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Brain tumor vanishes in 'Miracle Baby' after family chooses cannabinoid oil Darrell Miller 12/2/16
What Are The Symptoms Of GABA Deficiency? Darrell Miller 9/5/11
Neurological Health and CoQ10 Darrell Miller 2/25/07
Carnitine Creatinate Darrell Miller 12/8/05
Cinnamon may control sugar levels... Darrell Miller 7/8/05
MECHANISMS OF CHITOSAN FAT- BINDING Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Your Healthy Harvest Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Certified Foods Darrell Miller 6/12/05
the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) ... Darrell Miller 5/26/05



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Brain tumor vanishes in 'Miracle Baby' after family chooses cannabinoid oil
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Date: December 02, 2016 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Brain tumor vanishes in 'Miracle Baby' after family chooses cannabinoid oil





The spontaneous disappearance of a tumor is referred to as a vanishing tumor. Most vanishing tumors in the brain are eventually diagnosed as malignant tumors or multiple sclerosis. However, their long-term clinical course remains unclear. This study aims to elucidate the management of vanishing tumors in the brain. Patients with vanishing tumors should be followed up carefully by Magnetic resonance imaging for at least 5 years, even after the disappearance of an enhancing lesion.

Key Takeaways:

  • There is nothing quite so horrendous and heartbreaking as a baby with a malignant brain tumor, especially for parents and family.
  • the father of an eight-month-old baby decided he would shun traditional radiation treatment and chemotherapy and instead push for an alternative treatment using cannabis oil.
  • This makes sense, because numerous studies have shown that cannabis has incredible healing qualities, and that is particularly true for cancers.

"At four months the tumor had completely disappeared, and after eight months of treatment, the brain architecture and tissues were completely normal, making the toddler a miracle baby in Courtney's words."



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/056022_cannabis_oil_brain_tumors_medical_marijuana.html

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What Are The Symptoms Of GABA Deficiency?
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Date: September 05, 2011 11:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Symptoms Of GABA Deficiency?

Gaba Overview

In this modern age many of our illnesses comes from the lack of certain substances, chemicals or enzymes just to name a few possibilities but the list could go on. They are called so many different things but they all have one thing in common and that’s being essential to our day to day bodily functions. In this writing we will look into possible symptoms of GABA deficiency.

GABA or Gamma aminobutyric Acid

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an essential neurotransmitter in the body. Its main function is as an inhibitor which mainly focuses on regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system and another function that this chemical has it to aid in the regulation of muscle tone in human beings. In terms of its chemical makeup it is essentially an amino acid however it is very seldom to be called that in the scientific community.

The reason mainly for this is because it is not an alpha amino acid and is never incorporated with a protein which what the term amino acid is commonly reserved for in the medical science world. GABA, to keep things simple is mainly essential to the nervous system and brain health. It is responsible for the maintenance of our nervous system functions and some parts of the brain by allowing the nerves to complete the processes needed to get all the necessary chemicals to keep nerve functions healthy.

GABA Deficiency and Symptoms

As a neurotransmitter it has the ability to influence relaxation and aid in preventing anxiety when GABA levels are too low in the body there are a variety of unwanted effects that can happen. The reasons for GABA being too low in the body can possibly be two things, it can either be genetic or acquired reasons. Just to name some specific possible factors in GABA levels being low are chronic stress and chronic pain. Furthermore, inadequate sleep, caffeine excess, excessive electroMagnetic radiation and progesterone deficiency may also further initiate the lowering of GABA levels in the body. With GABA being an essential neurotransmitter the first symptom that may arise with a lack of this brain chemical in the body is expectedly anxiety and depression.

Many studies have shown individuals that suffer from some form of anxiety and depression commonly has low levels of GABA in their body and it has also confirmed that when subjects are supplemented with this brain chemical in an attempt to raise levels in the body they are alleviated of the incidence of depression and anxiety. Feeling panicky, nervous and having a low tolerance for stress are also possible symptoms and also have been shown in researches to be alleviated through GABA supplementation. The most common medication for people suffering from these symptoms is valium and as most of us know, even for those who haven’t used it, it has nasty side effects and one of them is addiction to it however more natural means of supplementing with GABA will be able to give the same desired improvements but with lesser side effects.

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Neurological Health and CoQ10
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Date: February 25, 2007 12:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Neurological Health and CoQ10

Between 1946 and 1965, 78 million Americans were born, creating the largest number of children in U.S. history. This Baby Boom generation has greatly influenced the makeup of American society and undoubtedly w ill continue to do so. Thanks to good nutrition and health care, Baby Boomers are aging well and have an excellent life expectancy. For the first time in history, we have more people turning 60 every day, and record numbers of adults reaching their seventh decade. As a result, neurological diseases associated with aging, such as Parkinson’s disease, are becoming major health care concerns. The good news is CoQ10 has applications for neurological diseases, in addition to its better known use for cardiovascular diseases.

Q. What is CoQ10?

A. CoQ10 is a natural, fat-soluble nutrient present in virtually all cells. CoQ10 also is known as ubiquinone (existing everywhere there is human life). CoQ10 is vital to the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is the energy-rich compound used for all energy-requiring processes in the body.

Q. Isn’t CoQ10 a supplement for heart health?

A. Yes, it is. Because the heart requires lots of ATP to meet its high energy needs, CoQ10’s function in heart health is well understood. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that when individuals with heart disease take CoQ10, their symptoms improve, sometimes quite dramatically. Supplemental CoQ10 improves the heart’s pumping ability, improves blood circulation, increases tolerance to exercise, and improves the heart’s muscle tone. CoQ10 also is a powerful antioxidant and protects heart tissue from free-radical damage.

Q. How does CoQ10 affect brain health?

A. CoQ10 works in the brain the same way it works elsewhere in the body: it’s essential to ATP production. Nearly all human cells contain tiny structures called mitochondria. Mitochondria are referred to as cell powerhouses because they produce cellular energy. Depending on what each cell’s job is. There can be several thousand mitochondria in one cell. If a cell needs a lot of energy, it will have more mitochondria. This explains why heart cells contain so many mitochondria; the continual pumping of blood requires continual ATP production.

The brain also requires huge amounts of uninterrupted energy to regulate, integrate, and coordinate ongoing nervous system transmissions. To meet this need, ATP production within the mitochondria of brain cells is vital. Since CoQ10 exerts such a powerful influence on heart cells in ATP production, it was a natural progression for scientists to wonder how it affects brain cells. Brain and nervous system research led to the conclusion that the same intracellular principles apply. CoQ10 is produced in the body to assist in ATP production. Without it, ATP cannot be produced.

The most important discovery regarding CoQ10 and the brain is that CoQ10, when formulated with certain ingredients, can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain’s mitochondria. If large amounts of CoQ10 can get into the brain cell’s mitochondria, its ability to make ATP is greatly enhanced.

Q. What is the blood-brain barrier and why is it important?

A. The blood-brain barrier is a unique anatomical structure. The cells that make up the blood vessels that provide blood to the brain are extremely close together. This greatly restricts what can leave the bloodstream and enter the brain. While the blood-brain barrier protects the brain and spinal cord from potentially toxic substances, it also can be a significant obstacle to therapy of central nervous system disorders. Only substances with certain solubilities or those that have a transport system can cross the blood-brain barrier to a significant degree.

Obtaining optimal absorption of CoQ10 is difficult. The CoQ10 molecule is large and inflexible. The easiest and least expensive way to increase absorption levels is with the use of harsh solvents such as propylene glycol. However, at higher doses, these types of chemicals are considered dangerous (neurotoxic) to the person with a serious neurodegenerative disease. It is more difficult, as well as more expensive (considering raw materials, research, and proper manufacturing methods) to promote absorption with less harmful alternatives. However, reputable companies ensure that their products are safe for all their customers. Look for CoQ10 products formulated with vitamin E and other safe ingredients such as Micosolle.

Nearly all CoQ10 supplements enter the bloodstream. But, only CoQ10 supplements with special formulations have been scientifically shown to enter the mitochondria and cross the blood-brain barrier.

Q. If CoQ10 is made in the body, why take supplements?

A. While CoQ10 is synthesized in the body, these levels may be insufficient to meet the body’s requirements. Researchers have discovered CoQ10 levels diminish with age and as a result of dietary inadequacies and various disease states. They also have determined some medications significantly reduce CoQ10 levels in the body.

Although CoQ10 exists in some dietary sources, it may not be realistic to obtain CoQ10 through food alone. For example, it would take approximately 3 pounds of sardines, 7 pounds of beef, or 8 pounds of peanuts to equal 100 mg of supplemental CoQ10.

Q. How does CoQ10 help people with Parkinson’s disease?

A. CoQ10 seems to have several beneficial actions in the illness. Researchers have looked at mitochondria in brain cells and determined people with Parkinson’s disease have reduced activity of Complex I in the electron transport chain. Recent research has proposed the reduced activity of Complex I interferes with the brain-signaling chemical dopamine. Stored and newly synthesized dopamine is depleted. The dopamine depletion causes nerve cell degeneration.

A recent clinical study involved 80 patients with Parkinson’s disease (both men and women). The researchers first evaluated all the participants to establish scores for basic motor skills (measuring the ability to control physical movements such as walking), mental status (whether the person was depressed or experiencing memory loss) and the activities of daily living (whether the person was experiencing difficulty with handwriting, dressing themselves, using utensils such as knives and forks, and so on). This scale is known as the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). This process is known as establishing “baseline values,” that is, the condition of the patient before receiving any treatment.

Participants were divided into 4 groups. Each group received either 300 mg, 600 mg, or 1200 mg of the special form of CoQ10, or a placebo. The researchers observed the participants for 16 months.

The results of the study showed that all the participants who received CoQ10 had smaller declines in function compared to the placebo group, but the smallest decline was experienced by the group taking the highest amount of the special form of CoQ10.

The most significant results were noted specifically in the activities of daily living scores by the people taking 1200 mg of CoQ10 daily. These people retained better ability to feed and dress themselves, speak, walk, and bathe or shower by themselves. They maintained greater independence for a longer time. Parkinson’s disease, as with other neurodegenerative diseases, robs the sufferer of their ability to control the movements of their own body and care for themselves. Supplementation with CoQ10, while not a cure, is the first intervention that showed a slowing in the progressive deterioration of the function associated with this disease.

Q. What were the results of clinical research on Huntington’s Disease?

A. A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study respected type of study, was conducted at the University of Rochester. All of the 347 Huntington’s disease (HD) patients were experiencing some HD symptoms, but were still in the early stages of the disease. The patients (who did not know which drug they were receiving) were randomly assigned to four different treatment groups: 25 percent received Remacemide, 25 percent received CoQ10, 25 percent received both, and 25 percent received a placebo, or sugar pill. The researchers, who also did not know which patients got which drug, watched and recorded their progress for two and one-half years. Remacemide is a new drug made by Astra Seneca that blocks the neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain, that has long been suspected of contributing to the death of brain cells in Huntington’s disease.

Unfortunately, in the CARE-HD study, Remacemide had no effect on the progression of the disease in patients in the early stages. However, the individuals who received 600 mg of CoQ10 per day experienced some slowing of the disease progression. They were able to manage daily activities, such as meal preparation, housekeeping tasks, and personal care longer than those not on CoQ10. They were also able to focus their attention better and were less depressed and irritable. The portion of the studied patients receiving 600 mg of CoQ10 per day experienced a 15 percent decline in the progression of HD. According to the researchers conducting the study, a 15 percent decline in the progression of HD would roughly translate into approximately one more year of independence for patients. This is the very first study from more than a dozen Huntington’s disease patient trails that showed any modification of the course of the illness.

Of note, the effects of the CoQ10 had not abated at the end of the research study. That is, the benefit of using CoQ10, 600 mg per day, was still increasing; this suggests that the longer a patient supplements with CoQ10, the greater the decline in the progression of HD. The next phase of the CARE-HD research will test a higher dose of CoQ10 (1200 mg or more per day), with more patients (over 1000), for a longer period of time (approximately 5 years). This study should improve our understanding of the optimal dose and the total achievable decline in the progression of HD. The CoQ10 product used in the CARE-HD study was designated an Orphan Drug by the FDA. The product utilizes a proprietary, patent-pending delivery mechanism, which is proven to be safe and tolerable at high doses for people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, substantially improving brain tissue levels of CoQ10.

Q. What other diseases could benefit from CoQ10 supplementation?

A. Studies show CoQ10 levels are greatly reduced in Alzheimer’s patients. Mitochondrial abnormalities also are noted; however, research has yet to determine how or why this occurs. Some scientists believe damage to mitochondria is an early feature of the disease. Free-radical damage also is a feature of Alzheimer’s.

In a study of 27 Alzheimer’s patients, subjects were given 60 mg of CoQ10, 150 mg of iron, and 180 mg of vitamin B6 daily. Each patient’s mitochondria activity was effectively activated. All patients continued to experience gradual decline. However, researchers believed that with this combination, the progression was much slower and allowed the patients to experience 1 to 2 years of extended good health.

ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) is a progressive, fatal, neurological disease. It occurs when the nerve cells in the brain that control voluntary movement gradually degenerate. Investigation of CoQ10 in individuals with ALS is just beginning. Researchers at the Eleanor and Lou Gehrig ALS Center at Columbia University recently conducted a small clinical pilot trial of CoQ10 in ALS. The study was an open label study, which meant that everyone enrolled received CoQ10, 400 mg three times per day. Of the 16 patients originally enrolled, nine patients completed the study. Six of these nine patients experienced some benefits. The patients declined from 0 – 25 percent in functional scores, 6 percent in strength, and 10 percent in breathing ability. These scores reflect a positive trend compared to the 50 percent decline that is seen in the natural history of ALS over the same period of time (5 to 9 months). Citing the need to conduct more studies of the effectiveness of CoQ10 for people with ALS is rapidly and efficiently as possible to get answers to patients and clinicians, another clinical trial is currently underway at the Gehrig ALS Center. This is a pilot study to determine if CoQ10 has short-term effects on motor nerves in the brain using Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The researchers are going to try to “see” if CoQ10 can change the chemical sin the brain’s upper motor nerves of people with ALS, an important next step of the investigation.

Q. Can taking CoQ10 prevent neurodegenerative disease?

A. To date, there have been no studies or research examining whether CoQ10 can prevent these diseases.

Alzheimer’s disease prevention is being clinically investigated. Researchers have determined that people who take certain anti-inflammatory medications seem less likely to develop the illness. A large, multi-centered trial is studying this connection.

Q. How much CoQ10 should I take?

A. Depending on your family history of neurological disease and your disease experience, studies show benefits at doses of 100 to 200 mg of CoQ10 daily. Some studies used doses of up to 1,200 mg per day.

CoQ10’s safety has been evaluated. To date, no toxicities have been reported. Mild stomach upset may occur. Taking CoQ10 with meals usually alleviates this rare effect.

Q. What should I look for in a CoQ10 supplement?

A. Use products which have a strong clinical research track record, supported by product-specific research from reputable institutions, and have been proven to be safe, tolerable and effective in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The CoQ10 product you choose should be proven to: be absorbed, enter the blood stream, cross the blood brain barrier and increase mitochondrial levels of CoQ10. If the product you are considering does not have evidence to support these points, keep looking. Once you have found a candidate, examine the product’s safety and efficacy record for neurodegenerative diseases- if the product has not been proven to be safe and effective, keep looking. Good products exist; however, caveat emptor.

Conclusion

CoQ10 supplementation for people with neurodegenerative diseases is supported by contemporary clinical research. CoQ10 is certainly not the only answer to the complex issues of management and treatment of these types of diseases. However, research indicates that it is a bigger piece of the puzzle than physicians and scientists ever imagined. As we continue to study this naturally occurring compound, we are finding more and more benefits to the body.

All CoQ10 is not created equal. For safety and overall effectiveness, use a CoQ10 product that is supported by product-specific research from reputable institution, which is proven to be safe, tolerable and effective at high doses; deviating from this set of criteria may do more harm than good for people with these serious illnesses. Choose clinically tested products from a well-respected company and increase the potential to achieve and maintain brain and neurological health.



--
Buy Coenzyme Q10 (COQ10) at Vitanet

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Carnitine Creatinate
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Date: December 08, 2005 03:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Carnitine Creatinate

Carnitine Creatinate

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 6/30/05

LIKELY USERS: Athletes, Bodybuilders, Dieters, People who consume a lot of fat, People needing cardiovascular support (energy for the heart), People who need quick energy, especially for fast muscle response, People with muscle wasting problems (including the elderly), Weightlifters

KEY INGREDIENTS: L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate is a specialized form of Creatine bonded to L-Carnitine. Creatine is a compound natural to the human body that aids in the regeneration of ATP, the chemical energy used by muscle tissue. During exercise, large quantities of creatine are irreversibly consumed. Clinical studies have shown that oral supplementation with Creatine can increase the amount of Creatine available in muscles for ATP production. L-Carnitine is an amino acid that is necessary for the transfer of fatty acids into the fat-burning parts of the cell, facilitating energy production from fat. The combination of these two compounds can produce a synergistic effect, making NOW® Carnitine Creatinate an ideal energy supplement.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: Carnitine and Creatinate Monohydrate is a patented ingredient that has been the subject of research studies. It is supported by the scientific staff in the laboratories of both NOW Foods and the raw material supplier, both of which have a mutual interest in protecting the integrity and efficacy of this product. Protected by U.S. Patent No. 5,994,581 (L-Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate).

Look at the price: this is a better way to buy both supplements than purchasing them separately.

This formula is suitable for vegetarians and is offered in both tablet and powder forms.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: As a dietary supplement, every two tablets provide 1,000 mg. (one gram) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Or one teaspoon provides 1,150 mg.) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Take one or more servings per day with a carbohydrate source, such as fruit juice or sports drinks.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: CoQ10, carbohydrates, B-Complex vitamins, chromium, vanadium, Hawthorn leaf and flower extract, protein supplements. Adaptogenic herbs: ginsengs, Eleuthero, Rhodiola, Maca, Ashwaganda, licorice root

CAUTIONS: none.

PRODUCT SPECIFIC: This product is very sensitive to moisture. Please keep in the original packaging or in a moisture resistant container. Do not take more than 20 grams per day. Discontinue use if cramps of stomach upset occur, especially if taking large doses. Do not take if kidney disease is present. Do not use large doses of caffeine with creatine, as it may increase the possibility of muscle cramping.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. When taking any new supplement, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time to avoid any potential problems.

Packages may contain moisture or oxygen controlling packets or canisters that are not intended for consumption. In order to maintain maximum freshness, please do not remove these from your bottle (until the bottle is empty). Please recycle your container.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

Fang S-M (1998) Carnitine Creatinate. U.S. Patent 5,994,581.

L-CARNITINE:

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Casey A, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Howell S, et al. Creatine supplementation favorably affects performance and muscle metabolism during maximal intensity exercise in humans. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E31-E7.

Earnest CP, Almada AL, Mitchell TL. High-performance capillary electrophoresis-pure creatine monohydrate reduces blood lipids in men and women. Clin Sci 1996;91:113-8.

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Felber S, Skladal D, Wyss M, et al. Oral creatine supplementation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a clinical and 31P Magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Neurol Res 2000;22:145-50.

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Green AL, Hultman E, Macdonald IA, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments skeletal muscle creatine accumulation during creatine supplementation in man. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E821–6.

Green AL, Simpson EJ, Littlewood JJ, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments creatine retention during creatine feeding in humans. Acta Physiol Scand 1996;158:195-202.

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Greenhaff PL, Bodin K, Soderlund K, et al. Effect of oral creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle phosphocreatine resynthesis. Am J Physiol 1994;266:E725-30.

Greenhaff PL, Casey A, Short AH, et al. Influence of oral creatine supplementation on muscle torque during repeated bouts of maximal voluntary exercise in man. Clin Sci 1993;84:565-71.

Harris RC, Soderlund K, Hultman E. Elevation of creatine in resting and exercised muscle of normal subjects by creatine supplementation. Clin Sci 1992;83:367-74.

Hultman E, Soderlund K, Timmons J, et al. Muscle creatine loading in man. J Appl Physiol 1996;81:232–7.

Juhn MS, O’Kane JW, Vinci DM. Oral creatine supplementation in male collegiate athletes: a survey of dosing habits and side effects. J Am Diet Assoc 1999;99:593–5.

Kreider RB, Ferreira M, Wilson M, et al. Effects of creatine supplementation on body composition, strength, and sprint performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1998;30:73-82.

Poortmans JR, Auquier H. Renaut V, et al. Effect of short-term creatine supplementation on renal responses in men. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 1997;76:566–7.

Poortmans JR, Francaux M. Long-term oral creatine supplementation does not impair renal function in healthy athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999;31:1108–10.

Pritchard NR, Kaira PA. Renal dysfunction accompanying oral creatine supplements. Lancet 1998;351:1252–3 [letter].

Sewell DA, Robinson TM, Casey A, et al. The effect of acute dietary creatine supplementation upon indices of renal, hepatic and haematological function in human subjects. Proc Nutr Soc 1998;57:17A.

Silber ML. Scientific facts behind creatine monohydrate as a sports nutrition supplement. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 1999;39:179–88 [review].

Sipila I, Rapola J, Simell O, et al. Supplementary creatine as a treatment for gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina. N Engl J Med 1981;304:867-70.

Stone MH, Sanborn K, Smith LL, et al. Effects of in-season (5-weeks) creatine and pyruvate supplementation on anaerobic performance and body composition in American football players. Int J Sport Nutr 1999;9:146-65.

Stout JR, Eckerson J, Noonan D, et al. The effects of a supplement designed to augment creatine uptake on exercise performance and fat-free mass in football players. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1997;29:S251.

Tarnopolsky MA. Potential benefits of creatine monohydrate supplementation in the elderly. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2000;3:497-502 [review].

Tarnopolsky M, Martin J. Creatine monohydrate increases strength in patients with neuromuscular disease. Neurology 1999;52:854-7.

Tarnopolsky MA, Roy BD, MacDonald JR. A randomized, controlled trial of creatine monohydrate in patients with mitochondrial cytopathies. Muscle Nerve 1997;20:1502-9.

Toler SM. Creatine is an ergogen for anaerobic exercise. Nutr Rev 1997;55:21-5 [review].

Vandenberghe K, Gills N, Van Leemputte M, et al. Caffeine counteracts the ergogenic action of muscle creatine loading. J Appl Physiol 1996;80:452–7.

Vandenberghe K, Goris M, Van Hecke P, et al. Long-term creatine intake is beneficial to muscle performance during resistance training. J Appl Physiol 1997;83:2055-63.

Walter MC, Lochmuller H, Reilich P, Klopstock T, Huber R, Hartard M, Hennig M, Pongratz D, Muller-Felber W. Creatine monohydrate in muscular dystrophies: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Neurology. 2000 May 9;54(9):1848-50. PMID: 10802796

Walter MC, Reilich P, Lochmuller H, Kohnen R, Schlotter B, Hautmann H, Dunkl E, Pongratz D, Muller-Felber W. Creatine monohydrate in myotonic dystrophy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. J Neurol. 2002 Dec;249(12):1717-22. PMID: 12529796



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Cinnamon may control sugar levels...
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 08, 2005 10:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cinnamon may control sugar levels...

Best Cinnamon

  • Use as Part of Your Diet to Help Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*
  • HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS
  • Cinnamon,
    a staple ingredient in apple pie, has remained one of the
    world's favorite spices throughout recorded history. The
    evergreen cinnamon tree (Cinnamomum verum), considered to be
    true cinnamon, is native to Sri Lanka. Chinese cinnamon
    (Cinnamomum cassia or Cinnamomum aromaticum), the cinnamon most
    commonly sold in the U.S., goes by the name “Cassia.” Usage of
    cinnamon in Chinese medicine is said to date back over 4,000
    years. Mentioned in the Bible, cinnamon was imported to Egypt
    and Europe from the Far East by 500 B.C. In addition to its
    value as culinary spice, cinnamon has traditionally been
    utilized as a folk medicine for colds and minor digestive
    complaints. True cinnamon and cassia are very similar; cassia
    has a more pungent flavor. Cassia buds can be found in potpourri
    and used as a flavoring agent in sweets and
    beverages.1

    Recent research has revealed that constituents in
    cinnamon bark called procyanidin Type-A polymers help maintain
    the body's ability to metabolize glucose in a healthy way.* Best
    Cinnamon Extract is Cinnulin PF®, a patented, water extract of
    Cinnamon that contains Type-A polymers. Cinnulin PF® is a
    registered trademark of Integrity Nutraceuticals International
    and is manufactured under US Patent #
    6,200,569.

    Benefits

    Use as Part of Your Diet to Help
    Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*

    In Vitro and Animal
    Studies

    Research has revealed that a number of herbs and
    spices have insulin-like activity.2 In a study by the U.S.
    Department of Agriculture (USDA), cinnamon demonstrated the
    greatest ability to stimulate cellular glucose metabolism among
    49 botanicals tested.3

    In a 2001 study, researchers at the
    USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center showed that bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon trigger an insulin-like response in fat
    cells.4 These compounds stimulated glucose uptake into cells and
    increased glycogen (stored glucose) production via activation of
    the enzyme, glycogen synthase.

    The bioactive compounds in
    cinnamon appear to potentiate insulin activity at the level of
    the cell receptor for insulin. It has been shown that insulin
    resistance involves down regulation of “insulin signaling”
    characterized by dephosphorylation of the receptor.5 Enzymes
    called “protein tyrosine kinases” (PTPases) are believed to
    decrease receptor phosphorylation, and increased PTPase activity
    has been observed in insulin resistant rats.6 Cinnamon compounds
    have demonstrated the in vitro ability to inhibit PTP-1 and
    increase autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor.7

    In a
    recent animal study, cinnamon (cassia) extract was administered
    to rats for three weeks. Following this, the rats were infused
    with insulin and glucose to assess their insulin response.
    Increased phosphorylation of the insulin receptor was observed
    in skeletal muscle of these rats, suggesting that cinnamon has
    the ability to potentiate insulin function by normalizing
    insulin signaling, leading to improved uptake of glucose into
    skeletal muscle.8

    Until recently, the precise molecular
    structure of the bioactive compounds in cinnamon had not been
    clearly defined. The USDA has now determined that the bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon are water-soluble procyanidin Type-A
    polymers of catechin and epicatechin. In a 2004 study, type-A
    polymers were isolated from cinnamon and characterized by
    nuclear Magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Type-A
    polymers were found to increase in vitro insulin activity by a
    factor of 20. Type-A polymers also exhibited antioxidant
    activity, as measured by inhibition of free radical production
    in platelets. These results suggest that, in addition to
    regulating glucose metabolism, cinnamon may help protect cell
    membranes by controlling the lipid peroxidation associated with
    disruptions in insulin function.9

    HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS

    The effect of cinnamon on glucose and blood lipids
    levels on people with type 2 diabetes was tested in a recent
    randomized, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 60 subjects
    were divided into six groups administered 1, 3, or 6 grams of
    cinnamon daily, in 500 mg capsules, or equal numbers of placebo
    capsules.

    The cinnamon or placebo capsules were consumed for
    two periods of 20 days each. Serum glucose, triglyceride,
    cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol were measured
    after 20 days, 40 days and again at the end of a 20-day wash-out
    period, during which neither cinnamon nor placebo was
    consumed.

    In all three cinnamon groups, statistically
    significant reductions in blood glucose levels occurred, with
    decreases ranging from 18 to 29 percent. Interestingly, glucose
    levels remained significantly lower after the 20-day wash-out
    period (60 days from the study start) only in the group that
    took the lowest cinnamon dose (1 gram daily). The placebo groups
    showed no significant changes.

    Decreases in triglyceride
    levels ranging from 23 to 30% were observed in all three
    cinnamon groups after 40 days. When the study ended at 60 days,
    triglyceride levels remained lower than at the study start in
    the 1 and 3 gram cinnamon groups, but not in the group taking 6
    grams daily. Cholesterol reductions also occurred with the three
    cinnamon doses, with decreases ranging from 13 to 25% that were
    maintained at the study end. For LDL, the 3 and 6 gram cinnamon
    groups showed significant reductions from 10 to 24%, while in
    the 1 gram cinnamon group, non-significant reductions occurred
    after 40 days; LDL levels continued to decrease, reaching
    statistical significance at 60 days. With respect to HDL,
    significant increases were seen only in the 3 gram cinnamon
    group after 20 days; non-significant changes occurred in the 1
    and 6 gram groups after 40 days.

    The overall results of this
    trial demonstrate that cinnamon exerts a beneficial effect on
    blood glucose and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes,
    at daily intakes of 1 gram, and that this low dose is equally
    efficacious as are the higher doses of 3 and 6
    grams.10

    Safety

    The various species of cinnamon are
    classified as GRAS (generally regarded as safe) herbs.11 The
    Botanical Safety Handbook lists Cinnamomum cassia a “Class 2b”
    herb; not to be used during pregnancy.12 The water-soluble
    cinnamon extract is largely free of the lipid-soluble components
    of cinnamon most likely to be toxic at high dose of cinnamon and
    long-term consumption of the herb.9

    *This statement has not
    been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product
    is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any
    disease.

    Scientific References

    1. Manniche, L. An Ancient
    Egyptian Herbal. 1989, Austin , TX : University of Texas
    Press.

    2. Khan A, Bryden NA, Polansky MM, Anderson RA.
    Insulin potentiating factor and chromium content of selected
    foods and spices. Biol Trace Elem Res 1990;24(3):183-8.

    3.
    Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM, Anderson R. Insulin-like biological
    activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in
    vitro. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48(3):849-52.

    4. Jarvill-Taylor
    KJ, Anderson RA, Graves DJ. A hydroxychalcone derived from
    cinnamon functions as a mimetic for insulin in 3T3-L1
    adipocytes. J Am Coll Nutr 2001;20(4):327-36.

    5. Nadiv O,
    Shinitzky M, Manu H, et al. Elevated protein tyrosine
    phosphatase activity and increased membrane viscosity are
    associated with impaired activation of the insulin receptor
    kinase in old rats. Biochem J. 1998;298(Pt 2):443-50.

    6.
    Begum N, Sussman KE, Draznin B. Differential effects of diabetes
    on adipocyte and liver phosphotyrosine and phsophoserine
    phosphatase activities. Diabetes 1991;40(12):1620-9.

    7.
    Imparl-Radosevich J, Deas S, Polansky MM, et al. Regulation of
    PTP-1 and insulin receptor kinase by fractions from cinnamon:
    implications for cinnamon regulation of insulin signalling. Horm
    Res 1998;50:177-182.

    8. Qin B, Nagasaki M, Ren M, et al.
    Cinnamon extract (traditional herb) potentiates in vivo
    insulin-regulated glucose utilization via enhanced insulin
    signaling in rats. Diabetes Res Clin Pract
    2003;62(3):139-48.

    9. Anderson R, Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM,
    et al. Isolation and characterization of polyphenol type-A
    polymers from cinnamon with insulin-like biological activity. J
    Agric Food Chem 2004; 52(1):65-70.

    10. Khan A, Safdar S,
    Muzaffar M, et al. Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of
    people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care
    2003;26(12):3215-18.

    11. Duke, JA. Handbook of Phytochemical
    Constituents of GRAS Herbs and Other Economic Plants. 1992. Boca
    Raton, FL: CRC Press.

    12. Botanical Safety Handbook. American
    Herbal Products Association. McGuffin M, et al., eds. 1997; Boca
    Raton , FL : CRC Press.

    Acting as a biochemical
    "super-thiamin," it does this through several different cellular
    mechanisms, as discussed below.



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    MECHANISMS OF CHITOSAN FAT- BINDING
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 08:02 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: MECHANISMS OF CHITOSAN FAT- BINDING

    MECHANISMS OF CHITOSAN FAT- BINDING

    The exact way(s) that Chitosan prevents fat absorbtion is not fully understood but a number of experimental observations support two basic mechanisms. The first mechanism involves the attraction of opposite charges which can be compared to the attraction of opposite Magnetic poles. The second entrapment mechanism can be compared to the effect of a net. In the first mechanism the positive charges on chitosan attract the negatively charged fatty acids and bile acids binding them to the indigestible chitosan fiber. This mechanism can explain why chitosan reduces LDL cholesterol levels.

    Our bodies make bile acids in the liver using the cholesterol from LDL. When chitosan binds bile acids it increases the rate of LDL loss thus improving the LDL to HDL ratio. If enough bile acids are bound, the fats are not solublized, which prevents their digestion and absorption. The second mechanism (figure 2) describes a netting effect of chitosan fiber.

    In this model the Chitosan wraps around fat droplets and prevents their being attacked and digested by lipid enzymes. Fats unprotected by Chitosan are digested and absorbed. The “netting” mechanism has been seen to operate in vivo. 108

    Substances that Enhance the Action of Chitosan

    Fibers can be likened to a tangled-up chain. Fibers must “unravel” in order for them to be of maximum benefit to us. “Unraveling” is especially critical for chitosan because each link has a hook on which to attach lipids. Chitosan can absorb an average of 4 to 5 times its weight in lipids. Reports of numbers above and below this range have also been reported and may well reflect the rate or extent of unraveling that had taken place. Fiber formulations can be prepared that unravel rapidly and swell quickly. These highly effective formulations are called superabsorbants. When certain substances are added to chitosan, its remarkable fat-binding ability can be significantly enhanced.

    Ascorbic Acid

    D-Ascorbic acid (erythorbic acid) and L-ascorbic acid are C-vitamins which enhance chitosan’s ability to bind lipids. Combining chitosan with ascorbic acid results in even less fat absorption and greater fecal fat losses.77,108 In one study the addition of ascorbic acid to a chitosan enriched diet increased fecal fat losses by 87 percent and decreased fat absorption by over 50 percent.77

    Cholesterol oxides cause lesions in artery walls which predispose blood vessels to collect plaque. These dietary cholesterol oxides profoundly influence the initiation of heart disease.Free radicals can also contribute to the formation of cholesterol oxides which are even more likely to damage the heart. Cholesterol oxides have been found in deep-fried foods, powdered eggs, processed meats and in human blood itself. Consequently, taking antioxidants like ascorbic acid is vital to protect against the cellular damage this type of free radical causes.112

    Citric Acid

    In feeding experiments with animals, adding citric acid to a chitosan enriched diet resulted in a decreased feed consumption.77 The most likely explanation for this effect is that the citric acid may be enhancing the swelling action of chitosan leading to a sense of fullness, producing satiety and appetite suppression.

    Indoles

    Indoles are remarkable phytochemicals which have the ability to selectively activate certain Mixed Function Oxidases (MFOs).113 These MFO’s help balance estrogen metabolism and prepare dietary toxins for elimination before they are absorbed. The presence of fiber in the intestines provides a bulk agent to carry the metabolized toxins out of the body. Chelat ed Minerals The very best approach to weight loss is to nutritionally augment food choices with nutrient supplementation. Certain biochemical compounds are essential to promoting vigor during the process of thermogenesis. Chelated minerals act to bolster, support and protect the organ systems of the body.114,115

    For example, when fat is burned, heat and energy are released. If a lack of certain minerals exists, energy levels will drop. Minerals help to transport needed nutrients to depleted areas of the body, thereby stemming off the fatigue we so often experience after eating a fatty meal. Even more importantly, free radicals are released whenever fat is consumed and burned and the presence of chelated minerals helps to expedite the removal of these metabolites and facilitate the availability of fuel for energy.

    Essential Fatty Acids

    Prostaglandins control and balance many body functions. The dietary building blocks for making prostaglandins are the essential fatty acids (EFAs). The role of prostaglandins in weight loss has been extensively discussed in a recent review.116 EFAs exert profound lipid-lowering effects.They reduce the synthesis of triglycerides and very low density lipoproteins (bad cholesterol) in the liver. EFA supplementation coupled with a low-cholesterol, low-saturated fat in diet produces a complementary effect in lowering serum lipid levels.117 Garcinia Cambogia ( Hydroxy Cit ric Acid) Garcinia Cambogia contains hydroxycitric acid (HCA). This form of citric acid inhibits the liver’s ability to make fats out of carbohydrates.118

    Carbohydrates are converted to glycogen stores, not fat stores, giving the body a better energy reserve and an increase in stamina.119 Ephedra And Thermogenisis Thermogenesis means “creating heat.” This is one of the ways our bodies have of burning off excess calories and maintaining a constant weight.120 This is an area of weight management research that is being intensely studied. When we repeatedly yo-yo diet or abuse ourselves by eating too much, our thermogenic ability may be reduced. Numerous animal and human studies have confirmed the benefits of ephedra and methylxanthines in inducing weight loss and restoring thermogenic responsiveness.43,44,121

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    Your Healthy Harvest
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 14, 2005 11:05 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Your Healthy Harvest

    Your Healthy Harvest by Marjorie Flakowitz Energy Times, August 15, 2004

    Once frowned on by conventional farmers, organic food has won respect from everyone concerned about the health of both the earth and the people who inhabit it.

    Today, organic farming is considered one of the most rapidly growing areas of American agriculture. Organic foods sales topped $9 billion in 2002 and grew about 20%, up to almost $11 billion in 2003 (Organic Trade Association).

    So when you buy organic, you join an expanding market that takes advantage of great-tasting, good-for-you food. Long ago, when the practice of farming was first devised, all farming was organic farming. So today's organic movement is bringing farming back to its roots.

    But, safe to say, that is not what's motivating most consumers. A main reason for the popularity of organic food derives from the reassurance that organic foods, raised without artificial chemicals and pesticides, cut your exposure to toxic residues. A growing body of research shows organic food is richer in beneficial natural substances, too.

    " Organic food and organic farming represent a philosophy that goes beyond just the quality of the food," says Steve Meyerowitz in The Organic Food Guide (Globe Pequot). "It strives to maintain the integrity of the entire food chain-plants, soil, air, water, animals and people. We are all part of the same ecosystem."

    By eating organic, you eliminate pollution both from your body and the earth. Because our bodies are made of the animal and plant products we consume, our internal, physiological ecosystem and the earth's environment are inexorably entwined.

    Chilling Arctic Evidence

    As evidence of this connection, consider what's happened in the Arctic. Researchers who have analyzed Arctic water, ice, snow, soil and plants have found that chemicals used in farming and industry in other parts of the world have traveled north and accumulated in alarming quantity. How and if these chemicals break down depends on sunlight and the amount of organic matter contained in Arctic waters (American Chemical Society, 9/11/03).

    " Once pollutants enter the water column, their behavior is poorly understood-particularly the processes that govern their lifetime and concentrations," says Amanda Grannas, PhD, a researcher at Ohio State University. "Such pollutants are now being found in wildlife, from fish to seals to whales, and even in people living in the Arctic."

    Dr. Grannas and others looked at the pesticides lindane and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), two chemicals that have migrated to Arctic waters. Lindane is used by American farmers to treat seeds before they are planted. HCB, banned in the US in 1984, is still used in other countries to protect wheat from fungus.

    The scientists found that sunlight at the top of Arctic waterways can help break down some pesticides. At lower depths, however, cut off from the sun's rays, pesticides can remain largely intact. In this research, lindane proved to persist much more readily than HCB.

    " Lindane is one of the most persistent of pollutants," warns Dr. Grannas. "This could be because it's photochemically inert, whereas pollutants like HCB degrade relatively quickly. The main message is that pollutants can behave quite differently. These pollutants already affect local ecosystems, and could have repercussions for human health."

    Organics Means More Benefits

    Researchers are also finding that organic produce contains larger quantities of beneficial natural chemicals. For instance, one study (Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 2/26/03) showed that berries and corn grown organically can have almost 60% more polyphenolics. Polyphenolics are antioxidants plants use for protection against disease and which are good for humans. Researchers believe that when crops are grown conventionally, protected by pesticides and herbicides, they produce fewer of these substances. " This really opens the door to more research in this area," says Alyson Mitchell, PhD, assistant professor of food science at University of California at Davis, who led the research.

    These scientists compared levels of total polyphenolics and vitamin C content in marionberries (a type of blackberry) and corn grown organically, sustainably or conventionally, and also looked at chemicals in strawberries grown either sustainably or conventionally. (Sustainable farming falls between the organic and conventional methods, and concentrates on farming that's self-sufficient-for example, feeding cows hay you've grown yourself, and then using the cows' manure to fertilize another crop.) They found that organic marionberries and corn had 50% to 58% more polyphenolics. The sustainably grown strawberries had 19% more polyphenolics. And all the organic produce contained more vitamin C.

    Self-Defense for Plants

    According to Dr. Mitchell, the organic crops contained the high levels of polyphenolics you'd expect to find in wild plants, suggesting that, on conventional farms, pesticides reduce the necessity for plants to make these protective, natural chemicals. " If an aphid is nibbling on a leaf, the plant produces phenolics to defend itself," she says. "[P]henolics guard the plant against these pests."

    Pesticides kill insects like aphids and thereby reduce the antioxidants produced by the plant. " This helps explain why the level of antioxidants is so much higher in organically grown food," Mitchell says. "By synthetically protecting the produce from these pests, we decrease their need to produce antioxidants. It suggests that maybe we are doing something to our food inadvertently.

    " We know [polyphenolics] are beneficial [to human health], but we don't know what types of polyphenolics are beneficial, or in what quantities," Dr. Mitchell notes. " Originally, the question was just really intriguing to me. I found that the higher level of antioxidants is enough to have a significant impact on health and nutrition, and it's definitely changed the way I think about my food."

    Vitamin C in Oranges

    Meanwhile, nutritional research on the vitamin C in oranges turns up similar results: organic oranges are richer in this antioxidant nutrient than conventionally grown oranges (Great Lakes Regional Meeting, American Chemical Society, 6/2/02).

    The more common supermarket oranges are significantly larger than organically grown oranges, and they have a deeper orange color. Because of their larger size, "we were expecting twice as much vitamin C in the conventional oranges," says Theo Clark, PhD, chemistry professor at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri.

    But when he isolated the chemicals in the oranges and further refined his search with nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR), spectroscopy demonstrated that organically grown oranges possess 30% more vitamin C than the conventionally grown fruits-even though they are only about half as large.

    Dr. Clark isn't sure why organic oranges are richer in vitamin C, but he says, "...[W]e speculate that with conventional oranges, [farmers] use nitrogen fertilizers that cause an uptake of more water, so it sort of dilutes the orange. You get a great big orange but it is full of water and does not have as much nutritional value.

    " However, we can only speculate. Other factors such as maturity, climate, processing factors, packaging and storage conditions require consideration." Along with analyzing oranges, Dr. Clark and his research team questioned about 70 people to measure their concept of the nutritional value of organic oranges. In this survey, 85% of the respondents thought that organic oranges have a higher nutritional content than conventionally grown fruit.

    Dr. Clark's laboratory work shows that "they were right on." In Dr. Clark's view, these issues are important because consumers have a right to know the real nutritional content of organic produce, and the fact that analyses show that organic fruit has much more vitamin C validates the benefits of eating organic.

    Defense Mechanism

    Both plants and animals protect themselves from disease with many of the same chemicals. The natural substances that, in a farmer's field, defend vegetables from insects and microbes before they are harvested for your dinner go to work defending your body after you eat and digest them.

    When you eat organic you bolster your health with more of these natural wonders. No wonder organic is becoming so popular!



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    Certified Foods
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 12, 2005 01:59 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Certified Foods

    Certified Foods by Glenda Olsen Energy Times, July 13, 2003

    What's in your food, and where does it come from? To most American consumers, that question may seem unimportant. But the answers might surprise you. Your food's origin and processing can make a big difference in its nutritional value, for better and for worse. Increasingly, concern over the quality of food and its influence on health are persuading shoppers to take a greater interest in their food. The result: More visits to natural food stores and more sales of organic food.

    Once upon a time, food used to be just food. Crops were grown on family farms, and animals were raised in barnyards. But today, corporations have conquered food production in a big way. Agribusiness is just that-a big business in which animals and plants are treated like assembly-line items and raised on factory farms.

    Organic Regulation

    While the term "organic" gets tossed around endlessly in the media, the term is often misconstrued. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), "Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones."

    In addition, organic farmers generally do not use pesticides, sewage sludge or synthetic fertilizers. This type of food is also produced without genetically modified organisms and is not subject to radiation used to zap the bugs on food. Today, USDA-approved certifying agents inspect the farms where organic food is raised to ensure organic standards are followed. In addition, the companies that process food and handle organic food have to be USDA-certified. Meeting these standards allows companies to use the USDA's organic label on foods that are at least 95% organic in origin. Labels for foods that contain between 70% and 95% organic content can use the words "Made With Organic Ingredients," but cannot use the seal.

    Solid Nutrition

    While the debate over the nutritional benefits of organic food has raged for decades, recent research is beginning to turn up evidence that organically grown fruits and vegetables may contain extra helpings of vitamins and other nutrients. A study at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri, found that organically grown oranges contain more vitamin C than conventional supermarket oranges (Great Lakes Regional Meeting, Amer Chem Soc, 6/02).

    Theo Clark, PhD, the Truman State professor who investigated the organic oranges, says that when he and his students began their research, "We were expecting twice as much vitamin C in the conventional oranges" because they are larger than organic oranges. To his surprise, chemical isolation combined with nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed that the organically grown oranges contained up to 30% more vitamin C than the conventionally grown fruits-even though they were only about half the size. "We speculate that with conventional oranges, (farmers) use nitrogen fertilizers that cause an uptake of more water, so it sort of dilutes the orange. You get a great big orange but it is full of water and doesn't have as much nutritional value," Dr. Clark says. "However, we can only speculate. Other factors such as maturity, climate, processing factors, packaging and storage conditions require consideration."

    Dodging Pesticides

    If you want to avoid pesticide residues in your food, research shows that going organic can make it much less likely that you or your family consumes these unwanted chemicals. Research, for instance, into the diets of children (Enviro Hlth Persp 3/03) shows that dining on organic fruits and vegetables, and organic juice, can lower kids' intake of pesticides.

    These scientists took a look at the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide breakdown products in the blood of kids ages two to five who ate conventional supermarket produce and compared it with the OP found in organic kids.

    The children on the organic diet had less OP in their blood than the other kids. As a matter of fact, the children on the conventional diet had six times the dimethyl metabolites, dimethyl being a pesticide suspected of affecting nerve function and growth. "Consumption of organic produce appears to provide a relatively simple way for parents to reduce their children's exposure to OP pesticides," note the researchers. "Organic foods have been growing in popularity over the last several years," says Jim Burkhart, PhD, science editor for the journal that published the study. "These scientists studied one potential area of difference from the use of organic foods, and the findings are compelling."

    GMO Development

    On the way to tonight's dinner, researchers have created genetically modified organisms (GMO), plants and animals that have been transgenically engineered. In the food world, that means organisms containing genes inserted from another species. Chances are if you eat food purchased at the typical supermarket, those comestibles contain GMO ingredients. In the United States, food companies are not required to label for GMO content.

    A growing number of American consumers are upset about not being told about the GMO products in their food. But industry scientists, worried that informed consumers may someday turn their back on GMO foods, consider consumer ignorance to be an acceptable state of affairs.

    For instance, the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) is fighting regulations that would require GMO labeling. According to ASPB President Daniel Bush, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Urbana, "The language...(in these types of regulations) is based on a system of beliefs of what is 'natural,' rather than a scientifically defined set of criteria focused on content and nutritional value. This is a radical departure from food labeling up to now, which is designed to maximize useful information for consumers concerning what is in the food they are buying."

    Dr. Bush continues, "There are, of course, examples of voluntary labeling standards in the food industry that reflect how foods are processed, such as organic foods. The voluntary organic labeling standards were sought by the organic food industry. Kosher foods are also labeled as having been produced in accordance with specific beliefs. However, mandatory labeling of targeted production methods has never before been required and we believe would obscure rather than clarify important issues of food safety."

    In other words, Dr. Bush opposes GMO labeling because he feels it would unnecessarily stigmatize GMO food items. Others are not so sanguine about the safety of GMO foods.

    GMO Objections

    The arguments against GMO foods include:

  • * The genes from GMO plants may end up in weeds and other unintended species, creating superweeds that will be difficult to eradicate. Animals, such as fish on fish farms, may interbreed with animals in the wild and cause harmful changes.

  • * People may grow ill or die from unexpected allergies to GMO foods (NEJM 1996; 334(11):688-92).

  • * GMO plants may harm other wildlife, such as butterflies, that depends on pollen from these plants (Nature May 1999; 399(6733):214).

    These types of risks have motivated industry groups to urge more regulation of GMO crops. The Food Marketing Institute, the Grocery Manufacturers of America (GMA) and the National Restaurant Association, plus seven other food groups, are worried that GMO plants grown to produce pharmaceutical drugs could contaminate the food supply and destroy consumer trust in food.

    Mary Sophos, a vice president of GMA, warns, "To minimize the possible risks, a clear system of regulatory enforcement and liability needs to be in place. Until then, no permits for new field trials or for commercialization should be issued because there is no room for trial and error."

    These food industry groups have voiced their concerns to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the USDA. Last year, the USDA forced ProdiGene Inc., a biotech firm, to dispose of 500,000 bushels of soybeans contaminated with a drug meant to treat diabetes. What are the chances of more GMO accidents? No one knows. But if you buy and eat organic, you minimize your risk and maximize your chances of dining on safer food.



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    the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) ...
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    Date: May 26, 2005 10:37 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) ...

    Abstract Objectie :To investigate the effect of vinpocetine on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the compromised circulation of a stroke affected hemisphere using transcranial Doppler (TCD) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methods. Methods : 43 patients with ischemic stroke were randomized into vinpocetine (VP) and placebo group in a double blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of a single-dose i.v. infusion of vinpocetine on cerebral blood perfusion and oxygenation. In the VP group 20 mg VP in 500 ml saline, in the placebo group 500 ml saline alone were administered. The concentrations of oxy-, reduced- and total hemoglobin were measured by NIRS frontolaterally on the side of lesion while the mean cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), the pulsatility index (PI) and Doppler spectral intensity (DSI) were monitored by TCD in the middle cerebral artery on the same side. Values were averaged for the first 5 min prior to the infusion and for the last 5 min of infusion and they were compared between groups. Results : The concentration of all three chromophores increased during infusion in the VP group (mean dHbT=1.03, CI95=0.84, P=0.058; mean dHbO=0.92, CI95=0.91, P=0.071; mean dHb=0.10, CI95=0.21, P=0.297). The HbT and HbO showed a substantially smaller increase in the placebo group (mean dHbT=0.31, CI95=0.74, P=0.22; mean dHbO=0.57, CI95=0.80, P=0.094) while the Hb decreased (mean dHb=-0.26, CI95=0.29, P=0.05). Comparing to the placebo group Hb increased significantly in the VP group (P=0.027) while the increase of HbO and HbT did not reach the level of significance (P=0.29 and 0.11). DSI showed a significantly larger increase in the VP than in placebo group (dDSI=25.8 CI95=8.8 [VP]; dDSI=3.3, CI95=3.7 [Placebo], P0.005). The CBFV and PI did not differ significantly between groups. (dVm=5.02.98 cm/s [VP], dVm=4.12.57 cm/s [Placebo], P=0.28; dPI=0.08 [VP], dPI=0.09 [Placebo]; P=0.47). Conclusion :VP increases cerebral perfusion and parenchymal oxygen extraction as well. The increased perfusion was indicated by NIRS and by TCD measurement of DSI while conventional velocity and pulsatility measurements failed to detect theses effects. NIRS is a sensitive, www.elsevier.com/locate/ejultrasou Abbreiations :BP, blood pressure; CI, confidence interval; CBFV, cerebral blood flow velocity; CT, computer tomography; CytO, cytochrome-oxydase; DSI, Doppler spectral intensity; Hb, deoxyhaemoglobin; HbO, oxyhaemoglobin; HbT, total haemoglobin; HR, heart rate; MAP, mean arterial pressure; MCA, middle cerebral artery; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; NIRS, near infrared spectroscopy; PET, positron emission tomography; PI, pulsatility index; TCD, transcranial Doppler; US, ultrasonography; VP, vinpocetine.

  • Doppler spectral intensity (DSI) - scans the brain and you can see blood flow.
  • DSI increased in both groups during infusion, however, the increase was significantly higher in the vinpocetine group (dDSI=25.8, CI95=8.8 [VP]; dDSI=3.3, CI95=3.7 [placebo] -- Significant increase in blood flow 25.8 (VP) vs. 3.3 (Placebo)
  • NIRS monitoring is feasible to detect changes of regional blood flow and tissue oxygenation.
  • The observation reported VP to enhance cerebral oxygen extraction and utilisation


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