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14 vitamins help manage fibromyalgia Darrell Miller 5/18/19
Antimicrobial properties of red ginseng make it a great naturalcure for acne Darrell Miller 5/6/19
Red ginseng is a natural cure for acne Darrell Miller 4/30/19
Eating ginger regularly may suppress the negative effects of ahigh-fat diet Darrell Miller 3/27/19
HIV-1 people can boost their immune system with Korean red ginseng Darrell Miller 2/11/19
Delicious remedy: Licorice is a potential treatment forischemia-induced brain damage Darrell Miller 11/20/18
Not just for coffee: Cinnamon found to have potent anti-cancer effects in latest research Darrell Miller 6/13/18
Lion’s Mane Mushroom: The Potential Brain-Boosting, Cancer-Fighting Powerhouse Darrell Miller 8/8/17
Is Spirutein A Good Meal Replacement? Darrell Miller 3/21/14
Korean Ginseng Root Extract Darrell Miller 12/14/12
What Is The Difference Between American Ginseng And Korean Ginseng? Darrell Miller 12/28/11
Albizzia Darrell Miller 6/3/08
Pinolenic Acid - Appetite Control Darrell Miller 4/25/08
Boost digestion with Bifidus Longum and Acidophilus Probiotics Darrell Miller 3/21/08
Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens Darrell Miller 10/18/07
Paulings Vindication Darrell Miller 5/28/07
IMMUNITY ENHANCERS and ADAPTOGENIC HERBS Darrell Miller 12/17/05
ELEUTHERO Darrell Miller 12/17/05
KOREAN GINSENG Darrell Miller 12/17/05
AMERICAN GINSENG Darrell Miller 12/17/05
B-Complex 50mg Energy Darrell Miller 11/18/05
Grape Juice Good For Blood Pressure Darrell Miller 7/6/05
Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles Darrell Miller 6/30/05
GINSENG and the Reproductive System Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus) Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Mushroom Miracales Darrell Miller 6/18/05
What is the difference between the types of Ginseng? Darrell Miller 6/17/05
Pep Up and Go! Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Herbs in Perspective Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Re: Keeping the Intestines Healthy Darrell Miller 5/12/05



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14 vitamins help manage fibromyalgia
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Date: May 18, 2019 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 14 vitamins help manage fibromyalgia





Fibromyalgia is a widespread medical condition and everyday new vitamins and supplements are discovered that can help alleviate it. Fibromyalgia causes pain and depression. Its pain is usually felt in the musculoskeletal system. It also causes depression in the brain and many other symptoms. That is why very few therapies have been discovered to use for treating this condition. Supplements are being recommended to patients. Some of them are essential oils that can help with pain relief and improving sleep, energy boosters that increase the level of energy in the body, and fish oils that can reduce the inflammation it causes. Fibromyalgia can be triggered by a deficiency in some minerals in the body, so one needs to avoid this. The essential vitamins and minerals that are needed in the body to prevent fibromyalgia are calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, and vitamin D. Therefore, one needs to take active measures to have these essential vitamins and minerals in his body to prevent fibromyalgia. They are very important, especially increasing the intake of Vitamin D through sunlight.

Key Takeaways:

  • Supplementing with vitamins and minerals is critical in controlling the pain and depression associated with fibromyalgia.
  • Vitamin D supplementation is generally recommended in fibromyalgia patients, especially those that are menopausal or pre-menopausal.
  • According to Korean researchers, low levels of magnesium, calcium, and manganese are related to fibromyalgia.

"Everyday vitamins and minerals take on a whole new level of importance if a person is afflicted with fibromyalgia."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-04-14-vitamins-help-manage-fibromyalgia.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6336)


Antimicrobial properties of red ginseng make it a great naturalcure for acne
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Date: May 06, 2019 03:42 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Antimicrobial properties of red ginseng make it a great naturalcure for acne





Phytotherapy Research recently published new South Korean research indicating the effectiveness of red ginseng extract against acne symptoms. They studied red ginseng ethanol extract and found that it exhibits comparable anti-microbial properties to those of the most common antibiotic acne medications. Red ginseng has been prized throughout Asia for its medicinal properties for many years. It also has other effects that can help fight acne, including boosting the immune system and improving sleep quality and endocrine balance throughout the body.

Key Takeaways:

  • If one is having an acne breakout he should try red ginseng because recent research shows that it improves the symptoms of acne safely.
  • Acne is a chronic inflammatory condition of the skin that develops when bacteria begins growing abnormally in hair follicles or skin.
  • Presently, doctors recommend antibiotics to treat acne but due to the rise of bacteria resistance, they are now turning to natural remedies like red ginseng.

"They found that red ginseng ethanol extract exhibited similar, if not even better, antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes compared to benzoyl peroxide or azelaic acid."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-21-red-ginseng-a-great-natural-cure-for-acne.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6267)


Red ginseng is a natural cure for acne
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Date: April 30, 2019 04:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Red ginseng is a natural cure for acne





According to a South Korean study published in Phytotherapy Research, red ginseng can be an effective treatment for acne in place of traditional medications with potential negative side effects. In fact, red ginseng performed as good or better than benzoyl peroxide in terms of its effectiveness against fighting acne. Specifically, redness symptoms were significantly reduced with the use of red ginseng. The study concluded that the participants acne improved because of panaxynol and panaxydol, the active ingredients in red ginseng.

Key Takeaways:

  • Red ginseng with the scientific name Panax ginseng has been found by some South Korean researchers to be effective against acne.
  • In the study which the researchers published in the journal Phytotherapy Research, they compared the antimicrobial activity of ginseng and identified its active ingredients.
  • Acne is a condition that is caused by chronic inflammation of the skin due to the growth of bacteria in hair follicles.

"They recruited 20 participants and treated them with cream that contains 3 milligrams per gram (mg/g) of red ginseng ethanol extract for four weeks."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-12-red-ginseng-is-a-natural-cure-for-acne.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6227)


Eating ginger regularly may suppress the negative effects of ahigh-fat diet
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Date: March 27, 2019 03:21 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating ginger regularly may suppress the negative effects of ahigh-fat diet





A study, conducted by Korean researchers and published in the journal "Nutrients", found that consuming ginger extract can prevent some of the detrimental effects of a high-fat diet. In the study, 27 rats were divided into three groups. Members of each group were fed a high-fat diet. Members of two of the groups were also given ginger extract. One group was given a hot-water extract; the other group was given ginger extracted by high hydrostatic pressure. Both groups that received ginger extract had lower body weight and lower body fat percentage than the group that was given no ginger extract.

Key Takeaways:

  • A new report that was due to a study by Korean researchers have found that taking ginger extracts prevents body weight gain and body fat.
  • The study used rats to understand the effects of taking ginger on obesity and inflammation and used two types of ginger extracts.
  • The study consisted of 27 rats fed with high fat diets. One group did not have ginger extracts while two other groups had different types of ginger.

"Consuming ginger or taking ginger extracts regularly may help prevent some of the negative effects of a high-fat diet, according to a study published in the journal Nutrients."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-26-eating-ginger-suppresses-the-negative-effects-of-high-fat-diet.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6100)


HIV-1 people can boost their immune system with Korean red ginseng
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Date: February 11, 2019 11:11 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HIV-1 people can boost their immune system with Korean red ginseng





Korean red ginseng may have critically important for people infected by HIV. HIV, which weakens the immune system by targeting T helper cells, can be controlled by antiretrovirals, but these can grow less effective over time. Patients who consumed Korean red ginseng had slower annual loss of T helper cells, and these patients had a longer survival duration as a result. Dosage levels had no real impact, but taking Korean red ginseng for longer periods of time enhanced the benefits.

Key Takeaways:

  • Korean red ginseng, which is also called Panax ginseng, has a long history of use as a supplement for longevity.
  • HIV targets the the body's T cells, causing an ongoing drop in the supply, which ultimately weakens and destabilizes the immune system.
  • Research revealed that HIV-infected study subjects given Panax ginseng experienced a smaller loss of T helper cells.

"The herb displays anti-inflammatory activity and helps manage the immune system. It also contains saponins that exert adjuvant actions against inflammatory disease."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-05-hiv-1-people-can-boost-their-immune-system-with-korean-red-ginseng.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6015)


Delicious remedy: Licorice is a potential treatment forischemia-induced brain damage
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Date: November 20, 2018 09:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Delicious remedy: Licorice is a potential treatment forischemia-induced brain damage





Little do people know, there are actually some large medical use cases that are related to licorice. The candy is not the favorite of many people around the world but there are some that really do like to have it on a regular basis. With that being said, it is now being considered as a potential treatment for people who have some brain damage. While the likelihood for success remains to be seen, doctors say early signs are promising.

Key Takeaways:

  • Licorice has been used for all sorts of things since it was brought to Europe from the Middle East. From flavoring food, to sweetening flour and as coloring.
  • Licorice is also used as a potent medicine in China. In fact, it is quoted as such in Chinese pharmacopeia.
  • The purported report that licorice has neuroprotective properties caught the attention of some South Korean researchers who sought to verify if this was really so.

"These days, licorice is best known as a candy flavor, but at the root of that sweetness is an actual root that holds a bevy of medicinal benefits."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-11-11-licorice-potential-treatment-ischemia-induced-brain-damage.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5847)


Not just for coffee: Cinnamon found to have potent anti-cancer effects in latest research
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Date: June 13, 2018 09:16 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Not just for coffee: Cinnamon found to have potent anti-cancer effects in latest research





Not just for coffee: Cinnamon found to have potent anti-cancer effects in latest research

Two South Korean colleges performed a study in which they hypothesized that cinnamon could successfully decrease the growth rate or infiltration status of certain cancer cells. They found that Chinese cinnamon was able to successfully decrease the amount in which cancer cells were able to infiltrate healthy cells when it comes to colorectal cancer specifically. However, the findings showed that this is not the only area in which cinnamon derived from the Chinese twig can help aid in cancer prevention and recovery.

Key Takeaways:

  • Cinnamon has been shown to be able to cause apoptosis (cell death) in colorectal cancer.
  • The main compound in cinnamon responsible for the apoptosis is scientifically known as TC-HW.
  • Cinnamon is also known for its other health benefits such as being a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.

"Based on the findings, researchers discovered that extracts derived from the twigs of the Chinese cinnamon were able to reduce the chances of human colorectal cancer cells to infiltrate other cells successfully."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-06-10-not-just-for-coffee-cinnamon-potent-anti-cancer-effects-research.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5633)


Lion’s Mane Mushroom: The Potential Brain-Boosting, Cancer-Fighting Powerhouse
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Date: August 08, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Lion’s Mane Mushroom: The Potential Brain-Boosting, Cancer-Fighting Powerhouse





Mushrooms are known to be a health providing food. They are also not as commonly eaten in American dishes as they should be. Lion's Mane is a mushroom that Americans and others might what to add to their diet. It has garnered quite a bit of attention as an all-round powerhouse of health in several Asian based research studies. Korean studies indicate it fights cancer, Malaysian research indicates it might help with gastric issues and in Japan Lion's Mane has been shown to help as an anti inflammatory agent.

Key Takeaways:

  • Lions mane is a mushroom which is found naturally in North America, Europe and Asia, although it is actually cultivated only in Asia.
  • Lion's mane can improve brain health by stimulating growth of dendrites and axons which helps to combat brain degeneration diseases such as Alzheimer's.
  • Lions' mane mushroom is not commercially available in America except for in limited areas where grocery stores focus on selling Asian products. You can also grow your own lion's mane using a kit.

"One study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry lists the benefits by stating lion’s mane mushroom is antibiotic, anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, anti-fatigue, antihypertensive, anti-hyperlipodemic, anti-senescence [anti-aging], cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, and neuroprotective, and improves anxiety, cognitive function, and depression. (1)"

Read more: https://draxe.com/lions-mane-mushroom/

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Is Spirutein A Good Meal Replacement?
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Date: March 21, 2014 02:18 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Spirutein A Good Meal Replacement?

What is spirutein

spiruteinSpirutein protein shakes are dinner swaps and protein supplements intended to help you meet your nutritional needs. The shakes are accessible in different flavors extending from espresso to berry, and you can buy them in single-serving bundles, in substantial holders or as canned shakes. While protein shakes can supplement your eating methodology or supplant dinners to lessen calories for weight reduction, they ought not reinstate adhering to a good diet.

Benefits of spirutein

Spirutein provides "green nourishment" for the reason that a portion from the health supplement put into the actual shakes tend to be through spirulina and also the eco-friendly tone, chlorophyll, that is recognized to provide unequalled nutritional revenue. In addition, Spiru-tein proteins lives in a mixture of grain, pea as well as soy meats. Flavorings, mineral deposits, nutritional vitamins, psyllium, guar chewing gum as well as oat feed may similarly appear within the smoothies, depending on the actual taste. The activity blend similarly provides house developed dietary supplements, for instance, Korean ginseng as well as ashwagandha. The actual combination of fixings can make Spiru-tein to some higher degree the supper than the health supplement. Presuming you don't put it to use in order to displace the banquet, you might notice that you'll placed on pounds instead of get healthy. Spiru-tein Activity provides 260 calories from fat for each 64-g details associated with proteins; eighty of these calories from fat tend to be through body fat.

What spirutein can do

If you're trying to reduce your own caloric entrance, the actual caloric high quality from the tremble provides sufficient calories from fat in order to displace the dinner. Be cautious associated with such as too much additional fixings, for instance, items from the dirt, crazy distribute or even yogurt, about the reasons these increment the actual calories from fat. The actual Blueberries as well as Lotion Spiru-tein provides 110 calories from fat with no body fat, therefore when you employ this in order to displace the dinner, you will have to consist of celery as well as grapefruits, yogurt or even whole milk in order to increase the actual caloric really worth. You can similarly choose to eat the vegetables as well as drink the actual healthy smoothie basic.

Numerous specialists reports that despite the fact that weight reduction shakes can help calorie counters lose the same measure of weight as low-calorie health food nuts, calorie counters who essentially drink shakes don't take in healthier propensities and have a higher danger of putting on back weight in the wake of completing the eating methodology. Calorie counters accompanying a low-calorie eating regimen have a tendency to have enduring weight reduction on the grounds that they for the most part consume uniquely in contrast to before. To counteract weight pick up, you ought to adjust your calorie consumption with your calorie yield. Decrease your parcels, pick lessened fat forms, and expansion your activity for long haul weight reduction.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3070)


Korean Ginseng Root Extract
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Date: December 14, 2012 12:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Korean Ginseng Root Extract

Korean ginseng is a perennial herb that has been long renowned for its medicinal properties in curing various health disorders. Extracts of the root of this plant are made by dilution of one part of ginseng root with one part of water and alcohol.

The Korean ginseng root has been a staple ingredient in traditional Chinese medicines for more than 2000 years. This herb was considered a miracle drug by them, and the theory of its beneficial properties has been passed down through the ages. People still recognize the miraculous powers of this root, and use it as a natural antidote for various ailments. The ginseng root is generally, powdered only after six years of its growth and is made available in the form of extracts at stores all over the world. The Korean root is believed to comprise of various phytochemicals which are the main cause of all beneficial properties.

  • Ginsenosides, possessing steroid-like properties, increase the brain activity and act as a stress-buster.
  • Panaxans, have the similar structure as anabolic steroids, and can strengthen and build body muscles.
  • Polysaccharides, with a carbohydrate structure can boost mood, maintain blood sugar levels and promote cardiovascular health.

Benefits of Korean ginseng root extract

General health tonic

Ginseng is classified as an adaptogen, which acts as a complete health tonic. This extract can help the body rebound from fatigue, arising from various kinds of stress. It also aids in improving energy and physical endurance, thereby, contributing to the overall well-being of an individual.

Improves cardiovascular function

- This root extract can prevent organ and tissue prolapse, and improve blood circulation for improved cardiovascular function. It lowers the bad cholesterol levels and increases HDL cholesterol in the human body.

Improves functioning of the nervous system

The plant nutrients found in the herb extract can enhance the cognitive abilities and act as memory boosters. They can cure problems related to poor concentration, memory, insomnia and anxiety.

Diabetes control

The ginseng extract holds great promises for people with type-2 diabetes as it can result in greater glucose and insulin resistance.

Prevents cancer

Ginseng extract has also been proved to act as a preventive remedy for several kinds of cancer.

Immunity support

The extracts of this herb act as a stimulant for boosting the immunity and effectively prevent all kinds of flu and cold.

Korean ginseng root extract has worked miracles on improving the general well-being of a person. The numerous benefits of ginseng extract might seem compelling but it is advisable to exercise caution, as with other herbal supplements. Consult your physician before consuming ginseng to explore probable side-effects with existing medication.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2750)


What Is The Difference Between American Ginseng And Korean Ginseng?
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Date: December 28, 2011 07:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is The Difference Between American Ginseng And Korean Ginseng?

Ginseng is a perennial plant which belongs to the genus of Panax, specifically in the family of Araliaceae. It is native in many places such as in North America and East Asia. It can also be abundantly found in other areas of the world which have a cool climate. Ginseng is a broad genus of plant. It has many subtypes in which plant description as well as health benefits may have similarities and differences. Despite their variations, all ginseng plant contains the active ingredient which is called ginsenosides.

One type of ginseng is the Panax quinquefolius or commonly called American ginseng. Despite its name, this kind of ginseng is widely used in the Chinese traditional medicine. This kind of ginseng originated in Northern America. However, cultivation is more abundant in China. Like many other ginseng plant, this is a perennial herb which contains ginsenosides.

Another type of ginseng which is popularly used in many alternative medicines is the Korean ginseng, also known as Asian ginseng. This kind of ginseng has a similar chemical structure with American ginseng. Like the American ginseng, this kind of ginseng also has many health benefits to human body because of its ginsenosides content. The scientific name for Korean ginseng is Panax ginseng.

Clinical studies have revealed that American ginseng has been found to have an effect more on the immune system of the person. It effectively boosts the immune system thus protecting the body from harmful microorganisms which can cause diseases and infections. Other studies have shown that American ginseng can potentially have a therapeutic effect against inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, Korean ginseng is more on as a tonic herb. It significantly helps the nervous system relax and stabilize mood and behavior. In fact, ongoing studies are being conducted to help develop the brain and the other parts of the nervous system to its maximum.

Other differences of the two beneficial ginseng plants are that American ginseng has a cooling effect therefore; it is best used during humid weather conditions. On the other hand, Korean ginseng is a little bit warm in nature. Hence, the latter is great in times of cool climates. Also, American ginseng is found to have a tranquilizing and sedative effect, while Korean ginseng has revitalizing and energizing properties.

Another difference is that, American ginseng is rich in a type of ginsenosides called Rb1 while Korean ginseng is abundant in Rg1 type of ginsenosides. The former is great for increasing the yin energy while the latter is effective in boosting the level of yang energy.

Ginseng herbs can be taken fresh. Many people prefer the roots while some like the leaves more. Nowadays, supplements are already formulated. It is available in the form of tablets, teas or extracts. Topical use is also common therefore ointments and creams are also manufactured. If you are planning to have ginseng supplements, it would be best that you should consult your doctor first. This would greatly help in the prevention of untoward effects of the supplement. Though ginseng is relatively safe, side effects may still occur. However, these effects are non – life threatening.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2552)


Albizzia
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Date: June 03, 2008 01:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Albizzia

Mental disorders, including depression, affect more than 22 percent of adults in the United States according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The stressful way in which we live contributes to this percentage of unhappy people. People feel pressure on the job and are being rushed all the time. We eat fast food on the run due to time constraints and have less time to exercise. This combination of factors leads to moodiness and irritability. It also detracts from our overall happiness.

Whether you typically experience seasonal sadness or have been diagnosed with depression, there is help available. You don't have to accept feeling down as part of life. Nor do you have to deal with the unwanted side effects that come with taking a prescribed antidepressant or anxiety medication. All you need to take the edge off of life is natural albizzia flowers. This herb provides a natural way to reduce stress.

Albizzia Flowers as a Natural Remedy for Sadness

Albizzia flowers are herbs that have been used by the Chinese for more than 500 years to treat sadness. They also have been used by Korean and Japanese people as a natural remedy for life's stresses.

Taken from the silk tree, albizzia is often referred to as the happy tree. It can be used for a variety of emotional needs, from spiritual disorders to emotional imbalances. It is also known as the Mimosa tree.

Uses for Albizzia Flowers

Albizzia flowers can be used to treat the following:

* Melancholy
* High stress
* Bad mood
* Irritability
* Insomnia
* Depression
* Seasonal mood disorder
* Feelings of anxiety
* Constant worrying
* Paranoia
* Bad temper
* Poor memory
* Unreasonable fears

In essence, this herbal flower provides a gentle calming effect. It works to relieve tension and bring a sense of peace over the body. The herb gives a sense of contentment and comfort, and relieves aches and pains associated with the symptoms above.

Albizzia is especially useful for those dealing with grief. Losing a loved one can feel devastating and overwhelming. Albizzia flowers help to relieve these feelings and can make coping with your loss a little easier.

Antidepressants vs. Natural Herbs to Relieve Depression

Using Albizzia flowers is much safer than taking a prescription antidepressant. Antidepressants are mind-altering drugs that have a list of unhealthy side effects. They can cause you to feel things like dry mouth to headaches. Drugs like Paxil can even increase the risk of suicide in some people. You can avoid these potentially dangerous side effects by using natural herbs to take the edge off of life.

Albizzia is a relaxant and a sedative that works to calm the liver, kidneys and heart. It works to ease and calm the mind and body without the effects of pharmaceutical drugs. Starting with a low dose of 10 drops two to three times per day is recommended. As your body adjusts, you can work your way up to 30-60 drops several times per day.

Though it isn't a miracle herb, Albizzia is a helpful herb that can relax the body and aid mood disorders. It can be used in conjunction with prescription drugs or in place of them to minimize the effects of a stressful lifestyle.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1808)


Pinolenic Acid - Appetite Control
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Date: April 25, 2008 02:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pinolenic Acid - Appetite Control

Mention "pine nuts" and peoples’ mouths are apt to start watering for a taste of garlicky pesto or fragrant pilaf. Ironically, the same ingredient that is so irresistible in gourmet cooking may help curb our out-of-control appetites. But only a particular variety of pine nut—Pinus koraiensis from Korea—will do.

Source Naturals PineSlim is a Korean pine nut oil (PinnoThin™). A small-scale study suggests that PineSlim may reduce feelings of hunger by increasing concentrations of appetite-suppressing hormones. The study also suggests that a feeling of fullness is experienced 30-60 minutes after taking PineSlim. For best results, PineSlim should be taken while following the Maximum Metabolism Weight Loss Plan™ enclosed in every bottle.

Enjoying good food is part of a healthy lifestyle, but too often we don’t know when to stop. PineSlim can help by addressing one of the most basic of the dozen deep metabolic systems identified by Source Naturals as critical to your optimal health: Hormones/Metabolism.

Less Calories for Improved Health

According to a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, an estimated 66% of U.S. adults are overweight. A normal body fat level is one of the factors associated with many markers of good health, including insulin efficiency, healthy inflammation response, good circulation, and normal cell regeneration. One of the best ways to achieve healthy weight is by curbing the amount of calories we take in—but that’s not always easy to do. Now an ancient Asian food source may help.

Korean Pine Nuts—Traditional Asian Food

The Korean pine nut (Pinus koraiensis) has been used as a food source for centuries and is often served as a snack at social events in China. Korean pine nuts grow on evergreen trees that produce seeds (commonly referred to as nuts) that are rich in oil, particularly oleic, linoleic, and pinolenic acids.

Pinolenic acid is a fatty acid, which may influence healthy blood pressure. According to recent research, pinolenic acid also may increase concentrations of the satiety hormones glucogon-like peptide-1 (GLP- 1) and cholecystokinin (CCK).

Appetite-Suppressing Hormones

Both GLP-1 and CCK are hormones that have been found to increase satiety and suppress appetite in normal-weight humans. They are believed to work by delaying gastric emptying. Retaining food in the stomach for a longer period of time may prolong a feeling of fullness.

In a randomized, double-blind trial, 18 overweight women received 3.00 grams of Korean pine nut oil (PinnoThin™)—the same amount as one daily dose of Pine Slim—or an olive oil placebo before a carbohydrate meal. Hormone measures of CCK and GLP-1 were taken from blood samples, and subjective measures of appetite were recorded. The study demonstrated a significant increase in appetite-suppressing CCK and GLP-1 hormones at 30-60 minutes after supplementation.

Your Source for Advanced Nutrition

The plant world offers an abundance of health promoting compounds. Today exciting discoveries are emerging from research into the health benefits of botanicals. The development of PineSlim reflects Source Naturals’ commitment to manufacturing supplements on the cutting edge of nutritional science. We are glad to partner with your local health food store in bringing you nutritional resources that help you take charge of your health.

References:

Causey JL (3/28/06) Korean Pine Nut Fatty Acids Induce Satiety-producing Hormone Release in Overweight Human Volunteers, American Chemical Society Abstract, “Health Benefits of Lipids” Symposium. ABSTRACT 0117: TECH-3.

Fontana L. (2006) Excessive Adiposity, Calorie Restriction, and Aging. JAMA. 295(13): 1577-1578. Masoro EJ. (2005) Overview of caloric restriction and ageing. Mech Ageing Dev. 126: 913-922. Sugano M, Ikeda I, Wakamatse K, Oka T. (1994)

Influence of Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis)-seed oil containing cis-5,cis-9,cis-12-octadecatrienoic acid on polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, eicosanoid production and blood pressure of rats. British Journal of Nutrition. 72:775-783.

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Boost digestion with Bifidus Longum and Acidophilus Probiotics
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Date: March 21, 2008 12:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Boost digestion with Bifidus Longum and Acidophilus Probiotics

Prior to discussing how you can boost digestion with bifidus longum probiotics, let's first have a look at probiotics in general and why they are so beneficial to us.

Probiotics are also known as microflora, and are beneficial organisms that live in your digestive tract. Not all microorganisms are bad news, and many are essential for good health. Included in these organisms are various types of bacteria and yeasts, each of which has a specific part to play in the proper functioning of your body. Because of this they are found in foods all over the world, including yoghurt and fermented vegetables such as German sauerkraut and Korean kimchi.

Among their major benefits to health are that they help to support your immune system, they aid the digestion and absorption of food, they provide increased energy by improving the metabolic conversion of blood glucose to energy, and they can also help to delay aging. However, you should be aware that not all probiotics are the same, and when used properly some can have the same effect as antibiotics.

They are used to cure many digestive problems such as irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea, and can also help to relieve heartburn and acid reflux. In fact your lower intestine should contain a minimum of 85% friendly bacteria, and 15% at most of unfriendly bacteria that can cause disease if they over-colonize your colon. It might surprise you to learn that you have around twenty times more bacteria in your body than body cells.

One of the best known of the probiotics are members of the lactobacillus family that are contained in yoghurt and curds and whey, so Little Miss Muffet had the right idea. However, you might not have the right idea in eating commercial yoghurt because, while raw yoghurt does contain these helpful bacteria, the type that you buy in pots in the supermarkets has likely been pasteurized - a process that kills off the bacteria. Unless the product has been seeded with live bacteria after pasteurization, then there will likely be none in your yoghurt! Make your own!

So what are the probiotics that do you most good, and in what form should you consume them? The common friendly bacteria are the already mentioned lactobaccilus, and then lactococcus, streptococcus thermophilus, enterococcus, bifidobacterium and others. Bacteria are easily killed off by the acidic conditions in your stomach, and since they must be taken live they should be consumed in a form that can resist the stomach acid.

There are many ways in which they benefit you, the main ones that are currently understood being:

Lactic acid production: the presence of lactic acid in the gut prevents stops or slows the growth of harmful bacteria by increasing the acidity. Some probiotics, known as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can do this. Most bacteria do not like acidic conditions.

Supporting the immune system: LAB bacteria have been shown to increase the production of cytokines that stimulate the activity of the macrophages that attack foreign viruses and pathogenic bacteria. The LAB also promotes the formation of NK-cells (natural killer cells) that destroy cells that have been infected by viruses.

Adhesion site blockage: bacteria attach themselves to your intestinal walls at specific adhesion sites. Friendly bacteria can colonize these sites and so prevent the pathogens from adhering.

Effect on the Intestinal wall: the intestinal wall has a natural mucous barrier that helps to prevent the passage of allergens and pathogens into the bloodstream through the intestine. Probiotics can strengthen this barrier, and also alter the nature of the mucous to render it less liable to penetration by these unwelcome visitors.

So where does bifidobacteria come into this? There is a number of strains of this bacterium living in the human body, but Bifidus longum is the most common or most abundant of these. Although it is the most common bacterium found in commercially available probiotic products, high numbers have to be consumed for the proper health benefits. However, commercial yoghurts contain very little of this bacterium, or even none at all. This is largely due to the pasteurization previously discussed, that kills the bacteria at high temperatures. Unfortunately this process is not selective, and in ridding the products of bacteria that could make you seriously ill, the beneficial bacteria are also destroyed.

This is a shame because Bifidus longum has been shown to inhibit E.Coli that can cause serious conditions of the digestive system. Among these are severe diarrhea and an inflammatory condition in the colon as the immune system tries to expel these nasty bacteria. This bacterium is particularly dangerous to the weak, such as the aged, children and people already weakened by illness.

It also helps to counteract yeast and other vaginal infections and when taken with other probiotics is believed to help in colon cancer cases. Among its other benefits are its part in the biosynthesis of thiamine, riboflavin and other vitamin B forms in your intestine, and also the absorption and assimilation of these vitamins by your body. It is also believed that it might help to reduce the cholesterol level in your body through its uptake of bile salts from the colon.

The major destructive elements of Bifidus longus are antibiotics of any kind, whether they be penicillin variants or tetracycline, and although the latter is used mainly for infections of the respiratory tract, it is ingested by the gut and effectively reduces the population of the bacteria that are needed for optimum health. That is one of the reasons why antibiotic use should be restricted to only what is necessary, and not use indiscriminately for all infections. Unless administered intravenously or site targeted, antibiotics kill off the good with the bad!

The other activities of Bifidus longus, such as removing the by-products of our metabolism that could be toxic if left to roam our bodies, render this bacterium as useful to your body as any vitamin or mineral supplement you could take. It is a supplement that many either overlook or are not even aware of, yet one that can make a significant difference, not only to your digestive and intestinal health, but also to you general overall wellbeing.

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Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens
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Date: October 18, 2007 11:13 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Adapt To The Stresses Of Life with Herbal Adaptogens

Life today places a number of different types of stresses upon us. There are the normal stresses of living, of facing problems at work, financial worries and family stresses. Schedules are becoming busier as we try to pack more and more into each day, and relaxation time is cut to a minimum. For many of us, the stress starts when we waken and rush through breakfast, if we have time for one, to catch the bus or train to work, or to slip into the morning traffic rush that takes us an hour to travel 10 miles or less.

Once at work we have problems to deal with that continue throughout a rushed lunch period, and then back to the stress of trying to return home in the evening to open the bills and check if we have enough in the bank to pay them. However, that is not all.

Our environment is continually changing, and our bodies are subject to the stresses of pollution from the planes, trains and automobiles, not to mention the pesticides, preservatives plastics and harsh lighting. The noise of air conditioning and the continual musak of the stores and shopping malls and everything else that goes to completely stress us out, weekdays and weekends.

That is ignoring the smog, the disappearing ozone layer and increased UV radiation, the greenhouse effect and global warming, El Nino and everything else that causes worry or affects the delicate balance of the body’s biochemistry. Rather than adapting to our environment we are continually striving to adapt the environment to suit our needs. We should develop a flexibility of mind and body so that we can survive these modern-day stresses, and this is where the substances known as adaptogens are important.

Adaptogens help us to adapt to the environment and withstand the stresses of modern life. The term was first used by Russian N.V. Lazarev in 1947 who defined an adaptogen as a substance meeting three specific criteria: it should cause a minimal disruption to the normal physiological function of the body, it must work by means of a range of chemical, physical and biochemical factors rather than through one specific action and must have an overall effect of normalization, so that no condition is aggravated to improve another.

There are a large number of identified adaptogens, among them several forms of ginseng: Panax, American, Siberian and Japanese; licorice, schizandra berries, rhodiola and others. These adaptogens tend to work in the body by improving the body’s availability and use of energy, improving the efficiency of removal of the metabolic waste and by-products, supporting the adrenal function so that the effects of stress are reduced or countered, improving the utilization of oxygen and helping to build up body tissue. In general the body works more efficiently in generating and using energy, muscle tissue and counteracting the effects of modern day stress, both environmental and psychological.

Of the ginsengs, Panax is very expensive for regular use, although many people prefer it. However, studies have shown that Siberian, or eleuthero ginseng, is a stronger adaptogen that Panax which is also called Korean or Chinese ginseng. In fact the other forms, including American and Japanese, tend to over-stimulate the body, and can also cause unwanted side effects such as constipation and over-excitement. The Siberian ginseng tends not to show these symptoms.

Siberian ginseng contains seven active substances known as eleutherosides A – F which are not present in the other ginsengs. These substances appear to have several properties that have been clinically proven. For example, they relieve insomnia, one of the symptoms of stress, high and low blood pressure, bronchitis, various forms of neuroses and, it is claimed, also some types of cancer. Siberian ginseng also allows humans to withstand noise, heat and extra stresses caused by severe workloads. It improves athletic performance and allows people to improve their work output under a variety of stresses. Athletes can train harder and recover quicker.

Another adaptogen is schizandra berries (also called schizandra chinensis and magnolia vine). Chinese herbalists class medicinal herbs by the five different flavors, sour, bitter, salty, acrid and sweet. Schizandra berries possess all five, and are therefore considered by the Chinese to balance all the systems of the body.

It is used in the West as a stress reducing adaptogen and is also included in sports and weight loss formulae. It helps insomnia and improves endurance and mental coordination. Schizandra is believed to be a good tonic for the liver and is often used in combination with Siberian ginseng (eleuthero) and licorice. The latter is another popular herb in China that is said to be a good tonic for the spleen. Licorice itself is a known anti-inflammatory since it contains flavanoids and saponins that promote the immune system. Licorice is thought be a useful supplement for HIV patients due to its effect on the immune system. It also increases corticosteroid levels by inhibiting the liver’s ability to break down adrenal hormone. However, people with high blood pressure should be careful with licorice since it can cause sodium retention. Like any other medication, you should seek your physician’s advice if you have any existing conditions.

Rhodiola, also referred as roseroot, is used for improved memory and enhanced vitality and it can also be used as a mood modifier. It is used by athletes of all types for increased strength and endurance, and improved cardiovascular and muscle recovery time. The Russians call it ‘Golden Root’ and it is a safe and effective adaptogen.

More and more people are turning to adaptogens to help them cope with the hustle and bustle of their daily lives, and they are becoming increasingly available from ordinary health stores. If you are finding it difficult to stay energetic and active then try them out. Not all work with every individual, but there is a large variety to choose from and most people are able to find an adaptogen that suits them and enables them to adapt to the stresses of daily life.



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Paulings Vindication
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Date: May 28, 2007 11:50 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Paulings Vindication

Decades later, in January 2007, the FDA finally acknowledged the legitimacy of Pauling’s approach by approving the Cancer Treatment Center of America’s investigation of high-dose intravenous vitamin C and its effects on cancer patients. Meanwhile, Korean researchers undertaking a similar investigation reported in February 2007 that cancer patients receiving mega-dose intravenous vitamin C were found to show greater physical, emotional and cognitive function, while reporting less fatigue, nausea, vomiting, pain and appetite loss.

Intravenous mega-dose vitamin C is entirely different league from supplementation—but many studies suggest that vitamin C supplements may help prevent cancer.

In the Nurse’s Health Study, premenopausal women with a family history of breast cancer who consumed an average of 205mg of vitamin C every day (well above the RDA) experienced a 63% lower risk of breast cancer than women who consumed an average of 70mg a day. A prospective study that tracked 870 men over 25 years found that those who consumed over 83mg of vitamin C daily had a 64% reduction in lung cancer. University of California researchers tracking 12,000 adults for an average of ten years found that those with the highest vitamin C intake had the lowest death rates for all cancers. Finally, an analysis of 90 separate studies found that vitamin C and vitamin C rich foods offered significant protective effects against various forms of cancer.

Vitamin C is already a supplement superstar—but, as it turns out, we may just be beginning to understand its far-reaching health benefits. –Patrick Dougherty

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IMMUNITY ENHANCERS and ADAPTOGENIC HERBS
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Date: December 17, 2005 01:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: IMMUNITY ENHANCERS and ADAPTOGENIC HERBS

ADAPTOGENIC HERBS AND IMMUNITY ENHANCERS

In addition to Rhodiola Rosea, NOW® Foods carries a number of other dietary supplements with adaptogenic and immuneenhancing effects.

These products come from different parts of the world and have been used safely and effectively by different cultures for thousands of years.

Eleuthero
Korean Ginseng
Ashwaghanda
American Ginseng

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ELEUTHERO
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Date: December 17, 2005 01:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ELEUTHERO

ELEUTHERO

Eleuthero- Eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is a hardy herb indigenous to the Taiga region of the Far East, which includes southeastern Russia, northern China, Japan and Korea. The use of this popular herb can be traced back over 2,000 years in ancient Chinese medical texts, where it is indicated for the treatment of a wide variety of ailments. Although it is a cousin of the Panax ginseng family (Korean, Chinese and American) it’s considered distinctly different. The term panax is derived from the Greek words pan (all) and akos (cure), which means “cure-all”. In addition to its adaptogenic properties, which seem to stem from its ability to regulate the activity of the adrenal cortex in response to stress, Eleuthero has some unique benefits. It stimulates the immune system, especially during times of strenuous physical exertion and stress, and seems especially beneficial for supporting a healthy mood and mental alertness. Eleuthero is also extremely beneficial as a training aid for athletes.



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KOREAN GINSENG
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Date: December 17, 2005 01:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Korean GINSENG

Korean GINSENG

Korean Ginseng- A ginseng of the panax genus, Korean ginseng is very similar to American and Chinese ginseng. It grows on shaded mountainsides in China, Korea and Russia and, like other types of ginseng, has been used for thousands of years in traditional Chinese medicine. Historical references indicate that Korean ginseng was one of the most expensive herbs in the ancient Orient, and wars were even fought over the regions where Korean ginseng grew wild. Like all ginseng, Korean ginseng is also considered an adaptogen and is generally recommended to support physical and mental energy, helping one to maintain focus and stave off fatigue. It’s also an excellent herb for immune system support and it possesses potent antioxidant properties.



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AMERICAN GINSENG
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Date: December 17, 2005 12:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: AMERICAN GINSENG

AMERICAN GINSENG

American Ginseng - American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium) is grown primarily in Wisconsin and is considered a “cooler” alternative to Korean Ginseng. Asian cultures classify a particular ginseng as either “hot” or “cold” depending on its effects on body functions. American Ginseng is mainly used for additional energy and to support cognitive function and physical stamina. This type of ginseng also seems to support healthy cardiovascular function. And, as with most types ginseng, it has adaptogenic properties that aid the body in dealing with different types of stress, support immune system function, and hasten recovery from stressful occurrences.



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B-Complex 50mg Energy
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Date: November 18, 2005 10:21 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: B-Complex 50mg Energy

Complete List of Nature's Life Vitamins here!


Master the Art of Energy!

With Nature's Life B-complex 50 Energy

This product has a comprehensive B-vitamin and herb combination, B-complex vitamins are intended to provide nutritive support for many aspects of health, including but not limited to: metabolism, energy, nervous system, homocysteine levels, muscle tone, skin and hair.

also added, Green tea, Korean Ginseng and Gota kola as anti-fatigue herbal support.

Suitable for Vegetarians

One tablet daily.

Supplement Facts:

  • Thiamine (as Thiamine HCL) (B-1) - 50mg
  • Riboflavin (B-2) - 50mg
  • Niacin (as Niacinamide)(B-3) - 50mg
  • Vitamin B-6 (as Pyridoxine HCL) - 50mg
  • Folic Acid (Folate) - 500mcg
  • Vitamin B-12 (as Cyanocobalamin) - 50mg
  • Choline Bitartrate - 50mg
  • Inositol - 50mg
  • L-Taurine - 50mg
  • Korean Ginseng (Panax Ginseng)(Root extract) (Supplying 12.5mg Ginsenosides) - 250mg
  • Gota Kola (Centella asiatica)(Aerial) - 50mg
  • Green Tea (Camellia sinensis)(leaf extract)(Supplying 49mg Polyphenols, 40mg Catechins, 25mg EGCG [Epigallocatechin Gallate])

Boost your energy with Natures life B-Complex 50 Energy!







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Grape Juice Good For Blood Pressure
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Date: July 06, 2005 06:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Grape Juice Good For Blood Pressure

Grape Juice Good For Blood Pressure

If lowering your blood pressure is a pressing concern, indulge in concord grape juice. The evidence of its cardiovascular benefits continues to grow:

A recent study shows that grape juice's polyphenols (phytochemicals which act as antioxidants) may reduce blood pressure by encouraging relaxation of artery walls. (Experimental Biology Meeting, 4/4/05). Another study on 40 Korean men with mild hypertension showed that drinking Concord grape juice lowered there blood pressure by almost seven points (Biofactors 4/05). Researchers have also found grape juice to lower cholesterol and inhibit atherosclerosis, proving that it's an all-around superstar for cardiovascular health.



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Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles
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Date: June 30, 2005 09:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ginsengs - Energy Tonics For Today's Hectic Lifestyles

Ginsengs By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt

Different Ginsengs

What's the difference between Chinese (white root), Chinese (red root), Eleuthero and American Ginsengs? Which one is best for me? There are actually many different "ginsengs." We will discuss those mentioned above since they are the most widely available. All of these Ginsengs are considered to be potent adaptogens, which means that they are: 1) harmless to the body 2) non-specific in their actions 3) have balancing or normalizing effects. An adaptogen helps the body adapt to stress - both mental and physical. It is in this area that ginseng excels.

Chinese Ginseng (Panax ginseng) is what most of us think of when Ginseng is mentioned. It is indigenous to the forests of northeast China, Manchuria and Korea. Red Ginseng is often referred to as "Korean" Ginseng. In traditional Chinese Medicine Ginseng is used to tonify the "Chi" (vital energy or life energy force). Modern scientific studies indicate Panax Ginseng stimulates the immune system, has antifatigue, antistress, antitumor, anticancer and anti-aging properties, balances blood sugar levels, enhances mental performance and memory, lowers cholesterol, strengthens the heart muscle and protects against radiation damage. Panax ginseng has had a notorious reputation as a sexual rejuvenator which studies give some credence to; albeit not to the degree of its reputation. Ginseng "overuse syndrome", although rare, is characterized by irritability, insomnia and rapid heart beat, and is associated with using too much Chinese Ginseng, especially by healthy, active men.

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium) is indigenous to the eastern woodlands ranging from Georgia to Quebec and was used by many Native Americans. Jesuit Priests were reported to be trading American Ginseng to the Chinese as early as 1718. Ironically, American Ginseng is highly sought after in China, while Americans chase after Chinese ginseng. While having much the same adaptogenic qualities of Chinese Ginseng, American Ginseng is believed to have a more "yin" or cooler nature. What this means is that American Ginseng is excellent for the high-paced, stressed, not enough time culture that we live in. While still energizing the body, American Ginseng calms the central nervous system, quiets the brain and lowers blood pressure. Also, because of its more "yin" nature, it is generally better to use on a day-to-day, long term basis than Chinese Ginseng. American Ginseng is one of the best tonics for all-around health and vitality, particularly well suited for the hectic world we've created.

Eleutherococcus senticosus (known as Siberian Ginseng in Herbs of Commerce) is native to Siberia, Japan, Korea and China. Although not a "true ginseng", this variety is most highly prized. Eleuthero was traditionally used to promote longevity and general health. Many herbalists prefer Eluthero for helping with women's health issues. It is particularly useful with depression associated with PMS and menopause. Research, mostly from Russia, confirms this herb's ability to increase mental and physical performance, stimulate the immune system, increase phagocytosis (movement of white blood cells) promote circulation and enhance the benefits of medical radiation treatments while lessening its negative side-effects. (The dosage used in one Russian study was 4 milliliters in the morning and 2 milliliters at night.)

Which Ginseng is Right For Me Here's a simple guide for deciding which Ginseng to use. Chinese Ginseng is best suited as a tonic 1)for the fragile and weak 2) during convalescence, and/or 3) to support the immune system. American Ginseng is for regular daily use, specially suited for energetic personality types. Eleuthero is excellent for endurance and stamina, and well suited for athletes as well as for women's issues. If you're still confused, try Balanced Ginseng™ (alcohol-free) a high-powered liquid herbal extract supplement that blends several varieties of Ginsengs together to assure balanced tonic action.

It is important in purchasing Ginseng products to buy from a company you trust and one that has the technical capabilities to test and guarantee quality and activity. Unfortunately, the Ginseng market is prone to both adulteration and poor activity levels. Nature's Answer®, with its full pharmaceutical level in-house laboratory and years of experience, is proud to offer a variety of the finest quality of Ginseng formulations available in either liquid (alcohol-free or organic alcohol) or encapsulated (standardized or single) forms. The company also offers the herb in unique, proprietary blends. All products are Unconditionally Guaranteed.



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GINSENG and the Reproductive System
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Date: June 25, 2005 01:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: GINSENG and the Reproductive System

Reproductive System

There has been a lot of interest in the reported aphrodisiac effects of ginseng. It is often marketed as a sexual stimulant. Yet the results of most studies have been i n c o n c l u s i ve. Asian ginseng seemed to increase the sperm count in rabbits as well as the egg laying of hens in some studies. A Korean study found the mating behavior of rats to increase with ginseng consumption.36 Hormonal secretions are thought to be stimulated by ginseng which may be one reason for its use as an aphrodisiac. 37 Ginseng has also been found to influence the growth of the testes and testosterone levels.38 Studies on Siberian ginseng have found its tonic effect to help with sexual function. It was found to increase the sperm count in animals.39 Ginseng has been used for thousands of years to strengthen the male reproductive system. Clinical studies and historical use seems to support the claims of ginseng use for the reproductive system. It is highly recommended alone or in combinations for male and female health. However, it is generally not recommended that women take it over long periods of time.

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GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus)
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Date: June 25, 2005 12:54 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: GINSENG - KoreanAmerican(Panax quinquefolium), Siberian(Eleutherococcus senticosus)

GINSENG

  • Asian or Korean (Panax ginseng)
  • American (Panax quinquefolium)
  • Siberian (Eleutherococcus senticosus)

    Ginseng and ginseng products are increasing in popularity. They have been highly valued for thousands of years in many different cultures for their medicinal properties. Ginseng is probably the most highly regarded tonic and adaptogenic herb in the world. There are many different varieties of the ginseng plant grown throughout the world that are used for traditional medicine. All of the most common species of plants known as ginseng have similar reactions in the body. Ginseng is often used to maintain and support health as a tonic rather than treating a particular disease in the body. Panax ginseng, also known as Asian, Korean or Chinese ginseng, is the type most often studied and the most abundant. The genus name for Asian ginseng is Panax ginseng from the Greek word meaning “all healing.” The Wild American variety, Panax quinquefolium, is thought to have properties similar to the Asian plant. Most consider it to be less stimulating than the Asian root. The Siberian ginseng, Eleutherococcus senticosus, grown in Russia originally and now throughout the world, is not considered to be “true ginseng,” though scientists have reported common pharmacological features to the Panax. The compounds in the Siberian variety, eueutherosides, are not the same as the ginsenosides found in the American and Asian, but they do have similar chemical activity. The American, Asian and Siberian ginsengs are all considered to be superior adaptogens.1

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    Mushroom Miracales
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    Date: June 18, 2005 09:11 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Mushroom Miracales

    Mushroom Miracles by Bert Hoffman Energy Times, April 12, 2004

    Mention mushrooms and few people immediately recognize these humble fungi as important tools that can be used to boost well-being. More often, folks identify mushrooms as food with a peculiar appeal. But mushrooms' potential impact on health far surpasses their culinary reputation.

    You don't have to stretch your imagination too far to understand why mushrooms have been much neglected in the modern, Western medical search for plants that can boost health.

    Unable to make chlorophyll, often dependent on the kindness of other nutrient-producing organisms for their survival, these humble fungal denizens of dark, damp spaces seem to prefer an anonymous existence that is out of sight and out of the consciousness of the scientific mind.

    However, mushrooms have now assumed a spot in the center of the research spotlight. Because of their potent content of natural chemicals that appear to have a strong influence on human health and well-being, during the past decade mushrooms have been the subjects of intensive studies on how they can be used to reduce the risk of cancer and to treat these diseases.

    Appropriately, this recent round of research began in a place that has long revered these diminutive organisms: Japan. Japan and other Oriental countries have traditionally recognized the immense value of mushrooms as both food and medicine.

    Food and Medicine

    As an ancient Chinese saying notes, "food and medicine share a common origin." And one of the very earliest Chinese medical books, Shen Noug's Herbal (Shen Noug Pen Ts'ao Jing), first noted the extraordinary beneficial effects of eating mushrooms 2,000 years ago, back in the first century.

    More recently, but still well ahead of Western medical experts, in 1575, Pen Ts'ao Kang Mu (a Chinese compendium of medicinal therapies), written by Li Shi Zhen, outlined the medical benefits of about 20 mushrooms.

    Nowadays, modern researchers believe mushrooms' usefulness stems from the fact they contain a wealth of antioxidants. But these aren't just any antioxidants. Scientists think that some of these chemicals can potentially drop your risk of cancer, significantly lower blood pressure, help the body fight diabetes, offer protection for the liver, alleviate some of the ill effects of inflammation, lessen the chance of blood clots and help the body's immune system fend off viruses and other microbes. Quite a collection of benefits for these lowly beings!

    The 10,000-Year Mushroom

    Through the ages, the reishi mushroom (also known variously as the Mannetake, or 10,000-year mushroom, and the Immortality Mushroom) has been the most popular mushroom in Chinese, Korean and Japanese cultures. The reishi mushroom is frequently depicted in a wide variety of traditional Oriental artwork and even puts in an appearance in Chinese royal tapestries.

    To some, reishi's power goes beyond the natural and include the supernatural. Originally grown on aging plum trees, reishi is also sufficiently well regarded to be employed by the Japanese as a good luck charm. But you don't have to believe in the supernatural to be superbly impressed with reishi. The beneficial natural substances in reishi include steroids, lactones, alkaloids, triterpenes and polysaccharides.

    Large Molecules

    Of these chemicals, polysaccharides (complex chains of sugars) in particular have intrigued researchers looking into the way mushrooms help health. These polysaccharide macromolecules are very large (for molecules) and complex, a complexity that leads researchers to believe they are capable of conveying a huge amount of biological information that help the immune system stop cancer in its early stages. The differences in the benefits of various polysaccharides stems from their intriguing geometrical shapes.

    Distinctive Differences

    Even though two distinctive polysaccharides may contain the same number of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms, their three-dimensional differences-the way they are structured and branch off in different directions-can endow them with very different health benefits.

    Though they all share a basic structure (usually, these molecules consist of a main chain of atoms with various side chains), the slight variations of the side chains changes their effects.

    By deciphering the microscopic structures of these molecules, scientists think they are beginning to uncover which ones are most effective against cancer. For instance, in isolating a particularly useful polysaccharide called beta-D-glucan from reishi, researchers have found that this substance fights tumors in lab experiments (Chem Pharm Bull 1981; 29: 3611).

    Maitake Benefits

    Meanwhile, beta-D-glucan and other extracts taken from the maitake mushroom have also been shown to possess powerful anti-cancer effects in lab experiments (Immunopharm Immunotox; 19:175).

    In one instance, researchers in the laboratory who were trying out various substances on prostate cancer cells found that applying extracts of maitake results in a kind of programmed self-destruction (apoptosis) of these undesirable cancer cells (Molec Urol; 4:7). In addition, another substance known as maitake d-fraction has been shown to strongly fight cancer in lab animals-in one study, their liver cancer growths were reduced by up to 90% (Ann NY Acad of Sci; 833:204).

    At the same time, research in China on people has demonstrated that maitake may help reduce tumors and alleviate the effects of leukemia (Alter Comp Ther 12/98; 420).

    According to A.S. Daba and O.U. Ezeronye (Afr Jrnl Bio 12/03; 672), "Mushroom polysaccharides offer a lot of hope for cancer patients and sufferers of many devastating diseases.

    " [These substances support]...a fundamental principle in Oriental medicine...[they help] regulate homeostasis of the whole body and... bring the diseased person [back] to his or her normal state."

    The Activity of Active Hexose Correlated Compound Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC), an extract taken from shiitake and other mushrooms, is a relatively new substance that is also being researched for its anti-cancer benefits.

    Studies on AHCC began in Japan in the 1990s when scientists looked at how it could potentially help people recovering from liver cancer. In those tests, researchers found that giving people AHCC apparently helped them survive longer.

    In the future, scientists feel certain that they will uncover even more anticancer uses for mushrooms and the chemicals they contain. A key advantage to these natural substances is their lack of side effects. For instance, in research on an anti-cancer chemical called lentinan, taken from shiitakes, investigators have found that less than one percent of people experience the kind of discomfort that make them discontinue treatment. (This chemical has been used to treat stomach cancer.)

    But a long list of beneficial mushroom substances are probably still waiting to be discovered. More evidence of mushrooms' benefits: A study of mushroom workers in a part of Japan called the Nagano Prefecture found that these farmers enjoyed a significantly lower cancer rate than other inhabitants of that part of the country.

    In the rest of Japan, about one in six hundred people dies of cancer. But that rate death rate drops to about one in a thousand for mushroom raisers who eat a diet heavy in mushrooms.

    John Smith, PhD, from the University of Strath-Clyde, notes that "...increasing evidence [shows] mushrooms offer a remarkable array of medicinally important compounds that have yet to be evaluated by Western medical scientists." Mushrooms offer the best of both worlds: good health that tastes great.



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    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?
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    Date: June 17, 2005 12:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    Ginseng has been used for thousands of years by the Chinese and Native Americans. The Chinese name, Ren Shen means "Man-Root" because it is shaped like a human. There have been over 3,000 scientific studies published on Ginseng. Studies have examined the anti-tumor, anti-infective, nervous system, lipid lowering, and anti-fatigue activity of ginseng. Experimental research indicates that Ginseng helps the body adapt to stress, protects the body against radiation, and increases sperm count, and stabilizes blood sugar levels.

    Ginseng can differ depending upon the species, the way it is prepared, and of course the dose administered. There are two main kinds of Ginseng: American and Asian. American Ginseng, Panax quinquefolium, grows wild in many states although it is cultivated mainly in Wisconsin. American Ginseng generates body fluids and is said to clear heat. Those who can benefit most from American Ginseng are individuals that are under stress, athletes, and people who feel hot and thirsty. They may also have coughing, or coughing up blood, which indicates heat according to traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Asian Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, is usually imported to the US from either China or Korea. It is traditionally used to treat cold syndromes, which include cold limbs, weak pulse, exhaustion, and shortness of breath. White Ginseng usually refers to untreated ginseng, and is said to be less warm than red Ginseng. Typically red Ginseng is steamed and cured with other herbs giving it a dark red appearance; most Korean Ginseng is red.

    A common substitute for Ginseng in the US and China is Codonopsis, known botanically as Codonopsis pilosula. It has similar effects to Asian Ginseng: it is not as strong and not nearly as expensive. Eleuthero Ginseng, sometimes referred to as Siberian Ginseng, is really not ginseng at all but is in fact a distant cousin. It belongs in a different botanical species: Eleutherococcus Senticosus. Eleuthero Ginseng grows in northern China and Russia. Although it is used to help the body adapt to stress, it is less specific as a medicinal herb than Asian or American Ginseng.

    Traditional herbalists rarely use ginseng by itself. Herbs are usually combined with other ingredients in order to increase clinical benefits and reduce negative reactions. For example, Generate Pulse Powder (Sheng Mai San) is a traditional combination, which often combines America Ginseng with herbs to moisten the lungs; therefore it can be used for chronic cough that is difficult to expectorate, and shortness of breathe. Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan is an ancient formula that has been used for at least one thousand years to treat patients who are exhausted, feel cold, and may have weak limbs and/or chronic loose stools. In this ancient formula, Ginseng is combined with Astragalus and other harmonizing herbs, which help the body assimilate ginseng. Modern formulas with Ginseng or Codonopsis, have been used to help people overcome serious conditions such as impotence, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and fibromyalgia. Modern Ginseng formulas have also been used in conjunction with western medical approaches to treating patients with HIV, and patients undergoing chemo and radiotherapy.

    Asian Ginseng is considered a "big gun" and should not be indiscriminately used especially by itself. Headache, elevated body temperature, digestive upset, rash, fever, irritability, and insomnia are possible signs that Ginseng is not appropriate. It should not be taken at the same time as caffeine or other stimulants. Good quality Ginseng is expensive. Superior grade Ginseng can run several thousand dollars per pound. For this reason, it makes no sense to shop for the cheapest Ginseng or Ginseng products.



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    Pep Up and Go!
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    Date: June 14, 2005 05:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Pep Up and Go!

    Pep Up and Go!

    by Harris Parker Energy Times, February 2, 2000

    Feel your energy flagging?

    You've lost count of the number of phone calls you fielded all afternoon-the last was from your son, who missed the late bus home from school-and colleagues needing your decision are lined up outside your office. Your husband has invited clients home for dinner. You wilt like a new hairdo on a damp August day and pray for a miracle to jump-start your engine.

    Your pep quotient depends on three essential ingredients: nutrients you consume through your diet and supplements, how much you exercise and your sleep schedule.(Of course, if you're troubled by any kind of disabling, ceaseless fatigue accompanied by mental fuzziness, joint pain, sore throat, swollen glands, headaches and other chronic distress, consult your health practitioner.)

    Vitamins and Energy

    Certain nutrients are called vitamins because scientists consider them to be crucial for vitality. They generally function as coenzymes, partnering with the enzymes that are catalysts for the chemical reactions constantly taking place in our bodies. Our need to replenish our store of vitamins, which may merge with cell, muscle, enzyme, hormone, blood and bone structure once they have been absorbed, depends on their rate of utilization, according to The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery) by Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning.

    While a low-fat diet rich in raw fruits and vegetables helps supply important nutrients, a B complex supplement and a balanced multivitamin can guarantee daily vitamin levels.

    Be Energetic with B Vitamins

    Vitamins, especially the B vitamins, play extremely important roles in producing cellular energy. The chart on page 39 lists the key vitamins and describes their effects as well as the consequences of not getting enough of them. Their benefit is felt most profoundly in the energy producing process known as the Krebs cycle (which we'll explain in a moment).

    Vitamins B2 and B3, for example, supply the major building blocks for substances that are called flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and FADH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD and NADH), which are critical elements of energy production in the Krebs cycle as well as a process called oxidative phosphorylation.

    Hundreds of Reactions

    Even though you may never have heard of NAD and NADH, these molecules are found in very many places throughout your body; they play a role in hundreds of biochemical reactions in all kinds of cells. B vitamins also combine with other materials to build coenzymes, chemicals which help form other chemicals necessary for cellular energy. B vitamins are crucial: miss out on one or more and you may break these metabolic chains necessary for peak energy.

    Energy to Spend

    The main energy currency of every cell single cell is ATP: a chemical called adenosine triphosphate. This material is used by cells for every imaginable task including reproduction, growth, movement and metabolism. Specialized metabolic cycles within the cell are designed to generate ATP.

    Consequently, the more ATP our cells create, the more energy can be generated. The raw materials used to make cellular energy are glucose (blood sugar) and "free" fatty acids. The best way to supply your cells with the sugar they need is to consume complex carbohydrates which also supply fiber and other nutrients. When you eat carbohydrates, they are made into glucose which is stored as a starch called glycogen in muscles and the liver. Your body can rapidly turn glycogen into glucose for extra energy. (The process of making energy from glycogen yields carbon dioxide and water as well as ATP.)

    Making Energy

    The first step in making glucose into energy is called glycolysis. This complicated process requires nine different steps. During these steps, glucose is made into a substance called pyruvate. The process of glycolysis requires ATP, but yields twice as much ATP as is present when it starts.

    From here, the process gets a little more complicated as pyruvate enters into a complex chain of events in tiny cellular structures called mitochondria. (Many metabolic events take place in the mitochondria.) The pyruvate molecules are converted to a molecule known as acetyl coenzyme A and eventually made into carbon dioxide, water and more ATP.

    This process is known as the Krebs cycle or citric acid cycle. It also involves a series of events known as oxidative phosphorylation in which NADH formed during the Krebs cycle is oxidized to form ATP.

    Why is fat such a concentrated source of energy? Free fatty acids enter the Krebs cycle to help generate ATP much more efficiently than glucose - producing roughly six times more energy per gram than glucose.

    And Don't Overlook. . . . . .other supplements that may aid energy production: • Alpha Lipoic Acid, an antioxidant that works in the fatty tissues of cell membranes and in cells' watery interiors • Coenzyme Q10, also known as ubiquinone as it exists everywhere in the body, acts like a vitamin because it stimulates some reactions. CoQ10 protects cell membranes, especially of the heart, against oxidation and toxins.

    Ginsengs: Energy Generators

    With their legendary and slightly mysterious characteristics, the ginsengs are greatly respected natural energy boosters. " Perhaps no herb has excited so much interest in medical circles as ginseng, and yet, strangely, it does not actually 'cure' any one particular ailment," reports Michael Hallowell, the author of Herbal Healing (Avery) and a frequent lecturer on botanic medicine. "Rather, its virtue lies in its tremendous power as a tonic and invigorator. Russian athletes are prescribed large amounts of ginseng because researchers in Moscow have shown that it not only improves stamina, but also increases the efficiency with which blood is pumped to the muscles."

    What are the physiological mechanisms that allow ginseng to bolster your get up and go? In order to unravel the legend and lore of ginseng, the first step is understanding the intricacies of the three types: • Asian (Panax ginseng), which produces the strongest and most profound stimulation; • American (Panax quinquefolium), which soothes at a more subtle level; • Siberian (Eleutherococcus senticosus), a stamina booster embraced by a wide range of athletes. All three varieties are treasured for their ability to help people adjust to stress.

    Biologically Active

    The ginsengs are adaptogens, "biologically active substances found in certain herbs and plants that help the body and mind adapt to the changes and stress of life," says Stephen Fulder, MD, author of The Book of Ginseng and Other Chinese Herbs for Vitality (Inner Traditions). "Stress is not an illness in itself. Stress is change, our ability to adapt to all the changes that occur in life, emotional or physical, from exercise, work, chemicals, drugs, food, radiation, bacteria, disease, temperature, or simply too many late nights or too much fun."

    The body reacts to stress by producing the hormone adrenaline, which throws the whole body into a state of alert. Metabolism, blood pressure and circulation accelerate; immunity and resistance drastically decline; performance suffers.

    Top-Notch Tonics

    Enter the ginsengs, with their varied, subtle tonic qualities. The Greek name for this herb, "panax," means "panacea" or cure-all. But the Chinese, who first referred to it 2,000 years ago, more literally called it "ren shen" or "person root," in reference to its physical resemblance to a miniature human form.

    " Most exhibit medicinal properties, but each species has a different chemical makeup and has a unique application in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)," says Kim Derek Pritts, author of Ginseng: How to Find, Grow and Use America's Forest Gold (Stackpole). "In general, all true ginseng contains biologically active saponins (chemicals similar to human hormones), essential oils, carbohydrates, sugars, organic acids, nitrogenous substances, amino acids, peptides, vitamins and minerals."

    Building Vital Energy

    All the ginsengs strengthen, nourish and build Qi, the TCM concept describing basic vital energy circulating through our bodies. Every physical and mental function, from breathing, thinking, nutrition and circulation, is regulated by Qi. Although many of the Native American tribes used the abundant, indigenous Panax quinquefolium ginseng extensively, particularly to increase mental acuity and boost fertility, the herb never has been as popular in North America as it is in Asia. American ginseng traditionally has been a lucrative export crop to China, where the wild native variety suffers from overharvesting. Even today, according to Paul Bergner in The Healing Power of Ginseng & the Tonic Herbs (Prima), 95% of the American ginseng crop is exported to China, where XiYang Shen, or "western sea root," as it is called, is immensely valued and costs double what it does here.

    Energy Boost

    Jacques MoraMarco, author of The Complete Ginseng Handbook: A Practical Guide for Energy, Health and Longevity (Contemporary), as well as a licensed acupuncturist and doctor of Eastern medicine, suggests American ginseng for a slight energy boost. The moderate effect of American ginseng is considered a more appropriate tonic to the intensity of our pace and diet.

    Variations on a Theme

    In TCM terms, American ginseng cools and moistens, as well as lubricates and strengthens the body. It is reputed to reduce fevers and night sweats and alleviate hot, dry lung problems like smoker's cough. With its emollient qualities, American ginseng is considered to treat dry, wrinkled skin effectively.

    The Bolder Energizer

    Asian ginseng, which includes red Korean panax, is a bolder energizer taken by those who feel depleted from anemia, blood loss, cardiovascular weakness, injury, shock or trauma, as well as the disabling effects of age. In general, Asian ginseng is warming and stimulating, urging the body to run faster.

    Siberian ginseng, though botanically not a true ginseng, still acts similarly to Asian ginseng in its reputed power to control stress, boost energy, support the immune system, enhance performance and increase longevity. Called Wu Cha Seng in Chinese, Siberian ginseng is perceived by natural practitioners as an ideal herb for the healthy who want to lift both stamina and endurance. Experts believe it counteracts the effects of cortisol, the stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands in response to injury, pain or emotional turmoil.

    Natural Energy Boosters

    The herbal pharmacopeia includes several other natural energy boosters available in various forms-shakes and bars for those on the run-loaded with nutrition absent from commercial snacks. Some choices: • Ginkgo biloba-used in Chinese medicine to heat the body and increase sexual energy. Ginkgo enthusiasts take this herb to increase the supply of oxygen to the brain and generally increase circulation. • Gotu kola-may stimulate the central nervous system and help eliminate excess fluid, thereby reducing fatigue. • Astragalus-a Chinese herb that enhances energy and builds the immune system. It is credited with strengthening digestion, improving metabolism, increasing appetite, combating diarrhea and healing sores. • Schisandra-also a Chinese herb, treats respiratory illness, insomnia and irritability and rejuvenates sexual energy. Its mild adaptogens help the body to handle stress. • Licorice-is a favored endocrine toner in Chinese medicine. It is reputed to support the adrenals, the pair of small glands directly above the kidneys that secrete steroidal hormones, norepinephrine and epinephrine, the "fight or flight" hormones. People with high blood pressure or edema, or pregnant women, should avoid it. • Ashwagandha-an Ayurvedic herb used for thousands of years in the traditional healing of India as a potent strength builder for men and women.

    Experienced herbal practitioners acquire an impressive and fascinating store of knowledge and experience-you'll find it helpful to visit one as you begin your course of ginseng or other energy-boosting herbs.

    TCM Visitation

    When you visit a TCM practitioner, you'll notice that she evaluates your body's condition through an extremely careful examination of all the different systems: Several pulse points are felt in order to ferret out and detect troubling abnormalities. The condition and color of the tongue is observed to decipher digestive disorders. In addition, your urine may be examined to determine other imbalances and specific health problems.

    In many cases, your TCM practitioner will recommend ginseng as an adaptogen that can give you an overall boost. When taking ginseng, follow the directions on the package. Note: in some cases, you may want to consume a little bit less if you suffer headaches, insomnia or high blood pressure. Consult your health practitioner if you are afflicted with either acute inflammatory disease or bronchitis.

    Then take comfort in the eternal soothing wisdom of Chinese Traditional Medicine. In the first century A.D., the Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing (The Divine Husbandman's Classic of the Materia Medica) effusively described ginseng and the tonic herbs in this beguiling and intriguing manner: "The first class of drugs...are considered to perform the work of sovereigns. They support human life and they resemble heaven. They are not poisonous regardless of the quality and duration of administration."



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    Herbs in Perspective
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    Date: June 10, 2005 10:25 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Herbs in Perspective

    Herbs in Perspective by Phyllis D. Light, RH-AHG Energy Times, June 16, 2004

    "I don't claim a cure...I just try to give people some ease," noted Tommie Bass, a traditional Southern herbalist whose life has been the topic of several books, including Mountain Medicine by Darryl Patton (Natural Reader Press) and Trying to Give Ease by John Crellin and Jane Philpott (Duke University Press). That philosophy reflects the perspective embraced by herbalists for eons.

    The traditional use of herbs is incorporated into all cultures. Herbs were the first medicine and the origin of what we now call modern medicine. These plants have not been prescribed to conquer specific illnesses but instead nourish the body and aid in building overall health.

    Traditional Knowledge

    Observation, psychological need and human instinct form the foundation of traditional herbal knowledge and use. This knowledge has been passed down through generations based on practice and experience. The result: a depth of information about the safe and effective use of herbs that spans thousands of years.

    The goal of a traditional herbalist is to bring the body into balance (homeostasis), prevent disease and support immune functioning. Unfortunately, any kind of therapeutic knowledge can be misused, and that has happened with some herbs, causing some people to question herbal medicine's safety.

    As more people turn to natural therapies, scientists have begun to perform evidence-based research into their safe and effective use. The good news is that much of this research has validated the effectiveness of herbs and supplements.

    Echinacea to the Rescue

    Do the sniffling sneezes that herald a cold have you reaching for your bottle of echinacea? If so, you are in good company. Echinacea (Echinacea spp) is one of the top-selling herbs.

    The colorful American prairie plant was extremely popular during the early 1900s, until the use of modern antibiotics relegated it to the back shelf. But a resurgence of interest in herbs propelled echinacea back into the mainstream in the second half of the twentieth century. And this herb boasts an impressive body of research and has an excellent record of safety.

    For instance, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy have found echinacea to be effective in supporting the body's defenses against upper respiratory tract infections and for reducing the duration of discomforts that accompany the common cold (Pharmacotherapy 2000; 20(6):690-7).

    Although studies have not confirmed its ability to prevent colds, echinacea is widely used by many folks for just that purpose. Researchers have found that echinacea's effectiveness may drop if you use it for eight straight weeks (Am J Health-Syst Pharm 1999; 56(2):121-2). So if you take it for a couple of months, take a couple of weeks off before using it again.

    Flower Power

    St. John's wort is another herb with ancient origins that has experienced a modern resurgence. Named after St. John the Baptist, St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is generally in bright yellow bloom around St. John's Day (June 26). According to herbalist Michael Tierra, author of The Way of Herbs (Pocket Books), St. John's wort affects the liver and the nervous system. In 1984, the German Commission E, a recognized herbal authority, approved St. John's for depressive disorders, and in topical form for acute injuries and first-degree burns.

    Modern research has reaffirmed the use of St. John's wort in the short-term treatment of mild to moderate depression (Cochrane Review Issue 2, 2004). It has also been found to be useful in premenstrual depression (Int J Psy Med 2003; 33(3):295-7). (Researchers have found that the herb may alter how the body processes some prescription medications, so check with your healthcare provider before using such medicines along with St. John's wort.)

    King of Herbs

    " Ginseng (Panax) received the lofty title, King of Herbs, due to its reputation as a tonic and its ability to stimulate the body into healing," notes herbalism writer Darryl Patton. This plant was once so popular in China that it was worth its weight in gold.

    In fact, ginseng is the popular name for two different types of ginseng, American and Korean (Panax quinquefolium and P. ginseng). Both are considered adaptogens, or substances that help the body deal with stress more effectively. And modern research has found that ginseng can be used to improve overall energy and vitality, and to help the body deal more effectively with chronic stress (J Pharm Sci 2003 Dec: 93(4):458-64).

    Researchers have found that ginseng helps boost the immune system (J Med Food 2004 Spring; 7(1):1-6). This ancient herb is also a powerful antioxidant that confers protection on the heart (Biochem Biophys Acta 2004 Feb 24; 1670(3):165-71). In other studies, ginseng has been found to reduce symptoms of menopause, improve endurance and lower blood sugar levels. To avoid overharvesting wild ginseng, most of the herb on the market is now grown on farms.

    Ode to Ginkgo

    Known as the Living Fossil, ginkgo is the oldest known plant in the world. A native of Asia, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) is now found in many US cities, where it has been planted as a quick-growing shade tree. Traditionally, ginkgo was used for disorders and diseases of the lungs and the kidneys, as a remedy for bronchitis and to improve circulation in older people.

    Ginkgo contains substances that act as potent antioxidants by scavenging cell-damaging free radicals, and it is thought to help reduce the risk of disease. By opening capillaries, ginkgo increases circulation, and enables nutrients and oxygen to move around the body, especially to the extremities.

    Indeed, recent research indicates that ginkgo may ease pain associated with arterial disease in the legs (Am J Med 2000; 108:276-81). Other studies support the use of ginkgo for acute stress (J Pharm Sci 2003 Dec; 93(4):458-64) and some cases of hearing loss (Acta Otolaryngol 2001; 121:579-84).

    In a UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute study on ginkgo, researchers found significant improvement in the verbal recall of people who had age-related memory problems. According to Dr. Linda Ercoli, lead author of the study, "Our findings suggest intriguing avenues for future study...with a larger sample to better measure and understand the impact of ginkgo on brain metabolism."

    Tasty Ginger

    Traditionally, fiery ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been used to aid digestion, reduce nausea, relieve gas, reduce symptoms of arthritis and strengthen the heart. Modern researchers have started to validate these traditional uses; ginger has reduced the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness in studies (Aust NZJ Obstet Gynaecol 2003 Apr; 4392:139-44).

    Meanwhile, researchers at the University of Minnesota have applied for a patent on a substance found in ginger, believing it to have anticancer activity. According to Ann Bode, "Plants of the ginger family have been credited with therapeutic and preventive powers and have been reported to have anticancer activity."

    Ginger can be found in natural food stores as fresh or dried root. It often appears in small amounts in herbal formulas as a carrier herb-one that helps move other herbs around the body.

    The best medicine combines the health support of herbs with the scientific rigor of conventional medicine. And as scientists continue to search for new medicine from ancient remedies, we can enjoy the best of both perspectives.



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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 12, 2005 09:33 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    Keeping the Intestines Healthy

    "Friendly Bacteria" Therapy Breakthrough

    by Richard Conant, L.Ac., C.N.

    Ninety percent of the cells found in the human body are not of human origin.

    No, this does not mean we are all products of some sinister alien experiment.

    The human body is made up of about 10 trillion cells. This huge number is dwarfed by the bacteria we all carry around in our intestinal tracts. The lower bowel is a campground for roughly 100 trillion bacteria, single-celled plant organisms that can be seen only through a microscope.

    When we enjoy good intestinal health, the bulk of these bacteria are beneficial. Known as "friendly flora," these tiny guests help digest our food by breaking down undigested proteins, fats and carbohydrates. The friendliest of the friendly bacteria are the "lactobacilli," so named because they produce lactic acid in the bowel, by fermenting carbohydrates. This lactic acid production is profoundly important for keep the intestines healthy. And good intestinal health is the foundation of overall health.

    How do we maintain a thriving population of lactic acid-producing bacteria in the gut? First introduced into the human body through mother's milk, lactobacilli are somewhat fragile. Stress, poor diets, and antibiotics can kill them off. They should be replanted fairly regularly throughout life. One way to do this is through consumption of cultured milk products such as sour milk, kefir and yogurt, which contain live lactobacilli. They can also be consumed in dietary supplements, but this may or may not be a reliable route. Bacterial products do not keep very well on the shelf, they require refrigeration, and are largely destroyed on the trip from the mouth to the gut by our own digestive juices.

    Introducing Lactobacillus sporogenes- a revolutionary new friendly bacteria supplement.

    This article will focus on one particular species of lactobacilli, a relatively unknown member of the family called Lactobacillus sporogenes. This lactic-acid producing bacteria may prove to be one of the most practical forms for use in supplements, thanks to a unique property not shared by the more well-known friendly flora such as acidophillus. L. Sporogenes is a spore-forming bacteria. Safely enclosed within a spore coat that protects it from the environment, L. sporogenes is resistant to heat, oxygen and digestive acids. Once L. sporogenes reaches the intestines, its spore coat dissolves, freeing the bacteria to multiply and churn out the beneficial lactic acid. (The spore coat, made up of a calcium-protein-carbohydrate complex, is harmless).1

    The difficulty of keeping friendly bacteria supplements alive is an ongoing problem for manufacturers of these products. Studies have analyzed various commerical products claiming to contain acidophilus and found they often contain few live bacteria.2,3 L. Sporogenes is naturally microencapsulated; this insulates it from the gauntlet through which friendly bacteria in dietary supplements must pass.1 Autointoxication-Poisoning by Bacterial Toxins The intestinal tract may also play host to pathogenic, or disease-causing bacteria. These "unfriendly flora" cause putrefaction and release injurious toxins into the lower bowel. This healthy picture is all too common, and has long been concern of wholistic health practitioners.

    The concept of "autointoxication," poisoning of the body by intestinal toxins, was popular among doctors in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. An editorial on the dangers of autointoxication which appeared in the June 3, 1893 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) declared that "most likely a large majority of chronic diseases take their origin from this cause."4 The famous Russian physician Eli Metchnikoff pioneered the use of lactobacteria for preventing autointoxication and restoring bowel health. His landmark work 'Prolongation of Life' sparked interest in lactobacilli as a food supplement.5,6

    Naturopathy, widely practiced during the early twentieth century, has always stressed the fundamental importance of bowel cleansing. With the advent of so-called "scientific medicine," naturopathy slipped into decline, and the concept of autointoxication was discredited. Over the last thirty years or so, this has changed. Naturopathic medicine has rebounded, and the importance of bowel health is once again recognized. A paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1964, while opining that autointoxication "was exploited by quacks and faddists" in the early 1900's concedes that "the concept of autointoxication must now receive serious consideration."7

    Leaders in the rebirth of natural medicine such as Dr. Bernard Jensen have helped educate the public about the importance of keeping the bowels healthy through regular use of lactobacilli. Jensen is well-known for his extensive studies of regions such as the Hunza Valley in Pakistan where people commonly live well over one hundred years. Jensen and others have noted that the consumption of fermented dairy products containing lactobacilli is a common dietary practice in these areas. Their observations have contributed to the popularity of friendly bacteria supplements. At the same time, clinical research has provided ample evidence of the beneficial effects of lactobacteria supplementation.5,9<.sup>

    Eubiosis-Keeping a Healthy Bacteria Population in the Intestinal Tract

    In his book 'Tissue Cleansing Through Bowel Management, which contains a wealth of valuable wisdom on intestinal health, Dr. Jensen writes, "Where health and vitality are found, we invariably find the friendly and beneficial microbes ... To a large extent the flora in the bowel determines the state of health in an individual."8 In a healthy bowel the friendly flora make up the bulk of the bacteria population. The unfriendly, disease-causing organisms are in the minority. The good bacteria keep them firmly under control. This healthy microbial balance in the gut is called "eubiosis."

    Life in our modern industrial society is hardly favorable to eubiosis. Residents of the Hunza Valley lead unhurried lives in a pristine, pollution-free environment. They grow their own food in fertile, nutrient-rich soil, work close to the landÐand consume lactic-acid producing bacteria on a daily basis. For the rest of us who cannot hope to enjoy this enviable lifestyle, eubiosis is something we should never take for granted. This means taking proactive steps to plant the seeds of health in our intestinal garden, by using a viable friendly bacteria supplement.

    Supplements which help to populate the intestinal tract with friendly bacteria are known as "probiotics." The term "probiotic" literally means "for life.' (In contrast, "antibiotic" means "against life.") Probiotics restore the natural state of "eubiosis" that is so very important for health and longevity.

    L. Sporogenes-an ideal probiotic

    Not every species of lactobacilli qualifies as an effective probiotic. As noted above, many do not survive processing, storage and passage through the digestive system very well. The following attributes make L. Sporogenes an ideal probiotic supplement:1,10,11

    1) Naturally microencapsulatedÐstable at room temperature and can be stored unrefrigerated for long periods without loss of viable organisms.

    2) Tolerates heat, stomach acid and bile, allowing it to successfully travel into the lower bowel.

    3) Non-pathogenic, has only beneficial effects on its host. Has similar characteristics as acidophilus: prefers a mild acid environment; produces lactic acid, digestive enzymes, etc.

    4) Readily multiplies in the human gut. In the stomach, the spore coat absorbs moisture and begins to swell. Upon reaching the small intestine, the bacteria cells germinate and begin to multiply, doubling in number every 30 minutes.

    5) Produces enzymes which help digest protein, fats and carbohydrates. These enzymes include lactose, the enzyme that digests milk sugar.12

    6) Creates a favorable environment (mildly acidic) in the gut for other friendly bacteria to thrive. Prevents overgrowth of pathogenic organisms.

    7) Produces lactic acid in the form of L- lactic acid only.

    The last point is especially important. Lactic acid occurs in the form of three isomers (substances with identical molecular structures that have different shapes): L-lactic acid, D-lactic acid and DL-lactic acid. The D form is metabolized slowly, and can produce acidosis in the system. (Infants have a particularly difficult time metabolizing D-lactic acid.)11,13 DL-Lactic acid, the kind acidophilus makes, may be converted to either D or L.

    The L form is the one we want. L. sporogenes is a "homofermenter," it makes L-lactic acid exclusively. Lactic acid keeps the gut mildly acidic. This acidity is essential for the gut to be a hospitable home for friendly bacteria, and stops the growth of the unwelcome disease-causing bacteria.

    L. sporogenes has only one drawback. It is a transient visitor that does not permanently colonize in the digestive tract. A study on the retention of L. sporogenes found no bacteria in the feces six days after consumption was discontinued.14

    L. Sporogenes-Results from Clinical Studies

    L. Sporogenes is used extensively in Japan and approved by the Japanese equivalent of the FDA. L. sporogenes has been given to hospital patients suffering from intestinal complaints such as gas and bloating due to abnormal fermentation, constipation, diarrhea and indigestion. (These problems often occur after surgery or chemotherapy.) A total of 16 clinical reports are on record in Japanese hospitals, documenting 293 case of digestive complaints treated with L. sporogenes.15 The overall improvement rate is an impressive 86 percent. Results are typically seen within four to five days. L. sporogenes has also been used with success to clear up diarrhea in newborns.16 Like other lactobacilli, L. sporogenes lowers blood cholesterol. (Lactobacilli break down cholesterol and bile salts in the intestinal tract.) Researchers at a hospital in New Delhi, India gave L. sporogenes tablets to 20 patients with high cholesterol for twelve weeks.17 Total cholesterol levels were substantially reduced, along with LDL cholesterol, and the beneficial HDL rose slightly.

    The popularity of L. sporogenes in other countries as an ideal friendly bacteria supplement will no doubt be soon matched in the U.S. This microscopic helper for intestinal health is now sold in probiotic products under the name "Lactospore®."

    References

    1. Gandhi, A.B., Nagarathnam, T. Probiotics in veterinary use. Poultry Guide 1990;27(3):43-47.

    2. Brennan, M., Wanismail, B., Ray, B. Prevalence of viable Lactobacillus acidophilus in dried commercial products. Journal of Food Protection 1983;46(10):887-92.

    3. Gilliland, S.E., Speck, M.L. Enumeration and identity of lactobacilli in dietary products. Journal of Food Protection 1977;40(11):760-62.

    4. Dalton, R.H. The limit of human Life, and how to live long. JAMA 1893;20:599-600.

    5. Shahani, K.M., Ayebo, A.D. Role of dietary lactobacilli in gastrointestinal microecology. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1980;33:2448-57.

    6. Metchnikoff, E.. Prolongation of Life. New York: G.P. Putnam Sons;1908.

    7. Donaldson, R.M. Normal Bacterial populations of the intestine and their relation to intestinal function. New Eng. J. Med. 1964;270(18):938-45.

    8. Jensen, B. Tissue Cleansing Through Bowel Management. Escondido, CA: publ. by Bernard Jensen, D.C.;1980.

    9. Schauss, A.G. Lactobacillus acidophilus: method of action, clinical application, and toxicity data. Journal of Advancement in Medicine 1990;3(3):163-78.

    10. 'General InformationÐLactospore®' 1996; Sabinsa Corporation: Piscataway, NJ.

    11. Gandhi, A.B. Lactobacillus sporogenes, An Advancement in Lactobacillus Therapy. The Eastern Pharmacist August 1998:41-44.

    12. Kim, Y.M., Lee, J.C., Choi, Y.J., Yang, H.C. Studies on the production of beta galactosidase by lactobacillus sporogenes. Properties and application of beta galactosidase. Korean J. Appl. Microbiol. Bioeng. 1985;13(4):355-60.

    13. Oh, MS. D-Lactic acidosis in a man with short bowel syndrome. New Eng J Med 1979;31(5):249-52.

    14. Hashimo, K. et. al. New Drugs and Clinics 1964;13(9):53-66.

    15. 'Abstracts of papers on the clinical studies of Lacbon' Unpublished data.

    16. Dhongade, R.K., Anjaneyule, R. Lactobacillus sporogenes (Sporlac) in neonatal diarrhea. Unpublished data.

    17. Mohan, J.C., Arora, R., Khaliullah, M. Preliminary observations on effect of Lactobacillus sporogenes on serum lipid levels in hypercholesterolemic patients. Indian J. Med. Res. 1990;92(B):431-32.

    Full Spectrum Multidophilus Probiotic Supplement 12 Strains of acidophilus

    Proprietary Probiotic Blend (Supplying over 20 billion organisms):
  • B. lactis
  • B. bifidum
  • B. infantis
  • B. longum
  • L. acidophilus
  • L. brevis
  • L. bulgaricus
  • L. paracasei
  • L. planatarum
  • L. rhamnosus
  • L. salivarius
  • Streptococcus thermophilus


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