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5 Amazing Neem Face Packs For All Skin Types #ABC Beauty Tips Darrell Miller 4/18/18
This Recommended Me My Grandmother To Remove The Bad Smell From The Armpits!! Darrell Miller 9/17/17
Remedies for managing high blood pressure || Blood pressure Darrell Miller 4/9/17
What Are A List Of Detox Foods? Darrell Miller 1/3/13
Neem Health Properties Darrell Miller 12/19/12
An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam - NEEM Darrell Miller 7/27/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
PADMA BASIC: A Tibetan Herbal Formula Darrell Miller 6/21/05



Organix South African Neem Oil (Fragrance Free)
   1.6 oz Liq $10.89 $ 10.89
AUROMERE Ayurvedic Bar Soap Lavender Neem
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AUROMERE Ayurvedic Bar Soap Lavender-Neem
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AUROMERE Ayurvedic Bar Soap Vanilla Neem
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AUROMERE Ayurvedic Bar Soap Vanilla-Neem
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AUROMERE Ayurvedic Neem Balm
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AUROMERE AYURVEDIC NEEM PICKS
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AUROMERE Ayurvedic Soap Tulsi-Neem
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Organix South Butter To Go Neem
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Organix South Butter To Go Neem
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Organix South Chest Rub with Neem
   3.77 oz $17.79 $ 15.99
Allvia Chest Rub with Organic Neem
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AUSTIN ROSE, INC (Mia Rose) Doggie Sudz - Lavender and Neem
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AUSTIN ROSE, INC (Mia Rose) Doggie Sudz - Mango and Neem
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Organix South Kids Neem Toothpaste Tropical Blast (Tropical)
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Organix South MA - Tester - Neem Fade Cream
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Organix South Nail Polish Remover with Neem
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DESERT ESSENCE Natural Neem Toothpaste Cinnamint
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Woodland Publishing Neem
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ARK NATURALS Neem Bug Free Shampoo
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Organix South Neem Cream
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Organix South Neem Cream
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NEEMAURA NATURALS Neem Hand & Body Lotion with Aloe Vera
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Organix South Neem Hand Soap-Lavender
   8 oz $13.39 37% OFF $ 8.44
Organix South Neem Hands On Guide
   42pgs Book $5.09 34% OFF $ 3.36
Organix South Neem Leaf & Oil Lotion
   1oz $2.49 $ 2.49
STARWEST BOTANICALS NEEM LEAF C S
   1LB $14.67 31% OFF $ 10.12
NEEMAURA NATURALS Neem Leaf Capsules (Organic)
   60 caps $12.95 34% OFF $ 8.55
NEEMAURA NATURALS Neem Leaf Extract 'Regular Strength' Organic
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Organix South Neem Lip Butter To Go
   0.25 oz $5.99 23% OFF $ 4.61
Organix South Neem Liquid Soap Gentle Therape
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Organix South Neem Liquid Soap Soothing Therape
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Organix South Neem Mouthwash-Mint Travel Size
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Organix South Neem Nail And Cuticle Display
   16 ea $255.20 34% OFF $ 168.43
Organix South Neem Oil Lemongrass & Lavender (Lemongrass)
   1 oz L-Oil $13.69 $ 12.99
Organix South Neem Oil Peppermint & Rosemary (Rosemary & Peppermint)
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NEEM AURA NATURALS Neem Salve Stick
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5 Amazing Neem Face Packs For All Skin Types #ABC Beauty Tips
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Date: April 18, 2018 01:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Amazing Neem Face Packs For All Skin Types #ABC Beauty Tips





Neem offers a plethora of benefits for the skin. It doesn't matter the skin type, Neem can make a considerable difference. Mixing Neem with a few different ingredients, like basil leaves, mint leaves, and honey, can alleviate many skin concerns that men and women experience, like acne, dry skin, and aging skin. Making a Neem face mask is a simple task that leads to great results and making your own is something that you should do right away.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8qldC0c6xY&rel=0

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5581)


This Recommended Me My Grandmother To Remove The Bad Smell From The Armpits!!
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Date: September 17, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: This Recommended Me My Grandmother To Remove The Bad Smell From The Armpits!!





The video begins with an explanation of how everyone has armpit odor in some degree, especially after activity. It states that though products can be used to eliminate armpit odor, natural remedies can be used. It follows with recipes for these remedies. The first is a mixture of a tablespoon each of baking soda and lemon. Put it on the armpits and let stand for one minutes. Do this daily for 2 weeks. Option 2 is to mix equal parts of baking soda and cornstarch and apply occasionally to dry pits. Option 3 is to boil Neem leaves and apply during a shower for antibacterial qualities. If these options still don't work, one should go see a specialist.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpagVNXdYJ8&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Bad armpit smells are a scorn in the lives of many people. Follow the advice of one grandmother who understands how to remove odors.
  • The odor can be blocked, even using all natural ingredients in house. That has helped people manage the symptoms associated with bad odors.
  • Take pride in smelling good, especially while at work or at school. That should help people handle some of the stress that they encounter too.

"There are no excuses to continue suffering from bad smell."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5257)


Remedies for managing high blood pressure || Blood pressure
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Date: April 09, 2017 11:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Remedies for managing high blood pressure || Blood pressure





Men and women both can experience high blood pressure, and when they do, it brings big trouble your way. High blood pressure is a condition that can greatly impeded on your life, but it doesn't have to be this way. You will find an array of remedies that help alleviate high blood pressure, and using one or more of them is a good idea when you need help managing this condition. It doesn't get any better than these awesome high blood pressure remedies.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLzuwbe-0Pg&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • There are simple home remedies for high blood pressure. One remedy is to take onion juice mixed with honey in the morning on an empty stomach.
  • Raw onions and cloves of garlic are also effective because both help lower cholesterol.
  • Amla powder, fenugreek seeds, 4 Basil leaves together with 4 Neem leaves are also recommended for naturally lowering blood pressure.

"You can forget the medicine and start looking at a natural cure for your high blood pressure."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4384)


What Are A List Of Detox Foods?
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Date: January 03, 2013 12:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are A List Of Detox Foods?

A quick search online will undoubtedly result in you managing to come across a list of detox foods that various experts claim will help you to just cleanse your body of various toxins in an entirely natural way. There are clearly a number of health benefits associated with doing this, but prior to starting you do need to have a firm understanding as to which foods or herbs are the best and indeed some of these will now be discussed below.

Eating practices

First on the list is fruit in general and you should look at eating several pieces every single day in order to really get the benefit from them. The reason why they are so good is due to the amount of liquid that is contained within them and this helps the body to flush out those toxins and when you combine this with the number of vitamins, fiber, antioxidants and nutrients, then you get a powerful food that can do you a lot of good.

Greens:

Another food group that deserves to be on a list are your greens and the reason why the likes of spinach, kale, and chard are so good is thanks to the amount of chlorophyll that is contained within them. Chlorophyll is great as it boosts your digestive system, but more than that it has been shown to help your liver to detox itself and this is key since the liver plays a central role in your system due to it filtering waste and toxins and processing them correctly. You will also find that chlorophyll helps your body to clear out various environmental toxins that we breathe in on a daily basis and this alone can really improve your body.

One type of food that deserves to be mentioned on its own is garlic and you should certainly look at eating more of it on a regular basis due to the positive effects it has on your body. It is so important because it entices your liver into producing more of the correct enzymes that will lead to your body being able to detoxify itself and in particular to help remove those toxins from the digestive system, so do add it to your recipes as much as you can and you will certainly benefit from doing so. 

Raw Vegetables:

Other types of foods that you may wish to consider include some raw vegetables and you may wish to juice them and have them that way rather than simply eating them. The main ones to look at include:

  • onion
  • carrots
  • cabbage
  • beet
  • asparagus
  • kale

As with other things listed above they work by helping your liver to deal with the various toxins in your system. These vegetables are also good because of their naturally high levels of things such as glutathione and sulphur, so consider just eating them as nature intended to really benefit from doing so.

Finally, you should also consider using more herbs if you wish to detox and there are several that should play a key role due to their various properties. Two that you will have heard of are ginger and turmeric and they will tackle your immune system and your digestion process and by balancing them out it helps your body when it comes to getting rid of the toxins.

Others that should be included are gymnena due to it being good for your blood sugar levels, Neem due to it helping to purify your blood, guduchi as it will cleanse your liver, and mangistha as this will boost your lymphatic system and since this is linked to your immune system you are going to need to have both working perfectly if you want your body to cleanse itself.

What has been attempted here is to point you in the direction of certain types of foods that can help you to detox rather than simply listing one after the other. You are advised to try to include as many as possible when going through the detox process and by doing so you will feel the benefit that comes from removing those toxins from your system and enjoy the increase in health and energy that comes with it.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2799)


Neem Health Properties
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Date: December 19, 2012 02:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Neem Health Properties

Neem

Neem is a large tree of the mahogany family Meliaceae and is native to both semi-tropical and tropical regions of Asia. The tree is tall and evergreen with a height ranging from 15 to 20 m. It is effective for treating various ailments to an extent of being referred to as Muarubaini within East Africa, meaning ‘a tree of the forty'; due to its capability of treating 40 diseases. Every part of the Neem tree is endowed with a capacity to fight infections.

Here are some health benefits of Neem.

It has powerful antibacterial and antiviral properties which make it a first choice in several households, medicinal, cosmetic and agricultural products.

  • - The active compounds that exist in its finished products and extracts are useful in preparing the traditional and modern medicines.
  • - It is very beneficial to individuals that suffer from different skin conditions such as acne and skin ulcers.
  • - Its astringent properties help in the promotion of wound healing in gashes, minor cuts and bruises.
  • - A combination of Neem oil application and carrier oil treats some hair-related problems such as itchy scalp.
  • - Toothpastes plus other products for dental care have Neem as one of the ingredients due to its antiseptic properties that keep the gums and teeth healthy.
  • - Neem can strengthen the resistance that a person has toward diseases by boosting the immune system.
  • - It is used in the preparation of medicines for treatment of different diseases like diabetes and arthritis
  • - The herb causes inhibition of the growth of the free radicals which could result in some types of cancer developing within the body.
  • - The Neem herb gets incorporated within items such as disinfectants.
  • - Several products intended for skin care like cosmetics contain Neem. It is also very popular in virtually all aromatherapy products which help in the restoration of mental health.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2754)


An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam - NEEM
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Date: July 27, 2005 04:23 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam - Neem

Keen on Neem

An old Indian remedy gives your teeth a new gleam.

The search for clean teeth, healthy gums and fresh breath is not just a modern obsession, but an age-old fixation. Dental historians believe that ancient cavity rates ranged from 1% among Eskimos, with their highly carnivorous diet, to 80% among members of Egypt’s royalty, who feasted on dainties that included many high-carb delights. So it’s no surprise that most ancient cultures had their favorite oral hygiene therapies.

In Indian, the tooth scrubber of popular choice was twigs taken from the Neem tree. Small wonder: This tropical evergreen’s therapeutic versatility sports and impressive 4,000-year-old track record, earning it the nickname of “village pharmacy.” Indians who went abroad carried Neem with them, and they put the entire tree-bark, fruit, leaf, root, seed-to health-enhancing use. One famous Indian emigrant, Mahatma Gandhi, was a keen Neem enthusiast; after returning to his native land, Gandhi held prayer meetings under a Neem tree.

Today, Neem’s beautiful branches grace a vast swath of the Southern Hemisphere, including Australia (which may become the biggest Neem-producing nation over the coming decades), Fiji, sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America and the Caribbean. This remarkable plant’s Sanskrit name, arista, says it all-“perfect, complete and imperishable.”

Keeping Teeth Intact

Your dentist is actually the second one to drill your pearly whites. The first drillers are the germs that reside in your mouth-or, to be more accurate, the acids these wee beasties produce. Their handiwork: dental caries, or just plain cavities. These bacteria are also responsible for gum disease, which can lead to tooth loss if unchecked. What’s even worse, low-level inflammation caused by disordered gums may create the kind of blood-vessel havoc associated with heart problems.

Neem extracts act against a variety of detrimental microbes, which may explain its time-tested success in helping to keep teeth whole. Scientists at India’s Zydus Research Centre found that individuals who used a Neem dental gel twice a day for six weeks enjoyed significant reductions in both plaque-the gummy, bacteria-harboring stuff that accumulates on teeth-and gum disease (International Dental Journal 8/04).

Neem’s fame is spreading among Northern Hemisphere consumers. It is becoming an herbally aware toothpaste ingredient valued for the fresh feeling its cool astringency imparts to the mouth. Neem is also a prized component of other health and beauty products, such as bath powders, lotions, shampoos and soaps.

Ayurvedic Superstar

In India, Neem is a vital weapon in the arsenal of Ayurveda, that country’s system of traditional medicine. Practitioners there mash the leaves into a paste to alleviate chickenpox and warts, and brew them into tea to break malaria’s feverish grip. The leaves also make a soothing soak for fungus-infected feet.

Indian scientists are also hard at work studying Neem. They’ve distilled the substances that account for Neem’s ability to fight bacteria, fungi and parasites (including the pests that infest pets). Researchers have explored Neem’s other traditional usages; in one study, a bark extract was able to ease ulcers (Life Sciences 10/29/04). What’s more, Neem is esteemed for its contributions to Indian agriculture; the seedcake makes a nutritious feed supplement and bees that feed on Neem are free of wax moths.

If you value keeping your teeth in gleaming condition, consider Neem.
-Linda James



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=714)


REFERENCES
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Date: June 25, 2005 08:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: REFERENCES

REFERENCES

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PADMA BASIC: A Tibetan Herbal Formula
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Date: June 21, 2005 05:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PADMA BASIC: A Tibetan Herbal Formula

PADMA BASIC: A Tibetan Herbal Formula

By Isaac Eliaz, M.D.

"As an integrated system of health care, Tibetan medicine can offer allopathic medicine a different perspective on health. However, like other scientific systems, it must be understood in its own terms, as well as in the context of objective investigation. In practice it can also offer Western people another approach to achieving happiness through health and balance." --His Holiness the Dalai Lama, May 16, 1997

In this article I want to discuss a Tibetan-based herbal formula that reflects the philosophy outlined by H.H. the Dalai Lama. PADMA BASIC® is an extensively researched formulation that bridges the gap between Classical Tibetan Medicine and the modern Western medical paradigm. With over 50 published scientific papers spanning the last 30 years, PADMA's popularity among Western medical professionals can be attributed to its history of safe use and its health-enhancing properties. The original formula, used for centuries as a cardiovascular tonic and to counteract "heat" (inflammatory processes or infections), made its way to Europe by the first half of the 20th century. Acceptance of an ancient Tibetan formula into the Western medical tradition requires sensitivity to both the original Tibetan intention, and the rigorous requirements of the international pharmaceutical community. Today PADMA BASIC is produced in accordance with strict manufacturing guidelines. The herbs are grown organically, or meticulously tested to ensure they are not contaminated. Ingredients are verified using thin layer or high pressure liquid chromatography. While the highest "scientific Western methods" are used, traditional Tibetan "scientific methods" of smelling and tasting are also followed.

PADMA BASIC can be understood from two viewpoints. In Classical Tibetan Medicine, good health means maintaining a dynamic equilibrium of universal elemental forces. Illness is a manifestation of imbalance. Therapeutic intervention aims at restoring balance by treating the cause, not just the symptoms. Within this traditional model, PADMA has three functions:

  • * Padma is a cooling formula.
  • * Padma enhances the movement of wind.
  • * Padma vitalizes blood (a result of moving wind). To the Western medical practitioner, untrained in Classical Tibetan Medicine, these concepts provide little practical guidance. However, we can examine such energetic terms in relation to "Western Physiology."
  • * Cooling effect: Our body systems reflect our Western lifestyle, which tends to "excess heat" caused by running too fast without a break; eating on the run, not sleeping enough, etc. The result is inflammation, the hallmark of imbalances involving our cardiovascular and immune systems, cell health, and much more. Since inflammation causes oxidative stress, such a formula has profound antioxidant value.
  • * Enhancing wind: This concept relates to flow in the body. When substances heat up they get sticky and do not move harmoniously. In Western medicine this translates to issues such as hyperviscosity or blood thickness, and circulatory imbalances.

  • * Vitalizing blood: As the system cools and flows harmoniously, circulation improves, influencing multiple systems from memory to cardiovascular health to immunity. Following the Western medical paradigm, extensive clinical research demonstrates that PADMA supports circulation, cardiovascular health and immunity, moderates inflammation, and has antioxidant effects. From a pharmaceutical point of view, its compounds can be classified into functional groups, including tannins (anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, cleansing), polyphenols/flavonoids (immune and circulatory support, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative), and essential oils (digestive support, cleansing, anti-inflammatory, immuno-stimulating). Research shows that the circulatory and cardiovascular benefits of PADMA BASIC are partly due to its antioxidants. These compounds promote arterial health and normal blood flow, which, in turn, supports oxygen supply to the heart, extremities, and all living systems. They also protect blood lipids from oxidation, shown in controlled studies to contribute to detrimental vascular effects. While specific nutrients are beneficial, the synergy created by combining ingredients far exceeds their individual effects. It is the unique integration quoted by H.H. the Dalai Lama that is responsible for such benefits. As we move forward to understand and research ancient formulas, it is my belief and clinical experience that we need to respect and preserve their origin and traditional indications.

    PADMA BASIC

    Ingredients: Iceland moss (Cetraria islandica), Costus root, Neem fruit (Azadirachtaindica), Cardamom fruit, Red Saunders heart wood (Pterocarpus santalinus), chebulic myrobalan fruit (Terminalia chebula), Allspice fruit, bael tree fruit (Aegle marmelos), Calcium Sulfate, Columbine aerial part (Aquilegia vulgaris), English Plantain aerial part, Licorice root, Knotweed aerial part (Polygonum aviculare), Golden cinquefoil aerial part (Potentilla aurea), Clove flower, Spiked ginger lily rhizome (Hedychium spicatum), Valerian root, Lettuce leaf (Lactuca sativa), Calendula flower, Natural Camphor (Cinnammum camphora).

    Dr. Isaac Eliaz is a medical doctor and licensed acupuncturist with extensive training in complementary modalities. For 15 years, his practice has centered on the integrative treatment of cancer. He has been involved in numerous studies investigating the effects of nutritional supplements on cancer and has been granted two patents.



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