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Catch Your Breath
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Date: June 14, 2005 05:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Catch Your Breath

Catch Your Breath

by Carl Lowe Energy Times, October 10, 2004

Asthma is on the rise. This serious breathing problem already afflicts 300 million people around the world and is expected to hinder the lung function of 400 million people in 20 years (Annual World Asthma Meeting, 2/17/04).

In the US, asthma continues to strike our kids. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (2/24/03), the rate at which kids developed asthma doubled between 1980 and 1995. By 2001, 6.3 million American kids had asthma. The cost of treating all these kids: more than $3 billion a year.

Few researchers are prepared to state definitively why asthma rates have continued to climb during the past two decades. However, many investigators point to factors that seem inextricably linked to this disorder, which is marked by wheezing, shortness of breath and coughing spells.

CO2 Buildup

A report from the American Public Health Association and researchers at Harvard puts a lot of the blame for the high rate of asthma on global warming, smog and the atmosphere's growing burden of carbon dioxide. These are linked to industries and car exhaust that release pollution.

In this increasing burden of toxins released into the atmosphere, the rate of asthma among toddlers has grown to be particularly worrisome. Their rate of asthma has climbed more than twice the national average: by 160% between 1980 and 1994. According to these researchers (Inside the Greenhouse: The Impacts of CO2 (Carbon Dioxide) and Climate Change on Public Health in the Inner City), global warming-which involves large increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide released by internal combustion engines and and industrial processes-has fomented the asthma epidemic in several ways:

• Extra heat in the atmosphere has stimulated rapid plant growth that results in more fungus, pollen and spores; this causes allergies that often lead to asthma. Weeds like ragweed, which release allergenic particles, have greatly increased during the past few years. • Extreme weather has caused more floods and damp houses, leading to more indoor air pollution from molds. • Diesel pollutants are now combining with pollen and mold to irritate lungs, causing troublesome allergic reactions.

Bus Fume Hazards

The report notes that in neighborhoods like Harlem, in New York City, 25% of all children suffer asthma. Rates are particularly high in children who live in apartments that are located along bus routes.

A finding that surprised the scientists is the fact that carbon dioxide released by city traffic and the burning of coal and natural gas persists over urban areas, causing a dome of CO2 pollution.

Research on air quality in New York City, Phoenix and Baltimore shows that these lingering CO2 domes contain from 400 parts per million (ppm) of carbon dioxide to 600 ppm. Those levels are significantly above the global average of 379 ppm. Over the course of the earth's history, going back more than 400,000 years before the Industrial Age, research shows the atmosphere has averaged only 180 to 280 ppm.

Nighttime Distress

Breathing difficulties that increase at night can point to asthma, according to Robert Fink, MD: "Asthma can be a nocturnal disease, at its worst between 10 pm and 4 am, when cortisol [a hormone that regulates many bodily functions] levels are lowest" (Pediatric Asthma: Diagnosis and Treatment Goals, Medscape).

Dr. Fink says that if problems with breathing are bad enough to interfere with sleep, a health practitioner should be consulted to analyze the difficulty.

Diet and Asthma

Although nobody can guarantee protection against asthma, research suggests that eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can significantly reduce your risk. For instance, a study in Australia found that people who ate the most apples and pears reduced their chances of suffering from this breath-robbing disorder.

In research involving about 1,600 people, aged 20 to 44, they found that those who consumed the largest quantity of these fruits enjoyed the lowest rate of asthma (AJCN 2003; 78:414).

This is the latest study to confirm the fact that apples and other fruits help to keep lungs healthy. " There is extensive evidence from studies over the last 10 to 15 years that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is beneficial to lung health," observes Carol Trenga, PhD, a research scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. "The most compelling evidence is linked to fruits high in vitamin C, which are associated with improved lung function in the general population of adults and children."

Produce for Smokers

Quitting smoking represents one of the best ways to reduce lung disease. But even if you smoke, research on smokers has found that those who ate a moderate amount of fruits and vegetables have fewer lung problems (American Thoracic Society 97th International Conference 5/2001).

And you don't have to change your diet very much to make a difference: In that research, merely eating one and half pieces of fruit a day or eating about a tablespoon of vegetables daily significantly dropped smokers' chances of serious lung disease.

Fruits and Veggies to the Rescue

In a study at the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, scientists looking at the diets of more than 2,500 people found that eating five or more apples or three tomatoes a week increased lung function. Eating apples and tomatoes also reduced the risk of wheezing.

" The likelihood is that any effect is due to the concerted action of all the nutrients in apples and tomatoes, especially the antioxidants that are particularly rich in the peel of apples and contribute to the coloring of tomatoes," says researcher Sarah Lewis, PhD.

" Antioxidants may work by protecting the airways against the insult of tobacco smoke and other atmospheric pollutants," she adds. Dr. Trenga recommends that everyone eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. She also notes, "[I]t is reasonable to suggest modest supplementation with for example, vitamin C (250-500 mg twice/day) and vitamin E (up to 400 IU per day), in at-risk populations as a complementary therapy after considering the specific needs of the individual...These levels are very safe and have other health benefits (such as vitamin E and heart disease) in addition to potentially improving lung health."

Herbal Relief

Since asthma is linked to allergies, herbs that help to quell respiratory allergies can possibly lower your risk of asthma. A blend of standardized herbal extracts that contains Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or amla), Terminalia chebula (Harda or Haritaki), Terminalia bellerica (bedda nut tree), Albizia lebbeck (Indian walnut), Zingiber officinale (ginger root), Piper longum (Indian long pepper), and Piper nigrum (black pepper) has been found to improve breathing and reduce the effect of allergies (FASEB J 2004; Vol II:A912, Abs. 600.8). Other studies have shown that these herbs can relieve Nasal congestion, ease sneezing and clear bothersome mucus (J Am Coll Nutr 22(5): Abs 46, 2003).

Antibiotic Avoidance

Avoiding antibiotics may also lower the risk of asthma. " Over the past four decades there has been an explosive increase in allergy and asthma in westernized countries, says Mairi Noverr, PhD, a researcher who has looked at the lin between antibiotic use with asthma and allergies. " We propose that the link between antibiotic use and dysregulated pulmonary immunity is through antibiotic-induced long term alterations in the bacterial and fungal GI microflora."

In other words, Dr. Noverr's research shows that beneficial bacteria in people's intestines, which take part in strengthening immunity and regulating the immune response to pollen, may have been harmed by the overprescription of antibiotics by physicians. Dr. Noverr and his fellow researchers gave lab animals antibiotics before exposing them to candida albicans (a yeast infection). They then exposed the animals to mold spores. The result: a greater sensitivity to inhaling the spores and breathing problems similar to what people experience during hay fever season (104th General Meeting American Society of Microbiology).

" The studies presented here are the first direct demonstration that antibiotic therapy can promote the development of an allergic airway response," says Dr. Noverr. On a global scale, the outlook for asthma is worrisome. As other countries continue their industrial growth, the burden on the earth's atmosphere will grow. Meanwhile, few serious measures are being taken to reduce global warming, and the national diet frequently neglects lung-friendly vegetables and fruits. But within that uncertain scenario, you can boost your chances of healthy lungs: Eat more apples. Stay away from smoky buses. Hope for clear skies.



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Allergy Alleviation
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Date: June 10, 2005 05:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Allergy Alleviation

Allergy Alleviation by Cal Orey , February 2, 2002

Allergy Alleviation By Cal Orey

Welcome to the stuffed up world of seasonal allergic rhinitis: the wheezing, sneezing "inhalant allergies" that torment 35 million Americans. Adding insult to sinus pain, other allergens attack year-round. Air pollution, dust mites (microscopic gremlins that infest bedding, upholstery and rugs) and animal dander trigger allergies-or other respiratory ailments-in any season. Urban air is full of rubber tire particles, a true blowout for those with latex sensitivity. Altogether, roughly 50 million Americans-about one in five-suffer from some form of allergy, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI). Tired of cross-pollinating with plants or being bowled over by dust balls? Vitamins, herbs and other nutrients can help you nip allergy discomfort in the bud.

The Allergy Response

Your immune system triggers an allergic response when it overreacts to otherwise harmless substances or antigens (we're talking dust, pollen and mold).The alarmed immune system then launches a defensive chemical reaction, releasing potent chemicals (antibodies) supposed to destroy the "invaders." The antibodies, called IgE, carry the invading substances to special cells, which zap them with more biochemicals. Among these protective cells are mast cells: they release histamine, the substance that causes swelling and inflammation to the linings of the nose, sinuses and eyelids, resulting in sneezing, upper respiratory congestion and itchy, watery eyes.

Just Blame The Folks

Most allergies are determined by your genes. If your Mom or Dad sneeze and scratch, there's a good chance you will, too. "That is not to say that we directly inherit an allergy to any specific substance. Rather, it seems as if we might inherit some kind of immune system defect or weakness that leaves us more vulnerable to allergies," explain co-authors Glenn S. Rothfeld, MD, and Suzanne LeVert in their book Natural Medicine for Allergies: The Best Alternative Methods for Quick Relief (Rodale). For some people, allergies lurk in food, throwing the immune system into overdrive. "Many natural medicine practitioners believe that a diet high in animal fats will contribute to the development of allergy and asthma, as does a diet high in food additives, such as preservatives and dyes," says Gary McLain, PhD, in his book The Natural Way of Healing: Asthma and Allergies (Dell). Worse, allergies can up the risk of asthma, which afflicts 15 million Americans. Most people afflicted with asthma also suffer allergies: the two are linked, according to the AAAAI. Allergy triggers of asthma include pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. Remember Helen Hunt's asthmatic son in the movie As Good As It Gets? His character endured allergies to dust, and living in New York (and watching his mom date Jack Nicholson) didn't help his immune system. Coughs, ear infections, fevers and visits to hospital emergency rooms curtailed his social life (and limited his close-ups as well). That kind of routine happens in real life, too. (Well, maybe close encounters with Jack N. are not included for most.) But when we breathe substances such as molds, they can induce swelling and inflammation of the bronchial airways which narrow and restrict air flow. This, in turn, causes wheezing and shortness of breath and can trigger an asthma "attack," according to Andrew Engler, MD, who specializes in allergy and asthma in San Mateo, California.

The Nose Knows: Chemical Sensitivities

Imagine a picture-perfect, crisp, clear Saturday morning. You make a final stop on your weekly errand run to the dry cleaner, where you drop off your laundry and spend a moment chatting up the owner. Back in your car, your eyes tear and you feel a bit woozy. Kenneth Bock, MD, and Nellie Sabin, writing in The Road to Immunity: How To Survive and Thrive in a Toxic World (Pocket Books) sense that your reaction could be chemical sensitivity, a difficult to diagnose but, in their opinion, very real malady. (Of course, a clinician can test you for immune responses to certain chemicals.) Reactions to chemicals produce the typical allergic responses: puffy or red-rimmed eyes; swelling; aching or stiff joints and muscles; irritability or dizziness; respiratory inflammations; headaches and the like. Villains include aerosol sprays, tobacco smoke, glues, insecticides and herbicides, household chemicals and fragrances. Identification and avoidance are key, say the authors. Vitamin C, which binds with chemicals, is one of the best nutritional defenses.

Breathing Problems Expand

Americans now freely take lifesaving medicines such as antibiotics and insulin but, in some people, "they have the potential to alter the immune system, which is where allergies begin," says Dr. McLain. (Consult your pharmacist if you have questions about your prescription medication.) We, as a nation, are also eating more chemicals, from the pesticides drenched on plants to the preservatives poured on prepared foods. We're breathing polluted air, which can lead to or exacerbate asthma, and then we choke on recycled air in sealed buildings. And while a century ago you were likely to have spent much of your time close to home, you can now hop on a supersonic plane and be taken to the other side of the globe within a matter of hours. With travel comes exposure to even more exotic allergens that can drive your immune system to distraction.

The All-Natural Gesundheit

Certain allergy-relief nutrients and herbs can help make life more bearable. Here's how they work: n Vitamin C for the lungs. According to experts, when vitamin C is low, asthma is high. Vitamin C carries the major antioxidant load in the airways and therefore contributes mightily to the health of the lungs. A study in the Annals of Allergy (73(1994):89-96) reported that in seven of 11 clinical trials since 1973, vitamin C supplementation provided "significant improvements" in respiratory function and asthma symptoms. n Vitamin E and carotene to suppress allergic reactions. These antioxidants may also help protect the respiratory tract from caustic pollutants. Vitamin E is reputed to be one of the most important nutrients for antioxidant protection in the lungs. In addition, these two substances decrease production of allergy-related compounds called leukotrienes. n Zinc for the immune system. Research shows that a deficiency in this trace mineral can weaken your immune system, setting you up as a target for allergies and infections. (Some vegetarians may not store sufficient amounts of this mineral and should take supplements.) Zinc comes to the body's rescue by taking part in the production of IgA, the gastrointestinal antibody that lines the digestive tract. "When IgA binds to an allergen, it keeps it from being absorbed into the bloodstream and thus from causing an allergic reaction," report Rothfeld and Levert. Also, zinc protects mucous membranes and helps convert beta carotene to vitamin A, another anti-allergy, immune-boosting nutrient. In a study of 100 participants at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, half took a zinc-based lozenge, while the other half received a dummy preparation. The participants taking zinc experienced a 42% reduction in the duration and severity of their common colds (Annals of Internal Medicine, 7/96). n Quercetin as an antihistamine. A valuable, anti-allergic flavonoid (plant coloring agent that is a powerful antioxidant), quercetin shines as a potent weapon against allergies and asthma. Believed to inhibit histamine release from mast cells and slow the production of other allergy-related compounds, it stabilizes mast cell membranes. Other flavonoid-rich extracts include grape seed, pine bark, green tea and Ginkgo biloba. n Additional helpful nutrients: Vitamin B-12, particularly to combat sensitivity to sulfites (The Nutrition Desk Reference [Keats]); selenium, an antioxidant that breaks down leukotrienes (Clinical Science 77, 1989: 495-500); and magnesium to relax bronchial tissues (Journal of the American Medical Association, 262 [1989]: 1210-3).

Herbal Remedies To The Rescue

n Nettles for hay fever relief. Research at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon, showed that 40 of 69 folks suffering from hay fever found moderate to extreme relief from taking freeze-dried stinging nettles (Planta Medica, [1990] 44-47). "It is nontoxic, cheap and preferable to antihistamines, which I think are significantly toxic," reports Andrew Weil, MD, in his book Natural Health, Natural Medicine: A Comprehensive Manual for Wellness and Self-Care (Houghton Mifflin). n Cayenne to reduce inflammation. Cayenne, known as hot red pepper, is rich in capsaicin, a potent flavonoid "counter-irritant" that dilates and soothes inflamed Nasal and bronchial tissues, according to experts. A bonus: Cayenne also contains a rich amount of antioxidant vitamin C, which can help enhance your immune system. n Echinacea for allergy prevention. This popular Native American herb provides cold and allergy protection, particularly when you take it before encountering allergens. Studies reveal that echinacea aids your body's tissues and protects you from germs and allergens. In fact, German studies have found it possesses valuable antiviral, antibacterial and immunity-boosting properties.

Make Your World Allergy-Free

For the most effective allergy relief, make sure you stay clear of allergens that wreak allergy havoc. Visit an allergy-savvy health practitioner and get tested to find out which substances rock your respiratory world. Plus, allergy experts recommend: n Banish dust mites: sweep out clutter and have your house power-vacuumed, if necessary; wash bedding and linens in very hot water. n De-pollinate your environment: flip on the air conditioner to sift out pollen (keep its filter and any forced air registers clean); exercise indoors; machine dry, rather than line dry, your clothes. n Buy a home air filter, especially if you experience dust, pollen or pet dander allergies. n Avoid allergy triggers that dog your days: cats and canines (or consider the hairless or shed-less breeds), mold and tobacco smoke. No matter what you do or actions you take, allergies may always remain an annoyance in your life. But attention to the foods you eat, the places where you exercise and the right combination of anti-allergy nutrients can limit your discomfort.

Leveling The Leukotrine Playing Field

On a microscopic level, a series of biochemicals implicated in allergic reactions are leukotrienes, substances that may constrict the bronchial tubes (breathing passages). In some people, consuming the food additive tartrazine can cause severe asthmatic breathing difficulties by boosting leukotrine release. In turn, this can interfere with the body's use of vitamin B-6. The process in which lack of B-6 or "errors" in how your body uses B-6 causes allergic reactions and is complex. According to Michael Murray, ND and Joseph Pizzorno, ND in the revised edition of the Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine (Prima), breathing problems may begin when the metabolism of tryptophan (an amino acid) goes awry: "Tryptophan is converted to serotonin, a compound that, among other things, can cause the airways of asthmatics to constrict...Vitamin B-6 is required for the proper metabolism of tryptophan." Accordingly, a study of vitamin B-6, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, shows that people with compromised breathing may possess less B-6 in their blood than others who breathe normally. When people with asthma were given B-6, their wheezing and asthmatic attacks dropped.

Fat Fix For Allergies

The fat in your diet or supplements can also influence your susceptibility to allergies and asthma linked to allergies. Epidemiologists have found that countries where children eat fish at least four times a month cut their risk of asthma by 67% compared to other parts of the world where they consume fewer fish. Research on omega-3 fatty acids, the kind of fat found in fish, flax and hemp oil, demonstrates that some of these substances can improve breathing. In particular, fatty acids called eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can help open up bronchial tubes. Studies in the American Review of Respiratory Disease and the International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology show that breathing passageways may not react so negatively to the presence of allergens when you eat more fish or take supplements containing these types of fats. Many of the scientists who study the kinds of fats we eat believe that the increase in allergies and asthma in the US during the twentieth century may be due to both increasing air pollution (which irritates our lungs) plus a simultaneous increase in our consumption of what are called omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-6 oils are contained in most of the vegetable oils Americans eat, including sunflower and peanut oils. While experts believe that we would be better off consuming a diet containing about five times as many omega-6 fatty acids as omega-3s, today we eat about 40 times as much omega-6s. The chemistry of how these fats influence our allergy susceptibility is complex. It begins in our cell membranes which consist mostly of fat. When we consume omega-3 fatty acids, in our diet or in supplements, and these fats enter cell membranes, the change in structure cuts the availability of arachidonic acid, a fatty acid your body can make and which is found in meat, eggs and dairy products. Eventually, it is thought that this change in cellular metabolism and reduction in arachidonic acid forces the body to make less 4-series leukotrienes, substances which are quite prone to provoking allergic inflammation and, instead, produce 5-series leukotrienes, leukotrienes which don't cause nearly as much trouble. This process requires patience. According to Pizzorno and Murray. "It may take as long as one year before the benefits are apparent, as it appears to take time to turn over cellular membranes in favor of the omega-3 fatty acids."

Chinese Medicine Versus Allergies

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) views allergies as an imbalance of the liver, says Jason Elias, co-author with Katherine Ketcham of The Five Elements of Self-Healing (Harmony Books). "The average American's (liver) deals with about fourteen pounds of chemicals a year. What would normally be a minor irritant becomes major because the liver can't process them anymore," explains Elias. Licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) has traditionally been used to fight allergies since this herb battles inflammation as evidenced by Japanese research and a study published in the journal Allergy. Much of this anti-allergy action is thought to proceed from licorice's interaction with a biochemical called cortisol, a hormone secreted by the adrenal glands. Cortisol (along with epinephrine, another adrenal hormone) relaxes the muscles controlling airways. By slowing the liver's breakdown of cortisol, licorice prolongs circulation of this hormone which, in turn, can help breathing passages stay clear. In addition, glycyrrhetinic acid, a compound in licorice, slows the body's manufacture of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, substances which exacerbate allergic inflammatory reactions. Ma Huang (Ephedra sinica) has been employed for thousands of years to aid breathing since chemicals in this plant widen breathing passages.

Homeopathic Remedies for Allergy

Homeopathic treatments consist of highly diluted substances designed to coax the body into healing itself. The effectiveness of homeopathy for hayfever has been demonstrated by research published in Lancet performed at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. There, scientists showed that homeopathically-prepared medicines produced statistically significant improvements in allergy sufferers. The appropriate homeopathic remedy for any illness depends on the personality type of the person suffering an allergy. These treatments are among those recommended by Dana Ullman: n Allium cepa: appropriate for burning Nasal discharge that grows worse in warm rooms and improves outdoors. Relieves non-burning tearing from eyes, raw feeling in the nose with tingling sensation and violent sneezing. n Nux vomica: used when feeling irritable and chilled, with daytime fluent Nasal discharge and night congestion that grows worse indoors. Also for those sensitive to cold and to being uncovered. n Pulsatilla: best for women and children with daytime Nasal discharge and night congestion who are gentle, yielding, mild, impressionable and emotional. Used when congestion is worse in warm rooms, hot weather or while lying down.

Food Allergy Conundrum Food allergies can prove to be the toughest allergies to identify and eliminate. Jason Elias believes that people may develop food sensitivities from eating the same foods too often. "If someone has an allergy, I might say 'Let's get you off dairy for three weeks,'" he says, noting that some people have limited their hay fever problems by ceasing to consume dairy products. Many have also found relief by maintaining a food diary, keeping track of which foods are associated with allergy attacks and then eliminating those foods. So the next time you sneeze, don't just reach for your hanky, think back to the meal that you just ate. Your allergy problem may be sitting in your stomach as well as making you sneeze and stuffing your sinuses. Taking these kinds of anti-allergy preventive measures can provide life-enhancing relief that feels like a godsend. That lets you attain your healthy best.

This article included reporting by Judy Pokras.



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Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips
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Date: June 09, 2005 09:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips

Source Naturals' Allergy and Sinus Lifestyle Plan

Allergies are a growing health problem in the United States, according to a recent report issued by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAI). Every year more than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies. They are the sixth leading cause of chronic disease and affect more than 20% of the population. Hay fever alone accounts for more than eight million doctor visits annually, at a cost of $3.4 billion!

Source Naturals, as part of its commitment to Strategies for Wellness offers you these healthy lifestyle tips for allergy and sinus support.

Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips

Allergies are adverse reactions of the immune system to normally harmless substances?allergens. Some common allergens are pollen, weeds, molds, dust mites, animal dander, and latex particles.

Allergens can enter the body through inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, or injection (either intentionally as in the case of certain medications or through insect stings). Although there is a strong genetic component to allergies, there are also lifestyle factors we can control to prevent or minimize allergic reactions. Allergies are actually 'mistakes' or overreactions by the immune system. They are learned responses, which can be unlearned.

Allergy Proof Your Home

Cut down your exposure to dust mites and other indoor allergens by dust proofing your bedroom. Eliminate wall-to-wall carpets, down-filled blankets, feather pillows, and other dust catchers. Use window shades instead of venetian blinds, which can trap dust. Wash curtains and bedding regularly in hot water. Encase your mattress and pillows in airtight, dust-proof plastic covers. Dust and vacuum regularly.

If you have pets, especially cats, you should try to keep them out of your bedroom. Frequent brushing and bathing of pets can help get rid of excess hair.

Consider using a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter system if you have allergies to pollen, dust, or other particles -- or if you live with a smoker, or in a smoggy urban area. Dehumidifiers can help cut down on molds.

Avoid Outdoor Allergens

You may need to limit your time outdoors when pollen or mold spore counts are high. Walking through uncut fields or raking leaves can increase exposure to molds and fungi. Avoid tobacco smoke and polluted air. Keep windows and doors closed, and dry clothes in a vented dryer instead of outside.

Watch Your Diet

Sometimes 'avoidance therapy' to control allergies is impractical or undesirable. Diet is easier to work with and can have a significant influence on immune reactions. Excess or undigested dietary proteins may worsen an overresponsive immune system?cows' milk and wheat are frequent offenders. Cut down on protein, especially animal protein, avoid dairy products, and eat more fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates. You should also avoid nutritionless foods such as simple sugars.

Maintain Healthy Mucous Membranes

The mucosal cells that line the Nasal passages, throat and lungs are our first line of defense against airborne substances. One of the primary means of maintaining healthy mucous linings is to drink lots of pure water (6 to 8 glasses daily). This keeps mucus fluid thin and cleanses membranes. Nasal cleansing is helpful when sinuses are clogged. You can rinse the Nasal passages with a warm solution consisting of a quarter-teaspoon of salt to a cup of warm water, about the same sodium concentration found in your blood and tissue fluids. This practice washes away pollen grains and soothes irritated mucous membranes. Nasal cleansing can be done using a rubber suction bulb or a neti pot?a ceramic container used in Ayurveda that allows you to pour water directly into the nose. Inhaling steam with a little oil of eucalyptus in it may also ease clogged sinuses. Many people find acupuncture to be very effective for promoting sinus drainage.

Supplementation

Nutrients and herbs offer you safe, natural alternatives for supporting seasonal health. The bioflavonoid quercetin has been found in human cell culture studies to inhibit the release of histamines from immune cells. Ginkgo has been found in human cell culture studies to inhibit platelet-activating factor, a substance that stimulates the release of histamines. (Research is needed to determine if these effects occur in humans.) Stinging nettle is another herb that has been used traditionally to support a healthy respiratory system and sinuses. Vitamin A enhances macrophage function, is specifically needed for a healthy lung lining, and is beneficial for increasing the health of tissue cell membranes.



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Search Term: " Nasal "

  Messages 1-50 from 52 matching the search criteria.
Natural remedies to alleviate nasal allergies VitaNet, LLC Staff 10/30/18
5 Best Foods And Teas For Healthy Lungs Darrell Miller 6/27/18
Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies Darrell Miller 4/23/18
Lactic acid bacteria can protect against Influenza A virus, study finds Darrell Miller 12/19/17
Inhale Himalayan Pink Salt For These Benefits Darrell Miller 7/24/17
nasal polyps treatment miracle Darrell Miller 3/16/17
Does Quercetin Help Fight Allergies? Darrell Miller 8/22/15
Echinacea Health Benefits Darrell Miller 6/12/14
Bayberry Bark & Sinus Infections Darrell Miller 4/15/14
What Is Marjoram Oil? Darrell Miller 2/21/14
What are the Health Benefits of Spirulina? Darrell Miller 11/28/13
Discover the Wonders of Essential Oils Darrell Miller 11/15/13
The Differences and Benefits Darrell Miller 12/27/12
Can Serrapeptase Help Sinus Problems? Darrell Miller 12/1/12
Serrapeptidase: Natural NSAID Darrell Miller 3/27/12
What is Shea Butter Good for? Darrell Miller 2/24/12
Is Sulfite Sensitivity And Vertigo Linked? Darrell Miller 10/17/11
Reduce Inflammation, Nasal Drip, And Respiratory Infection With Natural Andrographis Darrell Miller 8/11/11
What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea? Darrell Miller 7/6/11
Why is Xylitol So Good for You Darrell Miller 5/23/11
Is Elderberry Good for Colds and Flu? Darrell Miller 4/14/11
Turmeric, Curcumin, And Good Health Darrell Miller 11/11/10
Herbs, Serrapeptase, and your Sinus Darrell Miller 2/18/10
Horse Radish Darrell Miller 10/28/09
Pleurisy Root Darrell Miller 9/24/09
Sage Darrell Miller 7/29/09
Hay Fever Darrell Miller 2/19/09
Natural Toothpastes Darrell Miller 2/18/09
Allergy Remedies Darrell Miller 11/25/08
ButterBur Extract Darrell Miller 4/29/08
Revita Darrell Miller 3/8/07
NaturalCare Virus Induced Nasal Decongestant – Super Strength SinuFix Darrell Miller 10/6/06
NaturalCare Nasal Decongestant - SinuFix Nasal Mist Darrell Miller 10/6/06
NaturalCare Healthy Sinus Function – SinuFix Capsules Darrell Miller 10/6/06
Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/8/05
Flue and Cold Times – For relief from Flue & Cold Symptoms Darrell Miller 11/7/05
Pregnant and eating for two... Darrell Miller 10/21/05
Nozovent - 1 pack or 2 pack Darrell Miller 9/8/05
Zinc, Vitamin C and Colds, length of Colds ... Darrell Miller 7/28/05
Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus... Darrell Miller 7/11/05
HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia) Darrell Miller 7/11/05
Quercetin and Bromelain - for better health. Darrell Miller 7/4/05
Hayfever & Allergies - Herbs To Help You Breathe Easier Darrell Miller 6/30/05
ENDNOTES Darrell Miller 6/23/05
Stomach Ulcers Darrell Miller 6/23/05
CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPSICUM Darrell Miller 6/23/05
Bromelain Sinus Ease - Nature's Life Darrell Miller 6/16/05
Catch Your Breath Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Allergy Alleviation Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips Darrell Miller 6/9/05



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Natural remedies to alleviate nasal allergies
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 30, 2018 09:51 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural remedies to alleviate Nasal allergies





There are so many people out there that really struggle from natural allergies. They wake up some days, and due to the environment around them, they can immediately start coughing and sneezing. They are not sick but they are allergic to the natural environment. It is very bothersome to some people. If you want to get rid of these allergies, then you need to look into some of the natural remedies that are said to help people.

Key Takeaways:

  • If you feel that you are allergic to something, go to a doctor and find out for sure.
  • The people who have no allergies to anything are so lucky in their every day life.
  • There are people who suffer from severe cases of allergies due to the environment at the time.

"Anyone can develop this condition, which can be triggered by animal dander, feathers, plants, pollen, or other environmental elements."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-10-25-natural-remedies-to-alleviate-nasal-allergies.html

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5 Best Foods And Teas For Healthy Lungs
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Date: June 27, 2018 09:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Best Foods And Teas For Healthy Lungs





5 Best Foods And Teas For Healthy Lungs

The breathe of life is an oft-used phrase. It can refer to inspiration, or sudden healing. But, it always indicates a transformation and something wonderful. The metaphor springs from the fact that breathe is intrinsic to life itself. Very few things cause despair, or a low quality of health like its lack. Yet, there are a variety of diseases that can take one's breathe away, including chronic pulmonary disease, asthma and much more. Moreover, in these times, when there is an unfortunately high level of air pollution and stress, a time when the genes we pass onto our children undoubtedly reflects the stresses of our environment, in these times we find ourselves more than ever prone to losing our breath.

Fortunately, there are foods and herbs that can assist us in fighting back against the problems that would steal breath from us. Many foods assist the body by killing microorganisms, flushing out toxins, reducing inflammation and mucus, and also by reducing stress. Some very potent, healing food options include, garlic, turmeric, olive oil and oregano.

Key Takeaways:

  • Many herbs, spices, teas, fruits and vegetables contain ingredients that can naturally promote respiratory health.
  • Oregano has benefits for respiratory health that includes treating cold, flu and bronchitis. It can also alleviate nasal congestion.
  • Pineapple can promote lung health by flushing out toxins, reducing mucus and phlegm, and combating sinus infections.

"Breathing is so fundamental that we hardly need to think of it, but when it is impaired, it’s hard to think of anything else."

Read more: https://www.thealternativedaily.com/5-best-foods-and-teas-for-healthy-lungs/

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Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies
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Date: April 23, 2018 09:17 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies





Coconut Oil For Clogged Sinuses + 4 Other Remedies

Chronic inflammation of the nasal membranes is a condition which affects millions of people. The condition can manifest as a stuffed up, or chronically runny nose. It can also cause chronic headaches, an inability to smell, and difficulty breathing through the nose. Environmental allergens, autoimmune disturbances and polyps can all be factors creating this disturbing condition, which most people attempt to treat using conventional, over-the-counter options. There are, however, useful natural, alternative treatment modalities, including the use of coconut oil.

Coconut oil, and other nutrient-dense foods and spices, contain anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and antibacterial components that can aid this condition. Irrigating and cleansing the sinuses with a neti pot is another efficacious, alternative way to alleviate chronic inflammation of the nasal passages.

Key Takeaways:

  • Spices and foods, like coconut oil and pineapple, have antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • These properties can mitigate the suffering of the 40% of the world's population that is afflicted with chronic allergic rhinitis.
  • Irrigating and cleansing affected nasal passages with a neti pot is another way to treat chronic inflammation of the nasal membranes,

"Many people turn to over-the-counter antihistamines and cold remedies to treat nasal congestion. By and large, these NSAID medications treat the symptoms of the condition rather than it’s underlying cause."

Read more: https://www.thealternativedaily.com/coconut-oil-for-clogged-sinuses-plus-4-other-remedies/

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Lactic acid bacteria can protect against Influenza A virus, study finds
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 19, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Lactic acid bacteria can protect against Influenza A virus, study finds





Researchers have shown that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may provide broad protection against influenza viruses. LAB are best known for their human gut floral maintenance, fermentative activity, and preservative capacity. LAB are widely used in food industry, such as in the preparation of fermented dairy products, pickling of vegetables, and baking. LAB have many health benefits, such as alleviation of diarrhea, stimulation of immune system, inhibition of infections, and prevention of certain diseases. So, LAB have been classified as probiotics. Previous studies have suggested that many LAB strains protect mice against influenza virus. The aim of the new study is to further explore the antiviral effect of LAB.

Key Takeaways:

  • The current seasonal vaccines are readily available but only work well when when vaccine strains and circulating influenza viruses are well matched.
  • The probiotics commonly used to regulate digestive issues can potentially offer protection agains Influenza A
  • After testing on mice in labs, they are beginning to feel confident that these probiotics can be offered in a nasal spray to humans.

"Our study provides evidence that heat-killed lactic acid bacteria could potentially be administered via a nasal spray as a prophylactic drug against non-specific influenza virus infections."

Read more: https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-12/gsu-lab121317.php

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Inhale Himalayan Pink Salt For These Benefits
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 24, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Inhale Himalayan Pink Salt For These Benefits





You can inhale some Himalayan pink salt and gain a lot of different benefits. Himalayan salt has anti microbial, anti fungal and antibacterial properties. The United States has been very late to the table when it comes to Himalayan punk salt. Eastern Europe actually saw the many benefits of it over 200 years ago. You can use it as an inhaler. It helps a lot with swollen Nasal passages and also hay fever and it eliminates harmful organisms.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9vMToj1PcA&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Himalayan salt is not table salt and has antifungal properties
  • Europe uses it for therapeutic benefits and the US has delayed usage
  • makes breathing easier which can help quiet coughs and can help Nasal passages

"This salt contains 84 natural elements and minerals that are already found in your body."

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nasal polyps treatment miracle
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 16, 2017 11:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nasal polyps treatment miracle





A mechanical voice presented an advertising video regarding a natural way to get rid of Nasal polyps. The video is not a moving picture but just a drawing of a woman injecting something into her nose and an audio description of an offer to tell the viewer how to naturally get rid of the polyps with diet and exercise along with the undisclosed remedy. A link is included to order the briefly described remedy, along with a written testimonial from the vendor and other purchasers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcqtadzoiu4&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Natural remedies are the best, so I decided to look for a natural cure for Nasal polyps.
  • Manuel Richards suffered from Nasal polyps, and found a natural way to treat them.
  • They are painful, and often require surgery. Just apply the principles in this book and they will be cured in a few days.

"Firm believer of natural remedy and this guide will combat all painful ailment."

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Does Quercetin Help Fight Allergies?
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 22, 2015 07:57 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Does Quercetin Help Fight Allergies?

Every year, thousands of individuals suffer from seasonal allergies.  Although many people will head to the pharmacy to fill prescriptions to cover the symptoms of this condition, there are those who seek a more natural approach. Natural treatments are available that have been clinically proven to alleviate itchy eyes, runny nose and sneezing associated with allergies.  One such natural treatment comes in the form of a supplement called quercetin.

Quercetin is a flavonoid with antioxidant properties, and is naturally found in green tea, onions and apples. Aside from being high in antioxidants, quercetin has also been found to have the same effect as over-the counter antihistamines.  By controlling the release of histamines, quercetin can alleviate many, if not all, of the symptoms of seasonal allergies.

Green Tea

When an individual encounters an allergen, such as pollen, the body releases histamines in response. These histamines trigger an inflammatory response within the body, causing congested Nasal passages, swollen eyelids, etc. An antihistamine keeps these compounds under control, therefore eliminating any uncomfortable symptoms.

Quercetin has been proven to reduce the symptoms and duration of viral illnesses, and to also prevent the release of histamines. Because it can be difficult for the body to assimilate, researchers have advised that allergy sufferers take a vitamin C supplement along with quercetin to ensure the maximum benefits are being received. Vitamin C also contains antihistamine qualities, and is most potent when taken alongside quercetin. The recommended dosage of vitamin C for allergy sufferers is 500 to 1000 milligrams, three times per day. The recommended dosage of quercetin is 500 milligrams per day, for a period of six to eight weeks. It would be most beneficial to begin taking this supplement one to two weeks before allergy season begins, and for six to seven weeks throughout allergy season.

Allergy season doesn't have to mean weeks of watering eyes and stuffy noses. By supplementing with quercetin and vitamin C, you can alleviate your symptoms naturally and enjoy the outdoors without worry.


References:

//www.wellnessresources.com/health/articles/quercetins_rising_star_nerves_immunity_and_metabolism

//www.needs.com/product/NDNL-0705-01/a_Quercitin

//www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART03109/Allergic-Rhinitis.htmlRead More

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Echinacea Health Benefits
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 12, 2014 08:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea Health Benefits

echinaceaWhat is an echinacea?

Echinacea is a herb that is local to North America, and develops common in the mid-west. It is named a famous restorative herb, with other normal names, for example, purple cone blossom, and American cone bloom. Battle microorganisms, infections and different contaminations, knew Echinacea. This herb utilized to empower the insusceptible framework to battle diseases, secure from the normal cool, and decrease the length of time of a frosty. Echinacea is additionally known to be compelling at treating moderate recuperating wounds and skin contaminations, by empowering new tissue development. This herb might be found in wellbeing nourishment stores or on the web.

Benefits of echinacea

The profits of Echinacea are surprising. It has turned into the most well known natural solution for colds and influenza. Its anti-toxin and resistant boosting properties make this herb a standout amongst the strongest recuperating herbs accessible. The properties of this plant respond with the cells in the body and quicken the mending methodology. The resistant boosting properties make Echinacea, especially supportive in battling upper respiratory diseases, for example, Nasal clogging, sore throat, and many people more contaminations. It additionally profits the circulatory system by separating the blood and disposing of poisons, its known as one of the best blood purifiers in nature.

The bloom and base of the plant are in charge of the recuperating parts, and fortifies new tissue development for wound mending. Its calming impacts and topical operators serve to battle incendiary skin conditions. Numerous individuals have approached to say that they were cured of different skin issue, with topical requisitions of Echinacea treatment. It likewise has a cortisone sort element that assists with the mending of wounds, and control the incendiary responses to hypersensitivities. At the point when utilized topically Echinacea is against incendiary, disinfectant, and analgesic, to battle an assortment of creepy crawly nibbles, Eczema, and many people more skin aggravations. It can likewise be utilized as a mouthwash.

At the point, when utilized alongside other homegrown cures, for example, garlic or vitamin c, it can decrease the length of time of a sickness. It is accepted to work through transient incitement of the insusceptible framework. Studies have demonstrated that taking this herb regularly can decrease your shots of contracting a bug or influenza throughout the year. In the event that you have caught an icy you can harvest the profits of Echinacea even half path through the icy, yet it works best on the off chance that you take it when you first begin to contract any of the manifestations connected with a cool.

Much of the time, Echinacea does not result in any symptoms for clients. For a protected and common approach to guarantee your well being and fitting capacity of your invulnerable framework you cannot discover a more trusted item. The calming impacts and topical operators help to battle skin conditions. In case you're searching for a regular incitement of the insusceptible framework, a mitigating topical executor to help against skin issue, this herb will do the greater part of this and the sky is the limit from there. It has a fabulous security record, and is generally endured by most individuals, with no known danger.


 

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Bayberry Bark & Sinus Infections
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 15, 2014 10:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bayberry Bark & Sinus Infections

bayberry barkSinus depression

The sinus depression is spotted behind the eyes and nose and is a substantial void space that channels the air for the lungs. At the point when the sinus hole gets aggravated or excited, it can without much of a stretch transform into a sinus contamination. A sinus contamination causes the sinuses to swell and produce abundance bodily fluid, making serious clogging, torment all around the head and neck and sinus weight. A sinus disease can commonly be dealt with effortlessly with either pills or regular cures.

Benefits of bayberry bark

Bayberry bark is a compelling approach to help treat the signs and manifestations of a sinus disease. The herb empowers the circulatory framework, supporting the body in dislodging abundance bodily fluid from the sinus depression. Bayberry bark additionally generates a warming sensation, which will help relax thick bodily fluid development.

Properties of  bayberry

Bayberry bark hold a certain synthetic called myricitrin, which is a regular anti-microbial. Not all like pill anti-toxins, has myricitrin just executed off destructive micro organisms. Drug anti-infection agents murder all microbes in the body, which can prompt different complexities, for example, a safety to anti-microbials, the runs and even the spread of the contamination. Myricitrin likewise regularly decreases fever and clears Nasal blockage while executing the contamination creating the sinusitis.

Dosing of bayberry

Bayberry bark might be utilized to treat a sinus disease as either an oral or topical result. Oral utilization ought to be a half teaspoon, twice every day. In the event that the manifestations stay following 24 hours, a singular can expand the measurements to one teaspoon, twice every day. As a topical result, the bayberry bark could be blended with back rub oil and connected to the paraNasal territory of the face. A light rub will help release bodily fluid and calm sinus weight.

Caution in using bayberry

There are potential symptoms when utilizing bayberry bark. For some individuals it has brought about unsteadiness, queasiness and spewing. It has likewise brought on gastrointestinal issues in individuals with previous gastrointestinal conditions. On the off chance that a sinus contamination continues for a week, a singular ought to see a specialist to focus the best technique for treating the diseases.

 

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What Is Marjoram Oil?
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 21, 2014 04:52 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Marjoram Oil?

What is marjoram

marjoram plantMarjoram oil is extracted from the marjoram plant. The plants’ flowering leaves are distilled (using steam) to obtain the yellow marjoram essential oil. The plant is cultivated primarily for its leaves. Though the name marjoram is derived from French, the plant is indigenous to the Southern regions of present-day Turkey and Cyprus.

Historically, marjoram oil has been used by traditional healers thousands of years back. It is mentioned in old medical texts as an essential oil with healing properties for many illnesses. Up to date, the plant’s oil is renowned for its great medicinal value. The essential oil has a woody and spicy aroma when dilute and pungent-smelling when concentrated. Some of marjoram oil’s health benefits are discussed below.

Benefits of marjoram

Marjoram oil has therapeutic properties. Rich in antioxidants, it is used to calm nerves and relieve headaches when massaged on the temple. The essential oil is also used to soothe and relieve muscles of pain. A body massage with the oil helps ease stiff joints. Inhaling the marjoram oil’s aroma helps clear mucous from the breathing system as well as easing a congested Nasal tract. It helps stem severe coughing.

Marjoram oil is best known for improving digestion and easing digestive tract disorders. It is a common essential oil used in aromatherapy as well. Adding a few drops of marjoram oil to bathing water or using it for massage helps relax the mind, bringing calmness. This can be used to pacify people who are stressed because it is a great sedative.

As an antiseptic, marjoram oil can be applied on wounds to help prevent these sores from becoming septic. For ladies who have to endure painful menstruation, this essential oil can be used to relieve menstrual cramps. Studies have also shown that this oil has the ability to lower blood pressure, slightly. Marjoram oil has quite a number of medicinal uses making it a versatile essential oil.

Sources

  1. //www.organicfacts.net
  2. //en.wikipedia.org
  3. //www.webmd.com

 

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What are the Health Benefits of Spirulina?
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 28, 2013 04:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What are the Health Benefits of Spirulina?

Whaty is Spirulina

SpirulinaSpirulina is one of the most nutritious food on the planet. It tastes and smells like seaweed. It's packed with nutritious vitamins and minerals which make it considered as one of the super foods available to humans.

Here are some of the health benefits of Spirulina

1. High in antioxidants - Some of the antioxidants found in Spirulina are carotenoids, selenium, vitamin E and phenolic acid.

2. Boosts immune system - Sprirulina helps our body to produce more monocytes and macrophages that kills bad cells and pathogens.

3. Rich in beta carotene - It has ten times richer beta carotene than carrots.

4. Remove toxins in our body - It is rich in phytonutrients like polysaccharides, phycocianin and chlorophyll that cleanse our bodies from the toxic chemicals found in drugs, food, water and air.

5. Allergy treatment - Studies show that it can treat allergic rhinitis and some of its' symptoms like sneezing, Nasal discharge, itching and congestion.

6. Cardiovascular Disease - It can reduce the level of bad cholesterol in our body. It prevents hypertension and stroke.

7. Cancer - It removes free radicals and fights cellular degeneration.

8. Diabetes - In a recent study, it was found out that after 12 weeks of taking spirulina, there was a significant drop in blood-fat levels.

9. Aids in digestion - It restrains bad bacteria like candida yeast and e-coli and boosts the healthy level of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus.

10. Prevents nutritional disease - Such as anemia or iron deficiency. It is rich in iron which is easier to absorb by our body than other iron supplements.

Did you know that Japan is the largest consumer as well as the largest producer of Spirulina? Maybe this is also one of the reasons why Japanese looks 10 years younger than their current age and their life expectancy is 82 which makes them the second country to have the longest life expectancy in the world.

References:
  1. //www.herbwisdom.com/herb-spirulina.html
  2. //www.naturalhealth365.com/food_news/spirulina.html
  3. //articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/07/17/spirulina-one-of-natures-nearperfect-foods.aspx
  4. //altmedicine.about.com/od/completeazindex/a/spirulina.htm //www.naturalnews.com/041615_spirulina_nutritional_supplements_health_benefits.html

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Discover the Wonders of Essential Oils
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 15, 2013 11:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Discover the Wonders of Essential Oils

What are the Source of Essential Oil

Essential OilsEssential oils obtained from plants are important in helping you stay healthy and in good mood. These oils are extracted from various parts of plants that include flowers, leaves, stem and roots. Water and steam distillation is the popular method of oil extraction employed to deduce the essence of natural plants.

What are the Benefits of Essential Oil

Natural plants are the main source of these volatile essential oils. Hence, the extracts are safe to your health with high therapeutic effects for aromatherapy. For maximum benefits, they are combined with smooth carrier oils such as grape seed oil to provide physical, emotional and psychological therapy essential for the body. Their ability to purify the air makes them a favorite diffuse when vaporized and diffused in the air. Most of volatile oils have antiviral and antibacterial properties. As a result, they inhibit pathogens and microbes when they come into contact with them, completely neutralizing them leaving the air off disease causing microorganisms.

What Essential Oil to use When Relaxing

Essential oils set the mood and promote relaxation. We all respond emotionally to scents. Most of these aromatherapy oils tend to be stimulating or promote relaxation. For example, citrusy smell is likely to stimulate while lavender relaxes. We also commonly associate jasmine with romance and the fragrance of roses with love. Oils from chamomile, patchouli, lavender, and clary sage are essential aromatherapy oils best known for reducing depression and stress.

When Having Nasal Problem 

Oils clear Nasal passages and ease symptoms. Rosemary, peppermint and eucalyptus are popular essential oils best for alleviating respiratory congestion. They also reduce inflammation in your Nasal passage when inhaled therefore relieving symptoms. Although they may not completely resolve your health problem, they can be used as palliatives during spells of illness and disease.

How to Improve Skin Health

Essential oils improve your skin health. They are readily absorbed by the human skin making them ideal for body massage. Studies show that, after just 20 minutes of a full-body massage with 2 percent dilution of lavender oil, its relaxing chemical constituents can be detected in the blood thus providing instant relief. With just few drops of essential oils, you too will soon be knocking on heavens doors.

Reference: 

//www.aromaweb.com/essentialoils/

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The Differences and Benefits
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 27, 2012 10:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Differences and Benefits

There are different sources of healthy foods and ingredients that people can consume to boost their health and performance. Honey is one substance that is considered natural and has great various health benefits to prevent serious ailments, increase stamina, and improve the health of the skin and the overall body system. When talking about natural products related to honey and bee activities, people can also enjoy great benefits from royal jelly, bee pollen, and Propolis. 

Value of Royal Jelly:

Although they are made through the same bee activities, the source of their existence is different; thus, leading to different health benefits and usages.

For a starter, let's talk about royal jelly first. Royal jelly is a substance that is milky or white in trait. The substance is produced by worker bees' gland in order to feed the queen bee. Although the royal jelly is also given to the larvae, it is the staple food for the queen bee. Queen bee gets to consume the jelly for life, while the larvae can only consume it for three days. The jelly is believed to contain healthy substances that make the queen bee survive for about four to five years.

The reason for the health benefit of the royal jelly is the pantothenic acid and acetylcholine levels which are quite high. They are responsible in delivering nerve message between cells, in order to make sure that the body system works perfectly. The acetylcholine is believed to be responsible for Alzheimer disease. When the acetylcholine level is low, the possibility of suffering from Alzheimer is increasing. On the contrary, when the acetylcholine level is high, people can prevent the ailment. 

Bee Pollen:

The bee pollen is gained from plants' pollen. When the worker bees collect the pollen and they mix it up with their saliva and the nectar, they create small pellets that are then used to feed the male bees. The drones (the male bees) are usually residing within the beehive.

Nutritive value of bee pollen:

The bee pollen itself is believed to have great health benefits since it is rich in nutrition, vitamins, and minerals. Since the pollens are rich in antioxidants, protein, carbs, amino acids, and coenzymes, the benefits people can get from consuming the pollens are:

  • - They can deal with anxiety issue
  • - They can fight off insomnia
  • - They can improve their memory and focus
  • - They can reduce the possibility of mood swings
  • - They can deal with addictive issues, such as drinking, smoking, or substance abuse
  • - They can fight off infertility issue, especially for women
  • - They can improve their skin condition and health

Propolis:

Propolis is another product from the bee. Known as the bee glue, the resinous and sticky substance is mainly used by bees to seal off the cracks in their hive. They collect it from tree buds, so the composition, colors, and odor are different - depending on the resin source. 

Uses:

When Propolis is produced as cream, it is said to treat minor burns, help opening the genital herpes lesions, and heal cervix inflammation. When used as Nasal spray, it can treat running nose or throat infection. When used as mouthwash, it can reduce the plaque formation, help treating gum inflammation, and reduce the numbers of bacteria.

Basically, each of these products is beneficial for people as they are rich in vitamins, minerals, and nutrition. People only need to choose which product suits their needs the most.

But to answer the question, royal jelly is believed to be the most beneficial!

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Can Serrapeptase Help Sinus Problems?
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 01, 2012 11:11 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Serrapeptase Help Sinus Problems?

Natural Anti-Inflammatory Enzyme

Serrapeptase is a natural enzyme derived from silkworm and it is used as treatment for various diseases. Actually, it is prepared from fermented enzymes gotten from worms. This enzyme known as Serrapeptase has many health benefits especially for treating inflammatory diseases like Sinusitis.

 Aids In Relieving Sinusitis

As you already know, Sinusitis is a medical condition that is caused by the inflammation of the sinuses due to bacteria, viral infection or fungal. However, Serrapeptase has proved to be one of the best treatments for sinus infections. It works by breaking down the mucus found in the Nasal cavity which makes it thinner to be remove from the body. Various researches that were carried out in the past showed how effective Serrapeptase is. In fact, about 97.3 percent of sinusitis patients who took part in a clinical trial in Italy experienced positive changes and were relieved of severe pains.

Serrapeptase is an anti-inflammatory agent and it has the power to cure various inflammatory diseases like sinusitis, osteoporosis, viral pneumonia and rheumatoid arthritis.

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Serrapeptidase: Natural NSAID
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Date: March 27, 2012 03:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Serrapeptidase: Natural NSAID

Serrapeptase, also known as Serratia peptidase is a proteolytic (protein-splitting) bioactive enzyme found in the intestines of the silk worm. This silk-worm enzyme is widely used in Europe and Japan in clinical therapy for relieving pain and inflammation. When the silk worm leaves the cocoon, it regurgitates the serrapeptase in to create a hole in the cocoon for its escape. It was soon discovered that serrapeptase enzyme has a unique property to dissolve dead material consisting protein without even harming the living tissue. This property of dissolving dead tissue can be used in treating many health conditions.

How Serrapeptase work?

Protein is the main component of most of the fibrous materials in the body. Once these fibrous materials out-live their purpose or are over-grown, they start causing serious disease conditions involving fibrosis. Fibrosis is an abnormal thickening and scarring of connective tissue caused by infection, injury, surgery or lack of oxygen. Serrapeptase works as an anti-fibrotic and helps in relieving the conditions in connective tissue scarring and thickening has occurred.

Health Benefits of Serrapeptase:

This proteolytic enzyme is considered an alternative to NSAIDS (Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) that are used to treat osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. Serrapeptase has been used to treat fibromyalgia, colitis, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, varicose veins, ovarian cysts, ear and throat infections, enlarged prostate and postoperative inflammation. Studies have shown its effective results in prevention and removal of arterial plaque.

Serrapeptase in relieving Pain:

Pain and Inflammation Reduction:

Serrapeptase is a great anti-inflammatory and analgesic agent. It reduces the inflammation and gives relief from the pain. It works by blocking the release of pain inducing amines from the inflamed tissues. Due to its pain relieving and anti-inflammatory properties, serrapeptase is used in treatment as an alternative to NSAIDS. This enzyme gives relief from mild to moderate pain like headache and backaches. Hence it is used all the inflammatory conditions such as colitis, sinusitis, arthritis and many more.

Cardiovascular Health:

Serrapeptidase has an anti-fibrotic and fibrinolytic action that prevents and treats the accumulation of plaque in the arteries. Plaque is the accumulated deposits of cholesterol, fatty substances, cellular waste products, fibrin and calcium. Excessive plaque formation impairs the normal blood flow and cause partial or complete blockage, which also results in arteriosclerosis. Serrapeptidase helps to prevent build-up of plaque in the body. Due to its fibrinolytic action, it also helps in dissolving of proteins and breaking down atherosclerotic plaques. The dissolved deposits are eliminated from the body.

Hence, serrapeptidase prevents coronary artery diseases and improves cardiovascular health.

Relieving Sinusitis:

Due to its anti-inflammatory and mucus dissolving properties, Serrapeptidase is very beneficial for chronic sinusitis sufferers. Serrapeptidase helps in thinning and expelling the thickened mucus secretion present in Nasal cavities of sinusitis sufferer.

Promoting Healing:

Serrapeptidase helps in reducing the recovery time in any injuries, wounds or surgery. It promotes healing in post-operative wounds by reducing the inflammation and pain.

Serrapeptidase is available in the form of supplements. If you are taking NSAIDS for any healthy condition, substitute it with serrapeptidase supplement

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What is Shea Butter Good for?
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Date: February 24, 2012 08:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is Shea Butter Good for?

Shea butter

Shea butter is an all natural creamy fatty substance with exceptional moisturizing properties. It is made from the nuts of karite or shea tree that grows in the savannah regions of East and West Africa. Shea nuts are cracked, grilled, pound and boiled in water to extract the butter. Africans called it the women's gold because most of young women in Africa make a living in shea butter production.

Shea butter is so rich in antioxidants that it has the ability to heal skin diseases such as eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis and skin rashes. It gives relief from skin itch and flaking. It is rich in Vitamins A and E that hastens the healing process of such skin diseases. Vitamins A and E are powerful antioxidants that eliminate skin toxicity and shield the skin from irritants. They also prevent the skin from getting damaged. Vitamin A prevents pimples and other skin blemishes. While vitamin E keeps the skin radiantly glowing and repairs damaged skin cells.

Anti-Aging

She butter is an excellent anti stretch mark cream. The human skin is naturally elastic. However, pregnancy and weight gain cause the skin to rapidly stretched. This process affects collagen production and causes stretch marks. Collagen is glue like substance that firmly holds the cells together to prevent skin to sag. Shea butter aids in increasing collagen production to cope up with rapidly stretching skin during pregnancy and weight gain. This keeps the skin's elasticity and prevents stretch marks. Its ability to increase collagen production erases, if not reduces the appearance of stretch marks and scars. Increased collagen production firms and tones the skin and prevents it from sagging.

Shea butter and Skin Health

Shea butter is an intensive moisturizer for severe dry, flaky, rough and sunburned skin. It softens rough knees and elbows, cracked heel and calloused hands and feet.

Shea butter delays skin aging. As people age, fine lines and wrinkles start to develop. Shea butter deeply moisturizes and rejuvenates the skin thus, prevents wrinkles and early signs of aging. It is easily absorbed by the skin as it penetrates deep into the skin making it more hydrated from the inside. It hastens skin cell regeneration and allows new skin cells to grow. This process peels away old skin, revealing younger looking skin. Skin cell regeneration repairs damaged skin caused by ultra violet rays, radiation, wind and pollution. It also aids in fast healing of wounds, insect bites and burns without leaving scar or marks. It evens out skin tone, removes dark spots and other skin blemishes by continuously renewing skin cells.

Skin Irritations

Shea butter soothes skin from irritation and stress caused by hair removal. Razor shaving, waxing and plucking leave the skin stressed and irritated. They also leave red bumps that lead to roughness and dark spots. The conditioning effect of shea butter calms red bumps and skin irritation when used as shaving cream.

Shea butter and Hair / Scalp

Shea butter works amazingly on hair and scalp, too. Dry scalp causes the it to flake. Shea butter conditions the scalp and hair follicles thus, prevents flaking and dandruf. It brings back hair's lost moisture due to frequent washing, hair styling and blow drying.

Shea butter is an excellent massage cream that treats arthritis, stiff joints and inflamed muscles. It has an anti inflammatory property relaxes swollen and stiff joints and aching muscles. It also relieves Nasal congestion and inflammation when applied topically.

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Is Sulfite Sensitivity And Vertigo Linked?
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Date: October 17, 2011 03:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Sulfite Sensitivity And Vertigo Linked?

Sulfites are chemical compounds which occur naturally in several animal and plant products. These chemicals are sulfur - based which is commonly used as food enhancer or preservative. Sulfites can effectively prolong the shelf life of food and also prevent discoloration of food. Foods which may contain sulfite include baked products, canned goods, junk foods, vegetable juices, fruit juices, apple cider, some teas and other processed food items. Sulfite - containing ingredients may include sulfur dioxide, potassium bisulfite or potassium metabisulfite and sodium bisulfite, sodium metabisulfite, or sodium sulfite.

Allergic reaction to sulfite is not that rare. In fact, the Food and Drug Authority have established "1 out of 100 people" prevalence rate that is hypersensitive to sulfite and its products. Any person may develop allergic reaction to sulfites any time of his/her life. Studies revealed that the cause of such hypersensitivity is still unknown. More studies are still ongoing. Initial results have stated that the allergic effects can be mild or life – threatening. In late 1980's, the FDA released a memorandum on prohibiting the use of sulfite on fruits and vegetables that are commonly eaten fresh and raw such as lettuce, apples, guavas and the like. Regulations are also released for manufacturers to put labels on sulfite – containing processed food items. Sulfites also occur naturally among wines and beers.

One theory revealed that sulfite allergic reaction may be caused by a significant insufficient amount of the enzyme necessary for the breakdown and elimination of such compound known as sulfite oxidase. This enzyme works hand in hand with the element molybdenum which acts as a cofactor. Nonetheless, asthma, Nasal and sinus congestion, rhinitis, postNasal drip, headache and bronchospasm may also be experienced by the individual as an effect of sulfite consumption. In addition, vertigo may also be a manifestation of sulfite hypersensitivity.

Studies have found that the allergic reaction brought about by the compound sulfite can significantly lower blood pressure thus resulting to decreased cardiac output which can eventually lead to insufficient tissue perfusion. Thus, dizziness is experienced or even loss of consciousness. Vertigo or dizziness is a kind of feeling in which your surroundings seem to be moving around even though there is no actual movement. In cases of severe vertigo, the person may experience nausea and vomiting. This will greatly affect your daily functioning since the person with vertigo may have difficulty walking or even standing on his/her own. This will significantly result to loss of balance and increase the risk of fall.

There is no direct treatment of sulfite sensitivity. However, the symptoms can be alleviated in a palliative manner. The one and only way to prevent the occurrence of allergic reaction is to avoid food products with sulfites or food items which are likely to have sulfite content. Therefore, if you have sulfite allergy, you must be vigilant on what you eat. Carefully check labels of processed and preserved foods and when eating out, politely as the waiter or chef if the food you like contains sulfite or ingredients which contain such chemical compound.

Foods to avoid:

Alcoholic beverages, Baked goods (pastries), Beverages fruit based, Condiments, Relishes, Confections, Frostings, Modified Dairy Products, Drugs, Fish, shell fish, fresh fruit and vegetables, gelatin, puddings, grains, jams, jellies, nuts, plant proteins, snack foods, soups and soup mixes, sweet sauce, and instant teas. To name a few. Look online to view a more details list of foods to avoid.

This practically eliminates most of our favored junk foods we love to eat. Avoiding these foods may be hard but it is a healthier choice.

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Reduce Inflammation, Nasal Drip, And Respiratory Infection With Natural Andrographis
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Date: August 11, 2011 01:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Reduce Inflammation, Nasal Drip, And Respiratory Infection With Natural Andrographis

Can Andrographis Help Improve Respiratory Health?

Andrographis is an herb noted for its health effects on the respiratory tract. It has been recognized as an effective treatment for the common cold in several countries all over the world, though it is most popular in China and India. Practitioners of natural remedies have ascribed a number of medicinal properties to andrographolide, which is the major phytochemical constituent of this herbaceous plant.

Andrographis paniculata is a plant species that belongs to the family of plants native to the tropical regions of the Old World. It is found in large concentrations in Southern Asia, but it is also cultivated in the Americas. It grows up to 40 inches in height. It prefers shady places that retain a fair amount of moisture, but survives in open spaces, such as hills, farms, roadsides, wastelands, and even coastlines.

Alleviates Nasal Secretions

Rhinitis is a medical term that refers to the irritation of the Nasal cavity. Otherwise known as stuffy nose, it often leads to uncontrolled Nasal dripping. Excessive release of mucus characteristic of a congested nose or runny nose stems from the irritation caused by infections, or allergens in the case of allergic rhinitis. It is one of the most visible symptoms of hay fever and cold infections.

Andrographis has been utilized as an all natural remedy for excessive Nasal secretions for centuries. In particular, it is an essential ingredient in herbal preparations associated with Ayurvedic Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Recent studies have shown that it produces a drying effect on the nose of participants suffering from colds after they took extracts of the plants in less than a week’s time.

Inhibits Inflammatory Mediators

Nasal dripping is tied to inflammatory responses in the employ of the immune system. Pathogenic microbes, such as viruses, bacteria, or even allergens, trigger immune responses that make use of endogenous chemicals known as inflammatory mediators. The process of inflammation attempts to contain infection, alerting immune cells. Production of mucus increases in the process.

The bitter taste of andrographis has been attributed to an organic compound called andrographolide, which is a natural diterpenoid now under investigation due to its pharmacological activity in vitro. It has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory action that even works as an antipyretic. It suppresses mediators of inflammation in the respiratory tract and allays fever tied to flu.

Combats Respiratory Infections

Modern herbalists have dubbed andrographis an immune booster. Indeed laboratory studies have documented that the organic compounds found in this plant prompt immune responses and modulate the disease fighting capacity of immune cells. Due to promising results of preliminary studies, it has often been linked to the amelioration of infections of the upper respiratory tract.

Andrographis is now becoming increasingly popular as an alternative treatment for sinusitis, cough, colds, and even flu. While it has been in use throughout the centuries, its efficacy remains under scrutiny. On the other hand, it is generally considered safe, and no side effects have been noted so far.

Grab some andrographis today and feel the difference!

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What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?
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Date: July 06, 2011 10:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?

Echinacea Health Benefits

Echinacea is a group of plant species that belongs to the same family as dandelion, sunflower, and daisy. These flowering shrubs are best known as ornamental plants in gardens. Also, they are widely recognized as medicinal herbs in alternative medicine. Modern herbalists have attributed a diverse variety of healing properties to this herb, drawing on its traditional uses among the Native Americans.

Echinacea angustifolia

Elk root, black samson echinacea, or narrow-leaved purple cornflower refers to Echinacea angustifolia. Its native range stretches from Manitoba in the north to Texas in the south. It is an herbaceous plant, as all species of echinacea are. It grows up to 28 inches in height, extending from a branched taproot. Its stems and leaves are hairy while other species are smooth. Its flowers resemble a cone in shape.

Echinacea angustifolia is so named in the vernacular due to the fact that elks knowingly consume the plant when sick or wounded. Elk root is an herb important to folk medicine practices of Plain Indians, such as the Cheyenne and Apache. It displays analgesic properties, and thus has been in use as a pain reliever for external wounds and internal inflammation, including allergies, rheumatism, and arthritis.

Research on elk root has been promising. It is one of the species of echinacea believed to enhance the immune system and improve immune responses. In particular, it is good for the respiratory system. It has been used in the treatment of the common cold, sore throat, and Nasal congestion. In addition, it exhibits antimicrobial properties, which effectively wards off infections of the respiratory tract.

Echinacea purpurea

Eastern purple cornflower, or simply purple cornflower, refers to Echinacea purpurea. It enjoys a wide distribution in North America, though they thrive in large concentrations in the wild in regions close to the east coast. Unlike all other species of echinacea, it grows from a woody base with fibrous roots instead of a taproot. Its flowers are arranged in a cone, sitting atop a stem that grows up to 40 inches.

Echinacea purpurea is arguably the most extensively studied of all species of echinacea. Traditionally, it has been utilized by many different tribes in North America as a cure-all medicinal herb. Clinical trials have shown that juice extracts obtained from this plant species are useful for the short term treatment of cold infections, though contraindications in children and pregnant women were noted.

Echinacea purpurea displays chemopreventive potential. Laboratory studies have discovered that it contains alkamides, which bind to cannabinoid receptors and inhibit tumor growth and pain chemicals in the process. Also, it has been linked to immunotherapy largely owing to its properties that appear to increase the activity of immune cells. It shows promise as an adjunct treatment for cancer.

Either way, Echinacea can help boost the body so the body can fight back against disease. Make sure you have some in your medicine cabinet just in case you feel a cold coming on!

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Why is Xylitol So Good for You
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Date: May 23, 2011 01:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Why is Xylitol So Good for You

Xylitol and Its Health Benefits.

Xylitol is fruit sugar that occurs naturally in fiber-rich plan-based foods, such as berries, oats, and mushrooms. Its sweetness has been compared to table sugar, the disaccharide sucrose to be specific. Unlike simple sugars and most other carbohydrates, it contains much less calories, making it one of the best natural sweeteners. More importantly, it has been associated with numerous health benefits.

The medicinal properties of xylitol were first noted in the second half of the 19th century, when it was introduced as a sugar substitute primarily for individuals afflicted with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. It is in fact a hydrogenated form of carbohydrate, which is also referred to as sugar alcohol. That being said, it does not impact insulin levels but rather contributes to healthy blood sugar.

Prevents Dental Carries

One of the earliest documented health benefits of xylitol is its role in preventing the formation of dental carries. Also known as tooth decay, dental carries result from the breakdown of hard tooth structure in the presence of bacteria. It is believed that over 90 per\cent of the global population experience caries at least once in a lifetime, with children being more susceptible.

It should be noted that bacteria taking up residence in the mouth cavity rely on fermentable carbohydrates for nutrition. The products of fermentation are acids that are capable of denaturing the mineral content of teeth, leading to rampant dental carries over time. The use of xylitol has been advocated for over a century since it is not fermentable, unlike glucose, sucrose, and fructose, which are almost always found in the human diet.

Fights off Infections

Xylitol has been observed to display disease-fighting properties. In fact, it has been utilized in the treatment of several bacterial and fungal infections. This sugar alcohol has long been reported to produce metabolites upon exposure to saliva. These metabolites are organic compounds that interfere with the ability of bacteria to adhere to the tissues of the oral and Nasal cavities.

More importantly, xylitol appears to enhance the effectiveness of mucus, antibacterial compounds, neutrophil granulocytes, and various enzymes that often get in contact with pathogens first. Regular intake of xylitol has been effective against oral infections of Candida yeast. It has also been cited in the treatment of ear infections, such as acute otitis media. Not surprisingly, it relieves sore throat.

Regulates Blood Sugar

Xylitol is one of the oldest recommended substitutes to sugar. It has a very low glycemic index, which makes that sugar levels in the blood rise gradually and steadily throughout the day. By so doing, it does not cause an insulin spike or impact blood sugar levels. Xylitol is an ideal source of energy for those who are suffering from metabolic syndrome and those who are following a low-carbohydrate diet.

If you haven’t started xylitol, isn’t it time too?

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Is Elderberry Good for Colds and Flu?
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Date: April 14, 2011 03:32 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Elderberry Good for Colds and Flu?

Elderberry and your Health.

Elderberry is a plant species best known for its medicinal properties believed to effectively treat colds and flu. It is native to Europe and North America, but also has a significant presence in the Middle East. It is cultivated for its flowers and fruits, which are utilized for both culinary and medicinal uses. The flowers are often made into a popular juice, which is the flavor of many local soft drinks. The fruits are consumed raw, and only consumed when fully ripe.

Sambucus nigra is the plant species generally referred to as elderberry although the term elder encompasses the entire genus Sambucus, which comprises up to 30 species. Most species of elderberry thrive well in damp regions where the soil is moderately wet and the area quite shaded, and sambucus nigra is no exception. This species is noted for their dark purplish berries and creamy white flowers, both of which are edible. It is usually categorized as a shrub, but it can grow up to 10 feet on average, looking much like a small tree.

Elderberry has been ascribed with herbal properties since the ancient times, with an emphasis on the amelioration of flu symptoms. All its parts are historically noted for their specific uses. The bark is utilized as an herbal treatment for cardiovascular, digestive, and renal conditions. The leaves are used to disinfect wounds. The berries are for inflammation, allergies, and skin disorders. And the flowers are usually used to relieve sore throat, colds, and influenza. Today elderberry extracts found in health products are obtained from various parts of the plants.

Stimulates Faster Immune Responses

The organic compounds naturally occurring in elderberry appear to speed up the immune responses implicated in viral infections, notably the common colds and influenza B. In Europe, elderberry has enjoyed overwhelming popularity in comparison with other herbal remedies for colds. Indeed it contains unique flavonoids believed to be responsible for stimulating the immune system. Its anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antibacterial properties are all attributed to the same organic compounds.

Reduces the Severity of Cold Symptoms

Researchers are enthusiastic about the outcomes of preliminary studies. Earlier studies in Europe recorded noticeable improvements in best known symptoms of the common cold, such as runny nose, Nasal congestion, headaches, and sinusitis. Furthermore, it shortened the duration of cold infections. And since its preparations have not been associated with any adverse effect, it can be administered to people of all ages. Succeeding studies conducted in North America yielded very promising results, cutting the severity of symptoms and defeating infections fast.

Effectively Treats Influenza Infections

There have been several studies looking into the efficacy of elderberry preparations, and all of them pointed to a compound called Sambucol. It was first observed to be a viable treatment for Influenza B infections, but more recent studies came to a conclusion that it also effectively treats influenza A. In all studies, Sambucol helped over 80 percent of patients suffering from flu in less than 3 days.

Keep Elderberry on hand in case of emergencies

It is good to keep elderberry on hand for when a cold rears its butt. Starting elderberry at first signs of a cold can greatly increase its effectiveness.

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Turmeric, Curcumin, And Good Health
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Date: November 11, 2010 03:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Turmeric, Curcumin, And Good Health

turmeric Leaves

Turmeric and its history

Turmeric is not just an ancient Asian spice but also an effective traditional alternative medicine used worldwide. Turmeric is a spice that originates in India and has been long used in both Ayurvedic and Chinese traditional medicine. This spice comes from the herb Curcuma longa L. which is a member of the Curcuma botanical group, a part of the ginger family of herbs called Zingiberaceae. The root and rhizome (underground stem) of this plant is crushed and powdered into ground Turmeric. Ground Turmeric is used worldwide as a seasoning and the main ingredient in curry powders. Ground Turmeric is also the source of Curcumin, an extracted potent substance also used as alternative medicine nowadays.

Turmeric, because of its Curcumin content, has many health benefits to humans. Firstly, Turmeric has an anti-inflammatory property. Its active ingredient, Curcumin, has been proven to help reduce inflammation. Decade to decade, Turmeric has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent to treat inflammations of the skin and muscles. Experiments done by researchers also revealed that this herb has been effective in decreasing post-surgical inflammation. This important health benefit of Turmeric is considered to be a result of the herb’s ability to slow down, if not to totally stop, Eicosanoid Biosynthesis, one of the processes the immune system undergoes during an inflammatory response.

Secondly, as a result of its anti-inflammatory characteristic, Turmeric also has an anti-arthritic property. It is widely used as an alternative medicine for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders. In addition, this herb also has a natural painkiller effect. Studies show that it has similar actions to the commonly used medications such as COX-2 inhibitor and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs.turmeric root

Thirdly, several studies have shown that Turmeric is also helpful in lowering the level of bad cholesterol in the blood known as the Low Density Lipoprotein or LDL and in increasing the body’s good cholesterol, High Density Lipoprotein or HDL. An increased level of LDL promotes cholesterol plaque deposits to the walls of blood vessels, most commonly in the arteries of heart. These plaques narrow the arterial diameter hence resulting to high blood pressure and even circulation blockage. An arterial block may cause poor circulation and oxygenation to heart muscles leading to cardiac injury then infarction. This is oftentimes the cause of heart attacks. It has also been discovered that Turmeric can promote excretion of dietary fats. Thus, controlling the intestinal uptake of fats, especially cholesterol.

Turmeric - Powerful Antioxidant

turmeric powder Lastly, Turmeric is also widely used because of its anti-oxidant property. Studies demonstrate that Turmeric is effective in eliminating free radicals in the body. These free radicals are harmful. It may cause cell mutations which can lead to tumor formation and, worse, cancer.

This herbal plant can be prepared in the household by pounding and pressing its roots to be able to extract the juice out. It is then mixed with water and may be used topically or by Nasal inhalation. The root can also be lightly cooked and eaten. Turmeric is also helpful in earaches and to clear clogged sinuses thus easing breathing. This herb can also be purchased in bulk powder or standardized forms to ensure its beneficial properties are intact.
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Herbs, Serrapeptase, and your Sinus
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Date: February 18, 2010 04:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Herbs, Serrapeptase, and your Sinus

sinus CavitiesSinusitis occurs when the Nasal sinuses become inflamed. There are sinuses that are located above the eyes (frontal sinuses), inside the cheekbones (maxillary sinuses), behind the bridge of the nose (sphenoid sinuses), and in the upper nose (ethmoid sinuses). Sinuses are air-filled pockets in the skull that are connected to the nose and throat by passages designed to drain away mucous. The sinuses are the first line of defense to protect the lungs from infection. The majority of sinusitis cases affect the frontal and/or maxillary sinuses. However, any or all of the sinuses may be involved, with each individual tending to have problems with a particular set of sinuses. If the sinuses are too small or happen to be poorly position to handle the volume of mucous produced, they can become clogged. This causes pressure in the sinuses to increase, which causes pain. Those sinuses that are clogged for a long time are extremely prone to infection.

Sinusitis can be either acute or chronic. Acute sinusitis is usually caused by bacterial or viral infections of the nose, throat, and upper respiratory tract, like the common cold. Over 50 percent of all cases of sinusitis are caused by bacteria. Air travel can also lead to acute inflammation of the sinuses, due to the changes in air pressure. Chronic sinusitis problems, on the other hand, may be caused by small growths in the nose, injury of the Nasal bones, air pollution, dental complications, emotional stress, smoking, and exposure to irritant fumes and smells. Allergic sinusitis may be the result of hay fever of food allergies, especially those allergies to milk and dairy products. People who have compromised immune systems are susceptible to fungal sinusitis, which is a potentially dangerous condition that requires aggressive treatment.

Sinusitis is characterized by symptoms such as fever which is usually low-grade but can be higher in some cases, cough, headache, earache, toothache, facial pain, cranial pressure, difficulty breathing through the nose, loss of the sense of smell, and tenderness over the forehead and cheekbones. If pain results from tapping the forehead just over the eyes, the cheekbones, or the area around the bridge of the nose, the sinuses may be infected. Sinusitis occasionally produces facial swelling which can be followed by a stuffy nose and a thick discharge of mucous. Those who suffer from sinusitis can have other unpleasant symptoms as a result of previous symptoms. PostNasal drip can cause a sore throat, nausea, and bad breath, while difficulty breathing can cause snoring and loss of sleep.Serrapeptase from Solaray

The following nutrients are considered to be helpful in dealing with and preventing sinusitis: acidophilus, bee pollen, flaxseed oil, a multivitamin and mineral complex, Quercetin, raw thymus glandular, vitamin A with mixed carotenoids, vitamin B complex, vitamin C with bioflavonoids, vitamin E, coenzyme Q10, colloidal silver, DMSO, garlic, MSM, proteolytic enzymes, Pycnogenol, sea mussel, serrapeptase, and zinc lozenges.

Additionally, the following herbs may be helpful in preventing and treating sinusitis: anise, fenugreek, marshmallow, red clover, bayberry, bitter orange oil, cat’s claw, ginger root, goldenseal, horehound, mullein, nettle, olive leaf extract, and rose hips. Serrapeptase is an enzyme that is able to help keep sinus fluid thin and flowing properly. Serrapeptase also possesses anti-inflammatory properties and can help reduce sinus inflammation which will ease pain and speed healing of the sinus cavity.

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Horse Radish
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Date: October 28, 2009 11:39 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horse Radish

Horse RadishThe horseradish plant is a perennial plant that is part of the Brassicaceae family, which includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbages. Native to southeastern Europe and western Asia, the plant is popular around the world today. The horseradish plant grows up to five feet tall and is mainly cultivated for its large, white, tapered root. The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. However, when cut or grated, enzymes from the damaged plant cells break down to produce allylisothiocyanate, which often irritates the sinuses and eyes. Once grated, if the plant is not mixed with vinegar or used immediately, the root darkens and loses its pungency. It quickly becomes unpleasantly bitter when exposed to air and heat.

Horseradish has been cultivated since ancient times. The Delphic Oracle in Greek mythology told Apollo that horse radish was worth its weight in gold. Horseradish was known in Egypt by 1500 BC and has been used by Jews from Eastern Europe traditionally in Passover. The plant is discussed by Cato in his treatises on agriculture. It is thought that horseradish is the plant known as Wild Radish by the Greeks. Both the root and leaves of the horseradish plant were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages, with the root used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain. This herb was taken to North American during Colonial times. It is not certain as to where the name horseradish come from. Some believe that it derives by misinterpretation of the German Merettich as mare radish. Others think the name comes from the coarseness of the root. The common thought in Europe is that it refers to the old method of processing the root called hoofing, in which horses were used to stamp the root tender before grating it.

For at least two thousand years, horseradish has been cultivated. It was brought to America by early settlers and used to treat conditions such as pain from sciatic, colic, and intestinal worms. Horseradish provides antibiotic action that is recommended for respiratory and urinary infections. The volatile oil in horseradish has the ability to work as a Nasal and bronchial dilator. Internally, it has been used to clear Nasal passages, alleviate sinus problems, help with digestion, work as a diuretic, aid with edema and rheumatism, and cleanse various body systems. Also, horseradish has been used to stimulate digestion, metabolism, and kidney function. Horse Radish This herb helps promote stomach secretions to aid in digestion. Horseradish can be used as a compress for neuralgia, stiffness, and pain in the back of the neck. Additionally, this herb can be used as a parasiticide.

The root of the horseradish plant can be used to provide antibiotic, antineoplastic, antiseptic, bitter, caminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, hepatic, parasiticide, mild purgative, rubefacient, sialagogue, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iron, phosphorus, sodium, and vitamins A, B-complex, and P. Primarily, horseradish is extremely beneficial in dealing with loss of appetite, circulation, coughs, edema, excessive mucus, sinus problems, internal and skin tumors, and worms.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, congestion, gout, jaundice, kidney problems, irritated membranes, neuralgia, palsy, rheumatism, skin conditions, water retention, and wounds. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horseradish, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Pleurisy Root
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Date: September 24, 2009 10:50 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pleurisy Root

The pleurisy plant is a perennial herb that has several stems. It can be found growing three feet high, with branches at the top. The leaves are dark green on the upper surface and pale green on the underside. The flowers are richly colored orange and are found blooming from June through September. This plant is a member of the milkweed family. Monarchs, swallowtails, and other butterflies are especially attracted to the pleurisy plant when it is in flower. The plant prefers open, dry fields. It is often growing in abundance in the southern United States. Similar to other milkweeds, pleurisy root produces pods that reveal rows of silky reeds that drift in the wind in autumn. However, unlike most milkweeds, this species does not produce a milky sap.

This plant is native to North America. It was long used by Indians and pioneers. Often, it was spread onto sores after being powdered and mixed into a paste. Indians of several regions brewed a tea from the leaves to induce vomiting in certain rituals, while settlers and Indians alike made a tea from the root to induce perspiration and expectoration in severe respiratory conditions. Pleurisy was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopeia in the 19th century.

Pleurisy root developed its name because of its use for treating lung conditions. The name comes from the Greek root word pleura, which means “lung membranes.” This name implies that this herb is extremely valuable for treating pleurisy. This is because it relieves chest pain and eases breathing difficulties. Pleurisy was used by Native Americans. Then, they introduced it to the European settlers who were suffering from numerous respiratory problems.

This herb works primarily as an expectorant. Pleurisy helps to expel phlegm from bronchial and Nasal passages. The herb is responsible for opening lung capillaries. This aids in the release of mucus, which thins discharge. This process helps to reduce lung congestion and improve breathing.

In addition to its uses for pulmonary problems, pleurisy root is also used as a gentle tonic. This tonic helps with stomach pain that is caused by gas, indigestion, and dysentery.

Additionally, pleurisy root is a powerful diaphoretic. It increases body temperature and opens pores to induce perspiration. It has also been used against poisoning and acute rheumatism. Unfortunately, this is not recommended for children.

The root of the pleurisy plant is used to provide alterative, anodyne, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, expectorant, febrifuge, nervine, mild purgative, and stimulant properties. Primarily, pleurisy is extremely beneficial in treating spasmodic asthma, bronchitis, acute dysentery, emphysema, fevers, indigestion, lung disorders, pleurisy, and pneumonia. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with croup, contagious diseases, flu, gas, kidney problems, measles, and excessive mucus, absent perspiration, poisoning, acute rheumatism, scarlet fever, tuberculosis, and typhus.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by pleurisy, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Sage
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Date: July 29, 2009 04:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sage

Salvia is the Latin name for sage, meaning healthy. The sage plant was highly revered for its healing benefits in the Mediterranean. It also originated in the Mediterranean. The plant is a perennial herbaceous shrub that can be found growing up to heights of fifty meters. It prefers dry chalky soils in sunny areas, but it will thrive in a rich soil with good drainage. Although it can now be found growing in many areas throughout the world, it should not be confused with the brush sage that grows in the desert areas.

Often, dried sage leaves are used as culinary spices. Sage is, and has been, a staple in many households. Traditionally, it is used to prolong life. It is also used in lotions to help heal sores and other sin ailments. Fresh sage leaves are chewed in order to remedy infections of the mouth and throat. Gargling with sage can also be an effective way to help treat a sore throat. Additionally, sage helps with excessive mucus discharge, Nasal drip, sores, and excessive saliva secretions. The herb has antipyretic qualities that have been known to help with fevers, night sweats, and related problems.

This herb is also beneficial for mental exhaustion and for increasing the ability to concentrate. Sage improves memory and has been used on some forms of mental illness. Also, it has been used to treat digestive disorders such as ulcers, nausea, and diarrhea. It is used topically as an antiseptic for sores, and sore gums. The herb is even used as a teeth cleaner or hair tonic.

Sage has been found in clinical studies to contain antioxidant properties. It is thought that the labiatic acid found within is the active constituent. Evidence has shown that there is some antimicrobial activity in this herb as well. Recent research using laboratory animals has found antispasmodic activity in sage extracts. This activity may account for its use as a digestive aid. It should be noted that those people with seizure disorders should only use sage under the supervision of a health-care provider.

The leaves of the sage plant are used to provide alterative, antigalactagogue, antihydrotic, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aromatic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, febrifuge, parasiticide, stimulant, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, sulfur, and vitamins A, B-complex, and C. Primarily, sage is extremely beneficial in dealing with coughs, diabetes, fevers, gastic disorders, sore gums, indigestion, infection, absent lactation, memory impairments, mental illnesses, mouth sores, nausea, nervous conditions, night sweats, sores, sore throat, and worms.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating snake bits, blood infections, colds, cystitis, diarrhea, dysentery, flu, hair loss, headaches, kidney stones, laryngitis, lung congestion, mucus discharge, Nasal drip, palsy, parasites, phlegm, sinus congestion, skin disorders, tonsillitis, ulcers, and yeast infections. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by sage, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Hay Fever
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Date: February 19, 2009 05:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hay Fever

Hay fever, which is an allergy to proteins in the pollen of trees, grasses, some plants, or mold, affects the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, and air passages. Symptoms of hay fever include itchy, red eyes; watery discharge from the nose and eyes; sneezing; fatigue; and nervous irritability. Many of the symptoms of hay fever can be confused with those symptoms of the common cold. However, allergies cause a distinctive clear, thin Nasal discharge, whereas secretions that come from colds are usually thick and yellow-greenish as the illness progresses. Colds are also associated with mild fever and are usually gone within a week. On the other hand, allergy sufferers often feel wiped out for many weeks.

At least 50 million Americans suffer from seasonal sneezes, runny nose, and itchy eyes that come with hay fever. There happen to be three seasons of hay fever which are distinguished by the different pollen present at these different times of the year. Tree pollen appears first, usually between February and May, depending on the climate. When trees, weeds, grass pollens, and people are out at the same time, the biggest problems arise. This usually occurs later in spring and in summer. The fall is the season for ragweed pollen. Depending on which pollen or pollens an individual is allergic to, hay fever may be present at any or all of these times.

In more detail, the following is a summary of the types of plants according to the times of year they are most likely to cause problems. Alder, hazelnut, and elm trees cause the most problems in February through May, while birch, maple, and oak trees are problematic in March through June. Beech and spruce trees bring about issues in April through June, while horse chestnut trees are responsible for causing problems in April through August. In April through September, Asters, pine trees, plantain, sorrel, stinging nettle, and various grasses are responsible for bringing about allergies. Buttercups are problematic in May through July and Goosefoot is an issue in June through September. In July through September, mugwort seems to pose a problem.

Those people who suffer from hay fever also often suffer from other atopic disorders like asthma and dermatitis. Those people who suffer from hay fever symptoms throughout the year are said to have perennial rhinitis, which can be caused by animal hair, dust, feathers, fungus spores, molds, and/or some other environmental agent. It should be noted that a susceptibility to hay fever tends to be an inherited condition. Those people who are most prone to allergies are often aware of the time of year and conditions under which they are most sensitive. A RAST test can easily be done and provide reliable results for a definitive diagnosis.

The following nutrients are beneficial for hay fever: bromelain, coenzyme Q10, Quercetin, raw thymus, vitamin A, vitamin B complex, vitamin C with bioflavonoids, proteolytic enzymes, zinc, calcium, magnesium, garlic, kelp, manganese, Pycnogenol, SOD, and vitamin E. Additionally, the following herbs have been noted to be helpful: alfalfa, chlorophyll, vitamin K, eucalyptus oil, eyebright, lady’s mantle, goldenseal extract, horehound, mullein leaf, stinging nettle, wild cherry bark, turmeric, nettle leaf, and noni juice.

In conclusion, discovering your allergic substance is the first step to recovery. When you can narrow down what is the cause then you can combat the problem with vitamins, herbs, and dietary changes. Your local or internet health food store has a large selection of herbal and homeopathic remedies for hay fever symptoms.



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Natural Toothpastes
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Date: February 18, 2009 03:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Toothpastes

Most of the time, halitosis is caused by poor dental hygiene. However, there may be other factors involved such as gum disease, tooth decay, heavy metal buildup, infection of the respiratory tract, improper diet, constipation, smoking, fever, diabetes, foreign bacteria in the mouth, indigestion, inadequate protein digestion, liver or kidney malfunction, postNasal drip, stress, and too much unfriendly bacteria in the colon.

Additionally, halitosis can be caused by a buildup of toxins in the gastrointestinal tract, salivary gland disorder, chronic bronchitis, sinusitis, or diabetes. It is also true that dieting, alcohol abuse, or fasting can also cause bad breath. “Morning breath” is the product of dehydration and the reduction in the amount of saliva. This saliva is necessary for washing away bacteria in the mouth.

Dieters and people who are fasting may often experience bad breath. This is because the lack of food causes the body to break down stored fat and protein for fuel. The metabolic wastes that are a result of this process have an unpleasant odor as they are exhaled from the lungs.

The following nutrients are beneficial for dealing with and preventing bad breath. One tablespoon of chlorophyll can be taken in juice twice daily, as green drinks are one of the best ways to combat bad breath. 2,000 to 6,000 mg of vitamin C with bioflavonoids should be taken daily. Vitamin C is important in healing mouth and gum disease and preventing bleeding gums. This nutrient also rids the body of excess mucus and toxins that cause bad breath. Acidophilus should be taken as directed on the label. It is needed to replenish the friendly bacteria in the colon. Insufficient friendly bacteria and an overabundance of harmful bacteria can often cause bad breath.

Garlic acts as a natural antibiotic by destroying foreign bacteria in both the mouth and the colon. It is recommended that you take 2 capsules of the odorless form 4 times daily, with meals and at bedtime. 30 mg of zinc should be taken three times daily as it has an antibacterial effect and neutralizes sulfur compounds. These sulfur compounds are a common cause of mouth odor. Bee propolis should be taken as directed on the label. It is helpful in healing the gums, aiding control of infection in the body, and also has an antibacterial effect. 15,000 IU of vitamin A should be taken daily; it is needed for control of infection and also in healing of the mouth. Additionally, 100 mg of vitamin B complex is needed for proper digestion.

The following herbs are also beneficial for dealing with halitosis. Alfalfa supplies chlorophyll, which cleanses the bloodstream and colon, where bad breath often begins. Gum disease, which is a major factor of bad breath, can be treated with goldenseal extract. This extract can heal the infected parts. Myrrh, peppermint, rosemary, and sage should be used to brush your teeth and rinse your mouth. Chewing a sprig of parsley after meals is an excellent treatment for bad breath. This nutrient is rich in chlorophyll, which happens to be a popular ingredient in breath mints. Other herbs that can be beneficial include anise, cloves, and fennel.

Whether you want to take it into your own hands to heal your gums from disease, a gum disease can be a sign of a more significant health problem that should be looked at by our health care provider. In either case, vitamins and herbs can be found at your local or internet health food store.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Natural Toothpaste is not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.

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Allergy Remedies
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Date: November 25, 2008 12:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Allergy Remedies

According to the 2006 National Health Survey from the National Center for Health Statistics, it is estimated that about 17.6 million adult Americans suffer from hay fever, with 6.8 children also suffering. Even more, physicians state that more than 11 million office visits are by patients seeking relief from hay fever, which is also known as allergic rhinitis. Symptoms of hay fever include itchy eyes, runny nose, congestion, and an endless amount of sneezing. All of these symptoms are caused by an overacting immune response to a variety of possible triggers, which include pollen from plants, dust, dust mites, airborne pollutants, mold, and pet dander.

Hay fever is marked by inflammation of mucous membranes in the eyes, throat, ears, sinuses, nose, and lungs. Although the development of inflammation in allergies is complex, one of the most influential factors is immunoglobulin E (IgE), which responds to protein allergens. Although there is a genetic component to susceptibility to allergic response to certain triggers, the focus of allergy relief is on the events that occur as a reaction.

Various natural products offer allergy relief by targeting the factors in allergy pathology. Similar to other areas of immune health, fruits and vegetables are suggested for the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that they provide. Vitamin C is a major antioxidant in the airway surface liquid of the lungs; therefore, it can severely impact allergies and asthma. Low levels of vitamin C have actually been associated with asthma in both adults and children. Also, low levels of vitamin E have been associated with asthma and other wheezing illnesses. Combining antioxidant ingredients also provides additional relief. Therefore, by combining vitamins C and E with the antioxidant NAC, pollen-induced airway inflammation is inhibited by blocking ragweed oxidases which cause oxidative stress and inflammation in the airways.

On its own, NAC reduces mucous viscosity and protects against lung tissue damage. According to scientists, lycopene may also be beneficial. As far as minerals are concerned, both magnesium and zinc have been proven to help. Quercetin has both antihistamine and anti-inflammatory properties, allowing it to inhibit the release of histamine in Nasal mucosa of allergic patients. Glucomannan was shown in a study to suppress allergy symptoms, while CLA reduces allergy symptoms such as sneezing.

One of the best natural remedies for allergies is comprised of botanicals such as licorice root, skullcap, pine bark extract, and butterbur. Licorice root offers anti-inflammatory activities along with aide in fighting IgE allergic reactions, while skullcap can restrict inflammatory cytokine production. Pine bark extract blocks the release of allergy troublemakers in the body even better than a known pharmacological histamine inhibitor.

Similarly, butterbur has abilities in blocking histamine release by IgE-sensitized mast cells and relieving allergy symptoms as effectively as drugs without the drowsy side effects. Although allergies are widespread and disrupt the daily lives of many people, they strike one out of every four Americans, affecting six times more than cancer. The mechanisms of allergic reactions in the body, especially those in the upper respiratory system, are becoming more and more well-known.

Natural products are available that can help to address these mechanisms, along with the mediators that produce the inflammation and symptoms that allergies create. Natural vitamin supplements are available at your local or internet health food store.



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ButterBur Extract
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Date: April 29, 2008 10:49 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ButterBur Extract

Butterbur extract is taken mainly from the rhizome, root and leaves of the butterbur, a member of the daisy family. They are very hardy and have creeping underground rhizomes and large leaves like those of rhubarb. Another name given to it is the sweet Coltsfoot, and they generally grow in the temperate climates of Europe, North Africa and South west Asia. They like damp conditions, specifically marshes and ditches, and also riverbanks where there are always plentiful supplies of moisture.

It has been used by Native Americans for headaches and inflammation, and has been shown to be an effective remedy for hay fever and to provide relief from painful menstrual cramps. Butterbur has also been used throughout the middle Ages to treat fever and the plague, and has been recorded in the seventeenth century as being used for asthma, wounds and coughs. However, one of its most important applications is in restore bladder function in the incontinent and semi-incontinent.

Urinary incontinence is typified by an unusually high frequency of urination – more than 8 times a day, an immediate strong urge to pass water or leaking and involuntary urination. Any two of these three indicates urinary incontinence. As people age their bladders become smaller, and by definition the periods between urination will reduce. This does not, however, suggest that bladder size is the cause of urinary incontinence.

Urination is caused by the contraction of the smooth layered muscle that surrounds the bladder, called the detrusor, a contraction in turn caused by neurons both in the brain and in the detrusor itself. This naturally contracts and expands according to the volume of urine in the bladder, and once the bladder is about half full the brain will tell you that the detrusor is ready to contract to expel the urine. However, if the time is not convenient, the cortex will suppress this desire until a more convenient time.

In incontinence, the desire is suppressed but the neurons still fire to contract the detrusor, expelling urine at inconvenient moments. Butterbur contains the sesquiterpenes petasin and isopetasin, which are known to reduce spasms in smooth muscle tissue and in vascular walls. It can therefore be used to control the involuntary spasms that cause urine leakage or expulsion against the patient’s wishes. These sesquiterpenes are at highest concentration in the roots of the plant.

The effect that the sesquiterpenes have in inhibiting the synthesis of leukotriene in leukocytes tends to support this effect, since leukotrienes can cause contraction of vascular and smooth muscle tissue. Not only this, but the spasmolytic effect could also be explained by the inhibition of cellular calcium caused by the petasin isomers.

Many studies have indicated that the effectiveness of butterbur extract is also useful in the prevention of migraines. There has been a lot of research carried out on the use of butterbur extract on migraine sufferers, and the effective dose appears to about 75 mg twice daily. There is little evidence of it being a cure but as a prophylactic there appears no doubt of its efficacy: there have been too many positive results against placebos for its effect to be deniable.

It is significant that leukotriene can cause constriction of the small blood vessels in the veins, and so affect the flow of blood. Butterbur, in inhibiting its biochemical production, helps to keep these blood vessels open. Lekotrienes are also important components of inflammation, and altogether it appears that whatever the real cause of migraine, the petasin isomers in butterbur have an effect in inhibiting its initiation. Add to that the potential reduction in calcium content that can cause blood vessels to become less flexible, and the argument for its effectiveness is both irrefutable and well explained.

In one example of such a double blind study that is representative of many, a group of patients given 50 mg butterbur extract twice a day for twelve weeks experienced a 60% reduction in the frequency of attacks, a reduction in the severity of the attacks they did have, and a reduction in the length of the attacks. Although the vascular theory of the cause of migraine is no longer supported, maintenance of the vascular system appears to at least reduce the likelihood of attacks.

The effect of butterbur on asthma and other allergic reactions is also well documented. This again is due to its anti-spasmodic properties and inhibitory effect on the inflammatory immune response through the inhibition of leukotriene synthesis and the consequent positive effect on the metabolism of prostaglandin. Prostaglandins also constrict vascular smooth muscle cells, regulate the mediation of the inflammatory response and constrict general smooth muscle cells. All of these can lead a to a variety of disorders cause by smooth muscle spasms in additional to urinary incontinence, such as menstrual cramps, liver and gastrointestinal disorders and asthmatic conditions.

In one study of allergic rhinitis, administration of butterbur extract appeared to result in a reduction in the histamine and leukotriene content of Nasal fluids and no difference was noticed between this treatment and histamine treatment. This was a useful study because histamines causes drowsiness and butterbur can be used as a substitute for histamine without the sedative effect. A study in Germany in 1993 has shown that the stomach ulceration caused by the anti-inflammatory medications for arthritis was reduced by the administration of butterbur extract

Cetirizine is a commonly prescribed prescription treatment for allergic conditions, and studies comparing that with butterbur demonstrated them to be equally effecting in reducing the symptoms typical of allergic reactions such as sneezing, runny nose and Nasal congestion. 50% of the patients in the group took each and there was no difference in results. Again it was explained by the petasin limiting the production of leukotriene and histamine, both of which are produced by the immune response and promote mucous secretions and inflammation. They also constrict airways that can be serious to asthma sufferers

These studies are simply providing scientific evidence and explanations for the tradition use of this plant for such conditions. Butterbur has been used for centuries to treat such conditions all over Western Europe, and once again the use of traditional medicine has been supported by modern investigative techniques.

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Revita
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Date: March 08, 2007 12:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Revita

Revita, the most efficient hair growth stimulating shampoo available in the market is the final result of DS Laboratories efforts on cutting edge research. Revita is a powerful and unique SLS/SLES free combination of active ingredients specially designed to maintain scalp vitality and act on folicle dysfunctions in order to achieve best results in short periods of time. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate, commonly used low cost detergents in shampoos and cleansers, are linked to skin irritation, skin drying and hair loss due to follicle attack. Revita is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate free, providing a high quality scalp skin safe shampoo product.

Revita was developed with a cost-no-object approach. Revita’s compounds have been chosen based exclusively on their properties, quality and efficacy (in the opposite of the majority of available products, which are usually developed with production costs in mind). The final result is a very high quality shampoo product with absolutely no equivalent competitor in the market. Revita combines costly first line compounds at high concentrations like Caffeine at 4.0%, Pyrus Malus (Apple) Seed Extract at 1.0% and Spin Traps (SOD Mimic) at 0.1% with other top level ingredients which make Revita a unique product in its class.

To improve the efficacy of this synergic combination, DS Laboratories developed a unique “chemical free” extraction process that keeps original properties and clinical efficacy of final components. Through gentle mechanical compression, Revita’s compounds are obtained as pure and chemically preserved active molecules.

Revita starts acting on your scalp and hair follicle since the first day of use. The time you will need to note the first results will depend of the severity and duration of your hair loss. No matter how long or how intense your hair loss is, using Revita on daily basis will improve the vitality of your scalp, maintaining the quality of your hair and stimulating new hair growth.

Through the synergic interaction of very effective compounds, Revita brings you a highly effective product designed to maintain scalp vitality and act on hair loss. By combining an antioxidant effect, anti-DHT properties, powerful hydrating molecules, hair growth stimulants and structural amino acids, Revita brings you the most effective hair growth stimulating shampoo available.

Apple Polyphenol (procyanidin B2 and C1) - phytochemical concentrate found in the skin of unripe apples that acts as potent antioxidant. It protects cells against free radicals, reactive atoms that contribute to tissue damage in the body. These chemical compounds are being studied extensively in labs around the world for their health effects in major diseases including treatment of hair growth. Studies showed that after sequential use, an increase of almost 80% of hair diameter and an increase in number of total hairs was shown, with no side effects.

In 2000, Japanese researchers presented their findings to the international community on the hair growth effects of apple polyphenols - specifically one known as procyanidin B-2. They identified two successful compounds- one from chardonnay grapes, and one extracted from unripe apples. The procyanidin B-2 fraction clearly outperformed the grape extract. "Procyanidin B-2 purified from apples," stated the research team, "shows the highest activity of more than 300% relative to controls."

In the same year, in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial, nineteen men with male pattern baldness were studied with a daily topical application of a 1% procyanidin B-2 solution, extracted from apples. Ten other balding men served as controls, receiving a placebo solution. After 6 months, the study concluded:

• The increase in number of total hairs and terminal hairs in the procyanidin B-2 group subjects was significantly greater than controls.

• 78.9% of subjects showed an increased mean value of hair diameter.

• "Procyanidin B-2 therapy shows promise as a cure for male pattern baldness."

Following the revelations, an attempt was made to further understand the mechanism by which the remarkable hair growth effects occurred. The results were published in the prestigious British Journal of Dermatology: Procyanidin B-2, extracted from apples, promotes hair growth: a laboratory study, Br J Dermatol. 2002 Jan;146(1):41-51. In this study, the researchers concluded that procyanidin B-2 acts to diminish protein kinase C isozymes, which play an important role in the hair growth cycle. Procyanidin B-2 seems to promote hair growth by down regulating PKC in both the anagen (active growth phase) and telogen (resting phase) of the hair follicle. When the anagen phase is prolonged, and the telogen phase is shortened, increased hair growth results.

Two more clinical trials and a total of seven published studies have now confirmed the surprising hair growth-promoting effects of apple procyanidins. Here is a summary of those findings:

• Total Number of Hairs: Significantly Increased

• Total Number of Terminal Hairs: Significantly Greater

• Increase in Hair Diameter: 78.9% Positive • Ratio of Thicker (terminal) Hairs: Significantly Higher

• Hair Follicle Activation: Intensive

In the most exciting development yet, Japanese researchers released a new study late in 2005. Once again, procyanidin therapy was proven successful in regrowing hair in subjects with male pattern baldness. The new study, published in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, confirmed the findings of earlier studies, showing clear improvement in the number of hairs and the density of hairs in the treated area. Building on the success of earlier trials, the study was extended to 12 months in the procyanidin group, and proved that longer term procyanidin therapy was even more successful than prior 4 and 6 month trials.

Cooper Peptides - Cooper Peptides have two main properties: (1) potent tissue protective anti-inflammatory agents that limit oxidative damage after tissue injury, and (2) tissue remodeling activation agents, that is, the processes for removal of damaged protein and scar tissue and their replacement by normal tissue. Studies at numerous universities and research institutes have found copper-peptides to improve hair transplant success, increase hair follicle size, stimulate hair growth and reduce hair loss.

Research scientists at the University of San Francisco Wound Center stumbled upon very interesting results. Their discovery was made while applying a synthetically formulated compound, Copper Peptide, to severe wound areas on several patients. During this process something unusual happened. Not only did the wounds heal about 30 percent faster, but a significant stimulation of the follicular cells occurred. As a side effect, these tripeptide complexes actually grew hair around the wound area.

The discovery was so startling that they then applied the same Copper Peptide complex to a female patient who had suffered roughly 90 percent alopecia (hair loss) for years. After about six months of use, she had recovered almost 100 percent of her hair. Dr. Loren Pickart, the leading authority in Copper Peptide technology, describes it as being like a protein injection to the scalp.

Tests were then conducted with chemotherapy patients and recent hair transplant recipients, all with great success in stimulating newer and stronger hair follicles.

Spin traps – are very special compounds that were originally utilized in measuring free radical activity because they react with free radicals both in vitro and in vivo, producing stable complexes. The most commonly used spin trap and the standard which measures new ones is PBN - alpha-phenyl- N-tert butyl nitrone. Hundreds of studies have been conducted over the last ten years that have tested PBN and other “spin traps” in numerous conditions. Later it was discovered that these spin traps had powerful free radical quenching abilities in living systems and could treat a variety of conditions. Spin traps could provide unique protection against free radical damage that complements and enhances the activities of the classical antioxidants such as vitamin C and vitamin E.

Spin traps modulate NF kappa-B regulated cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthases that are implicated in pro-inflammatory disease conditions. A method for ameliorating a cellular dysfunction of a tissue such as the treatment of hair loss and stimulation of hair growth comprises administering a nitroso or nitrone spin trap to the affected tissue. These agents inhibit the reaction of superoxide and nitric oxide to produce peroxinitrite. Scientists discovered that nitrone and nitroso spin traps have properties in the body for ameliorating cellular dysfunction in tissue attributed, in part, to high energy oxygen and hydroxyl free radicals, and enhancing recuperation of the tissue. Alpha-phenyl-N-tert butyl nitrone (PBN) can be administered, for example, as an anti-alopecia agent to stimulate hair growth.

Spin traps can be administered to the skin to be treated, such as the scalp. Depending on the type of hair loss or alopecia being treated and the conditions thereof, the stimulation of hair growth can usually be obtained by topical application, preferably repeated daily application. The utility of topically applied spin traps is not limited thereto, however, and the stimulation of hair growth can include an increased rate of growth, increased hair diameter, follicular neogenesis, and the like; inhibiting hair loss or alopecia from progressing.

Ketoconazole - Topical ketoconazole shows itself to have an anti-DHT binding effect in the scalp. Nevertheless, it is likely that ketoconazole exhibits other methods to its anti-hair-loss effect. One such theory of ketoconazole anti-alopecia effects may be on its activity upon the removal of sebum, a fatty substance that accumulates in the scalp around the hair follicles. In addition, ketoconazole is an antifungal medication and is significant for people combating hair loss since acting as an antifungal agent it reduces scalp irritation caused by fungal colonization or infection. Reduction of the inflammatory process that occurs in male pattern alopecia is crucial.

If we first examine the role of androgens, specifically dihydrotestosterone (DHT), we find that this hormone has been thought to slowly "choke" the growth of the hair follicle by inhibiting the function of an enzyme in the hair follicle called adenylate cyclase. Suffice it to say that when DHT concentrations remain high in the scalp, we see terminal (thick, coarse) scalp hair become reduced to vellus hair (fine, thin peach fuzz). On March 04, 2001, at the American Academy of Dermatology Meeting in Washington DC, scientists presented the findings of a study done on 1% ketoconazole shampoo which had good news for hair loss sufferers. In the study presented, one hundred male volunteers with mild to moderate dandruff and somewhat oily scalp, were using in a double-blind fashion either a 1% ketoconazole shampoo or a 1% zinc pyrithione shampoo, 2-3 times a week for 6 months.

Analysis of the different parameters set up in the study shows that the hair diameter gradually increased with ketoconazole use (+8.46%) over a 6 month period, whereas the diameter showed a trend to decrease with zinc pyrithione use over the same period (-2.28%). The sebum excretion rate was reduced with ketoconazole (-6.54%) while it increased with zinc pyrithione (+8.2%) over the same period of time. The number of hairs shed over a 24-hour period was reduced by 16.46% with ketoconazole and 6.02% with zinc pyrithione after 6 months. Finally, the percentage of hairs in the anagen phase increased by 6.4% and 8.4% respectively during the study.

The results are similar to a previous study done on 2% prescription strength Ketokonazole where it was shown that use of 2% ketoconazol yielded an increase in hair shaft diameter similar to what was achieved by the control group using 2% Minoxidil and a non-medicated shampoo.

Rooibos - Rooibos or Red Bush Tea - a hardy shrub indigenous to the North Western Cape of South Africa – is an exciting new botanical ingredient with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties well documented in medical literature. In alternative medicine Rooibos is often prescribed for nervous tension, allergies, stomach and digestive problems. Results from an independent study also showed a significant improvement in hair loss. Studies were initiated at an independent laboratory (Dermascan, France) to study the effect of the use of Rooibos in a hair lotion on a group of healthy persons who were suffering from the problem of hair loss. A 90 day trial was conducted comparing a hair lotion containing Rooibos with a placebo lotion.

After 90 days results showed a significant increase of the hair growth in the lotion containing Rooibos compared with the placebo. An increase in the hair growth was observed with 89% of the volunteers with no undesirable reactions (irritation or allergy). The participants were next asked to fill in a questionnaire. When the results were tallied, 67 percent rated their hair loss as zero or low, 78 percent saw a low to medium improvement, 45 percent saw a low to medium regrowth of hair, and 63 percent considered their hair had become smoother and shinier.

Conclusion: results show that most of the volunteers had a remarkable improvement in both the increase of hair growth and the decrease in hair loss.

MSM - Sulphur is present in protein-rich foods containing high levels of the amino acids methionine and cysteine. These foods include meat, fish, legumes, nuts, eggs, and vegetables, especially onions. However, sulphur has recently become a popular nutritional supplement and topical treatment thanks to the discovery of methylsulfonylmethane, or MSM.

The use of MSM as a nutritional supplement and topical application is relatively recent. An American chemist named Robert Herschler, began studying MSM in 1955. However, another man, Dr. Stanley Jacob with Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, is considered by many to be the father of MSM. Dr. Jacob found that simple marine life like algae and plankton convert inorganic sulphur to organic sulphur compounds. These compounds are known as dimethylsulfonium salts. These salts are transformed into dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is released into the atmosphere and is converted by ultraviolet light into dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). When DMSO oxidizes, it turns into MSM and is absorbed by plants that become food for animals and humans. MSM is a white, crystalline powder that is odorless and nearly tasteless. When taken as a dietary supplement, MSM proved to have the same health benefits as DMSO without side-effects such as bad breath, itchy skin, Nasal congestion, and shortness of breath. Why does MSM help with the development of stronger hair? Various scientific studies have proven that MSM contributes a definite normalizing effect on body functions. The sulfur normally provided to the body by MSM is required for healthy collagen and keratin which are essential for healthy hair, skin and nails. MSM also has proven antioxidant benefits which can disrupt or alter damaging chain reactions of lipid peroxidation in the cell membranes.

MSM has been widely used as a dietary supplement without any reports of allergy or intolerance related to its use. Supplements of MSM are comfortably assimilated without side effects. There are no known contraindications.

Caffeine 4% - Active caffeine ingredient helps to regulate the effects of testosterone levels. Male pattern baldness is known to occur in individuals with sensitivity to testosterone, causing damage to hair follicles that eventually leads to baldness. Caffeine is a xanthine alkaloid compound that acts as a stimulant in humans. Caffeine is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant, having the effect of warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness.

The independent study at the University of Jena used hair samples from the scalps of young men entering into the first stages of hormone-related hair loss. The study relied on a hair organ culture that used four different types of testing samples. The first was a nutrient-based sample, the second a testosterone only sample, the third was a caffeine only sample and the fourth a mixture of caffeine and testosterone.

According to the research, the results showed that the samples containing the caffeine nutrient helped to stave off hair loss and encouraged new hair growth, while the sample that relied on testosterone only led to increased hair loss. But perhaps the most impressive was the testosterone and caffeine sample, which helped to prevent further hair loss.

The results showed that using the caffeine treatment average growth was increased by around 46 per cent and the life cycle of the hair was extended by 37 per cent, when compared to the control study.

Carnitine Tartrate - L-Carnitine, a vitamin-like nutrient, occurs naturally in the human body and is essential for turning fat into energy. Active energy metabolism is an essential prerequisite for the growth of strong and healthy hair. In biological systems ATP acts as the universal energy currency. One of the most potent bio-actives that significantly increases cellular ATP content is carnitine tartrate.

Statistical evaluation demonstrated a significant increase in ATP equivalents in human hair roots treated with carnitine tartrate, showing that carnitine tartrate is an ideal ingredient for hair care formulations, providing energy for the optimal environment to produce strong and healthy hair. Throughout the test period ATP content within plucked hair follicles was determined twice daily using a commercially available test kit. Statistical evaluation of baseline adjusted values demonstrated a significant increase in ATP equivalents in human hair roots treated with carnitine tartrate. These effects were absent in the placebo group, thus underlining the stimulating activity of carnitine tartrate.

The outstanding bio-activity of carnitine tartrate was furthermore demonstrated in a second study, assessing the effects after a single application of a shampoo formulation supplemented with carnitine tartrate. Again, ATP levels in plucked human hair follicles were significantly increased.

Amino Acids: Ornitine, Taurine, Cysteine - Amino acids are the building blocks of protein, from which hair is created. They are assembled in the correct sequence by stem cells to form keratin, a complex and immensely strong hair protein. Vital amino acids have to be replaced consistently, as damage is accumulated over time. We can replace a combination of these lost amino acids directly into the hair, where they are shown to provide significant tensile benefits to the hair shaft.

Hair is composed primarily of proteins (88%). These proteins are of a hard fibrous type known as keratin. Keratin protein is comprised of what we call "polypeptide chains.” The word, polypeptide, comes from the Greek word "poly" meaning many and "peptos" meaning digested or broken down. In essence, if we break down protein, we have individual amino acids.

Many (poly) amino acids joined together form a "polypeptide chain". Two amino acids are joined together by a "peptide bond", and the correct number of amino acids placed in their correct order will form a specific protein; i.e. keratin, insulin, collagen and so on. The "alpha helix" is the descriptive term given to the polypeptide chain that forms the keratin protein found in human hair. Its structure is a coiled coil. The amino acids link together to form the coil and there are approximately 3.6 amino acids per turn of the helix (coil). Each amino acid is connected together by a "peptide bond". The peptide bond is located between the carbon atom of one amino acid extending to bond with the nitrogen atom of the next amino acid. In many individuals the extremities, including the top of the head, are the most difficult places to maintain blood flow. Follicles which are constantly deprived of blood, and therefore nutrients, cannot produce hair properly. Lack of proper nutrients, amino acids, minerals and vitamins can certainly hamper hair growth.

L-Arginine is a semi-essential amino acid synthesized by the body from L-Ornithine. Arginine + Ornithine support protein synthesis because they are involved in the transport and storage of nitrogen. The usage of taurine corrects the "rigidification" of the connective sheath that surrounds the Pilosebaceous unit and hair follicles, specifically those affected by pattern hair loss. This is a novel and previously undisclosed angle on hair loss treatment that has yet to be touched upon in any of the medical literature or prior publications.

The amino acid, l-cysteine speeds up hair growth and increases hair shaft diameter resulting in fuller hair. L-cysteine has been reported to facilitate longer hair growth, beyond what is genetically programmed. L-cysteine also provides potent antioxidant protection to the hair follicle. Users of topical n-acetyl-cysteine have reported hair regrowth.

Emu Oil - The emu, dromaius nova hollandiae, is a flightless bird part of a group called ratites which also includes the ostrich and the kiwi. Modern Australians learned early on from the Aborigines the many valuable qualities in the emu and its oil. The earliest research studies in emu oil come from Australia, and Australia continues to export emu oil to this day.

In the United States today there is a growing network of research labs interested in emus and their incredible oil. Emu oil is rendered from a thick pad of fat on the back of the bird that was apparently provided by nature to protect the animal from the extreme temperatures in its Australian homeland. Emu oil is deep penetrating and super hydrating to the skin - an all-natural tissue nutrient. Michael Hollick, MD, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine, Physiology, and Dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine conducted a study involving emu oil and hair growth. His study found that there was a 20% increase in growth activity of skin that received emu oil compared to skin that received corn oil. Looking at the hair follicles Dr. Hollick realized they were much more robust, the skin thickness was remarkably increased suggesting that emu oil stimulated skin growth and hair growth. Additionally, the study showed that over 80% of hair follicles that had been "asleep" were woken up, and began growing.

Emu oil is anti-inflammatory, which may be in part why it stimulates hair growth. Emu Oil has also been shown to be a 5 alpha reductase inhibitor in target tissues when topically applied, which likely contributes significantly to its hair growth properties. A third important property of emu oil is that it is bacteriostatic.

Emu Oil contains a multitude of Essential Fatty Acids (EFA) which helps to "feed" the skin. Consumers who suffer from natural forms of baldness have reported hair re-growth. Since Alopecia Areata only suppresses the hair follicle (vs. killing the hair follicle), emu oil may have an effect to assist with hair regrowth.

Biotin – Biotin is a member of the B-vitamin family and a major component in the natural hair manufacturing process -- it is essential to not only grow new hair, but it also plays a major role in the overall health of skin and nails. The beneficial effects of biotin on hair may be linked to its ability to improve the metabolism of scalp oils. Biotin when absorbed by the scalp may promote hair growth and it is able to penetrate the hair shaft making it expand which actually thickens the hair cuticle.

Biotin is used in cell growth, the production of fatty acids, metabolism of fats and amino acids. It plays a role in the Krebs Cycle, which is the process in which energy is released from food. Biotin is so important to hair health, that many dermatologists prescribe biotin supplements to their patients as part of their medical treatment for hair loss.

After applying Revita with a gentle massage, you should leave it on the scalp from 1 – 2 minutes before rinsing. Then repeat and leave on the scalp for 3 – 5 minutes. If desired, follow with a high quality conditioner. For optimal results, Revita should be used at least 5 times per week.

This formulation is contraindicated in individuals with a history of sensitivity reactions to any of its components. It should be discontinued if hypersensitivity to any of its ingredients is noted.

Q. Is Revita safe ?

A. Revita primarily contains compounds that are not only safe in topical use, but actually dramatically enhance overall skin health. The other active ingredients such as Ketoconazole have been tested in clinical studies and have been shown safe.

Q: Can I use hair sprays, mousses, gels, etc.?

A: Hair spray, gel, and other styling aids are not recommended since they tend to clog the hair shaft. However, you can use them while using Revita.

Q: Can I have my hair colored or permed while using Revita ?

A: While there is no evidence that coloring or perming hair can lead to or even worsen hair loss, it is generally not recommended for people with hair loss. If you are experiencing hair loss then perming and coloring hair is not recommended. However, this will not interfere with Revita.

Q: What is SLS/SLES free ?

A: SLS means Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and SLES means Sodium Laureth Sulfate, commonly used low cost detergents in shampoos and cleansers. They are linked to skin irritation, skin drying and hair loss due to follicle attack. Revita is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate free, and that means that Revita does not irritate you scalp and preserves your hair follicale health.

Q: Can I blow dry my hair after using Revita ?

A: Extreme heat damages the proteins in the hairs making them fragile. Nevertheless, if you need or want to blow dry your hair, you can do it after using Revita.

Q: Who is a candidate for Revita ?

A: Ideal candidate is someone with little hair loss or at the beginning stages of hair loss, since it is much easier to prevent hair loss then to grow new hair. Someone who is concerned with hair loss prevention should start using Revita immediately.

Q: What type of results should I expect with Revita ?

A: When deciding to use Revita, it is important to have realistic expectations. Depending of severity and duration of your hair loss, it could take some time to see hair growth. In fact, during the first 2 weeks of treatment you may actually notice increased hair loss as old hairs are being pushed out and the hair follicles start growing new hair. Do not become alarmed with this and just stick to the treatment.

Q. Does Revita have any systemic side effects ?

A. No, when used as directed, Revita active ingredients have a long history of use both orally and topically.

Q. Does Revita work for women?

A. Yes. In most cases, the cause of hair loss in women is surprisingly similar to men. Fortunately for women, estrogen helps to protect the hair follicle from the destructive effects of DHT. However, many women develop thinning hair and loss due to fluctuation of estrogen levels and/or over production of DHT. Revita can help protect the hair follicle from DHT resulting in a thicker, fuller and healthier hair.

Q. I am using other topical treatments. Can I use Revita at the same time ?

A. Yes. Revita has no side effects and does not cross react with other topical treatments. You can safely opt to use Revita with other products, and we strongly recommend the association with Spectral.DNC for more severe hair loss or Spectral.RS for thinning hair.

Q. Do I need to use Revita for a long time ?

A. Once you have reached the desired results, you should continue to use Revita as your regular shampoo to maintain the revitalized hairs and a healthy scalp.

Q: Is stress a factor in hair loss?

A: When the body is under significant physical and emotional stress it is possible that the immune system will produce anti-bodies that attack hair follicles, and this results in bald patches or diffuse loss. Stress-induced loss will respond very well to Revita and you should keep using Revita as your regular daily shampoo to keep your scalp healthy.

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NaturalCare Virus Induced Nasal Decongestant – Super Strength SinuFix
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Date: October 06, 2006 02:34 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: NaturalCare Virus Induced Nasal Decongestant – Super Strength SinuFix

Super strength SinuFix Nasal Decongestant Mist 90 percent of Germs, Viruses and Pollutants May enter your body through the nose! All of us breath in through our nose and are inundated daily with thousands of foreign micro particles. Super Strength SinuFix Mist is an innovative formula specifically designed to fight the virus induced Nasal allergy/sinus/cold/flu-like symptoms that may result from exposure to germs and viruses in the air in any crowded, potentially germ-infested environment.

  • Works in seconds
  • Safe to use often as needed
  • Year-round relief
  • Non-prescription
  • No chemical dependency
  • No preservatives
  • No side-effects

Germs in the Air Everywhere!

  • Effects of the sneeze! Averaging 90 MPH, a sneeze is a sudden, forceful, involuntary burst of air through the nose and mouth. Others may inhale the tiny sneeze droplets that may contain many viral and infectious bodies that drift in the air.
  • What do you inhale through your nose? Answer: Germs, viruses, fungi, pollen, dust, mold, yeast, pollution, rubber tire dust from the street, ect.
  • Crowded environments like offices, schools, theaters, restaurants, airplanes, ect. are spawning ground for germs that cause colds and sickness.
  • Re-circulated air! 72 percent of people on an airline flight caught a cold from one infected person, says a study from the Am. Cntr. For disease control and prevention.
  • Is there airborne risk? We all have to breath, so there is always a risk of contagious disease in the air from someone near you or in confined areas.

Indications: For temporary, soothing relief of virus induced Nasal and sinus congestion and pressure, dry, irritated Nasal membranes associated with a cold and sinusitis, irritated/swollen sinus passages, hay fever, overuse of decongestant sprays or drops, or other upper respiratory allergies (Allergic rhinitis). Helps cleanse Nasal passages and promotes Nasal and sinus drainage.



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NaturalCare Nasal Decongestant - SinuFix Nasal Mist
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Date: October 06, 2006 02:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: NaturalCare Nasal Decongestant - SinuFix Nasal Mist

SinuFix Nasal Mist helps make Nasal passages and sinuses feel clear and more comfortable so you can breathe and sleep better, fast! Therapy for sinus/allergy problems should help control symptoms and also help people feel and function better in their everyday lives.

Antibiotics are widely used to treat sinusitis. According to the Mayo Clinic, the primary cause of sinusitis is fungi-molds and yeast which become airborne like pollen. Antibiotics, therefore, are not effective, in most cases, because they target bacteria.

Synthetic over-the-counter decongestions may offer some relief of symptoms, but they have no effect on the inflammation. With prolonged use, common Nasal decongestants typically become ineffective and can lead to dependency.

SinuFix Nasal Decongestant Cleansing Mist

  • Breathe free, soothe Nasal passages, and relieve sinus pressure
  • Works in seconds
  • Safe to use as often as needed
  • No Chemical dependency
  • No synthetic drugs
  • No artificial preservatives
  • For Adults and Children
  • Provides fine mist in precise dose spray
  • Year-round relief
  • Non-prescription
  • No side-effects

Indications: for the temporary, soothing relief of Nasal congestion, sinus congestion and pressure, and dry, irritated Nasal membranes associated with sinusitis, irritated/swollen sinus passages, hay fever, a cold, overuse of decongestant sprays or drops, or other upper repertory allergies (allergic rhinitis). Helps clear Nasal passages and promotes Nasal and/or sinus drainage.

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NaturalCare Healthy Sinus Function – SinuFix Capsules
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Date: October 06, 2006 02:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: NaturalCare Healthy Sinus Function – SinuFix Capsules

SinuFix Caps promotes healthy sinus function, clear sinus and Nasal passages, and stimulates healthy immune response and overall well-being.* it contains the highest quality and purity, plus the most effective form of natural ingredients for promoting healthy sinus and respiratory function.* No artificial colors, preservatives, fillers, binders, gluten, or yeasts.

To maximize your Nasal health, combine the SinuFix Nasal Decongestant/Cleansing Mist which helps to relieve sinus pressure and Nasal congestion, soothes dry, irritated Nasal passages, cleanses and moisturizes Nasal and sinus passages. This patent-pending precise-dose spray mist is non-addicting, and contains 100 percent natural ingredients.

According to the Mayo Clinic, the primary cause of chronic sinus infection is fungi, molds, and yeasts which become airborne like pollen. Antibiotics, therefore, are often not effective because they target bacteria. And synthetic over-the-counter decongestants typically become ineffective with more than 3 days usage, and can lead to dependency. Mayo Clin Proc. 1999;74:877-884 The informative, FREE Sinus Guide inside each SinuFix package provides tips for sinus and allergy problems. Sinus congestion can be a miserable and annoying nuisance. Don’t wait, start SinuFix today!

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Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet
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Date: December 08, 2005 04:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet

Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 8/1/05

LIKELY USERS: People wanting to support healthy blood flow to the brain and healthy neurological function 1-6,10 Those maintaining normal seasonal immune responses 7-10

KEY INGREDIENTS: 75 mg of Guaranteed Potency Butterbur Root (Petasites hybridus) Extract, min. 15 Sesquiterpenes as Petasines; 200 mg of Feverfew Leaf (Tanacetum parthenium) min. 0.4% Parthenolides

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) is a native shrub of Europe, North America, and Asia that has been used by herbalists for centuries. Modern scientific studies have demonstrated that Butterbur supports healthy blood flow to the brain and healthy neurological function.1-6, 10 In addition, Butterbur may help to maintain balanced seasonal immune responses.7-10 In a synergistic base of guaranteed potency Feverfew leaf.11-26

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: NOW Butterbur is free of harmful levels of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs), the undesirable compounds naturally found in Butterbur, so it is safe to use regularly.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: Take one VCap one to three times per day, or as directed by your physician.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Magnesium, Ulcetrol, B-2, B-12, Fish Oil (EPA, DHA), SAM-e, Ginger, Ginkgo Biloba

CAUTIONS: None.

SPECIFIC: Do not discontinue use abruptly; taper off use if discontinuing. Discontinue use at least 14 days before surgery or oral surgery. Use with caution if you have ragweed allergies or blood disorders and let your physician know that you plan to use it before you take it. May be contraindicated for pregnant women.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. Information given here may vary from what is shown on the product label because this represents my own professional experience and understanding of the science underlying the formula and ingredients. When taking any new formula, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. REFERENCES:

1. Diener HC, Rahlfs VW, Danesch U (2004) The First Placebo-Controlled Trial of a Special Butterbur Root Exract for the Preventio of Migraine: Reanalysis of Efficacy Criteria. Eur Neurol 51:89-97.
2. Lipton RB, Gobel H, Einhaupl KM, Wilks K, Mauskop A (2004) Petasites hybridus root (butterbur) is an effective preventative treatment for migraine. Neurology 63:2240-2244.
3. Pothmann R, Danesch U (2005) Migraine Preventiuon in Children and Adolescents: Results of an Open Study With a Special Butterbur Root Extract. Headache 45:196-203.
4. Rapaport AM, Bigal ME (2004) Perventive migraine therapy: what is new. Neurol Sci 25:S177-S185.
5. Wu SN, Chen H, Lin YL (2003) The mechanism of inhibitory actions of S-petasin, a sequiterpene of Petasites formosanus, on L-type calcium current in NG108-15 neuronal cells. Planta Med 69(2):118-124.
6. Wang G-J, Wu X-C, Lin Y-L, Ren J, Shum AY-C, Wu Y-Y, Chen C-F (2002) Ca2+ channel blockin effect of iso-S-petasin in rat aoritic smooth muscle cells. Eur J Pharmacol 445(3):239-45.
7. Lee DKC, Carstairs IJ, Haggart K, Jackson CM, Currie GP, Lipworth BJ (2003) Butterbur, a herbal remedy, attenuates adenosine monophosphate induced Nasal responsiveness in seasonal allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy 33:882-886.
8. Lee DKC, Haggart K, Robb FM, Lipworth BJ (2004) Butterbur, a herbal remedy, confers complementary anti-inflammatory activity in asthmatic patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids. Clin Exp Allergy 34:110-114.
9. Lee DKC, Gray RD, Robb FM, Fujihara S, Lipworth BJ (2004) A placebo-controlled evaluation of butterbur and fexofenadine on objective and subjective outcomes in perennial allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy 34:646-649.
10. (No Author) (2001) Petasites hybridus (Butterbur). Alt Med Rev 6(2):207-209.
11. Hayes NA, et al. The Activity of Compounds Extracted from Feverfew on Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells. J Pharm Pharmacol. Jun1987;39(6):466-70.
12. 2 Groenewegen WA, et al. A Comparison of the Effects of an Extract of Feverfew and Parthenolide, a Component of Feverfew, on Human Platelet Activity In-vitro. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1990;42(8):553-57.
13 Capasso F. The Effect of An Aqueous Extract of Tanacetum parthenium L. on Arachidonic Acid Metabolism by Rat Peritoneal Leucocytes. J Pharm Pharmacol. Jan1986;38(1):71-72.
14. 4 Bejar E. Parthenolide Inhibits the Contractile Responses of Rat Stomach Fundus to Fenfluramine and Dextroamphetamine but not Serotonin. J Ethnopharmacol. Jan1996;50(1):1-12.
15. 5 Prusinski A, Durko A, Niczyporuk-Turek A. [Feverfew as a Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine]. Neurol Neurochir Pol. 1999;33(Suppl 5):89-95.
16. 6 Barsby RW, et al. Feverfew Extracts and Parthenolide Irreversibly Inhibit Vascular Responses of the Rabbit Aorta. J Pharm Pharmacol. Sep1992;44(9):737-40.
17. 7 Pittler MH, Vogler BK, Ernst E. Feverfew for Preventing Migraine (Cochrane Review). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(3):CD002286.
18. 8 Pattrick M, et al. Feverfew in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Study. Ann Rheum Dis. 1989;48:547-49.
19. 9 Makheja AM, et al. A Platelet Phospholipase Inhibitor from the Medicinal Herb Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium). Prostaglandin Leukotri Med. 1982;8:653-60. 20. 12 Drug Identification Number Notification. Drugs Directorate, Therapeutic Products Division, Health Protection Branch, Health Canada . Ottawa , Canada
20. 12 Drug Identification Number Notification. Drugs Directorate, Therapeutic Products Division, Health Protection Branch, Health Canada. Ottawa, Canada.
21. 14 Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press; 1996:119-21.
22. 15 PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd ed. Montvale , NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:307.
23. 16 Pribitkin ED. Herbal therapy: what every facial plastic surgeon must know. Arch Facial Plast Surg. Apr2001;3(2): 127-32.
24. 17 Schmidt RJ. Plant dermatitis. Compasitae. Clin Dermatol. Apr1986;4(2):46-61.
25. 18 Heck AM, et al. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin. Am J Health Syst Pharm. Jul2000;57(13): 1221-7.
26. 19 Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London : The Pharmaceutical Press; 1996:119-21.



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Butterbur at Vitanet ®

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Flue and Cold Times – For relief from Flue & Cold Symptoms
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Date: November 07, 2005 02:34 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Flue and Cold Times – For relief from Flue & Cold Symptoms

Flue and Cold Times – For relief from Flue & Cold Symptoms

Flue and Cold times is a fresh herb tincture containing Echinacea, Belladonna, Eupatorium and other herbs for temporary relief of fever, chills, postNasal drip, head and chest congestion, minor sore throat pain, cough, body aches, pains and soreness associated with cold and flu. For children and adults.

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Pregnant and eating for two...
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Date: October 21, 2005 01:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pregnant and eating for two...

Not - Quite - Dual - Nutrition

It’s time to ditch a dietary cliché often foisted on expectant moms. “try to keep in mind that you are not eating for two, you are carefully eating for one,” write Catherine Jones and prenatal nutrition expert Rose Ann Hudson in Eating for Pregnancy (Marlowe & Company), who add that pregnancy “is not a time to skip meal, eat junk food or lad up on empty calories for quick energy.” The idea is to eat a nutritious diet that allows you to gain weight gradually as your baby grows.

It helps to be at a healthy weight when starting a family. Being overweight makes conception more difficult, and at least one study ahs found a link between excess maternal weight and the risk of a birth defect called cleft palate (in which the roof of the mouth is split from behind the teeth to the Nasal cavity). However, dieting during pregnancy may actually program a child for obesity by rewiring the developing brain, so try to lose weight before you try to conceive.

How much should you expect to gain over the course of nine months? “A lot depends on your unique circumstances and the advice of your health care provider, but in general you can anticipate adding from two to five pounds a month for the first 14 weeks and roughly a pound a week thereafter until your due date-between 25 and 35 pounds in total. That translates into roughly and extra 300 calories a day; Jones and Hudson say that more nourishment may be necessary if you are breastfeeding, extremely active or carrying more than one child. Since stress and anxiety often lead to out-of-control eating (and gaining), be sure to tend to your own emotional needs during what can be a very exhilarating, yet sometimes overwhelming, time of life.

For maximum nutrition try to eat a variety of foods while avoiding anything that provokes morning sickness. Whole grains provide both steady energy (unlike sugar-fueled spikes and crashes) and B vitamins to boot. Do not scrimp on fat-your baby’s developing nervous system depends on it-but “don’t use your pregnancy as an excuse to pig out, either,” warn Jones and Hudson. Stick with such unsaturated fats as olive oil along with rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids like flax seed oil. You definitely want to indulge in those omega-3s, which appear to boost infant intellectual development. Fish is a fine source of both omega-3 and the high-quality protein needed to build your baby’s tissues, but beware: Some species such as fresh tuna, swordfish, tilefish and king mackerel, can be contaminated with mercury. Your best low-mercury bets are catfish, pollock, salmon, and shrimp. (Other good protein sources include chicken, cottage cheese, lean red meat, yogurt and milk, all organically sourced whenever possible.)

Supplemental fish oil is another omega-3 possibility because mercury is found in the muscle of fish and not in the oil,” according to OSU’s Jane Higdon, who suggests consulting your health care practitioner for advice. “If I was going to take a fish oil supplement, I’d look for one that the manufacturer is testing for PCBs (an industrial pollutant),” such as products that meet California’s Proposition 65 standards.

Don’t forget to stock the fridge with fresh produce. Fruits and veggies are richly endowed with vitamins and minerals; for example, making like Popeye and downing your spinach helps ensure you get plenty of folic acid and iron.

These superfoods also supply phytonutrients, substances that may actually help protect your baby against cancer even as they enhance your own well-being. Studies on the link between maternal diet and childhood cancer protection are in the early stages according to Dr. David Williams, a researcher at the Linus Pauling Institute, but he says that shouldn’t stop you from loading up on cancer-fighting green stuff. “Certainly among the vegetables the cruciferous ones (the broccoli family) are particularly valuable in protecting against cancer,” he says. “These vegetables are also a good source of fiber and vitamin C.”



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Vitanet ®

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Nozovent - 1 pack or 2 pack
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Date: September 08, 2005 10:01 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nozovent - 1 pack or 2 pack

Nozovent

Anti-Snoring Device--developed by a leading swedish ear nose and throat physician, Nozovent has been clinically documented to open Nasal passages and significantly reduce snoring. Nozovent has a strong physician recommendation.

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Zinc, Vitamin C and Colds, length of Colds ...
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Date: July 28, 2005 01:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Zinc, Vitamin C and Colds, length of Colds ...

Zinc, Vitamin C and Colds

Research indicates definite benefits from taking vitamin C and zinc when trying to fight a cold. Studies do not suggest a lessening of the number of colds acquired for each individual. But results show a reduction in the severity and duration of the cold. Vitamin C and zinc both are known antioxidants helpful in boosting the immune system into action. A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine, July 1996, found that zinc can help reduce the symptoms of a cold including coughs, headaches, hoarseness, muscle aches, Nasal drainage, Nasal congestion, scratchy throats, sore throats, sneezing and fevers.(Herbs for Health, September/October 1997, 65)



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Vitanet ®

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Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus...
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Date: July 11, 2005 09:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus...

HANDLING SPRING(HAY)

The National Institute of Health’s branch of Allergy and Infectious Diseases re p o rt that 40 to 50 million Americans suffer from allergies in one form or another. Many experience food allergies that a re treated somewhat diff e rently from hay fever allergies. Hay fever comes from airborne allergens, generally from pollen or pollutants.

The symptoms of allergy occur when an immune system is overactive. The immune system often recognizes something as foreign and treats it as foreign by attacking it, when in fact it really isn’t a substance the body should be concern e d with. This over-activity of the immune system leads to the release of substances including histamine that cause the symptoms of hay fever.

The most common symptoms include a runny nose and itching eyes and scratchy throat. Sometimes, an allergy will precede a sinus infection by causing swelling in the Nasal membranes preventing fluids f rom exiting the sinus passages. An infection then ensues. However, most people who feel pressure over their sinuses, never develop an infection and so can be adequately treated with the supplements mentioned here. Many people experience a tickle or a shallow cough that comes from the throat rather than the lungs. They may also experience a change in emotions, becoming quite irritable or moody.

These airborne allergies can often be g rouped by season. Those people sensitive to tree pollens usually have more severe allergies in the springtime. Those sensitive to grasses are often worse in mid-summer. Those allergic to weeds have their symptoms peak in the fall. There are some unfortunate people who have allergies all summer long who may be allergic to a few plants in each group. Those who have symptoms of allerg i e s all winter long probably are allergic to molds and mildew or household animals and dust mites. On occasion, it takes a real detective to determine from where the allergies come.

There are several methods used to diagnose a cause of an allergy. In a scratch test, drops of an allergen are put on small scratches on the arm or the back. Are action is considered positive if swelling or redness occur around the scratch. A blood sample can also be used to meas ure antibody response to certain allergens. It is often helpful to determine the allergen which cause the hayfever to reduce the symptoms. There are also practitioners who use kinesiology or electronic devices to determine the cause of allergies.

The most common treatment of allergies is with antihistamines. Their side effects include drowsiness and drying of the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth. Many of the newer prescription antihistamines don’t cause drying but often have serious drug interactions and the consumer must be very careful in combining the prescription antihistamines with antifungal drugs, and blood thinning as well as asthma medication. There are some natural products that can be taken to decrease allergy symptoms. They are often equally effective without the side effects of antihistamines.

QUERCETIN

One of the more popular is quercetin. Quercetin is a bioflavonoid found in red apples, red onions, brussels sprouts, kale, peas, bell peppers, pears and asparagus. It is also found in bee pollen and propolis, two plant materials found in the beehive. It is possible to consume a fair amount of quercetin through your diet. If you have allergies, however, diet is often not enough and you may need a supplement to get enough quercetin to ontrol your symptoms. It appears quercetin decreases allergic symptoms by stopping the release of histamine. If you start taking quercetin and other nutritional supplements I will mention below before an allergy attack, they are likely to be more effective. However, don’t let that discourage you from taking them even after the symptoms have started. A common dose is 300mg to 600mg per day.

BROMELAIN

Bromelain is a nutrient often extracted f rom pineapple. Found in many digestive formulas, it is an enzyme that helps absorption. If it is found in a combination formula, chances are, it is there to help with the absorption of the other nutrients such as quercetin. Bromelain also has an anti-inflammatory effect. When someone develops allergy symptoms, part of the reason is due to the inflammatory response to substances such as histamine that are released as the allergy takes hold. This causes inflammation in the tissues which then manifests with redness and swelling.

VITAMIN C

Vitamin C is useful in many conditions including hay fever. Higher doses are often required in the treatment of allergies: 2,000mg is beneficial and you can take up to 4,000mg or more during acute symptoms. It also stabilizes capillaries, reducing the swelling in the throat, Nasal passages and around the eyes. If you are taking a multi-vitamin or a combination product that contains Vitamin C, I still recommend additional supplementation.

NETTLE (URTICA DIOICA)

Stinging nettle is probably a plant many a re familiar with, especially if it has come into contact with your skin, but it also has an historical use in the treatment of allergy. In fact, in double blind studies it was shown to decrease the symptoms of allergy, specifically runny nose.

EPHEDRA (MA HUANG)

The active component of the ephedra herb is ephedrine, an alkaloid. It is used in OTC asthma medication. As a natural herb, ephedra in small doses can be v e ry useful in decreasing the symptoms of colds, asthma, cough and in this case, hay fever. It is in many Chinese and American formulas that I use and I feel v e ry comfortable using 100mg to 200mg of ephedra that contain small doses of 2.5mg to 8mg of ephedra alkaloids per day. I feel comfortable using dosages of up to 15mg of ephedra alkaloids .

FEVERFEW

Feverfew is another herb with a variety of uses. You will find it in headache formulas, in fever reducing formulas, and many hay fever formulas. Like bromelain, it has an anti-inflammatory effect and reduces the swelling that occurs during a hay fever attack.

Homeopathic formulas can also be useful to reduce hay fever. There is no re ason why the herbs I’ve mentioned cannot be combined with homeopathic formulas. You may want to take them at separate times of the day.

So, if you suffer from hay fever, don’t give up. You can use these nutrients singly or in combination. You can take a formula that contains all of them and then add to that additional vitamin C for instance, or additional nettle. It may require trial and error to find the right amounts in combination that will work for you.



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HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)
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Date: July 11, 2005 08:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HAWAIIAN NONI (Morinda citrifolia)

INTRODUCTION

In a time when we are more concerned than ever with issues of health, a tried and true tropical herb called noni needs t o be added t o our list of the best natural remedies. It susage over hundreds of years supports it s description as a veritable panacea of therapeutic actions. At this writing, noni continues to accrue impressive medicinal credentials, and its emergence as an effective nat ural healing agent is a timely one. Amidst rising cancer rates, the high incidence of degenerative diseases like diabetes, and the evolution of ant ibiotic resist ant bacteria and new viral strains, herbs like noni are sought after for their natural pharmaceutical properties. Unquest ionably, all of us want to know how to:

  • • protect ourselves f rom toxins and pollut ants
  • • prevent t he premature onset of age-related diseases such as arthritis, heart disease, diabetes and stroke
  • • boost our immune defenses to protect ourselves from new viral and bacterial strains that have become antibiotic-resist ant
  • • reduce our risk of developing cancer
  • • better digest our food for proper assimilation and purge the intestinal system wit hout the dangerous side effects of harsh drugs. Its actions are multifaceted and must be considered when assessing natural treatment s for disease or injury. It s impressive and widespread use among various native cult ures of t ropical island regions supports the notion that it does indeed possess valuable, therapeutic compounds.

    Genus Rubiaceae

    Common Names

    Indian Mulberry (India), Noni (Hawaii), Nono (Tahiti and Raratonga), Polynesian Bush Fruit, Painkiller Tree (Caribbean islands), Lada (Guam), Mengkudo (Malaysia), Nhau (Southeast Asia), Grand Morinda (Vietnam), Cheesefruit (Australia), Kura (Fiji), Bumbo (Africa) Note: This is only a small sampling of vernacular names for Morinda citrifolia. Almost every island nation of the South Pacific and Caribbean has a term for this particular plant . This booklet will refer to the herb mainly as “ noni” or M. citrifolia, and is referring primarily to Hawaiin noni.

    Parts Used

    The parts of the noni plant most used for their medicinal and nutritional purposes are the fruit, seeds, bark, leaves, and flowers. Virtually every part of the noni plant is utilized for its individual medicinal properties; however, it is the fruit portion that is regarded as its most valuable. The seeds have a purgative action, the leaves are used to treat external inflammations and relieve pain, the bark has strong astringent properties and can treat malaria, the root extracts lower blood pressure, the flower essences relieve eye inflammations and the f ruit has a number of medicinal actions.

    Physical Description

    Morinda citrifolia is technically an evergreen shrub or bush, which can grow to heights of fifteen to twenty feet . It has rigid, coarse branches which bear dark, oval, glossy leaves. Small white fragrant flowers bloom out of cluster-like pods which bear creamy-white colored fruit. The fruit is fleshy and gel-like when ripened, resembling a small breadf ruit . The flesh of the fruit is characterist ically bitter, and when completely ripe produces a rancid and very dist inctive odor. Noni has buoyant seeds that can float formont hs in ocean bodies. The wood of the inflammatory, astringent, emollient, emmenagogue, laxative, sedative, hypotensive (lowers blood pressure) , blood purif ier, and tonic.

    Chemical Constituents

    Noni has various chemical constituents. First, it has an impressive array of terpene compounds, three of which—L. Asperuloside, aucubin, and glucose— have been identified by their actyl derivatives. Both caproic and caprylic acids have been isolated.1 Second, bushfruits, a category of which noni fruit is a member, are also considered a good source of vit - amin C.2 Third, Hawaiin noni has been linked to the synthesis of xeronine in the body which has significant and widespread health implications. Last , the alkaloid cont ent of the noni fruit is thought to be responsible for its therapeutic actions. Alkaloids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological and biological act ivitiesin the human body. They are nitrogencontaining organic compounds which can react with acids to form salts and which are the basis of many medicines. The following is an in-depth chemical analysis of each plant part and it s chemical constituents.

  • • amino acids (which include alanine, arginine, asparticacids, cysteine, cystine, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan tyrosine, and valine)
  • • anthraquinones
  • • glycosides
  • • phenolic compounds
  • • resins
  • • B-sitosterol
  • • ursolic acid

    FLOWER

  • • acacet in 7-0-D (+) -glucophyranoside
  • • 5,7,-dimet hylapigenin-4-0-8-D(+) -galactophyranoside
  • • 6,8,-dimet hoxy-3-methyl anthroquinone-1-0-8-rhamnosyl glucophyranoside

    FRUIT

  • • antioxidant
  • • alizarin
  • • anthraquinones
  • • caproic and caprylic acids

    discovered an alkaloid in the Hawaiin noni fruit which he calls proxeronine and which he believes has appreciable physiological actions by acting as a precursor to xeronine, a very crucial compound (see later sections) . In addition, a compound found in the fruit called damnacanthol is believed to help inhibit cert ain viruses and cellular mutations involved in cancer.

    ROOT AND ROOT BARK

  • • carbonate
  • • chlorubin
  • • rubicholric acid
  • • soranjidol
  • • chrysophanol
  • • phosphate
  • • magnesium
  • • ferric iron
  • • sodium
  • • glycosides
  • • morinadadiol
  • • morindine
  • • resins
  • • rubiadin
  • • sterols4

    Pharmacology

    Recent surveys have suggested that noni fruit exerts antibiotic action. In fact, a variety of compounds which have antibacterial properties (such as aucubin) have been identified in the fruit.5 The 6-Dglucopyranose pentaacet ate of the fruit extract is not considered bacteriostatic.6 Constituents found in the fruit portion have exhibited ant imicrobial action against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi (and other types) , Shigella paradysenteriae, and Staphylococcus aureaus. Compounds found in the root have the ability to reduce swollen mucous membrane and lower blood pressure in animal studies. Proxeronine is an alkaloid constituent found in Hawaiin noni fruit which may prompt the production of xeronine in the body. It is considered a xeronine precursor and was discovered in noni fruit by Dr. Ralph M. Heinicke. He has theorized that this proenzyme can be effective in initiating a series of beneficial cellular reactions through its involvement with the integrity of specific proteins. He points out that tissues contain cells which possess certain recept or sites for xeronine. Because the reactions that can occur are so varied, many different therapeutic actions can result when xeronine production escalates, explaining why Hawaiin noni is good for so many seemingly unrelated disorders. Damnacanthol is another compound contained in the fruit of the Hawaiin noni plant which has shown the ability to block or inhibit the cellular function of RAS cells, considered pre-cancerous cells.

    Body Systems Targeted

    The following body systems have all been effec-freeze-dried capsules, dehydrated powder or fruit, and oil. Noni plant constituents are sometimes offered in combination with other herbs. Some products contain a percent age of the fruit, bark, root and seeds for their individual therapeutic properties.

    Satety

    Extracts of M. citrifolia are considered safe if used as directed; however, pregnant or nursing mothers should consult their physicians before taking any supplement . High doses of root extracts may cause constipation. Taking noni supplements with coffee, alcohol or nicotine is not recommended.

    Suggested Uses

    Ideally, noni extracts should be taken on an empty stomach prior to meals. The process of digesting food can interfere with the medicinal value of the alkaloid compounds found in Hawaiin noni, especially in its fruit . Apparently, stomach acids and enzymes destroy the specific enzyme which frees up the xeronine compound. Take noni supplements without food, coffee, nicotine or alcohol. Using supplements that have been made from the semi-ripe or light - green fruit is also considered preferable to the ripe, whit ish fruit .

    NONI: ITS USE AND HISTORY

    Noni is a tropical wandering plant indigenous to areas of Australia, Malaysia and Polynesia. It is considered native to Southeast Asia although it grows from India to the eastern region of Polynesia. Morinda citrifolia has a long history of medicinal use throughout these areas. It is thought to be the “most widely and commonly used medicinal plant prior to the European era.” 7 Centuries ago, the bushfruit was introduced to native Hawaiians, who subsequently called it “noni” and considered its fruit and root as prized medicinal agents. Among all Polynesian botanical agents of the 19th and 20th centuries, Hawaiin noni has the widest array of medical applications. Samoan and Hawaiian medical practitioners used noni for bowel disorders (especially infant diarrhea, constipation, or intestinal parasites) , indigestion, skin inflammation, infection, mouth sores, fever, contusions and sprains. Hawaiians commonly prepared noni tonics designed to treat diabetes, stings, burns and fish poisoning.8 The herb’s remarkable ability to purge the intestinal tract and promote colon health was well known among older Hawaiian and Tahitian natives and folk healers. Interestingly, field observations regarding its repu-remarkable healing agent .

    Wonder Herb of Island Folk Healers

    Common to t he thickets and forests of Malaysia and Polynesia, and the low hilly regions of the Philippine islands, noni has been cultivated throughout communities in the South Pacific for hundreds of years. Its Hawaiian use is thought to originate from inter-island canoe travel and settlement dating to before Christ . Its hardy seeds have the ability to float which has also contributed to its distribution among various seacoasts in the South Pacific region. Historical investigation has established the fact that some of Hawaii’s earliest settlers probably came viaTahiti. For this reason, Tahitian herbal practices have specific bearing on the herbal therapeutics of islands to the nort h. The very obvious similarities between the Hawaiian vernacular for herbal plants like noni and Tahitian names strongly suggests the theory of Polynesian migrations to Hawaii. Cultures native to these regions favored using Morinda citrifolia for treating major diseases and ut ilized it as a source of nourishment in times of famine.9 Noni fruit has been recognized for centuries as an excellent source of nutrition. The peoples of Fiji, Samoa and Rarat onga use the fruit in both its raw and cooked forms.10 Traditionally, the fruit was propicked before it was fully ripe and placed in the sunlight . After being allowed to ripen, it was typically mashed and its juice extracted through a cloth. Noni leaves provided a veget able dish and their resiliency made them desirable as a fish wrap for cooking.

    Noni’s Medical Reputation

    Elaborate traditionalrituals and praying rites usually accompanied the administration of noni. Int erestingly, cultures indigenous to the Polynesian islands had a significant understanding of their flora. For example, native Hawaiians maint ained a folkmedicine taxonomy t hat was considered second to none.11 Noni was not only used for medicinal purposes but for its food value, for clot hing and for cloth dyes as well. Research indicates that noni was among the few herbal remedies that islanders considered “ tried and true.” In Hawaii, trained herbal practitioners reserved the right to prescribe plant therapies.12 Records indicate that Hawaiian medical practices were based on extensive and very meticulous descriptions of symptoms and their prescribed herbal treatments. Dosages were controlled and the collection and administration of plant extracts was carefully monitored.13 In addition to Morinda, it was not uncommon for these herbal doctors to also recommend using In regard to its application for common ailments, Hawaiians and other island communities traditionally prescribed noni to purge the bowel, reduce fever, cure respiratory infections such as asthma, ease skin inflammations, and heal bruises and sprains. In other words, noni was widely used and highly regarded as a botanical medicine.

    A Timely Reemer gence

    Today, the natural pharmaceutical actions of the chemical constituents contained in noni are scientif-ically emerging as valuable bot anical medicines. Tahitian “nono” intrigued medical practitioners decades ago; however, due to the eventual emergence of synthetic drugs, interest in this island botanical diminished until recent years. Ethnobot anists are once again rediscovering why Hawaiian people havet reasured and cultivat ed Morinda citrifolia for generations. Noni is now finding its way into western therapeutics and is referred to as “ the queen” of the genus Rubiaceae. Its ability to reduce joint inflammation and target the immune system have made it the focus of the modern scientific inquiry. Dr. Ralph Heinicke has conducted some fascinating studies on the chemical constituents of the Hawaiin noni fruit. His research centers on the proxeronine content of the fruit juice and how it profoundly influences human physiology. In addition, scientific studies investigating noni as an anti-cancer agent have been encouraging. It s conspicuous attributes and varied uses have elevat edits status to one of the best of the healing herbs. Today Morinda citrifolia is available in liquid, juice, freezedried capsules, or oil forms, and is considered one of nature’s most precious botanicals.

    TRADITIONAL USES OF NONI

    Throughout tropical regions, virtually every part of Morinda citrifolia was used to treat disease or injury. Its curative properties were well known and commonly employed. PatoaTama Benioni, a member of the Maoritribe from the Cook Islands and a lecturer on island plants explains: Traditionally Polynesians use noni for basically everything in the treatment of illness. Noni is a part of our lives. Any Polynesian boy will tell you he’s had exper ience with it . We use juice from its roots, its flowers, and its fruit... my grandmother taught me to use noni from the roots and the leaves to make medicine for external as well as internal use, and for all kinds of ailments, such as coughs, boils, diseases of the skin, and cuts.15

    decoctions to stimulate delayed menst ruation.

  • • Noni was frequently utilized for its antiparasitic activity.
  • • Respiratory ailments, coughs, and colds were treated with noni.
  • • A juice made from pounding noni leaves, roots and fruit mixed with water was administered for diarrhea.
  • • Dried and powdered forms of the bark mixed with water and administ ered with a spoon treated infant diarrhea.
  • • Small pieces of fruit and root infused with water were given to kill intestinal parasites.
  • • Boiled bark decoctions were given as a drink for stomach ailments.
  • • Coughs were treated with grated bark.
  • • Charred unripe fruit was used with salt on diseased gums.
  • • Pounded fruit combined with kava and sugar cane was used to treat tuberculosis.
  • • Babies were rubbed with fresh, crushed leaves for serious chest colds accompanied by fever.
  • • Eye washes were made from decoctions for eye complaint s from flower extracts.
  • • Leaf infusions were traditionally taken to treat adult fevers.
  • • A mouthwash consisting of crushed ripe fruit and juice was used for inflamed gums in young boys.
  • • Pounded leaf juice was used for adult gingivitis.
  • • Sore throats were treated by chewing the leaves and swallowing the juice.
  • • Skin abscesses and boils were covered with leaf poultices.
  • • Swelling was controlled with leaf macerations.
  • • Heated leaves were often used for arthritic joins and for ringworm.16

    XERONINE: THE SECRET OF NONI?

    One informed professional on the subject of noni is Dr. Ralph Heinicke, a biochemist who has researched the active compounds of noni fruit for a number of years. He discovered that the Hawaiin noni fruit contains an alkaloid precursor to a very vital compound called xeronine. Wit hout xeronine, life would cease. In Dr. Heinicke’s view, noni fruit provides a safe and effective way to increase xeronine levels, which exert a crucial influence on cell health and protction. His research suggests that the juice from the M. citrifolia fruit contains what could technically be considered a precursor of xeronine—proxeronine. This compound initiates the release of xeronine in the intestinal tract after it comes in contact with a specific enzyme which is also contained in the fruit .

    Because proteins and enzymes have so many varied roles within cell processes, the normalization of these proteins with noni supplemenation could initiate avery wide variety of body responses and treat many disease condit ions. Proteins are the most important catalysts found in the body. The beauty of obtaining a precursor to xeronine from the noni fruit is that the body naturally decides how much of this precursor to convert to xeronine. Disease, stress, anger, trauma and injury can lower xeronine levels in the body, thus creat ing a xeronine deficit . Supplementing the body with noni fruit is considered an excellent way to safely and naturally raise xeronine levels. It is the research and theories of Dr. Heinicke which have made the juice of the Hawaiin noni fruit a viable medicinal substance. He writes: Xeronine is analkaloid, a substance the body produces in order to activate enzymes so they can function properly. It also energizes and regulates the body. This par-ticular alkaloid has never been found because the body makes it, immediately uses it, and then breaks it down. At no time is there an appreciable, isolable amount in the blood. But xeronine is so basic to the functioning of proteins, we would die without it . Its absence can cause many kinds of illness.17 Because so many diseases result from an enzyme malfunction, Dr. Heinicke believes that using the noni fruit can result in an impressive array of curative applications. Interestingly, he believes that we manufacture proxeronine while we are sleeping. He proposes t hat if we could constantly supply our bodies wit h proxeronine from other sources, our need to sleep would diminish.18

    NONI PROCESSING

    How an herb is processed is crucial to how beneficial it is: this is especially true of noni, with its unique enzymes and alkaloids. Morinda citrifolia should be picked when the fruit is turning from its dark green immature color to its lighter green color, and certainly before it ripens to its white, almost translucent color. Once picked, noni, like aloe, will denature extremely quickly due to its very active enzymes. After harvesting, it should swiftly be flash frozen. This is similar to what is done to fish caught at sea to keep them f esh. This stops it from losing its potency while not damaging any of its constituents. To process noni, freeze-drying is recommended. This removes only the water without damaging any of this miracle plant’s vital enzymes and other phytonutrients like xeronine and proxeronine. This pure high-quality noni fruit juice powder is then encapsu-has a very harsh taste and an extremely foul smell, similar to the fruit it self . Other methods of processing include thermal processing, dehydrat ion and air drying. Thermal processing is generally found in liquids, while the dehydrat ed noni is then milled and encapsulated. Unfortunately both methods utilize high heat (110+°F) , which can deactivate many of the vital compounds that make noni so import ant . Air-drying is effect ive without using damaging heat but has serious quality control problems for commercial production.

    MODERN APPLICATIONS OF NONI

    Overview

    Noni possesses a wide variety of medicinal properties which originat e from its differing plant component s. The fruit and leaves of the shrub exert antibacterial activities. Its roots promote the expulsion of mucus and the shrinkage of swollen membranes making it an ideal therapeutic for Nasal congest ion, lung infect ions, and hemorrhoids. Noni root compounds have also shown natural sedative properties as well as the ability to lower blood pressure.

    Leaf extracts are able to inhibit excessive blood flow or to inhibit the formation of blood clots. Noni is particularly useful for its ability to treat painful joint conditions and to resolve skin inflammations. Many people drink noni fruit extracts in juice form for hypert ension, painful menstruation, arthritis, gastric ulcers, diabetes, and depression. Recent studies suggest that its anticancer activit y should also be considered. Concerning the therapeutic potential of the Hawaiin noni fruit, Dr. Heinicke writes: I have seen the compound found in noni work wonders. When I was still investigating its possibilities, I had a friend who was a medical research scientist administer the proxeronine to a woman who had been comatose for three months. Two hour safter receiving the compound, she sat up in bed and asked where she was. . . . Noni is probably the best source of proxeronine that we have today.19 Studies and surveys combined support the ability of noni to act as an immunost imulant, inhibit the growth of certain tumors, enhance and normalize cellular function and boost tissue regeneration. It is considered a powerful blood purifier and contributor to overall homeostasis.

    xeronine, which appears to be able to regulate the shape and integrity of cert in proteins that individually contribute to specific cellular activities. Interestingly, this effect seems to occur after ingestion, inferring that the most active compound of noni may not be present in uneaten forms of the fruit or other plant parts. Some practitioners believe that xeronine is best obtained from a noni fruit juice precursor compound. The enzymatic reactions that occur with taking the juice on an empty stomach are what Dr. Heinicke believes set cellular repair intomotion.

    Cancer

    A study conducted in 1994 cited the anticancer activity of Morinda citrifolia against lung cancer. A team of scientists from the University of Hawaii used live laboratory mice to test the medicinal properties of the fruit against Lewis lung carcinomas which were artificially transferred to lung tissue. The mice that were left untreated died in nine to twelve days. However, giving noni juice in consistent daily doses significantly prolonged their life span. Almost half of these mice lived for more than fifty days.20 Research conclusions state that the chemical constituents of the juice acted indirectly by enhancing the ability of the immune system to deal with the invading malig-nancy by boosting macrophage or lymphocyte activit y. Furt her evaluation theorizes that the unique chemical constituents of Morinda citrifolia initiate enhanced T-cell activity, a reaction that may explain noni’s ability to treat a variety of infectious diseases. 21

    In Japan, similar studies on tropical plant extracts found that damnacanthol, a compound found in Morinda citrifolia, is able to inhibit the function of KRAS- NRK cells, which are considered precursors to certain types of malignancies.22 The experiment involved adding noni plant extract to RAS cells and incubating them for a number of days. Observation disclosed that noni was able to significantly inhibit RAS cellular function. Among 500 plant extracts, Morinda citrifolia was determined to contain the most effective compounds against RAS cells. Its damnacanthol content was clinically described in 1993 as “a new inhibit or of RAS function.” 2 3 The xeronine fact or is also involved in that xeronine helps to normalize the way malignant cells behave. While they are still technically cancer cells, they no longer function as cells with unchecked growth. In time, the body’s immune system may be able to eradicate these cells.

    Arthritis

    with arthritic disease. One link to arthritic pain may be the inability to properly or completely digest proteins which can then form crystal-like deposits in the joints. The ability of noni fruit to enhance protein digestion through enhanced enzymatic function may help to eliminate this particular phenomenon. In addition, the alkaloid compounds and plant met abolites of noni may be linked to its apparent anti-inflammatory action. Plant sterols can assist in inhibiting the inflammatory response which causes swelling and pain. In addition, the antioxidant effect of noni may help to decrease free radical damage in joint cells, which can exacerbate discomfort and degeneration.

    Immune System

    The alkaloid and other chemical compounds found in noni have proven themselves to effectively control or kill over six types of infectious bacterial strains including: Escherichia coli, salmonellatyphi (and other types) , shigella paradysenteriae, and staphylo - coccus aureaus.25 In addition, damnacanthol, was able to inhibitt he early antigen stage of the Epstein- Barr virus.

    The bioactive components of the whole plant, combined or in separate portions, have demonst rat - ed the ability to inhibit several different strains of bacteria. Anecdotal reports support this action in that noni seems particularly effective in shortening the duration of certain types of infection. This may explain why noni is commonly used to treat colds and flu. The chemical constituents found in noni and the possibility that they stimulate xeronine production— as well as initiate alkaloid therapy—may explain noni’s reputation for having immuno-stimulatory properties. Alkaloids have been able to boost phagocytosis which is the process in which certain white blood cells called macrophages attack and literally digest infectious organisms. Interestingly, the ant it umoraction of noni has been ascribed to an immune system response which involves stimulating T-cells. tropical regions during World War II learned of the fruit’s ability to boost endurance and stamina. Native cultures in Samoa, Tahiti, Raratonga and Australia used the fruit in cooked and raw forms. M. citrifolia is considered a tonic and is especially recommended for debilitated conditions.

    Antioxidant

    The process of aging bombards the body with free radicals which can cause all kinds of degenerative diseases. The xeronine theory promoted by Dr. Heinicke submit s t hat as our bodies age, we lose our ability to synthesize xeronine. To make matters worse, the presence of many environment altoxins actually blocks the production of xeronine as well. He believes that the proxeronine content of Hawaiin noni fruit juice can help to block these actions, thereby working as an antiaging compound.26 The phytonutrients found in noni assist in promot - ing cell nourishment and prot ect ion from free radicals created by exposure to pollution and other potentially damaging agents. In addition, Morinda citrifolia contains selenium, which is considered one of the best antioxidant compounds available.

    Diabetes

    While scientific studies are lacking in this particular application of noni, Hawaiians used various parts of the plant and its fruit to treat blood sugar disorders. Anecdotal surveys have found t hat noni is current ly recommended for anyone with diabetes.

    Pain Killer

    A 1990 study found that extracts derived from the Morinda citrifolia root have the ability to kill pain in animal experiments.27 Interest ingly, it was during this study that the natural sedative action of the root was also noted. This study involved a French team of scientists who noted a significant central analgesic activity in laboratory mice.28 Dr. Heinicke has stated, “Xeronine also acts as a pain reliever. A man wit h very advanced int est inal cancer was given three months to live. He began taking the proxeronine and lived for a whole year, pain-free.” 29

    Skin Healing Agent

    One of the most prevalent hist rical uses of noni was in poultice form for cuts, wounds, abrasions, burns and bruises. Using its fruit extract for very serious burns has resulted in some extraordinary healing. Because skin is comprised of protein, it immediately responds to the presence of xeronine.

    burn site throught he direct application of a noni poultice is considered quite effective by Dr. Heinicke and his colleagues, who have studied enzymatic therapy. Concerning burns, he has written: I believe that each tissue has cells which contain proteins which have receptor sites for the absorption of xeronine. Certain of these proteins are the inert for ms of enzymes which require absorbed xeronine to become active. This xeronine, by converting the body’s procol- langenase system into a specific protease, quickly and safely removes the dead tissue from burns.30

    Drug Addiction

    The xeronine link to treat ing drug addiction is based on the notion that flooding t he brain with extra xeronine can reverse the neurochemical basis for addiction. This natural alkaloid is thought to normalize brain receptors which subsequent ly results in the cessation of physiological dependence on a certain chemical like nicotine.3 1 The potential of Hawaiin noni as a natural stimulat or for t he production of xeronine may have profound implications in treating various types of addictions.

    Complementary Agents of Noni

  • cat’s claw papaya
  • kava kava
  • pau d’arco
  • bioflavonoids
  • selenium
  • germanium
  • grapeseed extract
  • echinacea
  • proteolytic enzymes
  • aloe vera
  • glucosamine
  • shark
  • cartilage

    PrimaryApplications of Noni

  • abrasions
  • arthritis
  • atherosclerosis
  • bladder infections
  • boils bowel disorders
  • burns cancer
  • chronicfatigue syndrome
  • circulatory weakness
  • colds congest ion
  • cold sores constipation
  • depression diabetes
  • eye inf lammations fever
  • fract ures gastric ulcers
  • gingivit is headaches
  • high blood pressure immune
  • weakness
  • indigestion intestinal parasites
  • kidney disease menstrual



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    Quercetin and Bromelain - for better health.
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 04, 2005 10:28 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Quercetin and Bromelain - for better health.

  • Maintains Tissue Comfort by Regulating Enzymes*
  • Helps Maintain Normal Blood Viscosity*
  • Bromelain May Enhance Quercetin Absorption
  • Benefits

    Down-regulates the Body’s Response to Environmental Challenges Quercetin is a member of the flavonoid family, a diverse group of low molecular-weight compounds found throughout the plant kingdom. Flavonoids exhibit numerous biological activities, many of which are directly beneficial to human health. Quercetin, which belongs to the “flavonol” subgroup, is one of the most versatile and important flavonoids. Quercetin has a broad range of activity, much of which stems from its interaction with calmodulin, a calcium-regulatory protein.1 Calmodulin transports calcium ions across cellular membranes, initiating numerous cellular processes. Quercetin appears to act as a calmodulin antagonist.1 Through this mechanism, quercetin functions at the cell-membrane level with a membrane-stabilizing action.2 Quercetin inhibits calmodulin-dependent enzymes present at cell membranes such as ATPases and phospholipase, thereby influencing membrane permeability.3 Quercetin affects other calmodulin-dependent enzymes that control various cellular functions, including the secretion of histamine from mast cells.4 A number of investigations have corroborated quercetin’s ability to reduce histamine secretion from mast cells in various tissues, and also from basophils.5,6,7,8,9,10

    Quercetin modifies the body’s response to antigenic substances.* Suppression of histamine secretion from mast cells is one of quercetin’s most clinically important effects. Quercetin acts on ATPase at the membranes of histamine-containing granules in mast cells.3 Mast-cell degranulation and subsequent release of histamine into the bloodstream is an integral part of the body’s response to environmental challenges.

    Maintains Tissue Comfort by Regulating Enzymes*

    Quercetin’s enzyme-inhibiting action extends to enzymes such as phospholipase, which catalyzes the release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids stored in cell membranes.4,10 Arachidonic acid serves as the key substrate for substances such as thromboxanes, inflammatory prostaglandins and leukotrienes. In addition, quercetin inhibits the enzymes cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, which catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into its metabolites.4,10,11,12 Reducing levels of these metabolites, as well as histamine levels, is beneficial in maintaining the normal comfort level of body tissues and structures.

    Quercetin has also been shown to limit the function of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.13 Adhesion molecules are involved in physiologic processes that influence tissue comfort.13

    Bromelain is a complex substance derived from the pineapple stem largely composed of proteolytic (protein-digesting) enzymes. Bromelain acts by a variety of mechanisms to help maintain tissues in a normal state of comfort.14,15 Several investigators, including Taussig16 and Ako, et. al.,17 have presented evidence that bromelain is a fibrinolytic agent, i.e., it induces the breakdown of fibrin, a plasma protein that blocks tissue drainage. The generally accepted mechanisms involve direct proteolysis of fibrin by bromelain and activation of plasmin, a serum protease.16 Plasmin acts on fibrinogen (the precursor to fibrin), forming peptides which stimulate PGE1, a prostaglandin that helps maintain tissue comfort.16

    Helps Maintain Health of Blood Vessels by Modifying Oxidation of LDL Cholesterol* — Quercetin’s Antioxidant Action Quercetin is a versatile and effective antioxidant that scavenges a variety of free-radicals such as hydroxyl and lipid peroxy radicals.18 Quercetin also chelates ions of transition metals such as iron, which can initiate formation of oxygen free radicals.18 LDL cholesterol is vulnerable to oxidation by lipid peroxides. Oxidized LDL is absorbed by macrophages and arterial endothelial cells, leading to the formation of “foam cells,” and eventually plaque deposits, in arterial walls. Quercetin has been shown to protect LDL from oxidation, both by lipid peroxides and transition metal ions.19

    Helps Maintain Normal Blood Viscosity*

    Quercetin inhibits blood platelet aggregation (clumping), by potentiating PGI2, an anti-aggregatory prostaglandin, and by raising platelet cyclic AMP levels.20 Human studies have revealed that bromelain also reduces platelet aggregation.21 These properties qualify both quercetin and bromelain as valuable dietary ingredients for maintaining cardiovascular health.*

    Bromelain May Enhance Quercetin Absorption

    In addition to the actions described above that support the effects of quercetin, bromelain may also assist the absorption of quercetin in the G.I. tract. (Quercetin is generally believed to be poorly absorbed, although a recent study by Hollman et. al.,22 which concluded that humans do in fact absorb appreciable amounts of quercetin, contradicts this assumption.) Studies have shown that bromelain enhances absorption of antibiotics, presumably by increasing permeability of the gut wall.23, 24 Given that quercetin is a low molecular-weight compound, it is plausible that simultaneously ingested bromelain likewise enhances quercetin absorption.

  • *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
  • Scientific References

    1. Nishino, H., et. al., “Quercetin interacts with calmodulin, a calcium regulatory protein.” Experientia 1984;40:184-5.
    2. Busse, W.W., Kopp, D.E., Middleton, E., “Flavonoid modulation of human neutrophil function.” J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 1984;73:801-9.
    3. Havsteen, B,. “Flavonoids, a class of natural products of high pharmacological potency.” Biochemical Pharmacology 1983;32(7):1141-48.
    4. Middleton, E., “The Flavonoids.” Trends in Pharmaceutical Sciences 1984;5:335-8.
    5. Otsuka, H. et. al., “Histochemical and functional characteristics of metachromatic cells in the Nasal epithelium in allergic rhinitis: Studies of Nasal scrapings and their dispersed cells.” J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.1995;96:528-36.
    6. Fox, C.C., et. al., “Comparison of human lung and intestinal mast cells.” J. Allergy and Clin. Immunol. 1988;81:89-94.
    7. Pearce, F.L., Befus, A.D., Bienenstock, J., “Mucosal mast cells III. Effect of quercetin and other flavonoids on antigen-induced histamine secretion from rat intestinal mast cells.” J. Allergy and Clin. Immunol. 1984;73:819-23.
    8. Middleton, E. Drzewiecki, G., Krishnarao, D., “Quercetin: an inhibitor of antigen-induced human basophil histamine release.” J. of Immunology 1981;127(2):546-50.
    9. Bennett, J.P., Gomperts, B.D., Wollenweber, E.,“ Inhibitory effects of natural flavonoids on secretion from mast cell and neutrophils.” Arzneim. Forsch/Drug Res. 1981;31(3):433-7.
    10. Middleton, E. Drzewiecki G., “Naturally occurring flavonoids and human basophil histamine release.” Int. Archs Allergy appl. Immun. 1985;77:155-7.
    11. Yoshimoto, T. et. al., “Flavonoids: potent inhibitors of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase.” Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 1983;116(2):612-18.
    12. Della Loggia, R., et. al., “Anti-inflammatory activity of benzopyrones that are inhibitors of cyclo- and lipo-oxygenase.” Pharmacological Research Communications 1988; 20(Supp. V):91-94.
    13. Middleton, E., Suresh, A., “Quercetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of endothelial cell intracellular adhesion molecule-1.” Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol. 1995;107:435-6.
    14. Taussig, S.J., Batkin, S., “Bromelain, the enzyme complex of pineapple (Ananas comosus) and its clinical application.” An Update Journal of Ethnopharmacology 1988;22:191-203.
    15. Lotz-Winter, H., “On the pharmacology of bromelain: An update with special regard to animal studies on dose-dependent effects.” Planta Medica 1990;56:249-53.
    16. Taussig, S.J., “The mechanism of the physiological action of bromelain” Medical Hypothesis 1980;6:99-104.
    17. Ako, H. Cheung, A.H.S., Matsuura, P.K., “Isolation of a fibrinolysis activator from commercial bromelain.” Arch. Int. Pharmacodyn. 1981;284:157-67.
    18. Afanas’ev, I.B. et. al., “Chelating and free radical scavenging mechanisms of inhibitory action of rutin and quercetin in lipid peroxidation.” Biochemical Pharmacology 1989;38(11):1763-69.
    19. De Whalley, C.V., “Flavonoids inhibit the oxidative modification of low density lipoproteins by macrophages.” Biochemical Pharmacology 39(11):1743-50.
    20. Beretz, A. Stierle, A., Anton, R. Cazenave, J., “Role of cyclic AMP in the inhibition of human platelet aggregation by quercetin, a flavonoid that potentiates the effect of prostacyclin.” Biochemical Pharmacology 1981;31(22):3597-600.
    21. Heinicke, R. van der Wal, L. Yokoyama, M., “Effect of bromelain (Ananase®) on human platelet aggregation. ”Experientia 1972;28(7):844.
    22. Hollma, P. et. al., “Absorption of dietary quercetin glycosides and quercetin in healthy ileostomy volunteers.” Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1995;62:1276-82.
    23. Giller, F.B., “The effects of bromelain on levels of penicillin in the cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits.” A., J. Pharm. 1962;134:238-244.
    24. Bodi, T., “The effect of oral bromelain on tissue permeability to antibiotics and pain response to bradykinin; double-blind studies on human subjects.” Clin. Med. 1965;72:61-65



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    Hayfever & Allergies - Herbs To Help You Breathe Easier
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 30, 2005 09:36 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Hayfever & Allergies - Herbs To Help You Breathe Easier

    Hayfever & Allergies By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt Runny nose, watery eyes, itchy skin...oh no, it's that time of year again! Are you one of the 30 million Americans who suffer from hayfever? If so, breath easier and let the herbal world replace your antihistamines and steroids with both preventative and therapeutic remedies.

    Allergies and hayfever are abnormal reactions to everyday substances such as pollen, dust, dander, etc. and involve many different organ systems of the body, primarily the respiratory, liver and adrenal glands. Using herbs to strengthen these systems will give your body a preventative edge over allergic reactions, and will further help decrease the severity of uncomfortable symptoms.

    Licorice is a wonderful ally to the adrenal glands and is probably the most widely studied adrenal herb. Licorice has anti-inflammatory actions similar to the glucocorticoids (which are produced by healthy adrenals) and are involved with resolving allergic reactions. It also preserves the effects of cortisol, and adrenal hormone involved in clearing allergies.

    A second well-known herb used to strengthen the adrenals is Ginseng. Often times, the onset of allergies can be attributed to stress. The adaptogenic properties of Ginseng allow the glands to balance stress and energy while creating an overall resistance to allergic reactions, colds, flus and infections.

    A strong liver is also vital to a healthy balanced body, acting as a protective factor against allergies. Dandelion is one of the most nutritive and strengthening herbs to the liver. It helps clear toxins and stimulates the energy of the liver to work towards the resolution of the allergic reaction. Milk Thistle acts as both a protector and regenerator of the liver. This herb helps repair damaged tissue and support the actions necessary for dealing with allergens and their accompanying symptoms.

    When confronted with the copious secretions commonly experienced by allergy sufferers, Nettles and Eyebright are two of the best herbs to choose to control the "drip". Both work well for short-term relief, but may be taken before the season begins as a means of prevention. For those people who become congested and need a remedy which allows them to breathe while draining occurs, Ma Huang is a good choice. Due to its stimulating nature, use Ma Huang with caution if you have high blood pressure, heart disease, etc. Additional herbs suitable for allergy relief include Red Clover, Elder Flower and Bayberry.

    For a potent synergistic formula, try Allertone. This outstanding product featrues a blend of the well-known Echinacea and Goldenseal, along with Red Clover, Bayberry and Mullein to combat both the discomfort of allergies as well as reduce excess mucous from the Nasal and respiratory tract.

  • These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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    ENDNOTES
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 23, 2005 11:50 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: ENDNOTES

    ENDNOTES


    1 G.A. Cordell and O.E. Araujo, “Capsaicin: Identification, nomenclature, and pharmacotherapy.” Ann. Pharmacother. 27: 1993, 330-336.
    2 A.Y. Leung. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients used in Food. (John Wiley and Sons, New York: 1980.
    3 Cordell, 330-36.
    4 J.J. Jang, D.E. Defor, D.L. Logsdon and J.M. Ward. “A 4-week feeding study of ground red chile (Capsicum annuum) in male mice.” F o o d - C h e m - T o x i c o l . S e p t . 1992 30 (9): 783-7.
    5 John R. Christopher. Capsicum. (Christopher Publications, Springville, Utah: 1980), 27.
    6 Jack Ritchason. The Little Herb Encyclopedia, 3rd ed. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1994), 44.
    7 Christopher, 4.
    8 Juliette Bairacli-Levy. Common Herbs for Natural Health. (Schocken Books, New York: 1974), 41-43.
    9 Charles B. Heiser. Nightshades. (W.H. Freeman, San Francisco: 1969), 18.
    10 Lenden H. Smith, M.D., E.P. Donatelle, M.D., Vaughn Bryant, Ph.D. et al. Basic Natural Nutrition. (Woodland Books, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1984), 157.
    11 J. Jurenitsch et al. “Identification of cultivated taxa of Capsicum: taxonomy, anatomy and composition of pungent principle.” Chemical Abstracts. 91 July 30, 1977: 35677g.
    12 Daniel B. Mowrey. The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1986), 159.
    13 Ibid., 208-09.
    14 Michael T. Murray. The Healing Power of Herbs, 2nd ed. (Prima Publishing, Prima, California: 1995), 71.
    15 J. De Lille and E. Ramirez. “Pharmacodynamic action of the active principles of chile (capsicum annuum L.) Anales Inst. Biol. 1935: 6, 23-37. See also C.C. Toh, T.S. Lee et al. “The pharmacological actions of capsaicin and its analogues.” B r i t i s h Journal of Pharmacology. 1955: 10, 175-182.
    16 N.A. Castle. “Differential inhibition of potassium currents in rat ventricular myocytes by capsaicin.” Cardiovasc-Res. Nov. 1992, 26 (11): 1137-44.
    17 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
    18 Ritchason, 46.
    19 T. Kawada, et al. “Effects of capsaicin on lipid metabolism in rates fed a high fat diet.” Journal of Nutrition. 1986: 116, 1272-78. See also J.P. Wang, et al. “Antiplatelet effect of capsaicin.” Thrombosis Res. 1984: 36, 497-507, and S. Visudhiphan, et al. “The relationship between high fibrinolytic activity and daily capsicum ingestion in Thais.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1982: 35, 1452-58.
    20 K. Sambaiah and N. Satyanarayana. “Hpocholesterolemic effect of red pepper and capsaicin.” Indian Journal of Experimental Biology. 1980: 18, 898-99. See also M.R. Srinivasan, et al. “Influence of red pepper and capsaicin on growth, blood constituents and nitrogen balance in rats.” Nutrition Reports International. 1980: 21 (3): 455-67.
    21 Mowrey, 12.
    22 Ibid.
    23 Toh, 175-182.
    24 Mowrey, 12.
    25 Ibid., 19-20.
    26 Louise Tenney. The Encyclopedia of Natural Remedies. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 42. See also Peter Holmes. The Energetics of Western Herbs. (Artemis Press, Boulder: 1989), 322.
    27 Y. Lee, et al. “Flavonoids and antioxidant activity of fresh pepper (Capsicum annuum) cultivars.” Journal of Food Science. May 1995: 60 (3): 473-76. See also L.R. Howard, et al. “Provitamin A and ascorbic acid content of fresh pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum) and processed jalapenos.” Journal of Food Science. M a r c h , 1994: 59 (2): 362-65.
    28 J.J. Espinosa-Aguirre, et al. “Mutagenic activity of urban air samples and its modulation by chile extracts.” Mutat-Res. Oct. 1993: 303 (2): 55-61.
    29 Ibid.
    30 Howard, 362-65.
    31 Z. Zhang, S.M. Hamilton, et al. “Inhibition of liver microsomal cytochrome P450 activity and metabolism of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine NNK by capsaicin and ellagic acid.” Anticancer-Res. Nov-Dec. 1993: 13 (6A): 2341-46.
    32 C.H. Miller, Z. Zhang, et al. “Effects of capsaicin on liver microsomal metabolism of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine NNK.” Cancer-Lett. Nov. 30, 1993: 75 (1): 45- 52.
    33 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 71.
    34 Cordell, 330-36. See also Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 70-71.
    35 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
    36 C.P.N. Watson, et al. “The post-mastectomy pain syndrome and the effect of topical capsaicin.” Pain. 1989: 38, 177-86. See also C.P.N. Watson and R.J. Evans. “The post-mastectomy pain syndrome and topical capsaicin: A randomized trial.” Pain. 1992: 51, 375-79.
    37 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 73.
    38 Watson, 177-86.
    39 C. Nelson. “Heal the burn: Pepper and lasers in cancer pain therapy.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1994: 86, 1381.
    40 Ibid.
    41 “The capsaicin study group: Effect of treatment with capsaicin on daily activities of patients with painful diabetic neuropathy.” Diabetes Care. 1992: 15, 159-65. See also R. Tanden, et al. “Topical capsaicin in painful diabetic neuropathy. Effect on sensory function.” Diabetes Care. 1992: 15, 8-14, K.M. Basha and F.W. Whitehouse. “Capsaicin: A therapeutic option for painful diabetic neuropathy.” Henry Ford Hospital Medical Journal. 1991: 39, 138-40, and M.A. Pfeifer, et al. “A highly successful and novel model for treatment of chronic painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.” Diabetes Care. 1993: 16, 1103-15.
    42 R. Tanden, et al. “Topical capsaicin in painful diabetic neuropathy: controlled study with long- term follow-up.” Diabetes Care. Jan. 1992: 15 (1): 8-14.
    43 Ibid.
    44 J.E. Bernstein, et al. “Topical capsaicin treatment of chronic post-herpetic neuralgia (shingles) with topical capsaicin. A preliminary study. Journal of American Academy of Dermatologists. 1987: 17, 93-96. See also Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
    45 Sid Kircheimer. The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies. (Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania: 1993), 228.
    46 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 74.
    47 G.M. McCarthy and D.J. McCarty. “Effect of topical capsaicin in therapy of painful osteoarthritis of the hands.” Journal Rheumatol. 1992: 19, 604-07. See also C. L Deal, et al. “Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: A double blind trial.” Clinical Therapy. 1991: 13, 383-95.
    48 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 74.
    49 Kircheimer, 14.
    50 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 74.
    51 Michael T. Murray, N.D. and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D. Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. (Prima Publishing, Rocklin, California: 1991), 419.
    52 J. Y. Kang, et al. “The effect of chile ingestion of gastrointestinal mucosal proliferation and azoxymethane-induced cancer in the rat.” Journal of Gastroenterology- Hepatol. Mar-Apr. 1992: 7 (2): 194-98.
    53 K. G. Yeoh, et al. “Chile protects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury in humans.” Dig-Dis-Sci. Mar. 1995: 40 (3): 580-83.
    54 Ibid.
    55 Ibid.
    56 L. Limlomwongse, et al. “Effect of capsaicin on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow in the rat.” Journal of Nutrition. 1979: 109, 773-
    77. See also T. Kolatat and D. Chungcharcon. “The effect of capsaicin on smooth muscle and blood flow of the stomach and the intestine.” Siriraj Hospital Gazette. 1972: 24, 1405-18, O. Ketusinh, et al. “Influence of capsaicin solution on gastric acidities.” A m e r i c a n Journal of Proceedings. 1966: 17, 511-15, and Mowrey, 48.
    57 Mowrey, 48 and Limlomwongse, 773-77.
    58 M. Horowitz, et al. “The effect of chile on gastrointestinal transit.” Journal of Gastroenterology-Hepatol. Jan-Feb, 1992 7 (1): 52-56.:
    59 Christopher Hobbs. “Cayenne, This Popular Herb is Hot.” Let’s Live. April 1994: 55.
    60 V. Badmaev and M. Majeed. “Weight loss, the Ayurvedic system.” Total Health. Aug, 1995: 17 (4): 32-35.
    61 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 75.
    62 C.N. Ellis, et al. “A double-blind evaluation of topical capsaicin in pruritic psoriasis.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1993: 29 (3): 438-42.
    63 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 75.
    64 S. Marabini, et al. “Beneficial effect of intraNasal applications of capsaicin in patients with vasomotor rhinitis.” Eur Arch-Otorhinolaryngol. 1991: 248 (4): 191-94.
    65 Ibid.
    66 Mowrey, 242.
    67B. Dib. “Effects of intrathecal capsaicin on autonomic and behavioral heat loss responses in the rat. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1987: 28, 65-70.
    68 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
    69 Christopher, 31.
    70 M. Ponce, et al. “ In vitro effect against giardia of 14 plant extracts.” Rev-Invest-Clin. Sept- Oct. 1994: 46 (5): 343-47.
    71 Ibid.
    72 Humbart Santillo. Natural Healing with Herbs. (Hohm Press, Prescott, Arizona: 1993), 100.
    73 Daniel B. Mowrey. “Capsicum ginseng and gotu kola in combination.” The Herbalist premier issue, 1975: 22-28.
    74 Ibid.
    75 Mowrey, The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine, 102.
    76 J. Roquebert, et al. “Study of vasculotropic properties of Capsicum annuum.” Annales Pharmaceutiques Francaises. 1978: 36 (7-8): 361-68.
    77 Rita Elkins. Depression and Natural Medicine. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 161.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Stomach Ulcers
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    Date: June 23, 2005 11:24 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Stomach Ulcers

    Stomach Ulcers

    Ironically, if you suffer from a peptic or duodenal ulcer, the last thing you feel probably feel inclined to take is hot Cayenne Pepper. While it goes against eve rything we’ve ever heard about what aggravates an ulcer, the facts are that most “spicy” foods do just the opposite. Capsicum has the ability to serve as a local anesthetic to ulcerated tissue and can even help to control bleeding. While some individuals may be bothered by eating “peppery” or spicy foods, these foods do not cause the formation of gastric ulcers in normal people. What is particularly interesting is that people suffering from ulcers who would normally avoid Cayenne Pepper, may actually benefit from its therapeutic action. In addition, taking Capsicum may significantly reduce the risk of ever developing a peptic ulcer. A Chinese study published in 1995 stated, “Our data supports the hypothesis that the chile used has a protective effect against peptic ulcer disease.”52 Another 1995 study found that Capsicum can even protect the stomach lining from aspirin induced ulcers.5 3 As most of us are aware, aspirin can cause stomach ulceration in certain individuals if a sensitivity exists or if taken with too little liquid. Researchers concluded after experiments with human volunteers that the capsaicin content of capsicum has a pronounced gastro - protective effect on the mucous membranes of the stomach.5 4 Eighteen healthy volunteers with normal gastrointestinal mucosa took chile and water followed by 600 mg of aspirin and water. The study was conducted over a period of four weeks. Endoscopy results showed that taking 20 gm of chile before the aspirin definitely demonstrated a protective action on the stomach lining.55 In short, Capsicum has the ability to rebuild stomach tissue. Note: The ability of Capsicum to bring blood to regions of tissue at a faster rate boosts the assimilation of foods that are consumed with it.56 Several clinical studies support this phenomenon. It is thought that Capsicum initiates the release of certain substances which increase secretions and facilitate better profusion of blood to the stomach and intestines.57 Capsicum can increases the flow of digestive secretions from the salivary, gastric and intestinal glands. Capsicum and the Gastro-Intestinal Tract In 1992, researchers tested the effect of chile or Capsicum on gastrointestinal emptying. Eight healthy volunteers were evaluated before and after the addition of Capsicum to their meals. The results conclusively demonstrated that the ingestion of Capsicum greatly effects intestinal transit time.58 If food moves faster through from the stomach through the intestines, caloric assimilation and bowel evacuation may be influenced for the better. Capsicum seems to “speed up” various physiological processes. To add transit time to the list of functions Capsicum boosts comes as somewhat of a surprise and additional benefit. Capsicum and Weight Loss Capsicum may be an unheralded weight loss aid that is perfectly safe to use. Studies have suggested that Capsicum can slow fat absorption in the small intestines and actually boost the metabolic rate so the thermogenesis (fat burning) is enhanced.5 9 In many instances excessive weight gain is thought to be a result of a sluggish metabolism. Capsicum has been singled out by herbalists as an herb which may boost the burning of fat.60 Unlike other stimulants, Capsicum does not cause palpitations, hyperactivity or a rise in blood pressure. For this reason, it may be a valuable weight loss supplement that has been generally overlooked.

    Psoriasis

    As mentioned earlier, capsaicin has the ability to inhibit a neurotransmitter called substance P. Interestingly, an excess of substance P has been associated with psoriasis. Michael T. Murray, in his book, The Healing Power of Herbs, points out that this finding led researchers to study the effects of capsaicin ointments on psoriasis .61 Regarding the use of such an ointment for psoriasis, he states: “ . . . In one double-blind study, forty-four patients with symmetrically distributed psoriasis lesions applied topical capsaicin to one side of their body and a placebo to the other side. After 3 to 6 weeks, significantly greater reductions in scaling and redness were observed on the capsaicint reated side. Burning, stinging, itching, and skin redness were noted by nearly half of the patients initially, but these diminished or vanished on continued applications.”62 There is no question that capsaicin based ointments should be employed for psoriasis. Tests have conclusively found that treating psoriasis with capsaicin caused significant improvement in a variety of symptoms as well as the severity of the attack.63

    Rhinitis

    Capsicum has also scientifically proven its value in people suffering from vasomotor rhinitis. By using Capsicum in spray form, researchers found that it was able to significantly reduce Nasal obstruction and secretion.64 It is important to understand that in these particular instances, a Capsicum solution was applied directly to the mucous membranes of the nose. It did initially cause a painful burning and stimulated Nasal secretion. However, in time, after repeated applications, these side effects disappeare d .6 5 Apparently, Capsicum may block the action of peripheral nerve endings which may stimulate Nasal secretion and blockage. More study of Capsicum as a viable treatment for rhinitis has been recommended. Note: One of the many pro p e rties of Capsicum is its ability to b reak up mucous congestion which makes expectoration much easier.66 For this reason, Capsicum is recommended for upper respiratory infections which are characterized by excess mucus.

    Fever and Chills

    While it may seem somewhat contradictory, Capsicum actually l owers the temperature of the body by stimulating the region of the hypothalamus, which cools the body.6 7 “The ingestion of cayenne peppers by cultures native to the tropics appears to help these people deal with high temperature s . ”68 Capsicum also pro- motes perspiration which helps to cool the body off. In tropical areas, local people eat substantial amounts of hot peppers on a daily basis which helps to boost the elimination of sweat and thereby keeps body temperature down. This same mechanism can be used to treat fever and chills. In addition to this action, using Capsicum for any infection that may be causing a fever is also warranted. Capsicum helps to boost immune defenses and fights microorganism invasion.

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    CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPSICUM
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    Date: June 23, 2005 11:20 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPSICUM

    CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPSICUM

    Capsicum is a remarkable whole body stimulant that can boost blood flow, tone the nervous system, relieve indigestion, promote sweating, help to cauterize and heal ulcers, ease persistent pain and fight off infection. One very authoritative work on African plants suggests that Capsicum’s “regular ingestion is highly beneficial in hemorrhoids, varicose veins, anorexia, liver congestion and vascular conditions . . .the indigenous inhabitants of Africa and of the Antilles are remarkably free form all of these conditions as they use Capsicum fruit in their diet.”10 Most of the therapeutic actions of Capsicum are attributed to the alkaloid or glucoside content of the herb.11 The latest scientific studies conducted with Capsicum will be discussed in subsequent sections.

    Herbal Catalyst

    Because Capsicum boosts peripheral circulation and stimulates organ secretion, it expedites the therapeutic delivery and action of other herbs. In other words, the medicinal benefits of these herbs reach infected or inflamed tissue more rapidly due to enhanced blood flow.12 Consider the following statement: “Cayenne will insure the rapid and even distribution of the active principles of the rest of the herbs to critical function - al centers of the body, including those involved in cellular respiration, metabolism, data transmission, and neural-hormonal activation. Cayenne is included in several other blends for this reason. In extremely small quantities it can dramatically increase the efficiency of most other herbs.”13 Many health practitioners believe that the key to healing is CAPSICUM stimulation. Capsicum stimulates eve rything from blood flow to peristaltic action in the stomach, to intestinal transit time. The re m a rkable ability of Capsicum to stimulate organ secretion and even heart action makes it one of the strongest natural stimulants known. Se veral different kinds of herbal blends targeting various body systems will utilize Capsicum to boost the formula’s efficacy.

    Cardiovascular Tonic

    Capsicum is said to be unequaled for its ability to boost circulation and increase heart action. Interestingly, cultures who consume significant amounts of cayenne pepper in their diet have much lower rates of cardiovascular disease.14 Capsicum exerts a variety of desirable actions on the entire card i ovascular system. It has the extraordinary ability to enhance cardiovascular performance while actually lowering blood pressure.15 A quote taken from a card i ovascular publication re a d s , “Capsaicin has also been shown to prolong cardiac action potential in atrial muscle . . .”16 Michael T. Murray, N.D., has stated, “ Cayenne pepper [Capsicum] should be recommended as a food for its beneficial antioxidant and cardiovascular effects.”17 Herbalists have considered Capsicum as a superior “f o o d” for the heart. In fact, in cases where a heart attack is suspected administering capsicum in hot water has been thought to help lessen the severity of the attack. Capsicum can also be placed on or under the tongue in emergencies involving heart attack, stroke or hemorrhaging. 18 Note: Using Capsicum for any heart-related problem, especially a suspected heart attack should never take the place of medical attention or a physician’s care.

    CAPSICUM Blood Cholesterol Reducer

    Various studies have conclusively demonstrated that Capsicum reduces the risk of developing atherosclerosis (hardening of the a rteries) by reducing blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels .19 Additional clinical studies conducted in India found that when cayenne was ingested along with dietary cholesterol, the typical rise in liver and blood serum cholesterol levels was significantly inhibited. In addition, bile acids and free cholesterol were subsequently eliminated from the body through the stool.20 Interestingly, these tests revealed that using Capsicum was actually more effective in reducing cholesterol that capsaicin alone.2 1 Daniel Mowrey, Ph.D., emphatically points out that this is just one of many examples of the superiority of whole botanicals as opposed to their isolated components.22 Note: Using Capsicum in combination with Hawthorn is a particularly good cardiovascular tonic.

    Blood Pressure Equalizer

    While an added bonus of Capsicum’s capability to lower blood serum cholesterol is a decrease in blood pressure, additional evidence strongly suggests that the herb initiates other mechanisms that fight hypertension .23 “Cayenne, according to another study, also reduces the blood pressure in an even more direct manner: a number of years ago, a team of researchers discove red that capsaicin acts in a reflexive manner to reduce systemic blood pressure, a kind of coronary chemoreflex.”24 Adding Garlic to Capsicum creates an even better therapeutic blend for treating hypertension.

    Blood Detoxification CAPSICUM

    “Cayenne is a kind of catalyst in the blood purification process . . . it acts as a diaphoretic, stimulating the excretion of wastes in the swe a t . ”25 Because Capsicum stimulates organ secretion and boosts peripheral blood flow, it would only stand to reason that it would also facilitate the faster removal of toxins from the bloodstream and lymphatic system. You may have already noticed that Capsicum is frequently added to blood-purifying herbal combinations. Circulatory Booster Researchers have found that the simulating action of Capsicum on surface capillaries can help to pre vent cold hands and feet.2 6 For this reason, it may be helpful for Reynaud’s Syndrome. Old remedies using Capsicum have even recommended placing it in socks to warm the feet and to help prevent frostbite. An old folk cure for a chilled body was a steaming hot cup of Capsicum tea. Free Radical Scavenger The rich flavonoid content of Capsicum gives it significant antioxidant capabilities. A recent study conducted in 1995 showed that Capsicum has a higher ascorbic acid content than chiles from the jalapeno or serrano varieties .27 Vitamin C and bioflavonoids can scavenge for dangerous free radicals which cause tissue damage and can predispose organs to degenerative diseases. Free radicals are found everywhere and are created as by-products of metabolic p rocesses including the act of breathing itself. Pollutants can expose the body to free radicals. An interesting study done in Mexico City and published in 1993 found that Capsicum extract was able to modulate the mutagenic activity of urban air samples.28 In other words, these potentially dangerous nitro - a romatic compounds found in polluted air were kept from mutating by red chile extract.29 Chemical breakdowns of Capsicum have also found that CAPSICUM the pepper is high in Provitamin A, which significantly contributes to its healing ability and immune fortification.30 Anti-Carcinogenic Compound Anti-cancer research recently tested Capsicum on laboratory rats and found that it does indeed demonstrate anti-cancer properties by inhibiting certain enzymes which can initiate the mutation of cells.31 What this implies is that taking Capsicum can afford the body some protection against the cellular mutation which occurs in malignant growths. Capsicum actually inhibited the formation of dangerous metabolites under laboratory conditions where they should have normally been activa t e d .3 2 This study implies that Capsicum may have many more sophisticated bio-chemical actions than previously thought.

    An Impressive Pain Killer

    Capsaicin has recently emerged as a remarkably effective pain reliever and has become the subject of recent clinical research . Applying capsaicin in cream or ointment form to painful joints, scar tissue or other painful conditions involving peripheral nerves confuses pain transmitters. In other worlds, capsaicin temporarily disrupts sensory nerve cell biochemistry there by impeding the relay of pain sensations from the skin surface. It does this by inhibiting a neurotransmitter called substance P. This specific compound is thought to be the main mediator of pain impulses from peripheral nerve endings.33 Substance P has also demonstrated its ability to inhibit inflammatory pain generated in arthritic joints in much the same way.34 Today, several over-the-counter topical preparations utilize capsaicin for the pain of arthritic joints. The ability of Capsicum to control severe and unresponsive pain is significant, to say the least. Modern clinical utilization of topical capsaicin may offer signifi-cant relief for a number of painful conditions including: diabetic neuropathy, cluster headaches, post-amputation pain, post-mastectomy pain, shingles and painful scar tissue.35

    POST-SURGICAL PAIN

    In the early spring of 1996, prime time national news show s reported that scientists had found that individuals who had suffered from chronic pain in post-surgical scars (heart bypass, arterial grafts, etc.) were successfully treated with topical preparations containing capsaicin. While this may have been news to many of us, clinical studies had been already published for several years that capsaicin held profound value for various kinds of pain which did not respond to established medical treatments. Typically surgical scars and regions around them can produce persistent pain or can be very sensitive to the touch even when completely healed. This type of pain phenomenon seems to respond well to capsaicin ointments and creams.

    POST-MASTECTOMY PAIN

    When capsaicin preparations were applied following mastectomy or breast reconstruction, pain was significantly relieved. Se veral double blind studies found that using capsaicin creams four times daily for 4 to 6 weeks resulted in much less frequent occurrence of sharp, jabbing pain.3 6 All thirteen patients studied had a 50 percent or greater improve m e n t .3 7 Various unpleasant sensations other than pain also improved with topical applications of capsaicin creams.38

    MOUTH SORES FROM RADIATION OR CHEMOTHERAPY

    A fascinating study conducted at the Yale Pain Management Center discove red that capsaicin could ve ry significantly lessen pain caused by mouth sores which frequently develop after chemotherapy or radiation.39 Apparently delivering the capsaicin in the form of soft candy (taffy) enabled the substance to be retained in the mouth long enough to desensitize the nerve endings causing the pain. Each one of the eleven case studies re p o rted that their pain had decreased and in two patients, it stopped entirely.40

    DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    Diabetic neuropathy is a painful nerve condition which can develop in cases of prolonged diabetes. Several double-blind studies have supported the considerable value of capsaicin creams for relieving the pain associated with this disorder.41 The results of a controlled study using Capsicum for seve re cases of diabetic neuropathy which did not respond to conventional therapy were published in 1992. A cream containing Capsicum was applied to painful areas four time a day and pain was carefully e valuated for 8 weeks at two-week intervals. The results we re impressive, to say the least. In the 22 patients who used the Capsicum the following results we re re c o rded: “Capsaicin tre a tment was more beneficial than vehicle treatment in the overall clinical improvement of pain status, as measured by physician’s global evaluation and by a categorical pain severity scale . . . In a follow-up study, approximately 50 percent of the subjects reported improved pain control or were cured . . .”42 No t e : While there was a burning sensation when the Capsicum c ream was first applied, some subjects found that its magnitude and duration lessened with continued application.43

    SHINGLES

    The FDA has approved capsaicin-based ointments for the treatment of pain that results from diseases like shingles. Again, numerous studies have documented the value of capsaicin for decreasing the miserable nerve-related pain associated with shingles. The general consensus derived from these tests were that approximately 50 p e rcent of people suffering from shingles responded well to capsaicin creams, some even after 10 to 12 months.44

    Note: If blisters accompany a shingles outbreak, it is better to wait until they have healed before using any capsaicin-based ointments or creams.

    RELIEF FOR BURNING FEET

    Frequently an uncomfortable “burning” sensation in the feet will occur in many people, particularly in diabetics. As ironic as it may seem, using capsaicin creams may actually alleviate this burning. “In various studies, diabetics who treated their burning feet with capsaicin got greater improvement and we re able to walk more easily than those not using the cream.”45 In addition, using topical applications of capsaicin as opposed to strong, oral drugs is much more preferable.

    ARTHRITIS PAIN

    Clinical tests have confirmed that topical capsaicin ointments substantially alleviate the miserable pain that characterizes osteoand rheumatoid arthritis.46 These studies revealed that using 0.075 capsaicin cream reduced tenderness and pain.47 Dr. Michael T. Murray writes: “ . . . seventy patients with osteoarthritis and thirty - one with rheumatoid arthritis received capsaicin or placebo for 4 weeks. The patients were instructed to apply 0.025 percent capsaicin cream or its placebo to painful knees four times daily. Significantly more relief of pain was reported by the capsaicin-treated patients than by the placebo patients throughout the study . . .”48 Anyone suffering from osteo or rheumatoid arthritis should evaluate the effectiveness of capsaicin ointments for joint pain. Ester Lipstein-Kresch, M.D., has studied the effectiveness of capsaicin creams for arthritis and has stated: “You need to apply it three or four times a day on the affected area for at least two weeks before you’ll see any improvement. An initial burning sensation at the site is not unusual for the first few days, but this goes away with continued application.”49 Note: Capsaicin is also useful for tennis elbow due to its ability to block the transmission of pain.

    MIGRAINE HEADACHES (CLUSTER TYPE)

    Topical applications of capsaicin ointments intraNasally may also help to relieve the pain of a specific kind of migraine headache called cluster headaches. Cluster headaches are characterized by s e ve re pain which typically radiates around one eye. The term “cluster” refers to the fact that these headaches tend to occur in clusters of one to three per day and can recur at intervals. Headache pain and severity we re reducing in groups using intraNasal capsaicin.5 0 This type of capsaicin treatment should be done under a physician’s care. There is some speculation that capsaicin may be more effective in pre venting migraines before they develop into a full blown attack.51

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    Bromelain Sinus Ease - Nature's Life
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    Date: June 16, 2005 10:57 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Bromelain Sinus Ease - Nature's Life

    Bromelain Sinus Ease™


     

    Nature's Life Sinus Products:


     

    Sinus cavities are lined with delicate mucous membranes, which act as filters for your respiratory system. Normal sinuse tissues are pink and healthy. For many people, when their sinuses come in contact with allergens, pollutants or harmful micro-organisms, histamines are released as a protective measure by the immune system. Sinuses naturally respond by becoming irritated, red, and inflamed with these healing histamines. This process, called the natural inflammatory response, helps to neutralize and remove the irritants in sinuses cavities. Sometimes, however, the immune system continues to flood the sinuses even after the irritants are removed. Bromelain Sinus Ease™ contains three ingredients that have been shown to enhance the body’s ability to reduce this natural inflammatory response and help clear up sinuses.*

    Bromelain

    Bromelain is a group of protein-digesting enzymes extracted from pineapples (Ananassa sativa). Bromelain breaks down fibrin—a key component of the body’s natural inflammatory response to allergens and other foreign stimuli.* Bromelain also appears to inhibit the natural formation of prostaglandins (hormone-like substances) that trigger the natural inflammatory response.*1  It makes mucus less thick,2  allowing the mucus to drain more easily.*

    Human trials have shown that by breaking down and helping to remove fibrin, bromelain reduces the discomfort of irritated tissues.*3   Double-blinded trials in patients with irritated sinuses show that the natural inflammatory response is reduced more effectively by concentrated bromelain than by placebo.*4 ,5 ,6 ,7  In all cases, a majority of people responded well to bromelain supplements.*

    Bromelain has also helped reduce the dura­tion of the natural inflammatory response after Nasal procedures by over 70% in a controlled trial.*8 

    The recommended daily amount of Nature’s Life Sinus Ease™  utilizes 1,200 mg a very high potency bromelain enzyme which has an activity of 2,880 GDU (Gelatin Digestive Units), or 4,320 MCU (Milk Clotting Units) per serving.

    Vitamin C

    Vitamin C also helps reduce histamine release.*9   Some studies have reported that vitamin C is useful in reducing the natural inflammatory response in Nasal passages.*10, 11, 12   The effectiveness of vitamin C in reducing histamine release is still debated, however, because a controlled trial was unable to show consistent effects.*13  Doses up to 2 grams per day have been used by researchers. It may be diffi­cult to show these effects in research trials because vitamin C appears to help only some people without affecting others.*14  Studies, however, clearly show that vitamin C supplementation can lower elevated blood levels of histamines.*15, 16 Nature’s Life adds naturally-buffered vitamin C to Sinus Ease due to its safety, immune-supporting effects and potential effica­cy to reduce histamine release.*

    Quercetin is a bioflavonoid found in many natural foods including citrus fruits, onions, apples, tea and lettuce. As with bromelain, quercetin helps reduce the natural inflammatory response by inhibiting the natural formation of the pro-inflammatory agents, prostaglandins and leukotrienes (white blood cells).*17,18  Quercetin also helps lessen the natural inflammatory response for children with sensitivities to inhalants.*19  Additionally, quercetin may help reduce the effects of harmful micro-organisms *20  Bioflavonoids at doses of 1,200 mg per day have reduced the natural inflammatory response in human studies in combination with 1,200 mg vitamin C,21 an outcome con­firmed in double-blinded research using 600 mg/day of bioflavonoids and 450 mg/day of vitamin C.*22

    Substances which inhibit the natural inflammatory response rarely target just one part of the body.* While quercetin has yet to be tested in reducing the natural inflammatory response in sinuses specifically, doctors of natural medicine frequently use it for that purpose because of its proven ability to lessen the natural inflammatory response elsewhere in the body.*

    Nature’s Life Sinus Ease™

    Nature’s Life has combined these powerful phytonutrients to make Sinus Ease™. High potency Bromelain, Quercetin and vitamin C work to inhibit the natural pro-inflammatory response and encourage adequate sinus drainage.* No safety concerns have been identified with any of these ingredients.23, 24  It is recommended to take the three capsules per day between meals. Since bromelain is a proteolytic enzyme, if taken with a meal it will act on the protein in the food rather than the natural pro-inflammatory fibrin, so remember to take it between meals.*  Enjoy the winter season and find relief from allergens throughout the year!  Nature’s Life Sinus Ease™ can help.

    References:

    1.   Taussig SJ. The mechanism of the physiological action of bromelain. Med Hypoth 1980;6:99-104.

    2. Martin GJ. Bromelain pineapple proteases with anti-edema activity. Exper Med Surg 1962;20:228-48.

    3. Blonstein JL. Control of swelling in boxing injuries. Prac­titioner 1969;203:206.

    4. Seltzer AP. Adjunctive use of bromelains in sinusitis: a controlled study. EENT Monthly 1967;46:1281-8.

    5. Taub SJ. The use of Ananase in sinusitis—a study of 60 patients. EENT Monthly 1966;45:96-8.

    6. Ryan RE. A double-blind clinical evaluation of bromelains in the treatment of acute sinusitis. Headache 1967;7:13-7.

    7. Taub SJ. The use of bromelains in sinusitis: a double-blind clinical evaluation. EENT Monthly 1967;46:361-5.

    8. Seltzer AP. Minimizing post-operative edema and ecchymoses by the use of an oral enzyme preparation (bromelain). EENT Monthly 1962;41:813-7.

    9. Johnson CS, Martin LJ, Cai X. Antihistamine effect of sup­plemental ascorbic acid and neutrophil chemotaxis. J Am Coll Nutr 1992;11:172-6.

    10. Zuskin E, Lewis AJ, Bouhuys A. Inhibition of histamine-induced airways constriction by ascorbic acid. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1973;51:218.

    11. Ruskin SL. High dose vitamin C in allergy. Am J Dig Dis 1945;12:281.

    12. Holmes HN. Hay fever and vitamin C. Science 1942;96;497.

    13. Fortner BR, Danziger RE, Rabinowitz PS, Nelson HS. The effect of ascorbic acid on cutaneous and Nasal response to histamine  and allergen. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1982;69:484-8.

    14. Bai TR, Martin JG. Effects of indomethacin and ascorbic acid on histamine induced bronchoconstriction in normal  subjects. NZ  Med J 1986;99:163 [abstr].

    15. Holmes H, Alexander W. Hay Fever and Vitamin C. Science 1942;96:497-99.

    16. Johnston CS, Martin LJ, Xi C. Antihistamine Effect of Supplemental Ascorbic Acid and Neutrophil Chemotaxis. J Am Coll Nutr 1992;11:172-6.

    17. Middleton E, Drzewieki G. Naturally occurring flavonoids and human basophil histamine release. Arch Allergy Applied Immunol 1985;77:155-7.

    18. Welton AF, Tobias LD, Fiedler-Nagy C, et al. Effect of flavonoids on arachidonic acid metabolism. Prog Clin BiolRes 1986;213:231-42

    19. Balabokin II, Gordeeva GF, Fuseva ED, et al. Use of vitamins in allergic illnesses in children. Vopr Med Khim (Russia) 1992;38:36-40.

    20. Ohnishi E, Bannai H. Quercetin potentiates TNF-induced antiviral activity. Antiviral Res 1993;22:327-31.

    21. Miller MJ. Injuries to athletes. Med Times 1960;88:313-6.

    22. Cragin RB. The use of bioflavonoids in the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. Med Times 1962;529-32.

    23. Taussig SJ, Yokoyama MM, Chinen N, et al. Bromelain: A proteolytic enzyme and its clinical application. Hiroshima J Med Sci 1975;24:185-193.

    24. Hertog MGL, Feskens EJM, Holman PCH, et al. Dietary flavonoids and cancer risk in the Zutphen elderly study. Nutr Cancer 1994;22:175-84.

     



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