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  Messages 1-20 from 20 matching the search criteria.
The Many Benefits of Grape Seed Extract Darrell Miller 10/25/22
The key nutrients needed to prevent heart attacks, strokes andheart failure Darrell Miller 5/8/19
Reverse cardiovascular disease with cherries Darrell Miller 5/1/19
Supplementing with omega-3 can improve sperm motility and qualityof seminal plasma Darrell Miller 3/28/19
Chia Seeds vs Flax Seeds: Which Is Healthier? Darrell Miller 2/7/19
Finger millet is a nutritional powerhouse: A review of the nutrients it offers Darrell Miller 6/29/18
4 Main Health Benefits Of Grapefruit Darrell Miller 12/18/16
Raspberry Ketones can help you in losing Weight Darrell Miller 2/7/12
Can Vitamin B12 Boost Mental Alertness? Darrell Miller 7/18/11
Vitamin B2 Is Good for Nutrient Metabolism, Cellular Energy, And More Darrell Miller 5/10/11
Why is It so Important to Give Your Child a Multiple Vitamin Mineral Supplement Darrell Miller 3/11/11
What is Dandelion Tea Good for? Darrell Miller 3/8/11
How Does Cherry Fruit Extract Help with Gout? Darrell Miller 3/7/11
Oregano oil hi in Carvacrol Darrell Miller 4/25/08
Bioflavonoids: Boost Your Brain and Circulatory Health Darrell Miller 1/17/08
Is Maca a Magic Root? Darrell Miller 11/10/07
Learn about Bone Health! Darrell Miller 4/20/07
Degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) Darrell Miller 8/24/06
Timely News Briefs from the National Nutritional Foods Association Darrell Miller 4/15/06
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05




The Many Benefits of Grape Seed Extract
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Date: October 25, 2022 11:46 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Many Benefits of Grape Seed Extract

Did you know that grape seeds are actually a potent source of antioxidants? NOW® Grape Seed Extract is a highly concentrated extract with a minimum of 90% polyphenols, including oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs), which are the potent water-soluble free radical scavenging compounds found in grape seeds.* A growing body of research indicates that grape seed OPCs may help to support the health of vascular, bone, kidney, brain and other tissues by supporting a healthy, balanced immune response to oxidative and metabolic stress.*

The Antioxidant Power of Grape Seeds*

The natural world is full of antioxidants. These nutrients scavenge harmful toxins and byproducts that can damage cells, leading to inflammation. Inflammation is a major contributing factor in numerous degenerative diseases, so it's important to do everything we can to keep it in check. Some of the best sources of antioxidants are fruits and vegetables—grape seeds included.

Grape seeds are an especially rich source of antioxidants due to their high concentration of polyphenols. Polyphenols are micronutrients that have been shown to have numerous health benefits.* NOW® Grape Seed Extract is a highly concentrated extract with a minimum of 90% polyphenols, including oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs), which are the potent water-soluble free radical scavenging compounds found in grape seeds.* A growing body of research indicates that grape seed OPCs may help to support the health of vascular, bone, kidney, brain and other tissues by supporting a healthy, balanced immune response to oxidative and metabolic stress.*

What does this mean for your health? Preliminary research suggests that grape seed extract may support cardiovascular health, cognitive function, and healthy aging.* So if you're looking for a way to incorporate more antioxidants into your diet, consider giving grape seed extract a try!

In Summary:

NOW® Grape Seed Extract is a concentrated source of polyphenols—micronutrients shown to have numerous health benefits.* If you're looking for an easy way to incorporate more antioxidants into your diet, consider giving grape seed extract a try! *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

[*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.]

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The key nutrients needed to prevent heart attacks, strokes andheart failure
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Date: May 08, 2019 04:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The key nutrients needed to prevent heart attacks, strokes andheart failure





The CDC assesses that more than 5,100,000 Americans have some variant of heart disease, and that 610,000 will die from it this year alone. While the conventional range of treatments mostly relies on medications, micronutrient-based Cellular Medicine provides an alternative. Cellular Medicine pioneer Dr. Matthias Rath has carried out some very promising clinical research involving micronutrient supplementation. Dr. Rath believes that the American diet, medication side effects and modern food handling and production practices mean that many people are deprived of a range of important micronutrients, with very bad consequences for heart health.

Key Takeaways:

  • A physician named Dr. Rath views heart disease as an early form of scurvy, which results from a Vitamin C deficiency.
  • If your body does not have enough Vitamin C, cracks can form in your arterial walls and your body tries to repair them with artery-clogging plaque.
  • In addition to Vitamin C, people at risk for heart disease should also consume more Vitamin E and B-complex vitamins.

"With the odds of surviving past the five-year mark currently standing at 50 percent, it’s clear that more effective prevention and treatment options are needed."

Read more: https://www.naturalhealth365.com/prevent-heart-attacks-2913.html

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Reverse cardiovascular disease with cherries
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Date: May 01, 2019 09:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Reverse cardiovascular disease with cherries





Cherries are a surprising and tasty option for lowering your risk of heart disease, thanks to their bountiful polyphenols, flavonoids and micronutrients. Like apples and grapes, cherries have lots of quercetin, which can reduce oxidative damage to your body. The deep red carotenoids and anthocyanins in cherries can fight inflammation and act as antioxidants. Cherries may also reduce your levels of C-Reactive Protein, which is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Cherries and cherry juice are also good for regulating your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol.

Key Takeaways:

  • If you drink cherry juice, you can significantly lower your blood pressure.
  • Cherries can reduce your C-reactive protein, which in turn reduces inflammation and your risk of heart disease.
  • Be sure to consume organic cherries, because they do not contain residue from pesticides.

"In particular, the anthocyanins and carotenoids that give this stone fruit its deep red hue offer anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and they also help fight obesity and diabetes."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-03-26-reverse-cardiovascular-disease-with-cherries.html

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Supplementing with omega-3 can improve sperm motility and qualityof seminal plasma
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Date: March 28, 2019 05:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Supplementing with omega-3 can improve sperm motility and qualityof seminal plasma





Researchers located in Australia and Iran tested 143 men who were facing infertility in order to see if consumption of omega-3 fatty acids could improve their fertility rates. The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) that is naturally introduced to the body through omega-3 fatty acids was shown to significantly increase fertility levels in the men who engaged in routine consumption, and it also supplemented their levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which is also directly related to adequate fertility rates.

Key Takeaways:

  • Researchers in both Australia and Iran while working on omega-3 fatty acids and their relation to fertility found that Omega-3 fatty acids significantly improved sperm motility in infertile men.
  • Some of the effects the researchers looked at is on docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation on total sperm concentration and sperm motility.
  • From the treatments carried out on infertile men, they found that there was no effect on sperm concentrations or sperm DHA due to the administration period.

"In conducting the review, they investigated three studies on the supplementation of DHA or EPA, either alone or in combination with other micronutrients, in a total of 147 infertile men. The studies also involved 143 infertile men who belonged to the control group or did not receive any omega-3 fatty acid supplement."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-28-supplementing-with-omega-3-can-improve-sperm-motility.html

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Chia Seeds vs Flax Seeds: Which Is Healthier?
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Date: February 07, 2019 10:42 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Chia Seeds vs Flax Seeds: Which Is Healthier?





Although chia and flax seeds both have distinct benefits that provide consumers with health advantages, each of these seedling varieties excel in different areas. For instance, if you are experiencing some constipation, the high amounts of fiber located within chia seeds may help relieve your discomfort. When it comes to other ailments such as Crohn's Disease, flax seeds may help due to their significant amount of selenium. Both chia seeds and flax seeds have over 4 grams of protein per serving, making them a go-to treat for body builders.

Key Takeaways:

  • The author states that chia seeds and flax seeds are two seeds which have proven versatility, nutrient profile and wealth of health benefits.
  • When one is undecided about which is better between flax seeds and chia seeds, the author recommends both although per serving chia seeds are better.
  • Some advantages of chia seeds is that they are easy to digest, can be consumed either whole or ground, and include several micronutrients.

"Chia seeds and flax seeds nutrition both include a good amount of fiber and protein. They both also have an extensive nutrient profile and provide a type of omega-3 fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)."

Read more: https://draxe.com/chia-seeds-vs-flax-seeds-which-is-healthier/

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Finger millet is a nutritional powerhouse: A review of the nutrients it offers
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Date: June 29, 2018 09:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Finger millet is a nutritional powerhouse: A review of the nutrients it offers





Finger millet is a nutritional powerhouse: A review of the nutrients it offers

Millet tends to get short shrift in the US, since it’s grown mostly in semi-arid Asian and African climes, but it’s very nutritious, especially the variety known as finger millet. Finger millet’s five layer seed coat (called the testa) is rich in a variety of micro and macro nutrients, amino acids, dietary fiber, protein and phenols. Finger millet shows promise for the management of diabetes and conditions associated with high cholesterol. It has a remarkable ability to lower blood sugar. Most of the nutritional value is in the seed coat/testa, so always get the whole grain variety!

Key Takeaways:

  • Finger millet testa has 18 percent dietary fiber and assorted varieties of macronutrients and micronutrients.
  • Finger millet contains essential and conditionally essential amino acids like Arginine, Cystine and Valine.
  • The high amounts of phenolic compounds and dietary fiber content of finger millet makes it ideal for diabetics and pre-diabetics.

"While millet may not be as popular as other types of cereals, researchers from the G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology have argued that it deserves more recognition because it is a nutritional powerhouse."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-06-26-finger-millet-is-a-nutritional-powerhouse-a-review-of-the-nutrients-it-offers.html

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4 Main Health Benefits Of Grapefruit
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Date: December 18, 2016 08:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: 4 Main Health Benefits Of Grapefruit

Grapefruits are fruits loved by many. Most people prefer eating this fruit mainly because they're rich in vitamin C. Besides that, grateful also has a number of health benefits that you should probably know about. This fruit is found in 3 different pulps; white, red or pink pulps. But nevertheless, they still offer similar benefits. I'm going to show you some of the most unexpected health benefits of grapefruits that you probably need to be aware of. 

Benefits of Grapefruit

Boosts metabolism

Grapefruit is a good remedy for those who want to shed some weight. A high metabolism is good because it will help you burn down excessive fat in your body even when you're resting. Eating grapefruit before meal can tremendously help you lose some weight. This is because grapefruits have a high amount of enzymes and less sodium which helps to burn excessive fat easily.

Reduces the risk of having kidney stones

According to reports, grapefruits reduce the risk of having kidney stones. Naringenin is a natural compound that regulates protein a called PKD2 which is responsible for the prevention of kidney cysts. The antioxidant effects will also prevent the kidneys from swelling which is mainly caused by fluid retention.

Strengthen the immune system

Typically, any fruit that is rich in vitamin C will support and strengthen the immune system. This vitamin also works in conjunction with other micronutrients in order to provide the body with good nourishment. Having high levels of the vitamin will help reduce cold symptoms. This will make it easier to control allergies since vitamin C reduces histamine levels.

Protects against cancer

Grapefruits have also been linked to reducing the chances of getting certain cancers. Recent studies have discovered that the fruit can help repair/restore damaged DNA found in prostate cancer cells. The natural compound called naringenin stimulates repair of DNA in the cancer cells and will prevent your body from cancer. Grapefruits have been linked to reducing the risk of cancer like breast cancer, cancer of the stomach, colon, esophagus as well as bladder.



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Raspberry Ketones can help you in losing Weight
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Date: February 07, 2012 02:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Raspberry Ketones can help you in losing Weight

According to NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), more than two thirds of Americans are overweight and about one third are obese. Obesity is definitely a serious medical condition that not only reduces your stamina, but can also lead to various health complications such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, sleep apnea, menstrual irregularities, atherosclerosis and many more.

Any attempt to lose weight can succeed only when it is multidimensional. In order to get the desirable results, you will have to bundle various weight loss techniques to get the desired results. In some instances, this can also lead to deleterious side effects. For example, stringent dietary restrictions may result in various nutritional disorders such as goiter, osteoporosis, scurvy and so on. Excessive exercises can also cause various maladies such as depression, fatigue, muscular injuries and insomnia. So What Are Raspberry Ketones?

Raspberry, which is an edible fruit, is quite rich in Vitamin B, antioxidants, folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium potassium copper and manganese. Aside from these, it also has large amounts of ketones, referred to as “Raspberry Ketones”. Actually, ketones are phenolic compounds that help you in losing excess body weight without harming your body in any way.

How do Raspberry Ketones work?

Raspberry ketones, being natural substances work in an entirely different way. Unlike various other weight loss therapies, they work all alone and in the most effective way. They persuade the body to release norepinephrine, which is a stress hormone and affects that part of your brain, which controls responses and attention.

Along with norepinephrine, raspberry ketones trigger a increase in the heart rate, which increases the supply of oxygen to the brain. This also increases the blood flow to skeletal muscles. This results in increase in the energy requirements of the body. In order to get the desired energy, the stored body fat is broken down into much simpler products. Therefore, this lipolytic act of norepinephrine results in body losing considerable fat in an easy and healthy way.

Raspberry ketones have a molecular structure which is identical to the synephrine (orange peeols) and capsaicin (chili peppers). Both of these compounds active a enzyime known as lipase which triggers rapid metabolism of body fats. Raspberry ketones ensure that the lipolysis process continues at a constant rate. This results in enhanced weight loss within a short time period.

Raspberry ketones also increase the production of T and B cells and thus play an important role in strengthening the immune system of the body. Aside from that, they also nourish the body with all essential micronutrients such as vitamin C, vitamin B, copper, magnesium, manganese and copper.

If you are interested in using raspberry ketones for losing excess weight, then you will find many exciting options on the market. Before buying a supplement or pills, you must ensure that it is made by a reputable manufacturer and comes at a reasonable price and has safe ingredients. Many sellers on the Internet offer exciting deals and you can easily order your requirements right from the comforts of your home.

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Can Vitamin B12 Boost Mental Alertness?
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Date: July 18, 2011 12:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Vitamin B12 Boost Mental Alertness?

The body needs various nutrients in order to make vital biological reactions possible. These bodily reactions are necessary for energy production, immune system enhancement and health improvement. These nutrients are classified into two, macro and micronutrients. In addition, these micronutrients are further divided into vitamins and minerals. These vitamins are needed by individuals to help the body grow normally. Vitamins can be supplied by the food we eat. However, the body can make certain vitamins such as vitamin D and K. Individuals who are in strict vegetable diet usually need vitamin B12 supplement. In this article, we will be focusing on Vitamin B 12 or also known as cyanocobalamin.

Vitamin B 12 is also a water– soluble vitamin. It is considered as essential because it is not produced by the body. Excellent sources of this vitamin include fish, shellfish, meat, milk and milk products. Vitamin B 12 is also available in supplements in combination with other vitamin B complex. Like the other B vitamins, vitamin B 12 is also necessary in maintaining healthy brain cells and in the normal production of red blood cells. Riboflavin is also a component of DNA which is the cells’ genetic material. Vitamin B 12 in the stomach combines with a substance called intrinsic factor so that it can be absorbed into the blood stream.

Vitamin B 12 boosts mental alertness because it facilitates normal formation of body cells most especially the nerve cells. Vitamin B 12 is also an important component of the myelin sheath. Myelin sheath is necessary for the proper functioning of the nerves. Myelin sheath functions by increasing the speed of the movement of the impulse. With the presence of myelin sheath, the impulse hops from one sheath to another instead of just moving continuously along the nerve fiber. This is the reason why vitamin B 12 is commonly employed for boosting mental alertness and concentration. In fact, it is also commonly employed for treatment of memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease.

Vitamin B 12 can also help lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases by decreasing the concentration of homocysteine in the blood stream. Studies show that high levels of homocysteine can greatly lead to atherosclerosis which is the narrowing of arterial walls. It can also increase the tendency of abnormal blood clotting thus increasing the risk of clotting – related disorders. These factors can precipitate heart attacks and cerebrovascular accidents or commonly known as stroke.

Another function of vitamin B 12 is its involvement with energy metabolism in every cell of the body. Therefore, vitamin B 12 is not only good for enhancing mental alertness but also increasing energy levels. It is also required by the body so that other nutrients from the diet can be absorbed and readily utilized by the cells.

Vitamin B 12 is relatively safe. It usually comes in combination with other B vitamins in the form of tablets, capsules, or liquid which can be bought over –the – counter.

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Vitamin B2 Is Good for Nutrient Metabolism, Cellular Energy, And More
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Date: May 10, 2011 11:11 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vitamin B2 Is Good for Nutrient Metabolism, Cellular Energy, And More

Vitamin B2 is an essential nutrient. As its name suggests, it belongs to the B complex group of vitamins. The monosaccharide ribose is part of its chemical composition together with the ring moiety called flavin that gives its yellow coloration. Hence, it is also known by the name riboflavin. Inside the human body, it plays a central role in the synthesis of flavoproteins, which are involved in many chemical reactions, especially in the metabolism of other micronutrients and bioactive molecules.

Deficiency in riboflavin is quite common as it is routinely excreted through the urine. Common symptoms include sore throat, seborrheic dermatitis, lower blood count, all of which have been tied to higher incidence of esophageal cancer. Chronic ariboflavinosis, the medical condition caused by vitamin B2 deficiency, has been reported to contribute to carcinogenesis. The good news is that it can be easily reversed with regular intake of foods rich in riboflavin or supplementation.

Aids Nutrient Metabolism

It is not a coincidence that vitamin B2 deficiency is often accompanied by deficiencies in other vitamins and minerals. In some cases, deficiencies may be attributed to impaired liver function or intestinal absorption. That being said, low levels of riboflavin do impact the metabolism of other vitamins, such as vitamin A, vitamin B3, vitamin B6, and vitamin B9, among other water-soluble micronutrients.

Metabolites of riboflavin are required in the conversion of these vitamins to their active forms, for example, from vitamin A to retinoic acid, vitamin B6 to pyridoxic acid, vitamin B9 to folic acid. Furthermore, the metabolism of bioactive compounds, including fats, proteins, and carbohydrates, also necessitates the presence of this vitamin, the reason why it greatly impacts growth and development in children.

Increases Cellular Energy

In addition to its physiological potential in intermediary metabolism, vitamin B2 is also present in the generation of adenosine triphosphate, the primary transport of energy that powers intracellular activities. Adenosine triphosphate is synthesized in three different metabolic pathways, and one process called oxidative phosphorylation necessitates the involvement of flavin adenine dinucleotide, one of the active forms of riboflavin.

Vitamin B2 is an important cofactor in all chemical reactions that result in an increase or decrease of oxidation state. These reactions are collectively called oxidation-reduction, or simply redox. Metabolites of riboflavin are reliable oxidizing agents capable of carrying high-energy electrons needed for oxidative phosphorylation. They also participate in beta oxidation, another metabolic pathway that yields cellular energy.

Scavenges Free Radicals

A nucleic acid derivative of riboflavin is an important constituent of a special class of organic compounds called flavoproteins. These proteins are found in almost all cells of the human body, and one of their functions is to protect the cells from oxidative stress brought on by free radicals. Vitamin B2 is present in the production of cellular energy and the removal of harmful by-products of energy metabolism.

Insufficient intake of vitamin B2 is deleterious to human health, inasmuch as its biological roles are quite pervasive at the molecular level. Do you get enough Vitamin B-2?

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Why is It so Important to Give Your Child a Multiple Vitamin Mineral Supplement
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Date: March 11, 2011 11:42 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Why is It so Important to Give Your Child a Multiple Vitamin Mineral Supplement

Giving a multiple vitamin and mineral supplement to your child is tantamount to protecting him or her from the unknown dangers of malnutrition. It is a fact that children are picky eaters. Besides, not all food that you put on the table provides all the nutrients that they need. Experts remain divided over the need to give children daily multivitamins, but it is a common belief that doing so is just the prudent choice to make as parents. Does it make any difference? Yes, it does. Research has pointed to the positive effects of vitamin supplementation, and it has been cited a lot of times that the bioavailability of these supplements is not bad at all. This means supplementation does contribute to the well-being of your child.

Ensures to Meet Nutrient Needs

It is not a myth that our diet does not contain all the nutrients that we need. More often than not we are not getting the daily value for all vitamins and minerals as most of us are not able to monitor our eating habits. Also, we don’t have control over how sources of these nutrients change as they undergo the process of heating foods and other cooking preparations. With children being so picky, it is not surprising that they are susceptible to malnutrition. On the other hand, supplementation has been supported by decades-old research to meet the nutrient needs of individuals, including children. If you decide on giving your child multiple vitamin and mineral supplement, do check the label to make sure it says it contains 100 per cent of the recommended dietary intake of all nutrients.

Affects Growth and Development

A number of nutritional supplements available today have been proven to be of utmost help to the reversal of many medical signs and alleviation of diseases. Some of them have been associated with having a positive effect on the chemical reactions within the human body, and multiple vitamins and mineral supplements belong to this category. There is an ever-growing body of literature devoted to the interactions of exogenous compounds within the human body. Research on multivitamins in particular is among the most advanced in pharmacology, with emphasis on how the body effectively digests and absorbs them. Since the availability of vitamins and minerals is important to the physical and mental development of children, modern-day technology focuses on their absorption.

Strengthens Immune Defenses

There is scientific consensus that micronutrients, even trace minerals, boost our immune system. In fact, in individuals who have compromised immune responses, high quantities of vitamins and minerals slow down the progression of opportunistic diseases, as is the case with children with HIV. Children who have strong immune system are known to have levels of micronutrients adequate to ward off common illnesses. The opposite is also true. Multiple vitamin and mineral supplements have long been used to combat the dire effects of malnutrition as deficiencies are almost always reversed with supplementation. That being said, prevention is always better than cure.

Ensure you are getting the daily vitamins and minerals you need to maintain good health with a quality multiple vitamin and mineral.

What is stopping you from taking a multiple today?

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What is Dandelion Tea Good for?
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Date: March 08, 2011 02:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is Dandelion Tea Good for?

Dandelion Root

Dandelion tea must be best known as a detoxifying beverage that has been associated with improving liver and kidney functions. In the old days the plant is often considered a pesky weed, but today health organizations, such as the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy, have endorsed its efficacy in relieving liver problems among others. The tea produces a pronounced bitter taste and is often sweetened, but it also packs large quantities of micronutrients. dandelionrootherb

Peoples from the Old World are no stranger to dandelion tea, but the plant species are native to both Europe and North America. What we refer to as dandelion comprises a large group of flowering plants. The two most notable species are Taraxacum officinale and Taraxacum erythrospermum, both of which are used to make dandelion tea. The fact that it can be found right in your yard is the reason why health magazines regard this herb as one of the readily available nutritional powerhouses.

Maintains Intake of Nutrients during Weight Loss

Dandelion tea has been noted to contain significant levels of vitamins and minerals, the reason why it is popular among individuals who are following a weight-loss program. Many people seem to overlook the fact that depriving themselves of important food sources, such as whole grains, compromises their daily intake of dietary nutrients. Chronic dieting is particularly dangerous in the long run even for those who used to be physically healthy. Dandelion tea offers a solution to people on a diet by meeting the RDA for vitamin A and K and providing up to 30 per cent of vitamin C and vitamin B7. It is also rich in minerals like calcium, potassium, and iron.

Promotes Excretion of Toxins through Diuresis

Not surprisingly, dandelions have been used to aid a long list of symptoms and diseases, and it has been reputed as a natural diuretic for centuries. Due to its worldwide distribution, it is one of the few herbs that have earned visible presence in traditional medicine of the East and the West, and its use has always had something to do with the proper functioning of the liver and the kidneys. The bioflavonoids found in dandelion remove toxins from the liver, like ethanol metabolites, and facilitate their excretion through the urine.

Facilitates Absorption of Bioactive Compounds

Health professionals often point to the nutritional content of dandelion tea and other products from the herb. Most species of dandelions have been documented to be completely edible, and the quantities of bioactive compounds present in them have been compared with vegetables like spinach and broccoli. Consumptions of dandelions have even been considered tantamount to intake of dietary supplements as they are rich in phytochemicals that display the activities of many known polyphenolic substances found in black and green teas and other foods rich in antioxidants. While the plant contains high quantities of protein, carbohydrates, and fiber, the tea has been tied to more effective absorption of these bioactive compounds, making it an ideal beverage to match with any food source.

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How Does Cherry Fruit Extract Help with Gout?
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Date: March 07, 2011 04:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Does Cherry Fruit Extract Help with Gout?

Cherry fruit extracts contain the micronutrients and phytochemicals found in cherries. They are available as supplements widely touted to display antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Cherries, the fruits, are in fact very high in anthocyanins, which have a long association with the prevention of inflammation, even including the type that results in most known cardiovascular diseases. Also, research on anthocyanins in connection with its chemopreventative potential has yielded the most reliable public data. Individuals suffering from gout will definitely benefit from cherry fruit extracts as supported by an abundance of reports and anecdotal evidence concerning its efficacy.

Stabilizes Metabolism of Purine Nucleotides

The development of gout is greatly attributable to an anomaly in the metabolism processes involving purine nucleotides. A class of organic compounds classified as purines is necessary for life and present in many chemical reactions. They are a major component of ATP, the primary energy of cells, and several nucleotide bases of DNA and RNA are purines. The problem lies in its final metabolic product, uric acid, which at high levels condense into urate crystals that are deposited in tendons and ligaments, as is the case with gout and tophus. Cherry fruit extracts bring about twofold effects. First, they stabilize purine metabolites, notably uric acid, and, second, they facilitate the effective excretion of uric acid. If you consume a lot of foods high in purines such as animal products, especially beef, pork, and seafood, taking cherry fruit extracts will make sure that the uric acid they produce gets out of your system.

Affects Releases of Inflammatory Mediators

While high levels of uric acid is the causation of gout attacks, the painful inflammation that ensues is triggered by an entirely different group of endogenous compounds in the employ of the immune system. Eicosanoids have long been identified to precipitate pain not only during gout attacks, but in all inflammatory responses of the human body. These compounds are released locally by the cells around the joints containing urate deposits in an attempt to fight off the degenerative effects of uric acid on the surrounding tissues. They deal with the joints the same way they get rid of pathogens during infections, bringing on the redness, swelling, and pain characteristic of gout. A group of bioflavonoids called anthocyanins that are known to interfere with the releases of eicosanoids are abundant in cherries, and intake of cherry fruit extracts deliver these flavonoids into the region of pain.

Normalizes Acidic Digestive Environments

Cherries belong to the group of foods that are alkaline forming. With gout thriving in an acidic setting, it is just prudent to carefully reassess your diet and cut down on foods high in purines. Not surprisingly, your doctor may tell you to minimize consumptions of meat products especially if you suffer from recurrent gout attacks. Cherry fruit extracts rebalances the pH level of your gastrointestinal tract, and supplementation will keep your body in an alkaline state in the long run, protecting you not only against gout but also against the aging process.

If you suffer from gout or other uric acid buildup disease, give cherry fruit extract a try today!

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Oregano oil hi in Carvacrol
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Date: April 25, 2008 02:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Oregano oil hi in Carvacrol

VitaNet ®, LLC is pleased to distribute Nature’s Answer Oil of Oregano—one of the finest quality oregano oils available today. Nature’s Answer offers you a concentrated oil of true oregano, Origanum Vulgare, steam-distilled in a base of extra virgin olive oil. There is a lot of confusion about oregano, because many plants throughout the world are called oregano. For example, marjoram (origanum marjorana) is a close cousin to true oregano, and Spanish and Mexican oregano are actually different plant species. It is important to be aware of these differences, because only Origanum Vulgare contains high amounts of the active ingredient, carvacrol. This is the exact species that Nature’s Answer uses in its products.

It takes approximately 200 pounds of oregano to produce two pounds of Nature’s Answer Oregano Oil. This highly concentrated form yields a quality plant product, retaining all the important volatile oils intact, true to Nature’s Answer’s philosophy of maintaining the plant’s Holistic Balance.

Holistic Balance guarantees that the natural constituents of our herb products are in the same synergistic ratio as those found in the plant; an herb of this type reflects the natural balance of the plant, and all of its many micronutrients.

Oregano is rich in nutrients including vitamin A and C, niacin, calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, potassium, copper, boron, and manganese. It also contains the active chemical constituents, thymol and carvacrol. These components have shown strong activity in protecting cells against foreign organisms.

The protective properties of oregano have been recognized by traditional herbalists throughout history as well as supported by modern scientific research. Oregano is also a powerful antioxidant, offsetting the adverse effects of free radicals on out bodies. Oregano oil has been shown in scientific studies to support intestinal, digestive and respiratory health and can also be used topically for minor skin irritations.

Each four-drop dose of Nature’s Answer Oil of Oregano provides 13mg of oregano oil, which is guaranteed to contain a minimum of 7mg of carvacrol. Nature’s Answer Oil of Oregano liquid and its high quality oregano oil in softgel form are always on deal at VitaNet ®, LLC Health Food Store.

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Bioflavonoids: Boost Your Brain and Circulatory Health
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Date: January 17, 2008 01:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bioflavonoids: Boost Your Brain and Circulatory Health

Bioflavonoids are most commonly praised for their antioxidant properties. They were first identified in the 1930’s by Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, Ph.D., a Nobel laureate. They are thought to prevent the breakdown of vitamin C in the body, and they also boast their own antioxidant capabilities. Over 5000 different bioflavonoids have been identified in nature. They are classified into categories including flavones, anthocyanidins, flavones, flavonols, isoflavones and flavans. Science is still discovering new types and their healing properties every day. The best part about them is that they are all natural and very powerful.

For example, scientists have been promoting the amazing benefits of the antioxidant found in dark chocolate. It is called epicatechin, and it is an excellent bioflavonoid for heart health. Studies show that it helps maintain healthy blood vessels. Antioxidants in dark chocolate are also believed to lower high blood pressure, according to a study published in the Aug. 27, 2003 edition of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Rutin and quecertin, both found in red grapes, are also linked with a healthier circulatory system. A study conducted at the University of Wisconsin in Madison in 1995 found that “the antioxidant and platelet inhibitory properties of other naturally occurring compounds in the wine the consumption of flavonoid-containing foods and beverages may retard atherogenesis and prevent thrombosis on a daily basis.” Translated into common terms, the researchers concluded that bioflavonoid may slow artery and vein degeneration and prevent blood clotting.

The American Heart Association feels that this area of research is very promising. Their website states, “Phytochemicals are chemicals found in plants. Plant sterols, flavonoids and sulfur-containing compounds are three classes of micronutrients found in fruits and vegetables. These compounds may be important in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of fatty deposits in artery walls.”

As far as healthy brain function is concerned, bioflavonoid is thought to help with microcirculation in small vessels throughout the body. You might recall seeing ginkgo biloba in the news. It has been shown to improve memory with its powerful bioflavonoid in numerous studies. What makes ginkgo especially significant is that its bioflavonoids have a stronger potency than many other bioflavonoids, and it seems to have specific benefits in the capillary beds of the brain.

The National Center for Biotechnology Information recently reported the following on their website: “Flavonoids were shown to activate key enzymes in mitochondrial respiration and to protect neuronal cells by acting as antioxidants, thus breaking the vicious cycle of oxidative stress and tissue damage. Furthermore, recent data indicate a favorable effect of flavonoids on neuro-inflammatory events.” In other words, bioflavonoid is thought to help protect your brain cells from degeneration, and recent data shows that they may also reduce swelling.

Researchers are eager to discover all the healing properties bioflavonoids possess. Modern medicine is now faced with an all natural group of chemicals found in plant pigments that may prove to be effective in preserving brain function and promoting cardiovascular health. This is fantastic news for people that prefer natural supplements over expensive prescription pills. Current research shows that these chemicals have significant powers for enhancing overall health. In fact, many researchers advocate including bioflavonoid supplements in your daily health maintenance plan.



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Is Maca a Magic Root?
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Date: November 10, 2007 02:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Maca a Magic Root?

Maca is packed with nutrients; loaded with vitamins and minerals to help fuel brain function and ease hormone irregularities as well as nourish the body.

Maca contains:
1. vitamins: B1, B2, and vitamin C
2. Alkaloids: contains 4 novel alkaloids: Macaina 1, 2, 3, 4.
3. Bismuth: Aids in combating bacteria that causes gastritis.
4. Calcium: supports strong bones and teeth.
5. Copper: supporting hemoglobin production
6. Fatty acids: contains 20 fatty acids 7. Silicon: helps hair, skin, nails, and connective tissue.
8. Iron: supports hemoglobin also.
9. Magnesium: essential for protein synthesis, and activities of muscles and nerves.
10. Manganese: essential mineral
11. Phosphorus: regulates the transmission of neuromuscular chemicals and electrical stimuli. Important for the hemostasis of calcium, and the reactions of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. The body’s chemical energy is stored in phosphate compounds.
12. Potassium: participates in the regulation of osmotic pressure; its activity is carried out inside the cells.
13. sodium: when working with potassium helps reduce arterial pressure and hypertension.
14. Tannins: useful in the treatment of diarrhea. Combined with other medicines, they have the utility of treating inflammatory processes like ulcers and sores.
15. Zinc: a cofactor of dehydrogenises and carbonic anhydrite; its lack can cause skin rashes, taste disturbances, and mental lethargy.
16. Carbohydrates: quality carbs.
17. Fructose: Natural fruit sweetener
18. Micronutrients: minerals which help with the production of antibodies.
19. Proteins: rich in bio-available maca protein average of 11% grams in dry root.
20. Starch: chemical compounds that influence the nutrition and health of consumers.
21. Fiber: loaded with cellulose and lignin which stimulates intestinal operations.
22. Macronutrients: essential vitamins and minerals, nutritive properties to help convalescent people who are diagnosed with anemia.

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Learn about Bone Health!
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Date: April 20, 2007 12:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Learn about Bone Health!

Bone Health

Approximately 44 million American women and men aged 50 and older have osteoporosis (severe bone loss) or osteopenia (mild bone loss), with women being affected about twice as often as men. At least 1.5 million fractures of the hip, vertebra (back or neck), or wrist occur each year in the United States as a result of osteoporosis, and the annual cost of treating this disorder is nearly $14 billion and rising. Unfortunately, the toll in human suffering and loss of independence is even greater.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor, we will discuss the risk factors for osteoporosis and some key nutrients you can add to your diet that can minimize bone loss and reduce your chances of developing this disease.

Q. What are the risk factors for osteoporosis?

A. Small body frame, underweight, Caucasian or Asian race, a sedentary lifestyle, cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol or caffeine intake, high intake of carbonated beverages (especially colas), and having other family members with osteoporosis all increase personal risk of developing the disease. Certain medical conditions, including diabetes, celiac disease, hyperthyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive lung disease, hyperadrenalism, and hyperparathyroidism, are all associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis. Some medications increase the rate at which bone is lost; these include drugs prescribed for the treatment of seizures, drugs used for blood thinning, steroids such as prednisone, aluminum-containing antacids, and loop diuretics (furosemide {Lasix}).

Q. Isn’t bone loss just a normal consequence of aging?

A. Although bone mass normally declines after the age of 35, bone loss severe enough to cause fractures after just minor trauma (such as bump or fall) seems to be a relatively new phenomenon. Osteoporosis was rare in the late 19th century, and it was not until around 1920 that the condition began to attract attention among doctors. Since that time, the percentage of people who develop osteoporosis has continued to increase. For example, the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis in England and Sweden double between 1950 and 1980. In addition, the percentage of elderly people with osteoporosis in some developing countries is lower than that of elderly Americans, despite lower calcium intakes in the developing countries, further suggesting that osteoporosis is a disease of modern civilization.

Q. Can osteoporosis be prevented?

A. Engaging in regular weight bearing exercise, avoiding excessive consumption of alcohol and caffeine, and quitting smoking will slow the rate of bone loss. Eating adequate, but not excessive, amounts of protein also enhances bone health. In addition, a growing body of research has shown that supplementing with various vitamins and minerals may not only help prevent, but in some cases actually reverse, bone loss. At least 15 different nutrients have been found to play a role in bone health.

Q. What type of calcium is best?

A. For most people, calcium salts are absorbed about the same, between 30% and 40% of the administered dose. People who low stomach acid (hypochlorhydria) should not use calcium carbonate, because that form of calcium is absorbed poorly in the absence of stomach acid. Calcium phosphate may be preferable for many older people, because phosphorus is necessary for normal bone formation, the phosphorus intake of older people is often low, and calcium supplements inhibit the absorption of phosphorus.

Also, calcium bound to phosphorus is the form in which calcium in the bone is stored, and it has a much greater bone activity than other forms.

Q. How much vitamin D is needed to promote strong bones?

A. Because vitamin D is produced when the ultraviolet rays from the sun hit skin, people who stay out of the sun, wear sunscreen, or live in a northern latitude (such as Boston or Seattle) where less ultraviolet light reaches the skin, are at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. In addition, aging decreases a person’s ability to synthesize vitamin D in the skin. Results from five research trials on vitamin D found that supplementation with 700-800 IU of vitamin D per day decreased the number of hip fractures by 26%, but 400 IU per day was ineffective. In addition to enhancing bone health, vitamin D improves nerve and muscle function in older people, thereby reducing their chances of falling down. Supplementation of elderly women with 800 IU of vitamin D per day has been shown to decrease the number of falls by about 50%.

Q. Is that much vitamin D safe?

A. The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine established a “safe upper limit” of 2,000 IU per day in 1997. More recent research suggests that up to 4,000 IU of vitamin D per day is safe for the average person. However, you likely don’t need nearly this much to address most bone issues.

Q. Why would nutrients besides calcium and vitamin D is important?

A. Bone is living tissue, constantly remodeling itself and engaging in numerous biological functions. Like other tissues in the body, bone has a wide range of nutritional needs. The typical refined and processed American diet has been depleted of many different vitamins and minerals, some of which play a key role in promoting bone health. Not getting enough of one or more of these micronutrients may be and important contributing factor to the modern epidemic of osteoporosis. In addition, supplementing with calcium may cause a loss of magnesium, zinc, silicon, manganese, and phosphorus, unless these nutrients are also provided.

Q. What nutrients besides calcium and vitamin D promote healthy bones?

A. Magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, vitamin K, boron, strontium, silicon, folic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, phosphorus, and vitamin C have all been shown to play a role in bone health. Following is a brief description of the role that each of these 15 nutrients play in building healthy bones.

Calcium: A component of the mineral crystals that make up bone.

Vitamin D: Enhances calcium absorption, prevents falls by improving nerve and muscle function.

Magnesium: Important for bone mineralization (accumulation of minerals which form bones). Magnesium deficiency is associated with abnormal bone mineral crystals in humans. In an open clinical trial, magnesium supplementation increased bone mineral density by an average 5% after 1-2 years in postmenopausal women.

Copper: Laboratory research has found that copper promotes bone mineralization and decreases bone loss, and that osteoporosis can develop if the diet is deficient in copper. Western diets often contain less copper than the amount recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. In a 2-year double-blind trail, copper supplementation reduced bone loss by 90% in middle-aged women, compared with a placebo.

Zinc: Like magnesium, zinc is important for bone mineralization, and also has been shown to decrease bone loss. Low dietary zinc intake was associated with increased fracture risk in a study of middle-aged and elderly men. The zinc content of the diet is frequently low; a study of elderly low-income people found they were consuming only half the Recommended Dietary Allowance for this mineral.

Manganese: Plays a role in the creation of the connective-tissue components of bone. Manganese deficiency in laboratory tests resulted in low bone mineral density and weak bones. Manganese deficiency may be associated with the development of osteoporosis.

Boron: Supports creation of bone-protecting hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, and DHEA. Boron supplementation prevented bone loss in experimental studies. In human volunteers consuming a low-boron diet, boron supplementation decreased urinary calcium excretion by 25-33%, a change that may indicate reduced bone loss.

Silicon: Plays a role in the synthesis of the connective-tissue components of bone. Silicon deficiency has been associated with bone abnormalities. In an observational study, higher dietary silicon intake correlated with higher bone mineral density. In a clinical trial, administration of an organic silicon compound increased bone mineral density of the femur (or thigh bone) in postmenopausal women.

B vitamins (folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12): These three B vitamins have been shown to lower blood levels of homocysteine, a breakdown product of the amino acid methionine. An elevated homocysteine concentration is a strong and independent risk factor for fractures in older men and women. Homocysteine levels increase around the time of menopause, which may explain in part why bone loss accelerates at that time. In a 2-year double-blind trial, supplementation of elderly stroke patients with folic acid and vitamin B12 reduced the number of hip fractures by 78%, compared with a placebo.

Strontium: This trace mineral is incorporated into bone and appears to increase bone strength. It also stimulates bone formation and inhibits bone breakdown. Controlled trials have demonstrated that strontium supplementation of postmenopausal women increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture risk.

Vitamin K: Best known for its effect on blood clotting, vitamin K is also required for the creation of osteocalcin, a unique protein found in bone that participates in the mineralization process. The amount of vitamin K needed for optimal bone health appears to be greater than the amount needed to prevent bleeding. Vitamin K levels tend to be low in people with osteoporosis. In randomized clinical trials, supplementation of postmenopausal women with vitamin K prevented bone loss and reduced the incidence of fractures.

Q. Which form of vitamin K is best?

A. Two forms of vitamin K compounds are present in food: vitamin K1 and vitamin K2. Vitamin K1 (also called phylloquinone) is present in leafy green vegetables and some vegetable oils, and vitamin K2 is found in much smaller amounts in meat, cheese, eggs, and natto (fermented soybeans).

To make things a little more complicated, Vitamin K2 itself can occur in more than one form. The two most important to this discussion are menaquinine-4 (MK-4, also called menatetrenone), which is licensed as a prescription drug in Japan, and menaquinone-7 (MK-7), which is extracted from natto.

Research suggests that MK-7 from natto may be an ideal form of vitamin K. The biological activity of MK-7 in laboratory studies was 17 times higher than that of vitamin K1 and 130 times higher than that of MK-4. After oral administration, MK-7 was better absorbed and persisted in the body longer, compared with MK-4 and vitamin K1. Although both have shown ability to prevent osteoporosis in laboratory research, a much lower dosage (600 times lower) of MK-7 is required, compared to MK-4, to obtain beneficial effects.

Thus, MK-7 has greater biological activity, greater bioavailability, and possibly more potent effects on bone, compared with other forms of vitamin K. The potential value of MK-7 for bone health is supported by an observational study from Japan, in which increasing natto consumption was associated with a lower risk of hip fracture. While additional research needs to be done, the available evidence suggests that the best forms of vitamin K for long-term use at physiological doses are MK-7 and vitamin K1.

Q. Why is strontium so important in building strong bones?

A. Strontium is of great interest to bone health researchers and has been studied in very high doses. Surprisingly, lower doses are not only safer for long-term supplementation, but may in fact have a greater impact on bone health than very high doses. Too little, and bone density is impaired; too much and health may be impaired. This is a case where dosing needs to be just right for optimal impact. Therefore, until more is known, it is wise to keep supplemental strontium at less than 6 mg per day.

Q. Can people taking osteoporosis medications also take bone-building nutrients?

A. Because nutrients work by a different mechanism than osteoporosis drugs, nutritional supplements are likely to enhance the beneficial effect of these medications. Calcium or other minerals may interfere with the absorption of biphophonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) or etidronate (Didronel). For that reason, calcium and other minerals should be taken at least two hours before or two hours after these medications. Also, it is always best to discuss the supplements you are using with your healthcare practitioner to create an integrated health plan.

Final thoughts…

Bone health ramifications extend beyond osteoporosis and fractures. Bone health is essential for freedom of movement, safety, comfort, independence and longevity. Weak bones do not heal well – sometimes they never heal at all. Osteoporosis-related fractures rob us of our mobility and consign thousands of Americans to walkers and wheelchairs every year. In fact, 40% of people are unable to walk independently after a hip fracture, and 60% still require assistance a year later. The most terrible consequence of fractures related to osteoporosis is mortality. The impairment of the ability to move around freely can cause pneumonia and skin damage leading to serious infections. It is estimated that suffering a hip fracture increases the risk of dying almost 25%. Making bone health a priority now will allow you to reap health dividends for many years to come.



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Degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis)
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Date: August 24, 2006 03:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis)

Degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) damages or destroys cartilage and its supportive collagen structure. As many as 40 million Americans, including the majority of people over age fifty, are thought to suffer from some form of this disease. Primary osteoarthritis, the “wear and tear” form, is due to normal use and age-related causes. Secondary osteoarthritis results from repeated joint trauma, inherited predisposition, or previous inflammatory conditions. While non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) treat symptoms only, a natural, holistic approach strives to improve the environment of the cartilage and joint as a whole by providing protective and restorative nourishment, increased circulation, decreased inflammation and reduced free radical damage.

High levels of Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate

Widely regarded as the first defense in protecting joints, glucosamine and Chondroitin sulfate have been shown to effectively control joint pain and slow down or reverse the progression of cartilage deterioration. The integrity of joint gliding surfaces as well as the health of tendons, ligaments, joint fluids, skin, bones, heart valves and virtually all structural elements in the body is dependent upon the proper synthesis and availability of proteoglycans, integral components of joint cartilage.

Glucosamine provides two components critical to the synthesis of proteoglycans: hyaluronic acid and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs).

Chondroitin sulfate represents an important group of GAGs. It is not a single compound, but rather a class of compounds with different molecular weights that each have specialized functions within the body.

Numerous studies have shown that long-term safety, reduction in pain and protection of cartilage with body chondroitin and glucosamine are comparable or superior to results obtained with NSAIDs.

MSM. (Methylsulfonylmethane) MSM is a rich source of sulfur, a mineral required for GAG synthesis. A preliminary study suggests that MSM may help reduce pain in persons with degenerative arthritis.

Gota Kola. (Centella asiatica) known to support collagen synthesis and stimulate GAG’s, Gota Kola has been used for many years in Europe to promote wound healing and blood vessel integrity. It also has been shown to improve circulation in small vessels.

Turmeric. (Curcuma longa) this saffron-colored root offers a wide range of benefits. It naturally inhibits the inflammatory COX-2 enzyme, reduces pain and is a potent antioxidant that protects the liver and other cells. High antioxidant diets may inhibit joint deterioration.

Bromelain. Derived from pineapple cores, Bromelain is most commonly used for healing soft tissue injuries and inflammation. It contains potent selective proteases (protein-digesting enzymes) and other substances which serve to block destruction of GAGs.

Trace Minerals. Micronutrients play many distinct roles in support of healthy joint connective tissue and joint cartilage matrix.

Black Pepper Extract. Bioperine is a highly concentrated extract (95% - 98% piperine) of black pepper. Used as a bioavailability enhancer, it has been shown to increase the absorption of vitamins, minerals and herbs.



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Timely News Briefs from the National Nutritional Foods Association
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Date: April 15, 2006 01:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Timely News Briefs from the National Nutritional Foods Association

NNFA Questions, Responds to WSJ Article on Supplements… Last Friday, April 7th, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) published a letter to the editor from NNFA Executive director and CEO David Seckman, stating that a recent WSJ article titled “The Case Against Vitamins” ignored the vast majority of scientific studies that prove the safety and efficacy of vitamins while highlighting and distorting the few that do not. Seckman pointed out among other things that “While the author correctly stated people can get the proper amounts of micronutrients from foods, the fact is according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, more than 75 percent of Americans do not” and “while clinical syndromes of classical vitamin deficiencies are unusual in industrialized nations, suboptimal vitamin status is quite common has been associated with many severe chronic diseases.”



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REFERENCES
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Date: June 25, 2005 08:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: REFERENCES

REFERENCES

1 a. The Surgeon General’s “Nutrition and Health Report.” b. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES III)” c. The National Academy of Science’s. Diet and Health Report: Health Promotion and Disease Objectives (DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 91-50213, Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1990). e. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 2 Rolls BJ. Carbohydrates, fats, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr 1995; 61(4 Suppl):960S-967S. 3 McDowell MA, Briefel RR, Alaimo K, et al. Energy and macronutrient intakes of persons ages 2 months and over in the United States: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Phase 1:1988-91. Advance data from vital and health statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; No. 255. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics; 1994. 4 Center for Science in the Public Interest and McDonald’s Nutrition and You—A guide to Healthy Eating at McDonald’s: McDonald’s Corp,1991. 5 Bray GA. Appetite Control in Adults. In: Fernstrom JD, Miller GD eds. Appetite and Body Weight Regulation. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1994:1-92. 6 Michnovicz JJ. How to Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer. New York: Warner Book Inc. 1994:54. 7 Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet. National Research Council Report, National Academy of Sciences, 15 Feb. 1996. 8 Van Tallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979:32: 2723-33. 9 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:273. 10 Swaneck GE, Fishman J. Covalent binding of the endogenous estrogen 16A-hydroxyestrone to estradiol in human breast concer cells: characterization and intranuclear localization. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988:85;7831-5. 11 Colditz GA. Epidemiology of breast cancer. Findings from the nurses’ health study. Cancer1993;714:1480-9. 12 Hennen WJ. Breast Cancer Risk Reduction. The effects of supplementation with dietary indoles. Unpublished report 1992. 13 Deslypere BJ. Obesity and cancer. Metabolism 1995;44(93):24-7. 14 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:281. 15 Whittemore AS, Kolonel LN, John M. Prostate cancer in relation to diet, physical activity, and body size in blacks, whites, and Asians in the United States and Canada. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995;87(9):629-31. 16 Key T. Risk factors for prostate cancer. Cancer Survivor 1995;23:63- 77. 17 Kondo Y, Homma Y, Aso Y, Kakizoe T. Promotional effects of twogeneration exposure to a high-fat diet on prostate carcinogenisis in ACI/Seg mice. Cancer Res 1994;54(23):6129-32. 18 Wang Y, Corr JG, Taler HT, Tao Y, Fair WR, Heston WD. Decreased growth of established human prostate LNCaP tumors in nude mice fed a low-fat diet. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995;87(19):1456-62. 19 Nixon DW. Cancer prevention clinical trials. In-Vivo 1994;8(5):713-6. 20 Key T. Micronutrients and cancer aetiology: the epidmiological evidence. Proceed Nutr Soc 1994;53(3):605-14. 21 Gorbach SL, Goldin BR. The intestinal microflora and the colon cancer connection. Reviews of Infectious Diseases 1990;12(Suppl 2):S252-61. 22 Shrapnel WS, Calvert GD, Nestel PJ, Truswell AS. Diet and coronary heart disease. The National Heart Foundation of Australia. Med J Australia. 1995;156(Suppl):S9-S16. 23 Ellis JL, Campos-Outcalt D. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in native Americans: a literature review. Am. J. Preventive Med 1994;10(5):295-307. 24 DiBianco R. The changing syndrome of heart failure: an annotated review as we approach the 21st century. J. Hypertension 1994; 12(4 Suppl):S73- S87. 25 Van Itallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979;32(suppl):2723-33. 26 Kestin M, Moss R, Clifton PM, Nestel PJ. Comparative effects of three cereal brans on plasma lipids, blood pressure and glucose metabolism in mildly hyper-cholesterolemic men. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;52(4):661-6. 27 Story JA. Dietary fiber and lipid metabolism. In: Spiller GA, Kay RM. eds. Medical Aspects of Dietary Fiber. Penun Medical; New York, 1980, p.138. 28 Stein PP, Black HR. The role of diet in the genesis and treatment of hypertension. Med. Clin. North America. 1993;77(4):831-47. 29 Olin JW. Antihypertensive treatment in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Cleve. Clin. J. Medicine. 1994;61(5):337-44. 30 Tinker LF. Diabetes Mellitus—a priority health care issue for women. J. Am. Dietetic Association. 1994;94(9):976-85. 31 Gaspard UJ, Gottal JM, van den Brule FA. Postmenopausal changes of lipid and glucose metabolism: a review of their main aspects. Maturitas. 1995;21(3):71-8. 32 Coordt MC, Ruhe RC, McDonald RB. Aging and insulin secretion. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biology and Medicine. 1995;209(3):213-22. 33 Felber JP. From Obesity to Diabetes. Pathophysiological Considerations. Int. Journal of Obesity 1992;16:937-952. 34 Gillum RF. The association of body fat distribution with hypertension, hypertensive heart disease, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors in men and women age 18-79. J Chronic Diseases 1987;40:421-8. 35 Haffner SM, Stern MP, Hazuda HP, et al. Role of obesity and fat distribution in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellits in Mexican Americans and non- Hispanic whites. Diabetes Care 1986;9:153-61. 36 Bonadonna RC, deFronzo RA. Glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and Metabolism. 1991;17(1 Pt. 2):12-35. 37 Shoemaker JK, Bonen A. Vascular actions of insulin in health and disease. Canadian J. of Applied Physiology. 1995;20(2):127-54. 38 Resnick LM. Ionic Basis of Hypertension, Insulin Resistaince, Vascular Disease, and Related Disorders. The Mechanism of ‘Syndrome X’. Am. J. Hypertension. 1993;6(suppl):123S-134S. 39 Trautwein EA. 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