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The Best Keto Fiber Foods & Why You Need Them Darrell Miller 4/18/19
Dr. Mercola: How and why too much protein triggers aging and cancer Darrell Miller 7/6/17
What is a ketogenic diet? Darrell Miller 2/25/17
Low-Carb Diet May Aid Your Metabolism Darrell Miller 12/14/16
Why is Xylitol So Good for You Darrell Miller 5/23/11
Carbohydrate Loading Darrell Miller 10/17/06
Erythritol Sweetener Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/17/05
LIFE FORCE MULTIPLE - Essential Nutrients to Support Your Low Carb Lifestyle.. Darrell Miller 6/29/05
Nutritional Scorecard Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Truth in Labeling Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Power Meals - Shakes, smoothies and bars help make getting good nutrition easy. Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Gluco Sciense - Take Control of your Blood Sugar ... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
KetoJuice Smoothie Darrell Miller 5/21/05



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The Best Keto Fiber Foods & Why You Need Them
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Date: April 18, 2019 01:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Best Keto Fiber Foods & Why You Need Them





The Keto diet is well-known for emphasizing the value of healthy fats, but that doesn't mean it neglects the importance of fiber. It is not uncommon for those transitioning to the low-carb, high fat Keto diet to experience problems with digestion. The solution is to consume high fiber foods that keep you in a state of ketosis. These include non-starchy vegetables (e.g., cabbage and asparagus) as well as seeds and nuts. Keto fiber supplements - such as Gum arabic and Chia seeds - can also serve to maintain digestive regularity.

Key Takeaways:

  • Avocado is full of both healthy fats and dietary fiber, making it a valuable staple for people on keto diets.
  • Non-starchy vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and zucchini can provide lots of fiber, vitamins and antioxidants.
  • When eaten in moderation, high-fiber nuts like pistachios, walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts can provide fiber and nutrients and help digestion.

"Eighty percent of your total daily calories should be coming from foods like olive oil, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, nuts and seeds."

Read more: https://draxe.com/best-keto-fiber-foods/

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Dr. Mercola: How and why too much protein triggers aging and cancer
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Date: July 06, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Dr. Mercola: How and why too much protein triggers aging and cancer





Dr. Ron Rosedale's theory several years ago that too much protein can be a bad thing is gradually becoming accepted through further research. He theorizes you should eat foods that help you burn fat and not sugar. Proteins burn sugar but diets high in fat do not and can actually be very healthy for people with diabetes and heart problems. Too much protein prevents removal of damaging cells that can lead to aging and cancer. The best diet is moderate protein, low carb and high in fat.

Key Takeaways:

  • Excessive protein intake can do more harm to your body. Any food that helps you burn fat can be beneficial to your health.
  • Restricting protein can benefit your health, especially helping the aging process.
  • Contrary to traditional belief, a low-carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet would be the healthiest balance.

"In a nutshell, this hypothesis completely ignores the “calories in, calories out” dogma, and instead focuses on foods that support hormones and growth factors that make your body burn fat rather than sugar."

Read more: https://www.healthnutnews.com/how-and-why-too-much-protein-triggers-aging-and-cancer/

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What is a ketogenic diet?
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Date: February 25, 2017 05:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is a ketogenic diet?





The ketogenic diet is a very LOW-CARB, high-fat diet that shares many similarities with the Atkins and LOW-CARB diets. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. The reduction in carbs puts your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When this happens, your body becomes incredibly efficient at burning fat for energy. It also turns fat into ketones in the liver, which can supply energy for the brain

What is a ketogenic diet?

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Low-Carb Diet May Aid Your Metabolism
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Date: December 14, 2016 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: LOW-CARB Diet May Aid Your Metabolism





Feeling a little sluggish? Think you could lose a few pounds? Well low carb may be just for you. New research shows that low card is supposed to upstart metabolism making it even easier to lose weight. This is on top of the benefit that low carb provides. Start today.

Key Takeaways:

  • Research suggests that eating LOW-CARBohydrate meals may lead to healthy changes in a woman's metabolism.
  • The researchers also found that the timing of exercise may play a role in how beneficial it is for your metabolism.
  • Small changes can make a difference, such as watching the kinds of foods you eat and not exercising at an inappropriate time.

"Insulin is a hormone that helps the body use carbohydrates from food to fuel the cells in the body and brain."



Reference:

//www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=200089

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Why is Xylitol So Good for You
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Date: May 23, 2011 01:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Why is Xylitol So Good for You

Xylitol and Its Health Benefits.

Xylitol is fruit sugar that occurs naturally in fiber-rich plan-based foods, such as berries, oats, and mushrooms. Its sweetness has been compared to table sugar, the disaccharide sucrose to be specific. Unlike simple sugars and most other carbohydrates, it contains much less calories, making it one of the best natural sweeteners. More importantly, it has been associated with numerous health benefits.

The medicinal properties of xylitol were first noted in the second half of the 19th century, when it was introduced as a sugar substitute primarily for individuals afflicted with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. It is in fact a hydrogenated form of carbohydrate, which is also referred to as sugar alcohol. That being said, it does not impact insulin levels but rather contributes to healthy blood sugar.

Prevents Dental Carries

One of the earliest documented health benefits of xylitol is its role in preventing the formation of dental carries. Also known as tooth decay, dental carries result from the breakdown of hard tooth structure in the presence of bacteria. It is believed that over 90 per\cent of the global population experience caries at least once in a lifetime, with children being more susceptible.

It should be noted that bacteria taking up residence in the mouth cavity rely on fermentable carbohydrates for nutrition. The products of fermentation are acids that are capable of denaturing the mineral content of teeth, leading to rampant dental carries over time. The use of xylitol has been advocated for over a century since it is not fermentable, unlike glucose, sucrose, and fructose, which are almost always found in the human diet.

Fights off Infections

Xylitol has been observed to display disease-fighting properties. In fact, it has been utilized in the treatment of several bacterial and fungal infections. This sugar alcohol has long been reported to produce metabolites upon exposure to saliva. These metabolites are organic compounds that interfere with the ability of bacteria to adhere to the tissues of the oral and nasal cavities.

More importantly, xylitol appears to enhance the effectiveness of mucus, antibacterial compounds, neutrophil granulocytes, and various enzymes that often get in contact with pathogens first. Regular intake of xylitol has been effective against oral infections of Candida yeast. It has also been cited in the treatment of ear infections, such as acute otitis media. Not surprisingly, it relieves sore throat.

Regulates Blood Sugar

Xylitol is one of the oldest recommended substitutes to sugar. It has a very low glycemic index, which makes that sugar levels in the blood rise gradually and steadily throughout the day. By so doing, it does not cause an insulin spike or impact blood sugar levels. Xylitol is an ideal source of energy for those who are suffering from metabolic syndrome and those who are following a LOW-CARBohydrate diet.

If you haven’t started xylitol, isn’t it time too?

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Carbohydrate Loading
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Date: October 17, 2006 01:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Carbohydrate Loading

Carbohydrate loading is an ergogenic technique devised for endurance athletes to trick the muscles into storing more fuel than it normally would. Although carbohydrate loading has been hailed as an innovative training technique in the past few years, the discovery of carbohydrates as the preferred fuel of the body dates back several decades. In 1939 two scientists named Christiansen and Hensen demonstrated that the body burns carbohydrates before drawing upon its fat and protein. The research found that the body readily uses carbohydrates as fuel for the muscular and nervous system with minimal wastage and toxic by products – unlike the case with protein and fats.

The body stores carbohydrates in the form of glycogen in the muscles and liver. This glycogen helps the liver to detoxify otherwise dangerous substances. It also supplies a readily available source of glucose to maintain the essential blood sugar level. Glycogen stored in a muscle is available for energy use for only that particular muscle, unlike glycogen stored in the liver, which is available systemically. At rest, and during low-intensity exercise, the body burns about an equal mixture of fat and carbohydrate for energy purposes. However, as work intensity increases, carbohydrates become the dominant fuel because of its quick availability. Laboratory research has shown that an exercise intensity of less than 40-50 percent VO2 max, the body burns mostly fat, and the degradation of stored glycogen is minimal.

The situation changes during high intensity exercise, when carbohydrates become the sole source of energy. The activity itself is limited by the availably of glycogen as an energy source.

Muscle glycogen is five times more available as an energy source for intensity exercise as compared to liver glycogen. When the muscle glycogen becomes depleted, the muscle its self begins to fail, and fatigue rapidly sets in marathon running, this dreaded phenomenon is known as “hitting the wall”.

Since it is obvious that the availability of glycogen is a limiting factor in endurance athletic events, exercise physiologists devised ways to increase glycogen storage in the body. In 1967 two Swedish exercise physiologists came up with carbohydrate loading, also called glycogen loading, as a method of supper-compensation of glycogen through diet and exercise.

Hydrate loading usually is approached by any of the following means:

  • Consumption of high (complex) carbohydrate and high protein foods while limiting intake of refined sugars, 3-4 days before competition. This results in a glycogen level 40-60 percent above normal.
  • Exercise to exhaustion for several days, followed by a carbohydrate-loading period. This will deplete stored glycogen and then double its reserves.
  • A combination of low carbohydrate consumption and exhaustive exercise. The athlete eats only proteins and fats for 3 days, followed by eating only carbs for the next 3 days. On the carbo-concentration days, the athlete exercises minimally, so as not to interfere with the glycogen storage process.

According to researchers David Costill, Ph.D., carbohydrate consumption in excess of 600 grams daily won’t result in proportionally larger amounts of synthesized glycogen. In the first 24 hours of carbo-loading, the type of carbs eaten is not of critical importances. However, after the second day, Costill suggests eating complex rather refined or simple sugars.

Complex carbs are those which contain lots of intact fiber, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. An exception to this rule is pasta, which is a refined sugar but is good to ingest during carbo-loading. Complex carbs tend to maintain a steady output of the hormones insulin, which activates the enzymes glycogen synthetase, essential for effective glycogen storage.

Most experts today advocate a gradually tapering exercise program while increasing carbo consumption to about 525 grams daily. This avoids the problems associated with the LOW-CARB period, such as fatigue, weakness, potassium loss and muscle tissue loss.

One day prior to competition, the athlete rests completely and consumes about 550 grams of carbohydrates.

The carbohydrate loading program should be limited to three times a year. More often than seems to decrease its effectiveness. Costill suggests that athletes engaged in intense exercise on a daily basis consume about 70 percent of their daily calories in carbohydrates. This will maintain adequate glycogen levels in both the liver and muscles, according to Costill.

Carbohydrate loading is of no real benefit in athletic events lasting less than 60 min, because lesser activity time does not deplete glycogen levels enough to inhibit work capacity of endurance.

Carbohydrate loading isn’t for everyone. Each gram of cellular glycogen is stored with 2.7 gram of water. This rapid water storage makes some people feel stiff and tight, resulting in decreased performance. The only way to determine if the carbohydrate loading works for you is to try it – carefully!

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Discount Vitamins

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Erythritol Sweetener Fact Sheet
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Date: December 17, 2005 10:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Erythritol Sweetener Fact Sheet

Erythritol Sweetener Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 11/4/04

LIKELY USERS: People on LOW-CARB diets, People on calorie-restricted diets, People on restricted blood sugar diets, People concerned about dental caries (cavities).

KEY INGREDIENT(S): Erythritol crystals

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES

Physical properties:

A transparent white brilliant appearance, free-flowing crystalline powder. A very clean, sweet taste profile, similar to sucrose with no significant after-taste. The dry form exhibits a strong cooling effect. Has a similar look and taste to sugar. Erythritol will brown like sugar. Sweetness: Only about 70% as sweet as sugar; one teaspoon is equivalent to one teaspoon of sugar in baking measurements.

Fewer calories than white sugar: less than 0.2 calories per gram, only 5% as much as sucrose A sugar alcohol that is not a source of “impact carbs” that raise blood sugar Suitable for LOW-CARB (carbohydrate-restricted) diets “Zero” glycemic index sweetener, also rated “zero” on the insulinemic index Does not affect serum glucose or insulin levels. Will not promote tooth decay Laxative effects are unlikely, unlike some other sugar alcohols OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES: No artificial sweeteners, designated as GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status by the FDA. Pesticides: Absent (at ppm level)

AMOUNT TO USE: One or more teaspoons, as desired. 1.5 teaspoon has about the sweetness of a teaspoon of sugar.

SYNERGISTS: Flavor mixes well with other sweeteners, can be blended with them to “cut” them and improve their flavor.

CAUTIONS: Large doses are unlikely to have a laxative effect, unlike most other sugar alcohols. Doses of 1 gram per kilogram (2.2#) of body weight, equivalent to 68 grams per 150-pound adult, are typically well tolerated by adults. No other known cautions.



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Vitanet ®

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LIFE FORCE MULTIPLE - Essential Nutrients to Support Your Low Carb Lifestyle..
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Date: June 29, 2005 10:39 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: LIFE FORCE MULTIPLE - Essential Nutrients to Support Your Low Carb Lifestyle..

Life Force Multiple

Taking care of your body is an especially important challenge in today’s stressful and hectic world. Choosing a low carb lifestyle is an increasingly popular way to seek better health. In fact, there are approximately 30 million U.S. adults counting their carbs right now. While effective for weight control and therefore having positive health effects, low carb approaches can also result in serious nutrient imbalances. Thus, adding the right multiple to your low carb approach is an enormously important next step for your good health. LIFE FORCE MULTIPLE, the top-ranked and award–winning multiple from Source Naturals, replenishes these nutrients and provides compounds that will help your body process the increased proteins and fats better while you are restricting carbs.

Low Carb Benefits

Restricting carbs can have many health benefits. And lowering your intake of refined simple carbs, such as sugar and white flour, can help you promote healthy blood sugar and insulin levels, which is critical for your good health. Insulin is used to move the glucose from carbs into your cells for energy. Ingesting too many refined carbs can greatly reduce your body’s ability to use insulin well, which can lead to short and long-term health concerns.

Replenish Nutrients with LIFE FORCE

LIFE FORCE contains optimal levels of many nutrients that might be deficient in low carb meals. Counting carbs can lead to restrictions of nutrient dense foods such as dairy products, grains, fruits and vegetables. LIFE FORCE contains many of the same protective antioxidants, vitamins and minerals as fruits and vegetables, including beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, flavinols, magnesium and selenium. It also contains high levels of the same vitamins found in grains, including all of the B vitamins, to support your body’s healthy energy metabolism. And it contains nutrients found in dairy products such as calcium, potassium, vitamin A and vitamin D.

Support Healthy Fat and Protein Consumption with Life Force

Low carb lifestyles mean higher consumption of proteins and fats. Unfortunately, there are artery, heart, colon and many other health concerns associated with meals that are high in fat and protein and low in fiber and produce. However, the nutrients in LIFE FORCE can help you better process eating this way. LIFE FORCE contains high levels of protective fat-soluble antioxidants such as alpha lipoic acid, ascorbyl palmitate (vitamin C ester) and vitamin E to protect your body from the free radicals generated by consuming more fats. It also contains many nutrients for liver health, such as silymarin, CoQ10, N-Acetyl Cysteine and turmeric to help support the fat metabolism your liver is responsible for. LIFE FORCE also contains a high level of the B vitamin biotin, which aids in fat, protein and energy metabolism.

Restricting simple carbs can do much more than help you maintain a healthy weight; it can also be the foundation for maintaining good health throughout your long life. But you need to develop a thoughtful holistic strategy for success. When you integrate LIFE FORCE MULTIPLE into your wellness plan, then you can benefit from decades of clinical research about the nutrients your body needs to support optimal health and a low carb lifestyle, long before this information becomes part of mainstream health recommendations. Join this wellness revolution by adding LIFE FORCE to your strategies for health and allow yourself to start feeling energized today!

References
Marchione, M. (2004). Eating Lots of Carbs May Raise Cancer Risk. Associated Pres. Available at com/news?tmpl=story&u= /ap/20040806/ap_on_he_me/fit_cancer___carbs . Warner, J. (2004). Have We Gone Carb Crazy? Experts Clear Up the Confusion Over the LOW-CARB Craze. WebMD. Available at ent/ Article/83/97595.htm?pagenumber=2 . Whitney, E. N., et al. (1998). Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition. Wadsworth Publishing Company, Belmont, CA. 325-484.



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Vitanet ®

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Nutritional Scorecard
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Date: June 14, 2005 10:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nutritional Scorecard

Nutritional Scorecard by Sylvia Whitefeather Energy Times, June 15, 2004

For over 50 years, the federal government has produced Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) as guidelines for vitamin and mineral intake. Then, in 1993, the Reference Daily Intakes (RDIs) superseded the RDAs. By applying this new designation, the government's guidelines are now supposed to represent the designated amounts that an average person should consume. With this in mind, and the fact that many experts think you should consume more than some of the RDIs, how does your nutritional scorecard add up? Answering a few nutritional questions can point you in the right direction.

Perfect Protein

Are you trying to lose weight? If you are, the latest thinking on weight loss opines that eating more protein may be the key to keeping your weight down. Two recent studies published in the Annals of Internal Medicine (5/18/04) found that people who ate a LOW-CARBohydrate, high-protein diet lost more weight and had better cholesterol levels than dieters who ate fewer fatty foods. Both studies found that a LOW-CARB diet can improve your triglycerides (blood fats) and boost your HDL, or good, cholesterol.

Eating protein satisfies both tummies and taste buds. Researchers have found that the amount of protein eaten in a meal determines not only how much food you eat but also how satisfied you feel after eating (J Nutr 2004 Apr; 134(4):974S-9S). And when you feel satisfied after eating less food you improve your odds of losing weight.

We need about 50 grams of protein a day to support the body's functions. The best sources of protein are eggs, meat, milk, protein shakes and yogurt.

Classy Carbohydrates

Does your energy level go up and down during the day? To get off the energy rollercoaster, cut down on carbohydrates, and make sure the carbs you do eat are complex.

Carbohydrates have been getting some unflattering press lately. Yes, if you want to lose weight, you may want to go on a strictly LOW-CARB diet. But for those not concerned with weight, carbohydrates are the principle source of energy for the body.

What's more, even if you do restrict carbohydrates, you should still eat a tiny bit of them. Without some carbs in the diet your body cannot regulate protein or fat metabolism. According to Michael and Mary Eades, MD, authors of The 30-Day LOW-CARB Diet Solution (Wiley), "Carbohydrates control insulin and insulin controls your metabolic health."

So, make your carbohydrates count. Indulge in complex carbohydrates: whole grains, fruits and vegetables. In those foods, carbs are accompanied by fiber and larger amounts of vitamins and phytonutrients. Other reliable sources of complex carbohydrates are whole wheat bread, brown rice and oatmeal.

Fabulous Fiber

Are you concerned about your heart health? Fiber from beans, oats, legumes, nuts, rice bran, fruits and vegetables helps stabilize blood sugar and reduce cholesterol. Pectins, found in apples, pears, prunes and plums, are a particularly useful form of water-soluble fiber.

Insoluble fiber, in cereals, wheat bran and vegetables, reduces the risk of colon-related problems. In addition to adding fiber to the diet, dried beans and soybeans have been shown to lower cholesterol, improve vascular health and kidney functioning, preserve bone mineral density and reduce menopausal discomforts (AJCN 1999 Sept; 70(3 suppl):464S-74S). Fiber also promotes good bowel health and encourages the growth of beneficial intestinal flora.

You need 25 to 40 grams of fiber daily. If you have cut back on your carbohydrates, be sure to take a reliable fiber supplement.

Fantastic Fats

Do you have problems focusing on mentally challenging tasks? If so, you should eat more fish and get more of the omega-3 fatty acids that fish and flax contain. Higher levels of this type of fat have been linked to better concentration while performing demanding intellectual work (Lipids 2004 Feb; 39(2):117-23).

Fats add flavor to food, making meals taste better. Monounsaturated fats like plain olive oil and canola are liquid at room temperature and are suitable for use in cooking at high temperatures. Researchers have found that a diet high in monounsaturated fat has the ability to decrease LDL (bad) cholesterol (J Nutr 2001; 131:1758-63). Other fats, such as extra virgin olive oil and flaxseed oil, are best used in dishes that don't need cooking, such as salads.

Although the RDI for fat is less than 30% of the total calorie intake, some researchers believe that if you eat healthy fat, eating too much is not a concern. Omega-3 fats are available in supplement form.

Wonderful Water

Do you suffer from dry skin? You may not be drinking enough water. This precious liquid is used by every cell of our bodies and makes up 60% to 75% of our body weight. Water is important for kidney function. Researchers in Italy found that drinking adequate amounts of water can help prevent the formation of kidney stones (Urol Int 2004; 72 Suppl 1:29-33).

Your activity level, environment and diet influence how much water you need daily. Try to drink at least eight cups of fluid a day from noncaffeinated, nonalcoholic sources.

Voluptuous Vitamins

Do you exercise frequently? If you do, you need more antioxidant vitamins like natural vitamin E and vitamin C as well as a healthy supply of carotenoids. A study at the School of Applied Medical Sciences and Sports Studies, University of Ulster, found that exercisers need more antioxidants. Otherwise, their exertion may release an excess number of free radicals (caustic molecules) in their bodies and do damage to the heart arteries and other internal organs.

Vitamins, in general, are defined as micronutrients that are necessary for life. They are necessary for the production of energy, a healthy immune system and hundreds of other functions in the body.

Vitamins aren't the only substances that produce big benefits in small quantities. Phytonutrients are chemicals in plants that have health-promoting properties. These nutrients are getting more and more attention from researchers who are keeping score on our nutritional requirements.

Mineral Crunch

Do your meals contain plenty of calcium? If not, you may need supplements to keep your bones strong and help keep your weight down. One study, presented at the Experimental Biology 2003 meeting in San Diego, found that young women who consumed more calcium had better luck controlling their weight. In this research, it didn't take much calcium to make a difference in waistlines. Consuming just one more serving daily (a cup of milk or a thumb-sized piece of cheese, each of which contain about 300 mg of calcium) made, on average, about a two-pound difference.

In addition, many experts recommend multimineral supplements (along with multivitamins) to promote better health. A recent study of people with immune problems, for instance, found that those kinds of supplements seem to help boost the immune system (AT News 2004 Feb 27; 398:4-5).



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Vitanet ®

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Truth in Labeling
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Date: June 14, 2005 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Truth in Labeling

Truth in Labeling by Diane Stanton Energy Times, June 14, 2004

Do you or don't you read food labels when you shop? If you don't, you're missing out on a prime source of information about your meals. If you want control of your health, focus on package labels and pick your foods carefully.

The large print on food labels focus on what are called macronutrients: carbohydrates, fat and protein. Some of the smaller categories convey information about vitamins, fiber, and minerals, as well as the totals of fat and saturated fat contained in food. So, you have no excuse for claiming ignorance about your diet: the truth is in the labels.

Food labels can be confusing to the uninitiated. Go into a big food store and you can be faced with what seems to be a forest of food information: more than 15,000 labels. Add to that fact that every year more than 30,000 new food products can be introduced to the marketplace, and what you're faced with is a jungle of food labels.

That overwhelming wealth of food label information doesn't mean you should throw up your hands in dismay and give up reading and deciphering labels. You should arm yourself against that sea of labels with knowledge and, by understanding them, end your confusion and build your health.

Label History

A hundred years or so ago, food labels were only required to list the name of the food contained inside the package. The contents, quality and processes used to make the food were often a mystery. Little or no disclosure to consumers was made about how their food was created.

By the early 1920s, the federal government, via the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), began requiring food companies to list the net weight of food on labels as well as the names and addresses of food processors and distributors. Finally, by the 1970s, listing basic nutritional information was mandated in a uniform way so that shoppers could have some basis for comparing foods. Then, in 1990, the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act made major alterations to the kinds of labels that had to be included on food packages.

The FDA and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) required significant changes to food labels that were supposed to make it easier for consumers to eat healthier diets. The labels requirements of 1994 included five major changes:

  • • The nutrition information on the label had to be printed in larger, more legible type.
  • • This condensed information had to be on the back or side of food packaging and titled as "Nutrition Facts." This type of information is also shown in grocery stores near the fresh food displays of fish, fruits and vegetables.
  • • The label had to include a column of information tagged as the "% Daily Value," designed to help consumers understand how the food could fit into a healthy diet.
  • • Each label had to include information about fat, cholesterol, fiber, sugar, calories from fat, and other information relevant to designing a healthy diet.
  • • The computed serving sizes were supposed to be more realistic and reflect the amount of food people actually eat at one sitting.

    Label Questions

    Consumer questions regarding food labels have led researchers to look into ways to help shoppers comprehend what food labels tell them. These studies are designed to help consumers match up their nutrition requirements with the foods they buy.

    For instance, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, scientists have devised a label tool called See It, Do It, Teach It to help people improve their diets through comprehension of food label information. " One of the goals of the project was to help...teenaged girls and menopausal women understand how they can get the daily requirement for calcium into their diet in order to help prevent osteoporosis," says Karen Chapman-Novakofski, PhD, associate professor and nutritionist in the school's College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.

    According to the See It, Do It, Teach It program, you should think of food labels as consisting of two sections:

  • • Food items you should limit: total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium and, if you're eating a LOW-CARB diet, total carbohydrates
  • • What you may need to increase: vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron

    " Much more attention has been paid to what people should limit rather than the nutrients needed. The average consumer doesn't know, for instance, how much vitamin A 10% of the Daily Value is, or how much calcium 25% of the Daily Value is," Dr. Chapman-Novakofski says.

    Upping Calcium Intake

    In their eight-week study of people's calcium consumption (Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 4/04), the University of Illinois research team found that people didn't know how much calcium was in the food they ate.

    After the initial part of the study, in which participants were shown how to look for calcium on labels, "the post-test revealed that the participants significantly increased their calcium intake to 821 mg per day, up from 372 mg per day," notes Dr. Chapman-Novakofski.

    " That's a lot closer to the daily requirements of 1,200 mg per day for men and women over 50, 1,000 mg for men and women aged 19 through 50 and 1,300 mg per day for [youths aged] 9 to [18] years," she adds.

    Parts of the Label

    The first item at the top of a nutrition food label tells you the portion size that the label measures. An important point to remember: these sizes are determined individually by each manufacturer. Consequently, all of the other values on the label are measured per portion.

    So, if you are comparing foods made by two different companies that employ very different portion sizes in their nutritional calculations, your label comparisons may be complicated.

    Another fact to be aware of: the listed portion size may be an odd division of the food within the container and not reflect a common-sense division. For instance, some food packages are labeled as containing 2.5 portions.

    And, to make things even more interesting, small boxes of candy that you might think contain barely enough for one helping may be labeled by the manufacturer as having two or more portions. As a result, if you eat the whole box, you often have to at least double the number of indicated calories, etc. to figure out the nutrients and calories you are consuming.

    The section of the label that notes calories, calories from fat and percent daily values is listed under the portion size. Here you are told how many calories you consume when you devour one portion and how many of those calories are derived from fat.

    This label focus on fat originated when consumers and dietitians were very concerned about Americans' fat consumption and hadn't yet switched their focus to carbohydrate consumption as a prevalent dietary health priority.

    Also included on the label: the daily value percentages aimed at showing you how much out of a total day's intake of various nutrients a portion bestows upon you.

    These percentage numbers are based on a theoretical analysis of a diet that contains 2,000 or 2,500 calories a day. (A notation at the bottom of the label tells you whether the calculation is based on 2,000 or 2,500.)

    Carb Facts

    If you've been eating a LOW-CARB diet (or are planning this type of diet), the section of the label that lists carbohydrates may be especially useful. Under this heading, the label lists the totals for fiber and sugar.

    No matter what diet you are on, dietary fiber is desirable, since it represents indigestible carbohydrates that both pass through you without conveying any calories and keep beneficial bacteria in your digestive tract healthy.

    Most people want to limit their sugar totals, however, since this nutrient may raise your risk of being overweight and, when you eat a lot of it, may contribute to immune problems.

    Interestingly enough, when food chemists compute what is in food, they perform lab tests known as assays to distinguish its ingredients. (The manner in which these tests are performed are very strictly regulated by the FDA.)

    In fact, just about every nutrient listed on a food label is determined by laboratory test except for the carbohydrate content: the amount of water, fat, crude protein and ash are determined this way. But the total carbs are computed by simply subtracting the total of the other ingredients from the total amount of food, a kind of process of elimination.

    So while fat and protein are measured with precise lab tests, carbohydrate totals are figured by the leftovers. (The water and ash, by the way, are not usually listed on food labels.)

    Within the general carbohydrate group, are several categories of carbohydrates that produce very different effects in your body. These categories can be divided into sugar, sugar alcohols, dietary fiber and a collection of various chemicals that include organic acids, flavonoids, gums, lignans and others.

    According to the FDA, the food label only has to list the total carbs, sugar and dietary fiber. But some food companies now list things like sugar alcohols.

    Blood Sugar Effects

    Not all of these types of carbohydrates behave the same way in your body. For example, when your body digests table sugar, it turns immediately into blood sugar. So sugar and most other carbohydrate is what we call "digestible carbohydrate." Other carbs, such as sugar alcohol or glycerine, can be digested but do not turn to blood sugar. Still others, such as dietary fiber, are indigestible and pass through your body without impacting your blood sugar level.

    To date, the FDA has not focused on these important biochemical differences and treats all carbohydrates alike. This means that when you look at a food label, you do not see a number for the carbs that impact your blood sugar level. To do so, simply subtract the number of grams of fiber from the total number of carbohydrate grams.

    Net Carbs

    Recently, the phrases "low carb," "net carb" and "impact carbs" have begun to appear on food labels. These are not defined by the FDA; they were put on labels by by companies to help consumers pick out foods that are acceptable on LOW-CARB diets. To arrive at the total of net carbs, food companies subtract the total amount of fiber and sugar alcohol from the total carbohydrates.

    Fiber Calculations

    Since the body cannot digest fiber, this nutrient (which is still important for good health) is not calculated into the total amount of carbohydrates. As for sugar alcohols, while-technically speaking-these are carbs and they do have calories, they have little effect on blood sugar and usually are not counted in total carbohydrates.

    According to the American Dietetic Association, people with diabetes who are managing their blood sugars using the carbohydrate counting method should "count half of the grams of sugar alcohol as carbohydrates since half of the sugar alcohol on average is digested.

    " Fiber is not digested, however. If the serving of food has more then 5 grams of fiber one should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate grams." As you can see, when it comes to food, as in most things, knowledge is power. If you want power over your health, you need power over the food you eat. The road to that power is by reading food labels. What's in the food you're eating every day may surprise you.



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    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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    Power Meals - Shakes, smoothies and bars help make getting good nutrition easy.
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    Date: June 14, 2005 08:28 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Power Meals - Shakes, smoothies and bars help make getting good nutrition easy.

    Power Meals

    by Phyllis D. Light, RH Energy Times, March 12, 2004

    Choices, choices, choices: For convenience, nutrition and either low-calorie or LOW-CARB dieting, you now have an enviable range of choices. Shakes, smoothies and bars help make getting good nutrition easy.

    Whatever your inclination, drinks and bars offer a shortcut to daily nutrition without cooking. And whether you use them as meal replacements, diet aids or healthy snacks, these power meals fill you up without filling you out.

    That's the main reason these items have grown in popularity in natural food stores among the nutritionally knowledgeable searching for healthier alternatives to fast food.

    No matter how hectic your day, you have no excuses anymore for missing your daily required antioxidants and minerals. Either select a bar suited to your taste, or put your blender or food processor to work in creating drinks that use fresh fruits and veggies, yogurt, low-fat milk or ice and protein powders for maximum nutritional output.

    Quality note: always be sure to use organic foods for the best nutritional content, flavor and taste.

    Powerful Nutrition

    Prepared protein shake mixes and bars are ideal for losing weight, expanding personal energy or building muscle. Protein mixes are available in an assortment of flavors that are generally high in amino acids (protein building blocks) and low in carbohydrates. Of course if you are on a LOW-CARB diet, forsake putting fruits and vegetables in your shakes; these items are too high in carbohydrates.

    What's more, bars not only provide a wealth of different tastes, but different bars are also tailored to different needs-whether you're seeking to lose weight, gain muscle or replace a meal, there's a bar out there just for you.

    If you use power shakes as meal replacements and you are on a LOW-CARBohydrate diet, make sure the drink supplies plenty of protein and few carbohydrates. If you use either shakes or bars to replace one or more meals during the day, take a fiber supplement in addition. Fiber, which contains no calories, helps speed food through your digestive tract and may lower your risk of heart disease and cancer (Lancet 5/2/03).

    And remember: powders and bars should also be low in sugars and saturated fats. The weight-loss benefit: If you drink high-protein shakes or eat bars that taste good and leave you feeling satisfied, you'll have a better chance of sticking to your diet long enough to lose a significant amount of weight.

    Drink to Lose

    Research into weight loss has established protein shakes and bars as reliable diet aids. A study of 100 dieters between the age of 35 and 65 found that people who drank a daily soy protein shake lost more than 14 pounds each in three months (Eur J Clin Nutr 2003; 57:514). And in a study reported in the Journal of American Dietetic Association (3/01), folks who had a protein shake in place of one daily meal lost almost twice as much weight over 12 weeks than those who ate their regular food with the same amount of calories.

    Drinking your breakfast in the form of a protein shake can both increase your metabolism and help curb your appetite for the rest of the day.

    Researchers at Harvard University found that metabolism rose faster after eating a high-protein breakfast and that blood-sugar levels stayed high for about six hours after the meal (AHA Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and and Prevention, 3/6/03). In comparison, when a sugary breakfast is consumed, blood-sugar levels rise quickly but fall rapidly, causing fatigue, tiredness and sleepiness.

    Protein shakes are especially effective when you are on a weight-loss plateau, trying to lose those last few tenacious pounds. (But shakes, smoothies and bars should not be your only meals of the day. Eat at least one low-calorie meal daily to supply nutrients that may not be in your shakes or bars.)

    Smoothie Operator

    Made with fruits and vegetables, smoothies are a tasty way of getting extra amounts of nutrients and soluble fiber. Using low-fat milk, yogurt, buttermilk or kefir, plus ice, creates a tempting and wholesome blend that lights up the taste buds. Powdered mixes can be used for added protein.

    Fruits and vegetables in your smoothies not only fill you up on relatively few calories, but they boost your energy and supply plenty of bioflavonoids (healthy, natural chemicals from plants), antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.

    The fiber in smoothies can help reduce cholesterol, relieve constipation and aid in the prevention of high blood pressure. For reduced calories and added heart health benefits, low-fat or no-fat milk products can be used in place of cream or regular milk in most recipes. For the best taste sensation, combine sour and sweet fruits together.

    Adding raw fruits and vegetables to smoothies provides natural enzymes that help with digestion and act as catalysts in hundreds of chemical reactions throughout the body. (You can also take enzymes in supplemental form.) Enzymes are not present in cooked foods since the heat of cooking destroys them.

    Nutrition for Kids

    If you have trouble getting your children to eat their fruits and vegetables, try giving them smoothies. Children can't resist these naturally sweet and healthy creations.

    According to Sally Fallon, author of Nourishing Traditions (New Trends Publishing), smoothies should be "high in quality, contain healthy fats, be naturally sweet, and contain fresh seasonal fruits and vegetables."

    Fallon also believes children should consume what are called lacto-fermented foods, including yogurt and kefir, which are aged to contain the kinds of friendly bacteria that normally live within our digestive tracts. For kids, Fallon also encourages the use of cream or cultured milk to ensure adequate fat and calcium, so important for the development of growing bodies.

    Smoothies are an interactive drink as far as children are concerned, since they love to help blend them. For extra nutrition power, add nutritional yeast, nut butters or ground flaxseeds. These supply additional vitamins and minerals, along with healthy fats. You can also add silken tofu to bump up the protein content. If your child is lactose intolerant, try mixing smoothies with rice milk, soy milk or juice.

    Bars Designed With A Woman's Needs in Mind

    The modern woman is a multitasking wonder, constantly juggling work and home responsibilities. So it's no wonder that bars aimed at women are among the most popular bars there are. Many women, in eyeing the bathroom scale, shortchange themselves of the nutrients they need. That's why a woman's bar needs to provide minerals like calcium, a bone-building necessity.

    Women also need to ensure that a bar contains enough of the B vitamins, particularly folate. This is especially true if a woman is pregnant, or wants to be: Folate is crucial in helping to prevent neural tube birth defects.

    Folate also teams up with two other B vitamins, B6 and B12, to control homocysteine. This protein metabolism byproduct, when present in excessive amounts, is associated with heart disease.

    Another popular ingredient in women's bars is soy, which has been duly recognized for its heart benefits. Studies also indicate that soy may help keep bones strong. (Not to mention the fact that the moisture soy holds helps make a bar's texture that much more appealing!)

    The Protein Game

    If you are unsure about how much protein you need each day, you are not alone. Are you getting too much, not enough, or just enough? Most people need between 45 and 60 grams of protein daily, and most protein shakes contain about 14 and 20 grams of protein per serving (check your labels). No matter what your nutritional needs are, you may find an answer in a smoothie, shake or bar. When it comes to power nutrition, tasting is believing!



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    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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    Gluco Sciense - Take Control of your Blood Sugar ...
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    Date: June 02, 2005 10:51 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Gluco Sciense - Take Control of your Blood Sugar ...

    Gluco Sciense for Blood sugar

    Sedentary lifestyles, obesity, and sugar-rich diets are prevalent in our society. The result: challenges to your multiple, interdependent body systems involved with blood sugar levels and insulin activity. Now is the time to learn how a healthy diet and lifestyle can help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. For further support, Source Naturals offers you GLUCO-SCIENCE™, a breakthrough formula. GLUCO-SCIENCE is uniquely effective because it is a Bio-Aligned Formula™. Source Naturals evaluates the underlying causes of system imbalances. Then we design formulas that provide targeted nutrition to bring your interrelated body systems back into balance. GLUCO-SCIENCE can help bring your body’s systems for carbohydrate metabolism back into alignment.

  • GLUCO-SCIENCE™ Maintains Healthy Blood Sugar Levels When Used as Part of Your Diet

    A Bio-Aligned Formula™

    GLUCO-SCIENCE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula, based on the newest clinical research into key herbs and special ingredients. Source Naturals studied the scientific research, and then designed GLUCO-SCIENCE. This Bio- Aligned Formula provides targeted nutrition to five different body systems involved with healthy blood sugar levels and insulin activity.

    Glucose/Carbohydrate Metabolism

    GLUCO-SCIENCE supports glucose/carbohydrate metabolism with a range of nutrients. B-vitamins are required for glycolysis and the Krebs cycle, the metabolic pathways by which the body converts glucose into cellular energy. Chromium is believed to work closely with insulin to facilitate the uptake of glucose into cells. Manganese is also involved in glucose uptake. The formula also features herbs from several traditions, such as Gymnema sylvestre.

    Insulin/Pancreatic Activity

    Insulin is secreted by the pancreas in response to high blood glucose levels after meals. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter cells to provide fuel for cellular energy. Certain nutrients (see chart) support these vital metabolic processes, including mediation of insulin release and activity, and enhancing insulin sensitivity. N-acetyl cysteine protects pancreatic beta cells from oxidative damage in animal studies. In addition, vanadium, zinc, and selenium are notable for their insulin-like actions.

    Heart and Circulatory System

    Vitamin E supports a healthy lipid status, while myricetin has been shown in animal studies to influence triglyceride levels. Gymnema sylvestre and vitamin C are involved with lipid metabolism. Additional heart-healthy ingredients include CoQ10, garlic, fenugreek, and hawthorn.

    Nervous System

    Antioxidants are important for a healthy nervous system. Lipoic acid helps prevent lipid peroxidation, which can impact nerve function. Many B-vitamins are vital to the metabolic processes of the nerves or are present in the phospholipids of cell membranes. Methylcobalamin, an active form of vitamin B-12, supports the central nervous system. Other supportive ingredients are included (see chart).

    Vision

    GLUCO-SCIENCE provides antioxidants, nutrients and herbs with an affinity for eyes and the physiological processes involved in sight. Alpha-lipoic acid, quercetin, and vitamin C support healthy lens function. Bilberry, shown to support microcirculation in animal studies, is widely recognized for supporting vision.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Blood Sugar Levels: A Strategy for WellnessSM

  • • Eat a Glucose-Healthy Diet: Fiber: Soluble fiber helps modulate glucose absorption and lowers plasma cholesterol levels. Adding 50 grams per day to your diet could help lower blood sugar up to 10%. Foods high in soluble fiber include oranges, grapefruits, raisins, zucchini, oatmeal, oat bran, strawberries and apples. Viscous fibers, including guar gum, psyllium, and galactomannan can be helpful— they should be taken with liquid and mixed with carbohydrate foods. Protein: A high-protein, LOW-CARBohydrate diet is associated with healthy blood sugar levels. Fat: Too much fat may increase your risk for heart disease and/or hardening of the arteries, which compromises circulation. Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, however, are helpful for managing blood sugar. Glycemic Index: Avoid sugar and other foods with a high glycemic index. Different carbohydrates evoke different glycemic responses. Beans, peas, and oats, for example, raise blood glucose levels much less than bread and potatoes. The Glycemic Index, a useful educational tool in choosing foods to help modulate blood glucose levels, is available in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition [1995;62:871S-93S (88)], or go to the Internet at www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm.
  • • Maintain a Healthy Weight: If you are overweight, lose weight. Although a Body Mass Index (BMI) between 18.5 and 22 is considered “healthy,” problems arise at a BMI of 22, especially for women.
  • • Exercise: Exercise lowers blood sugar and helps reduce risks associated with elevated levels, such as nerve and eye damage. Exercise also improves insulin sensitivity, and supports heart function and circulation. Try to get 20-45 minutes of aerobic exercise at least 3 days per week.
  • • Maintain Healthy Blood Pressure Levels: If your blood pressure is 140 over 90 or higher, you are more likely to experience challenges to healthy blood sugar levels. Eat a “DASH Diet” containing 8-10 servings of fresh fruits and vegetables, 2-3 servings of low-fat dairy products and less than 2,400 mg of sodium per day.
  • • Stop Smoking: Smoking raises glucose levels and aggravates related health problems.
  • • Manage Stress: During stress, the level of many hormones increases and stores of glucose are released into your bloodstream, clogging and weakening vessels and capillaries. You can relax and reverse the hormonal response to stress by practicing deep breathing, meditating or doing yoga, exercising regularly, or talking with friends, family, or a support group.

    Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar levels with Gluco-sciense.

    Glucose/Carbohydrate Metabolism American Ginseng, Bitter Melon, Blueberry, Fenugreek, Gymnema sylvestre, Maitake, Myricetin, Pterocarpus marsupium, Chromium, Magnesium, Manganese, Vitamins B-1, B-2, B-5, B-6 & B-12, Biotin, Inositol, Niacinamide Insulin/Pancreatic Activity alpha-Lipoic Acid, Bitter Melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Maitake Fruit Body, Myricetin, N-acetyl-L-Cysteine, Pterocarpus marsupium, Taurine, Chromium, Manganese, Selenium, Vanadium, Zinc Heart and Circulatory System Bilberry, Blueberry, CoQ10, Fenugreek, Garlic, Grape Seed, Gymnema sylvestre, Hawthorn, Myricetin, Taurine, Siberian Ginseng, Magnesium, Selenium, Vitamins B-6, C & E, Folic Acid, Niacinamide Nervous System alpha-Lipoic acid, Glutamine, Magnesium, Taurine, Vitamins B-1 & B-6, Biotin, Choline, Inositol, Methylcobalamin Vision alpha-Lipoic Acid, Bilberry, Quercetin, Taurine, Zinc, Vitamins B-6, C & E



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    VitaNEt ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

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    KetoJuice Smoothie
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    Date: May 21, 2005 01:33 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: KetoJuice Smoothie

    KETOjuice™ Smoothies provide a creamy and delicious way to enjoy the tremendous nutritional benefits of fruits and vegetables, which help to supercharge all LOW-CARB diets and maximize results. Each incredibly delicious serving contains only 2 grams of carbohydrates, yet provides 23 grams of non-GMO soy protein.

    tasty snack in the afternoon after a hard days work. tastes best when blended with some ice.



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    VitaNet®
    VitaNet ® Staff





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