAs or non-helpful TOAs.

What makes cat’s claw identification even more challenging is the fact that plants with POAs one year will have TOAs the next. Cat’s claw plants seem to change their alkaloid chemotypes at will, an incredibly powerful accomplishment for a plant to possess. Harvesting of cat’s claw roots that contain POAs is very tricky. Unless the person gathering the root extract is an Ashaninka sancoshi. These medicine men know which cat’s claw to use; they can actually “see” the good spirits hidden inside the root. When scientists studying cat’s claw discovered they could “see” presence of TOAs using HPLC technology, they were able to harvest cat’s claw root extracts with POAs that consistently helps people get and stay healthy.

Q. Do some cat’s claw root extract supplements contain TOAs?

Yes they do. And buying those products will only benefit the cat’s claw distributor; they won’t help you stay healthy. When cat’s claw root is harvested from the rainforest, responsible supplement maker examine the root with HPLC to make sure that only POA roots are collected. But, this identification of the chemotypes takes significant time and costs money. For these reasons, many cat’s claw distributors don’t include this important process in their harvesting. The POAs and TOAs are simply just mixed together and sold as a cat’s claw product with no mention of any alkaloid content on the label.

Q. Why should I avoid TOAs?

While the POAs in cat’s claw root extracts have numerous benefits to the immune system, the TOAs have different effects in the body, none helping the immune system cells. Most importantly, however, when POAs and TOAs are mixed together, the TOAs actually work against the POAs. TOAs reduce the capacity of POAs to beneficially modulate the immune system.

Q. How can I be sure the cat’s claw I buy is POA cat’s claw?

Read the label of the cat’s claw root extract product you are considering buying. If it does not clearly state that it is the high POA cat’s claw, then chances are that it’s not.

Q. What do the Ashaninka receive in return for the cat’s claw harvesting?

The Ashaninka and reputable distributors of cat’s claw root extract have established a mutual and ethical relationship. Both groups benefit from the sale of the plant material. Maintaining this relationship is important for both the tribe and the distributors.

The distributors are paying a fair price for the raw material directly to the tribe. No intermediary is involved. This payment covers the raw material itself, a license-fee for the k knowledge of the plant, and a guarantee (from both sides) of a lasting relationship. Payment is also made for the protection of the rainforest. No deforestation is allowed. The area where the cat’s claw materials are processed is also leased and payment is made for this, as well.

This arrangement allows the Ashaninka to make independent decisions in how to spend this income from sale of their cat’s claw plants. They have been able to make improvements in the tribe’s water supply and in their living areas. They are also able to obtain outside medical aid as needed and provide for education of their children.

The partnership with cat’s claw distributors has created a sustainable resource for the Ashaninka. The tribe has been able to not only preserve their rainforest, but also compete financially with unsustainable income sources offered by timber and agricultural firms.

Q. Why is it important to preserve the rainforest?

The most amazing fact about these impressive medicinal plants is the vast number that5 has yet to be discovered. In fact, the rainforest’s abundance is one reason it is home to so many healing plants. Within a four square mile patch of rainforest, you could see 1500 species of flowering plants, 750 species of trees, 125 mammal species, 400 species of birds, 100 reptile species, 60 amphibian species, and 150 different species of butterflies.

Unfortunately, not everyone looks to the rainforest for the same reasons. Many consider its real value in board feet and cultivated acreage. The forces pushing industrial development move quickly; experts estimate that we’re losing over 130 plant, animal, and insect species every day/ That amount to almost 50,000 species a year.

A combination of logging, petroleum interests, cattle grazing operations, and, of course, our own consumer appetites are putting pressure on rainforest resources. The consequences are sobering:

  • Rainforests once covered 14% of the earth’s land surface; it’s only 6% today
  • The last remaining rainforests could be consumed in less than 40 years.
  • Nearly half of the world’s species of plants, animals and microorganisms will be destroyed or severely threatened over the next quarter century due to rainforest deforestation.

By leaving the rainforest intact, however, and harvesting its many nuts, fruits, oil-producing, and medicinal plants, the rainforest has more economic value than if it was cut down for timber or to make grazing land for cattle. If managed properly, the rainforest can provide the world’s need for sustainably harvested natural resources on a perpetual basis. That’s what the Ashaninka are doing with their cat’s claw harvesting.

Conclusion

The discovery of medicinal plants is dependent upon healthy rainforests. When an acre of tropical rainforest is lost due to deforestation, the impact on the number of plant and animal species lost and their possible uses is staggering.

We can all help the development of sustainable rainforest industries. By purchasing renewable and sustainable rainforest products, like POA type cat’s claw root extract, we are keeping rainforests alive and well. By benefiting from the innate wisdom of the Ashaninka people we are keeping ourselves just as alive and well. By honoring the science and the sacred of the world’s rainforests, like my friend the oncology nurse, the massive wealth and diversity will be there for generations to come.



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How to deal with Stress and Cortisol...
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Date: August 30, 2006 09:36 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to deal with Stress and Cortisol...

Beating the Aging Odds

All of us grow older, but aging is a choice. You have it in your power to retain much of the health, vitality and beauty of your youth. It boils down to a simple fact – retard oxidative stress and you’ll retard the aging process. The 70 million people who make up the “boomer” generation and are getting ready for an active retirement welcome this news.

Stress and Cortisol

The early twentieth century “stress doctor” Hans Selye, M.D. was renowned for his work on the human adaptive response and the effects of stress on aging. He taught that every stress leanves an indelible scar, and the organism pays for its survival after a stressful situation by becoming a little older. That’s because stress raises levels of the adrenal hormone cortisol. It increases internal generation of free radicals, disrupts normal metabolism and leads to aging conditions. Because of this, cortisol has been dubbed the age-accelerating hormone.

The more stressful our lifestyle and the level of environmental hazards we are exposed to, the higher cortisol levels will climb in an effort to jump-start our adaptive response. Coupled with a poor diet, this is a recipe for pre-mature aging. At least eleven major aging factors are related to high cortisol levels:

  • Breakdown of collagen and elastin in muscles, joints, and bone
  • Memory loss and reduced cognitive function
  • Increased cardiovascular risk
  • Hypertension and fluid retention
  • Disordered lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL to LDL ratio)
  • Decreased immune function
  • Increased inflammation (vascular network, allergies, asthma, acne and hair loss)
  • Hormone imbalances
  • Disordered sugar metabolism
  • Skin problems (wrinkling, psoriasis, seborrhea, acne and hair loss)
  • Nerve system damage

So, there you have it. Now let’s see how to tame cortisol and reduce oxidative stress.

Reducing Cortisol and Oxidative Stress

Be in the moment – stress reducing techniques such as meditation, prayer, visualization, yoga, chi gong, and listening to inspirational tapes induce calmness and a sense of balance.

Eat right for your genes – as we get older, we don’t digest animal protein as efficiently as when younger. Shifting to plant source proteins that are easier to digest and contain the full complement of vitamins and minerals is most desirable. We are accustomed to thinking of dairy, meat, poultry, and fish as “protein.” All vegetables are good sources of protein. Along with legumes, whole grains, and nuts, daily protein needs are easily fulfilled. Meals that combine a variety of tastes from plant foods also require less salt for flavor enhancement and this helps keep hypertension at bay. So, explore just how good meals can be that either do not contain meat or use it as a condiment. If you do need some salt, try substituting table salt with NOW Vitamins Potassium Chloride crystals.

Enzymes Increase Digestion

Use digestive enzymes such as Optimal Digestive System to insure that you are absorbing all the nutrients in your food. This product has been clinically tested for its digestive effectiveness helping to digest fats, carbs, proteins and even gas producing beans and cruciferous vegetables. Other enzymes, Serrazimes is a systemic enzyme that will help keep lymphatic’s clear of debris, support immune function, and boost your adaptive response to stress.

Tame Cortisol

As many people reach middle age they have a tendency to gain weight around the navel. High stress amps up levels of cortisol that results in increased girth. Middle body fat is considered a significant risk factor for impaired glucose metabolism and cardiovascular disease. Check your waist to hip ratio by dividing your waist measurement in Inches by your hip measurement. If you have a ratio of 0.85 or below, you have lower risk of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. This measurement is one of the best indicators of cortisol induced metabolic syndrome and weight gain.

Super cortisol support with Relora is an herbal, vitamin and mineral formula that’s designed to fight mid-body fat by taming cortisol. Its key ingredient is Relora which is a blend of the herbal extract of Phellodendron amurense and Magnolia officinalis. A small double blind clinical trial found that pre-menopausal obese women – half of whom took Relora – lost a significant amount of weight. These were women who eat in response to stress. Thus the researchers proposed that Relora appeared to reduce cortisol and perceived stress, resulting in weight loss. Super cortisol support also contains Ashwagandha and Rhodiola, herbs traditionally use for increasing adaptive response and reducing stress. You can read about these herbs and other nutritional products in the book 7-syndrome healing: supplement essentials for mind and body. Written by myself and coauthor Jayson Kroner. This book can be ordered from Now Foods.

Additionally, Chinese scientists found that the active components in Relora called honokiol and magnolol delayed gastric emptying, which would make you feel full longer. An additional anti-aging benefit was observed by another group of Chinese scientists. They reported that honokiol is a potent arterial thrombosis inhibitor because it inhibits prostacyclin release; a promoter of platelet adhesion. Platelet stickiness increases stroke risk. Phellodendron and Magnolia have been used in Chinese medicine for centuries.

Quell Free Radicals

Health and longevity essentially rests on the body balance between free radical load and antioxidant reserves. Toxic exposure depletes some of your antioxidant reserves. Eating a diet rich in antioxidant fruits, vegetables, legumes and grains, helps you rebound. Continued toxic exposure will challenge your antioxidant status and may overwhelm your reserves. VitaBerry Plus+ is a powerful antioxidant formula that contains a range of high ORAC fruits that naturally augment the diet. ORAC stands for oxygen radical absorbance capacity. It is a measure of the ability of a food to quell oxygen free radicals, the most dangerous kind. VitaBerry Plus+ is a product after my own heart. In my book The Anti-Aging Solution, I wrote about how different color foods protect DNA and prevent aging. VitaBerry Plus+ contains the important colors described in my bood. You can order your copy from Now Vitamins.

True-E Bio Complex rounds out the antioxidant colors. It contains all eight tocopherols and eight tocotrienols in the natural ratio found in “tan” foods such as whole grains and legumes. It is the only natural vitamin E that is produced from soy that has not been genetically modified.

The best anti-aging advice I can pass on is from my friend and food columnist Joan Jackson. “Take Pleasure in Your Life TODAY and Enjoy What You Eat”



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Staying on Your Diet throughout the Holidays
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Date: January 18, 2006 12:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Staying on Your Diet throughout the Holidays

The temptations of the holiday season don't have to mean a bigger waistline in the new year and yet another resolution to get in shape. With just a few tricks and tips, you can keep your weight in check and still celebrate with everyone.

Pre-Party Dos

While you might be invited to more parties than usual, you can do a lot before you even arrive to keep yourself from eating too much.

One way of keeping your food consumption down is to eat before you go out. An apple or a large glass of water before leaving home will keep you away from the dessert cart at the party.

At-the-Party! Dos and Don'ts

Now that you have lined your stomach, all you have to do is to take care of your calories, maintaining them at a sensible level. Do keep away from the high calorie sips. Alcohol, for instance, has a high calorie content that will easily build up to shatter your calorie allowance. It's a good idea to talk about anything but food, and try avoiding holding a plate! it helps to do something else with your hands, so they are occupied.

If you really must eat, you'll find that the vegetable and fruit trays can be the best places to fill up your plate. If you put these items on your plate first and then put smaller servings of other higher fat items, you'll be able to have everything without the caloric damage.

During the main course, you can balance your calories by eating only half of what is on your plate. You can easily explain it away by complementing your host on the meal, while pleading you couldn't possibly eat more. Or you could tell them the truth, one that most people readily accept! that you are being careful about your diet.

When you're at home

If you're doing the cooking during a holiday, you are more in control of your eating. Why not make items that are low in calories so you don't have to avoid anything?

When cooking, ask a family member to do the tasting. They will be only too thrilled to do this and you can save yourself from consuming added calories.

You might also want to freeze any cookies or other tempting items until you will be eating them for a meal or a gathering. It's a lot harder to eat something that's frozen.

At the end of it all, these dos and don'ts may even take a couple of Inches off your waistline at the New Year. But if they don't, and you still weigh the same, you accomplished what you set out to do! now that calls for a party!

Tania Makevey operates the website and writes for R You Diet which a site dedicated to researching diet related topics and contains all the very latest diet news and views. For more details please visit //www.ryoudiet.com



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Guys should forget the six-pack abs and just lose the beer belly.
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Date: September 24, 2005 12:00 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Guys should forget the six-pack abs and just lose the beer belly.

Time for a Gut Check

Guys should forget the six-pack abs and just lose the beer belly.

When a woman noticed her husband standing on the bathroom scale and sucking in his stomach, she said, “I don’t think that’s going to help.” “Sure it will,” he responded. “It’s the only way I can see the numbers.”

Funny line, sure. But whether you’re talking about “love handles,” a “spare tire” or the proverbial “beer belly,” having a tummy that hangs over your belt buckle is no laughing matter. It’s not even a matter of the quest for “six-pack abs” or a “washboard stomach.” It’s a matter of health.

Consider this: A recent study appearing in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that a man’s waist size can be a good predictor for the development of type 2 diabetes. A Harvard Health Professionals team, led by Dr. Youfa Wang, an assistant professor at the John Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, analyzed data from more than 27,000 men who were tracked for more than 13 years. The team found that men with larger waists or a higher body mass index (BMI) were both at greater risk for type 2 diabetes than slimmer men. (You find your body mass index by dividing your weight in kilograms by the square of your height in meters. If your waist size is 40 Inches or less, a BMI of 25 or over means you’re overweight.)

“Abdominal fat measured by waist circumference can indicate a strong diabetes risk, whether or not a man is considered overweight or obese according to his BMI,” says Wang. The Harvard team found that men with waist sizes of 40 to 62 Inches were 12 times more likely to develop diabetes and suggested that the current recommended waistline of 40 Inches or below for men may need to be lowered.

Flatten Up

Okay, now that we’ve scared the bejeezes out of all you guys under 6-foot-4 who by your pants in the big-man store, let’s talk about what you have to do to shop anywhere in the mall. Again, this is not about looking like a Greek ab god. This is about diminishing your risk for a myriad of health problems and being able to comfortably bend over for a ground ball during the pickup softball game. And there are no shortcuts, so forget about liposuctioning those years of accumulated lard. Despite what all those TV makeover shows say, liposuction can only really enhance your body aesthetic if you lose a large chunk of the surface fat first.

“Those makeover shows have it all backwards,” says Dr. Bruce Nadler, a fitness trainer who also happens to be a plastic surgeon. “They do surgery on someone’s midsection and then have them doing intense workouts when they are supposed to be recuperating from surgery. I wouldn’t do liposuction until you see what diet and exercise can accomplish. When you have all the weight in the midsection the dangerous fat is deep within the body. So liposuction may make you look better but it won’t necessarily improve your health.”

The Gut Check Plan

Talk to any exercise expert worth their weight in body fat, including Nadler, and they will tell you that on of the biggest fitness fallacies is the notion that intense abdominal workouts and use of abdominal machines (like those sold through those interminable infomercials) are the keys to getting a flatter and more “ripped” midsection. In fact, for many people it’s not physiologically possible to achieve a flat tummy because abdominals are not designed to be flat. And the idea of “spot reduction,” exercising the area where you want to lose the fat, is now considered a myth. Research has shown that fat is lost all over your body, not just in the area that you work.

It’s not that you can’t benefit from doing abdominal exercises. Crunches, situps and leg raises, when done properly, are great for muscle tone and endurance (and you do burn calories), but the real key to achieving a wonderful waist size is losing body fat. How do you do that?

“Dropping a few Inches from your midsection,” says Nadler, “depends on four things- calorie reduction through proper diet (eating very little fat, consuming complex carbohydrates and doing it all in smaller portions), stepping up aerobic activity (such as running an bicycling, which burns excess calories quickly and safely), and resistance weight training (which not only increases metabolism and helps burn more excess calories, but also builds and strengthens the abdominal wall).” Then, adds Nadler, when you’ve just about reached your waist=reduction goal, but genetics still won’t give you a flatter stomach, “that’s where plastic surgery may come in as icing on the cake.”

Nadler also advises men not to panic if they don’t notice a substantial weight reduction during a training program. “When people are doing weight and resistance training they are too hung up on the scale,” insists Nadler. “Muscle weighs more than fat so don’t judge your progress by what you weigh, but on what your percentage of body fat is. That’s the number you want to see going down.”

So how long does it take for men with an oversized gut to lose the excess? “Depending on how much they have to lose,” Nadler says, “it takes anywhere from three to six months.” By the way, for men in their 30s and up, there are also two important side benefits to decreasing the waist size and firming up the gut: better overall posture and diminishing the potential for chronic back pain. So get to work guys; suck it up so you can stop sucking it in. -Stephen Hanks

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HISTORY
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Date: July 12, 2005 09:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HISTORY

HISTORY or Milk Thistle

Natural substances which afford us protection from toxins and potential carcinogens have recently come to the fore front of scientific attention. Compounds known as antioxidants, which can help minimize the damaging effects of chemical stru c t u res called free radicals, are extensively used today. One of these protectant substances is not as familiar to most people as vitamin C or beta-carotene. It is an herb called Milk Thistle and it has some extraordinary protective properties. Milk Thistle, also known as Silymarin has enjoyed a long history of use in European folk medicine. Centuries ago, Romans recognized the value of this herb for liver impairments. They routinely used the seeds and roots of the plant to restore and rejuvenate a diseased liver. Pliny the Elder, an ancient Roman, re c o rded how the juice of Milk Thistle, when mixed with honey was used for carrying off bile. Dioscorides extolled the virtues of Milk Thistle as an effective protectant against snake bites. The genus silybum is a member of the thistle tribe of the daisy family. Two species of the plant exist and both are native to southern Europe and Eurasia. Plants which grow in the Southern United States actually have more potent seeds than their European and Asian counterparts. Milk Thistle is a stout and sturdy looking plant, which can grow up to 12 feet tall. The flower heads can expand to six Inches in diameter and are a vivid purple color. They usually bloom from June to August. Very sharp spines cover the heads. The leaves are comprised of hairless, milky bands, and when young, are quite tender. Historically, the seed of Milk Thistle was used as a cholagogue which stimulated the flow of bile. The seed was also used to treat jaundice, dyspepsia, lack of appetite and other stomach disorders. Homeopathic uses included:

peritonitis, coughs, varicose veins and uterine congestion. While tonics were sometimes made from the leaves of Milk Thistle, the most valuable part of the plant was contained in its seeds.

Milk Thistle is also known as Marian Thistle, Wild Artichoke, Variegated Thistle or St. Mary’s Thistle. Reference to Milk Thistle as “Vi rgin Mary” stems from its white milky veins. Legends explained that these veins were created when Mary’s milk fell on the thistle. Subsequently, a connection between the herb and lactation arose, which has no scientific basis for its claims. Milk Thistle is frequently confused with Blessed Thistle, which does act to stimulate the production of mother’s milk. Gerarde, a practicing herbalist in 1597, said that Milk Thistle was one of the best remedies for melancholy (liver related) diseases. In 1650, Culpeper wrote of its ability to remove obstructions in the liver and spleen. In 1755, Von Haller recorded that he used Milk Thistle for a variety of liver disorders. Subsequently, Milk Thistle became a staple agent for the treatment of any kind of liver aliment. European physicians included it in their written materia medica. Unfortunately, for an extended period during the 18th century, the herb was not stressed, however in 1848, Johannes Gottfried Rademacher rediscovered its medicinal merits. He recorded in great detail how Milk Thistle treated a number of liver ailments and spleen disorders. His research was later confirmed in medical literature. In the early 20th century, Milk Thistle was recommended for female problems, colon disorders, liver complaints and gallstones. Almost every significant European pharmaceutical establishment listed Milk Thistle as a valuable treatment. In recent decades, Milk Thistle has been primarily used as a liver tonic and digestive aid. Nursing women who wanted to stimulate the production of their milk used Milk thistle as a traditional tonic. As mentioned earlier, modern day medical science now refutes this particular action of Milk Thistle, however, its benefit to the liver has been confirmed.

German herbalists have routinely used Milk Thistle for treating jaundice, mushroom poisoning and other liver disorders. This therapeutic tradition contributed to modern German research into Milk Thistle, resulting in its use as a widely prescribed phytomedicine for liver disease. Silymarin or Thisilyn, as it is also known, is a relatively new nutrient in the United States. Since 1954, scientists have known the Milk Thistle contained flavonoids, however, it wasn’t until the 1960’s that they discovered the just how unique silymarin is. Silymarin was considered an entirely new class of chemical compound, and its therapeutic properties continue to impress the scientific community.

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THE GINSENG PLAN
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Date: June 25, 2005 01:00 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: THE GINSENG PLAN

THE GINSENG PLAN

The Asian ginseng grows to approximately two feet in height. It has five foliate leaves with small clusters of green-white flowers that are followed by bright red berries. The plant usually flowers during its fourth year of growth. The roots can grow up to 3-4 milliliters in diameter and to 10 centimeters in length. The older roots are the most valued. As the root ages, it takes on a two legged shape. The wild plant roots can grow much larger but are rare because of overzealous harvesting for commercial gain. It originally grew naturally in the wild damp fertile woodlands of northern China and Korea.

The American ginseng is found growing in shaded, wooded areas of the Northeast. Its natural habitat was under beech and maple trees, though those sources have been depleted and are now rare. The American ginseng plant grows from eight to fifteen Inches. The plant consists of three large leaves and two small leaves originating from the same stem. It contains a cluster of yellow-green flowers, and red, edible berries follow. The root is usually two to three Inches long and about an inch thick. The older roots take on a two-legged appearance.

The Siberian variety is found in Russia, China, Korea and Japan. It is not a “true ginseng” but does contain similar adaptogenic properties. It grows in high elevations, up to 2500 feet, and in forest areas in lower elevations. Thorns cover the stems and its flowers are yellow (female) and violet (male). The flowers are followed by black berries. The roots of the Siberian ginseng are really underground stems.11

The age of the root is thought to be essential. The older roots are thought to contain more healing properties and are highly valued and sought after. Folklore suggests that the very old roots glow in the dark, revealing an inner light.12

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Some Final Thoughts
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Date: June 22, 2005 09:54 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Some Final Thoughts

Some Final Thoughts

One of the important proofs of the belief Pariza and Cook have in this supplement is to learn that they both take it themselves.

Cook says it is the only supplement he takes, and he believes he will take it the rest of his life. He was naturally thin because of intense exercise, but he believes that it has helped him to keep Inches off during long weeks of travel. Pariza, for his part, has lost three Inches from his waist during the last year, as well as about seven pounds. He said he has less of an appetite. He says he feels warmer, probably an effect of a faster metabolism. He warns that this is not a quick fix. When he first started taking this supplement, he found virtually no results. He was disappointed. But the results have come.62

Another significant thing to remember is that, today, scores of scientists around the country are now studying this nutrient. The results will pile in human studies and in other long-term clinical trials. These will give broad indications of the use of this natural, previously unrecognized nutrient.

Why would CLA be involved in so many functions?

If human studies hold true, and the expectation is that they will, you might consider this the next aspirin or the next vitamin C. Vital, remarkable nutrients seem to work on a basic level and impact a variety of systems. This is the case with CLA. What a remarkable piece of science that emerged from a charcoal grill. So, the next time charcoal briquettes sizzle with the drippings of a nice burger, remember how science has found that life, with its remarkable chemistry, finds a way to survive and thrive. No better example exists than that beef cooking on the grill. Sizzling steak covers itself with dangerous chemicals that can cause cancer. Many people feared that fact for years, and science studied those dangers earnestly. How encouraging that nature thankfully also provided other chemicals that counteract, partially at least, the effects of these dangers. CLA, just another highway of chemicals, is a quiet blessing, wiping out carcinogens, blocking dangerous fat, and striving to keep our veins clear. And it was there all along, doing its job, just waiting to be studied and understood. Now that nearly two decades of research are beginning to show how this substance can benefit our lives, a celebration of nature’s bounty seems to be in order. Let’s light up the old grill. Shall we make it steaks or burgers this time?

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Prostate Health Naturally
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Date: June 16, 2005 11:11 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Prostate Health Naturally

Nature's Life Prostate Health Options


Prostate Health... Naturally

Prostate issues too often put a damper on the activities of men of all ages and they are far more common than previously thought. According to some studies, virtually all men will eventually experience prostate issues.

Men with enlarged prostates experience discomforts that may include difficulty urinating, increased frequency and urgency of urination, bouts with sleep-disturbing nighttime urination and lower back discomfort. Dealing with the discomforts from enlarged prostates may be costly, too. Every year about 400,000 men have prostate surgery, adding over $3 billion annually to the national health care bill.

Nature’s Life offers several products to support prostate health, including Saw Palmetto as a whole berry concentrate, and three doctor-formulated combinations including Saw Palmetto for supporting prostate health. All of these products are designed to provide nutritive support for:

  • healthy prostate gland function
  • normal urine flow

Nature’s Life® Prostate formulas are made from all natural ingredients… only the finest available. Regardless of the formula you prefer, you can always be sure of the same superior quality and consistent results.

Prostate function
A small doughnut-shaped gland, the prostate surrounds the urethra where it leaves the bladder. The prostate produces an alkaline substance which makes up the largest part of the seminal reproductive fluid (semen).

Most men’s prostates start to enlarge at about age 50. As the prostate gland enlarges, it pInches the urethra, causing reduced urine flow and increased discomfort. Research into prostate enlargement is focusing on male hormones, or androgens. In older men, androgen production changes result in higher levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is produced from testosterone. The prostate is more likely to enlarge when higher levels of DHT are present.

The Holistic Approach
A unique combination of herbs, amino acids, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and essential fatty acids may help provide nutritional support to maintain good prostate health.

Saw Palmetto Berry (Serenoa repens B.)
The berries from this small tropical palm contain lipophilic sterols and essential fatty acids, including beta sitosterol. Saw Palmetto extract may also support normal inflammatory response by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins. Research suggests that Saw Palmetto may help to increase urine flow and decreases nighttime discomfort. Saw Palmetto has been the subject of numerous double blind clinical trials. All of these effects of Saw Palmetto make it the key ingredient to support prostate health.

Pygeum Bark (Pygeum africanum H.)
The bark of this tall African tree contains lipophilic sterols, including beta sitosterol and sitosterone plus unique fatty acids. These ingredients influence prostaglandin synthesis to help provide nutritional support for a normal inflammatory response. Other components of pygeum may provide nutritive support to help maintain normal prostate size.

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.)
A common “weed” around the world, stinging nettle has a long history of traditional use to support normal urine flow. Nettle contains substances that may have anti-androgen activity. Many commentators feel that the potential beneficial effects of Nettle extract are increased when combined with Saw Palmetto.

Pumpkin Seed (Cucurbita pepo)
The seeds of this familiar food is a good source of zinc, phytosterols, and essential fatty acids: nutrients essential to prostate health. Preliminary studies find pumpkin seed extract promising alone, but combinations of pumpkin seed oil with nettle and/or saw palmetto have the potential to help restore and maintain healthy prostate size.

Minerals
Zinc is concentrated in the prostate gland and is a major constituent
of seminal fluid. Zinc appears to play a role in maintaining healthy male hormone balance, possibly by its effect on 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme which produces powerful androgens in the prostate. Preliminary reports suggest that zinc may be helpful in supporting urinary comfort. Copper is added to balance the zinc and prevent a
copper deficiency.

Active Aminos™ (Glutamic Acid, Alanine & Glycine)
These are the three amino acids found in highest concentration in the prostate. A recent study suggested that this combination of amino acids may help support normal urination and urinary urgency.

Beta Sitosterol
The oil constituents of a few plants, including soybeans, pygeum, and pumpkin seeds, contain a mixture of phytosterols, or plant hormones, that include beta sitosterol. Recent studies have suggested that beta sitosterol may help to support normal urine flow. Research also suggests that beta sitosterol may also support normal prostaglandin synthesis thus normalizing the inflammatory response.

Vitamin B-6 (Pyridoxine HCl)
This essential B vitamin is required for many metabolic processes, including the use of amino acids such as Glutamic Acid, Alanine and Glycine.

Lycopene: A valuable addition
Lycopene is an antioxidant carotenoid found primarily in most tomato products. In men, lycopene is stored in the prostate and testes, and has been associated with protecting the health of the prostate by acting as an antioxidant. As men age, the level of lycopene is diminished, therefore it should be replaced by food intake or supplements.

Several other herbs have traditionally been used for prostate and urinary tract health:

Herbs Traditional Indications*
Burdock Root
(Arctium lappa L.)
Contains polyacetylenes, amino acids and inulin for restoring harmony to the body.
Cayenne Fruit
(Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum)
Contains capsaicin and saponins for stimulating blood flow.
Goldenseal Root
(Hydrastis canadensis L.)
Contains alkaloids, including berberine, a powerful tonic for all mucus membranes.
Gravel Root
(Eupatorium purpureum L.)
Contains active volatile oils and flavonoids; for healthy kidney and bladder function.
Juniper Berry
(Juniperus oxycedrus L.)
Contains essential oils, flavone glycosides, organic acids and terpenes for healthy kidney and bladder function.
Marshmallow Root
(Althaea officinalis L.)
Mucilage, containing poly-saccharides and uronic acid for normal urine flow.
Parsley Leaf
(Petroselinum crispum M.)
Contains coumarin and flavonoids for normal urine flow.
White Pond Lily Root
(Nymphaea odorata)
For intestinal cleansing.

* These are traditional indications, and Nature’s Life does not guarantee that the indicated herb will have the referenced benefit at the levels provided.


Lifestyle Choices

Nutritionists believe that diet and exercise contribute a great deal to the success of natural prostate self-care. In addition to a comprehensive prostate support formula, men should reduce dietary fat, eat more fruits and vegetables and commit to a regular exercise program. This is not just for a healthy prostate, but a choice for a healthier, happier life.

The Nature’s Life® brand has three comprehensive formulas with herbs and nutrients intended to provide nutritive support for healthy prostate gland function and normal urine flow, as well as individual supplements to complement these formulas:

800 Prostate Support™ combines standardized extract of Saw Palmetto – the choice for a stronger dosage – with Stinging Nettle, standardized Pygeum bark extract, and zinc.

Prostate 700+™ combines standardized extract of Saw Palmetto with concentrated Nettle root extract, and pumpkin seed oil.

600+ Prostate Maintain™ combines a whole herb form of Saw Palmetto for a regular maintenance dosage with Active Aminos™, Zinc, and a blend of traditional herbs.

Saw Palmetto, 500 mg whole herb

Lycopene 30 mg & 10 mg


Which Prostate Formula is Best For You?

Nature’s Life® Formula/Per Serving
600
700
800
Saw Palmetto
600 mg
213 mg*
160mg*
Pumpkin Seed Extract
50 mg
267 mg*
Nettle Root Extract
400 mg
150mg
Pygeum Bark Extract
10 mg
50 mg



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Acupuncture nutrient Connection
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Date: June 12, 2005 05:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Acupuncture nutrient Connection

Acupuncture nutrient Connection by Robert Gluck Energy Times, November 1, 1998

The theory behind the practice of acupuncture confounds western science. This therapy, originating in Asia, is based on the concept that currents of energy called meridians flow through your body. However, no one has ever been able to conclusively demonstrate the existence of these meridians.

Despite the evasiveness of these energy streams, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) holds that alterations in these energy flows can disrupt health and cause pain. Consequently, an acupuncturist punctures your skin with specialized needles to redirect the body's vital energy.

Alleviating Illness

Despite the fact that western scientists have not been able to find satisfactory evidence of the existence of these energetic meridians, studies show that acupuncture works and is especially effective at relieving pain. This therapy has been used to alleviate a variety of conditions including chronic pain, nausea and even mental illness. In addition, some practitioners apply it to those trying to shake off the chains of drug addiction. (More recently, many practitioners now also successfully use acupuncture to relieve physical problems in animals.)

Of course, no matter what your perspective on this therapy, acupuncture's no panacea. While you might use acupuncture to relieve the discomforts of chemotherapy, you wouldn't use this technique as your primary weapon against a dangerous disease like cancer. Still, this reliable therapy occupies a welcome spot as an adjunct to many mainstream therapies. Consequently, many mainstream practitioners accept the validity of using acupuncture and many managed care companies reimburse this therapy. Some HMOs even keep a list of approved acupuncturists that they make available to enrollees.

Acupuncture East and West

The practice of acupuncture dates back at least 2200 years ago in Asia. Only during the last forty years has it become well-known and widely available in the United States. Today, 29 accredited acupuncture schools train practitioners in North America. In addition, traditional healers in Belize (south of Mexico) have been found to use a form of acupuncture derived from traditional Mayan medicine.

Is the use of acupuncture by Mayan shamans coincidence? Or further evidence that acupuncture meridians really exist? No one knows for sure, although some experts believe the Mayan use of this therapy supports the notion that the original ancestors of the Mayans migrated from Asia.

Needle Relief

Acupuncturists insert needles into the body to relieve pain or enhance bodily functions. TCM holds that acupuncture, and the manipulation of these tiny needles, moves and manipulates qi (pronounced chee), the body's energy force.

"Acupuncture is a method of balancing the body's energy," says Carol Alexander, an acupuncturist at the North Jersey Health and Pain Relief Center in Hackettstown, New Jersey. "Disease occurs because of an imbalance...Insertion of the acupuncture needles into meridians will bring about the balance of qi." Alexander has practiced acupuncture for 10 years and studied at the Tri-State School of Traditional Acupuncture in Stanford Connecticut.

Alexander says patients sometimes suffer a blockage of qi or display too much or too little qi. The manipulation and placement of the acupuncture needles vary according to the need for adjusting meridian energy flow.

Acupuncture can be used to prevent disease and, if disease is already rampant, it can be used to help the body correct the problem.

In conjunction with her use of acupuncture needles, Alexander rarely prescribes single herbs but uses combinations of whole herbs that are very specific for different diseases and disease patterns. "Certain herbs, such as ginseng, are very prized in Chinese medicine," Alexander notes.

"Astragalus is an herb used in China and around the world to tonify the qi and increase qi energy as well as stimulate the immune system."

Licorice Root

Alexander uses licorice root for assisting digestion and for helping women with menopausal discomforts. On the other hand, she recommends whole food concentrates like bee pollen granules for enhancing the immune system, peppermint for treating gastro-intestinal problems plus fiber supplements as well as the antioxidant/antihistamine quercetin, coenzyme Q10 and melatonin.

"In terms of classes of nutrients, I use a lot of whole food concentrates: the green concentrates like barley greens, wheat grass powder, spirulina and blue-green algae," Alexander says. "These are high in minerals, antioxidants, nutrients and fatty acids. I also use some soy products because the isoflavone concentrates are very much anti-cancer."

The Fine Points of Acupuncture

Acupuncture needles are very fine, as thin as hairs. They are available in a variety of diameters and lengths. When an acupuncturist inserts these needles, the sensation is that of mild pinpricks. (The needles enter the body at depths of only 1/8th inch to two Inches.) In many cases people experience mild pleasure during needle manipulation.

"From a Western point of view it's important to explain that there is a distinct function of acupuncture treatment and that is to increase circulation," Alexander says. "We do stimulate nerves and we know that with the stimulation of nerves many neurochemicals and neurotransmitters are released. They move through the nerves and find receptor sights, some in the brain, some in other parts of the body."

By stimulating nerves, acupuncturists can calm inflammation and deaden pain. These effects are believed to be linked to the release of endorphins and dinorphins, powerful painkillers and anti-inflammatories that the body produces for itself. Most acupuncturists use this therapy as part of an overall, multi-faceted treatment plan.

Unique Energy

"Qi is what makes you different from a sack of chemicals," points out David Molony, an acupuncturist at the Lehigh Valley Acupuncture Center in Catasaqua, Pennsylvania who studied at the Nanjing Traditional Medicine Hospital in China and has lectured at Cornell University.

What You Need

"You can manipulate qi with acupuncture, herbs and diet. Because people's bodies work differently, there are different approaches. When you ask the question what nutrients and herbs are effective at enhancing acupuncture, it depends on what the person needs, according to an Oriental Medicine diagnosis."

An Oriental Medical examination, Molony says, begins with a long list of health questions designed to reveal factors that contribute to disease. A practitioner measures your pulse in several different places along your arm, inspects your tongue, may press on your stomach, sniff your general odor and closely examine your nails and skin for signs of problems.

"You take in everything you can," adds Molony, a board member of the Acupuncture Society of Pennsylvania and former board member of the American Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. "This gives you clues that you need in order to make your diagnosis."

Acupuncturists use nutrients and herbs that complement the treatment, as well as dietary and lifestyle counseling. Some acupuncturists don't specialize in herbal remedies, so these practitioners might go to a specialist like David Winston for advice. Winston, an herb expert skilled in Cherokee, Chinese and Western eclectic herbal medicine, works as an instructor, lecturer and consultant.

"In China, acupuncture is considered a complementary therapy; you generally don't go for treatment and get purely acupuncture," says Winston who is working on a book about saw palmetto. "Herbal medicine, diet and qi gong are important therapies in their own right and acupuncture is one of those therapies. Qi gong is a form of martial arts that focuses on unique breathing and visualization methods. Qi is not exactly energy, it's energy in movement; it's what makes the blood move."

Open Blockages

Acupuncture is used to open blockages that sometimes build up in what TCM practitioners characterize as excessive heat or cold. These hot and cold spots do not always literally refer to the temperature of the body but are meant to depict changes in the character of the body's vital energy.

Chinese acupuncturists don't necessarily treat diseases, but target clusters of physical discomforts. Winston says, "Herbal formulas change depending on the 'symptom pictures.' Somebody could have acute appendicitis but the symptom picture could vary. Usually Chinese acupuncturists use herbs like isatis (a very cold, drying herb that's a powerful anti-bacterial agent) and coptis (a powerful anti-bacterial herb)."

Americans often visit acupuncturists complaining of back pain or some type of musculoskeletal problem-a wrenched knee, a ligament that hasn't healed properly or perhaps a torn rotator cuff. "If the injury is hot to the touch, it's red, it's inflammatory-that's a condition where there's excessive heat and in that condition the acupuncturist would give herbs that are cooling and anti-inflammatory such as the root of large leaf gentian."

Pain that Moves

If someone suffers pain that moves, pain that is sometimes exacerbated by damp or humid conditions, acupuncturists often prescribe clematis root, a wild variety of the garden plant that is an anti-spasmodic, or acanthopanax, a relative of Siberian ginseng used for damp pain.

"If there's pain with excessive dampness," Winston says, "acupuncturists might use duhuo, a drying herb that opens the meridians."

Molony agrees with Winston that when it comes to choosing herbs to enhance acupuncture, accurate analysis of the root cause of the health problem is paramount to making the right decisions. For example, if a person is qi deficient and her tongue is thickly coated, she may not be processing her energy properly. Phlegm builds up, decreasing energy. "What you want to do is give them herbs that move phlegm, like citrus peel, and combine that with acupuncture points that move phlegm also," Molony says.

For stimulating metabolism, Molony uses lactoferin-processed colostrum from cows. He uses ginseng and atractylodes as qi tonics and he adds herbs like magnolia bark or atractylodes alba.

Helpful Antioxidants

He believes antioxidants are helpful too, as preventive medicines, including vitamins C and E. These valuable nutrients disarm the harm that reactive molecules can wreak within the body.

So how important are herbs and nutrition to enhance acupuncture's effectiveness? Acupuncturists seem to agree that healthy doses of antioxidants (such as vitamins C and E plus antioxidants from grapeseed extract) as well as specialized herbs, turn this therapy into a highly effective healing tool. Those wanting to benefit from this penetrating technique should stock up on nutrients. Then sit back, relax, kick off your shoes and let the acupuncturist do her stuff.



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