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Bone Broth Diet Plan Benefits & How to Follow It Darrell Miller 4/26/19
Trace minerals from deep in the ocean found to increase blood flowand reduce inflammation in the brain Darrell Miller 4/17/19
Here are some of the best vegan-friendly protein sources Darrell Miller 1/27/19
Paleo Diet Plan, Best Paleo Foods + Paleo Diet Recipes Darrell Miller 12/6/17
How A Common Nutrient Is Improving Gut Health Darrell Miller 8/15/17
Wisconsin's war on butter is an attack on fundamental personal freedom Darrell Miller 3/29/17
On Health: Do carbs make you fat? Darrell Miller 3/13/17
How to grow garlic from a single clove Darrell Miller 2/24/17
How nutritious are plant-based milks? Darrell Miller 12/3/16
You Can Repair the Adrenal Glands with the Right Diet Darrell Miller 11/9/16
Myrrh oil health benefits Darrell Miller 2/21/14
Castor oil Darrell Miller 12/29/13
Flaxseed oil benefits Darrell Miller 7/9/12
What Are herbs For Hypoglycemia? Darrell Miller 12/21/11
What Is The HerbThyme Good For? Darrell Miller 12/16/11
Can Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Cholesterol And Triglycerides? Darrell Miller 12/5/11
How Does Prickly Pear Leaf Help with Blood Sugar Control? Darrell Miller 8/2/11
Bad Cholesterol, High Blood Sugar ? - Try Prickly Pear! Darrell Miller 3/29/11
Royal Jelly As An Anti-Aging Supplement Darrell Miller 2/27/10
Pleurisy Root Darrell Miller 9/24/09
Pumpkin Seed Oil Darrell Miller 9/15/09
Horsetail Darrell Miller 8/31/09
Caraway Herb Darrell Miller 8/25/09
Birch Darrell Miller 8/21/09
Nopal Prickly Pear And Your Health Darrell Miller 8/18/09
Marshmallow Root Herb Darrell Miller 8/12/09
Royal Jelly Darrell Miller 6/23/09
Passion Flower Darrell Miller 3/26/09
Inositol And Choline Darrell Miller 12/11/08
Fennel Darrell Miller 6/30/08
Detox your Body with Wasabi Rhizome Darrell Miller 1/29/08
Mushrooms are good for the Immune System Darrell Miller 1/26/07
Wasabi Rhizome Cleanse - Supports Phase II Liver Detoxification - Wasabi Health Benefits Darrell Miller 8/1/06
Curcumin - Turmeric Extract Darrell Miller 8/19/05
MORE RESEARCH ON FEVERFEW and EXERCISE MAY PREVENT DIABETES Darrell Miller 7/14/05
History Darrell Miller 6/24/05
Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion Darrell Miller 6/21/05
Centering Your Heart Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Stevia, Xylitol Sugar alternatives ... Darrell Miller 6/9/05



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Bone Broth Diet Plan Benefits & How to Follow It
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Date: April 26, 2019 05:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bone Broth Diet Plan Benefits & How to Follow It





The bone broth diet is something that has become increasingly popular. The diet was developed by Dr. Kellyann Petrucci and was detailed in her diet book on the same subject. The bone broth diet itself is used intermittently with the paleo diet, as an emphasis on consuming whole foods and low amounts of sugar and carbohydrates is necessary for its success. In order to follow the diet a user would consume only the paleo diet for five days and then fast on the other two days of the week.

Key Takeaways:

  • The bone broth diet consists of cycling between fasting and eating whole foods paired with bone broth for a period of 21 days.
  • Benefits of the bone broth diet include weight loss, healthy skin, improved joint function, and improved gut health.
  • The bone broth diet may not be for everyone, so it is recommended to test out the diet in a 7-day period before beginning the diet.

"Proponents of the plan claim that the bone broth diet results in quick weight loss, better skin, improved gut health and decreased inflammation. Let’s take a look at a few of the potential ways that the diet can enhance overall health."

Read more: https://draxe.com/bone-broth-diet-plan-benefits/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6201)


Trace minerals from deep in the ocean found to increase blood flowand reduce inflammation in the brain
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Date: April 17, 2019 01:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Trace minerals from deep in the ocean found to increase blood flowand reduce inflammation in the brain





Those who follow paleobiology have a deep belief that life started within the ocean itself. Right now, those who are highly active in physical activity typically rely on supplemental beverages that include a large amount of essential vitamins and minerals, but they often include a lot of preservatives as well. Fortunately, a recent study showed that athletes are able to thrive and preform just as well when ingesting discovery of deep ocean minerals (DOMs) through natural avenues.

Key Takeaways:

  • 70 minerals, sourced from the oceanic depths, were the recent focus of a multinational study.
  • These specific 70 minerals, purports the study, may increase brain blood flow and hemoglobin post-exercise.
  • Although athletes routinely ingest energy-boosting post-workout drinks, many are highly processed and replete with artificial ingredients.

"From this idea, scientists hypothesized that ingesting the minerals from deep ocean water may replenish incomplete molecular complexities and increase our physical capacity against energy-consuming and physically taxing challenges."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-02-11-trace-minerals-from-ocean-increase-blood-flow-reduce-inflammation.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6136)


Here are some of the best vegan-friendly protein sources
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Date: January 27, 2019 04:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Here are some of the best vegan-friendly protein sources





Vegan diets are something that is really in fashion right now. Years ago, very few people were following vegan diets. People did not pay much attention to it but now, due to social media and marketing, these diets are getting more and more hype. As a result, you should try to make sure you are getting all the nutrients you need when on this diet. It is only natural for there to be some kind of nutrient deficiency when on this sort of meal plan.

Key Takeaways:

  • There are many benefits that come from going and trying out a vegan diet for a period of time.
  • There is a reason as to why most people who try to be vegans do not last very long at all.
  • When you are on these kinds of diets, you need to make up for a deficiency in some nutrients in other ways.

"Following a vegetarian or (the stricter) vegan lifestyle is rewarding, but it also comes with some challenges. Foregoing meat means you lose out on a major source of protein, but the list below includes other Paleo meat-free sources of this crucial nutrient."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-12-08-best-vegan-friendly-protein-sources.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5990)


Paleo Diet Plan, Best Paleo Foods + Paleo Diet Recipes
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Date: December 06, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Paleo Diet Plan, Best Paleo Foods + Paleo Diet Recipes





Our diets have changed a lot over the past few decades. Foods have come and gone and overall, we have gotten worse at eating. Processed foods are a lot more common now. Fruits and veggies are actually less common than processed foods. It is also impossible to go down the road a few miles and not spot a fast food chain that has sprung up in the area. The Paleo diet is a rejection of this fast food lifestyle.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Paleo diet- a diet of consuming only foods similar to the diets of our hunter-gatherer ancestors- has become popular for being associated with weight loss, reducing satiety, and other benefits.
  • However, the Paleo diet may also have downsides, as no definitive data has been found that it improves our health. Paleo diet also may restrict intake of healthy macronutrients.
  • Take care with starting a paleo plan. Not all paleo-friendly foods are healthy. Best advice is to talk to doctor if experiencing negative effects.

"The Paleo diet has been associated with many health benefits from better blood sugar levels to reduced inflammation. Considered one of the best diet plans for weight loss because it’s high in protein and fat and emphasizes nutrient-rich foods, it may also increase satiety and help correct nutrient deficiencies. Still, the diet has remained the subject of much controversy in recent years."

Read more: https://draxe.com/paleo-diet-plan/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5427)


How A Common Nutrient Is Improving Gut Health
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Date: August 15, 2017 07:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How A Common Nutrient Is Improving Gut Health





There is a common nutrient that improves gut health. A recent study was released that has shown a strong correlation between tryptophan and gut health. If there is inflammation in the body, then there is a higher risk of for disease and weight gain. Because of this, diets such as the paleo diet and the anti grain diet have emerged. There has been an increase in diets that are attempting to repair the gut and make it healthy.

Read more: How A Common Nutrient Is Improving Gut Health

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5126)


Wisconsin's war on butter is an attack on fundamental personal freedom
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Date: March 29, 2017 09:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Wisconsin's war on butter is an attack on fundamental personal freedom





Kerrygold butter got pull from all stores in Wisconsin not because of any safety issues, but simply because the state wants domestic products to have an advantage over foreign products. Kerrygold has grown in popularity since people have been shifting over to healthy fat diets such as paleo and keto. A popular drink that has emerged from this is known as Bulletproof, which requires grass-fed butter. People of Wisconsin are outraged that the state has banned this brand of butter and feel that it attacks their freedom as consumers.

Read more: Wisconsin's war on butter is an attack on fundamental personal freedom

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4312)


On Health: Do carbs make you fat?
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Date: March 13, 2017 01:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: On Health: Do carbs make you fat?





There is a lot of info out there about dieting and nutrition. People think they know about carbs because a lot of info has been put out there. Some of it is true but some isn't. This gives you the truth about carbs and whether or not you'll get fat if you consume them.

Key Takeaways:

  • With some people advocating for high carbohydrate diets and others swearing by Atkins, you may be confused about the mixed signals surrounding carbohydrates.
  • Contrary to popular belief, carbohydrates does not cause diabetes or obesity. Instead, sedentary lifestyles and genetic factors play roles in these conditions.
  • Read on to learn more about the real truth about carbohydrates.

"With some people advocating for high carb diets while others swear by the Atkins, gluten-free, or Paleo diets, you may have been receiving mixed signals about carbohydrates."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.mapleridgenews.com/lifestyles/415812794.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmE1ZjVlMDc0YzcwMWFjZWI6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEwa4TPQ7nhbnIHN-sW6qIAUEVVIw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4136)


How to grow garlic from a single clove
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Date: February 24, 2017 11:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to grow garlic from a single clove





There is a way to grow garlic from a single clove. Garlic has been used for various purposes since ancient times. It was once described as being a cure for many different medical conditions. Over the years, science has actually backed up many of his claims. It can help to lower your cholesterol and also lower your blood pressure.

Key Takeaways:

  • While garlic is one of the world’s most potent foods, the Chinese bulbs are covered with harmful chemicals to prevent sprouting, kill insects and whiten the bulbs for a more appealing look.
  • While there are many garlic varieties to choose from, Natural Living Ideas recommends starting with Elephant garlic, which produces a mild-flavored bulb that even kids can stomach. On the other hand, if you live in a colder climate, hard neck types are the way to go.
  • When the leaves appear withered and Pale, it’s time to harvest the bulbs. Loosen the soil, gently pull them out with a digging fork, wash them with water, and let them dry in the sun.

"While the optimal planting time to produce beautiful, large bulbs is fall, just after the first frost has passed, cloves can also be planted in late winter or early spring."



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/2017-02-19-how-to-grow-garlic-from-a-single-clove.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4010)


How nutritious are plant-based milks?
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Date: December 03, 2016 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How nutritious are plant-based milks?





When deciding what type of milk to consume, it is best to read labels. While cow’s milk is fairly standard in the amount of nutrients it contains, plant-based milks can vary greatly depending on which company manufactures it. Unless there is a medical reason to do otherwise, it is recommended that all people consume cow’s milk. Soy, almond, coconut, and other nut milks can be lacking in their nutrients. Soy and nut milks contain a fair amount of protein, but none of the alternatives naturally contain calcium. It can be added, but these usually are not digested as well.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vegans and others may prefer to drink plant-based milks over milk that comes from animals, but a recent study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition confirmed that young children should drink cow’s milk.
  • An eight-ounce glass of cow’s milk naturally contains about eight grams of protein and almost a third of the recommended percent daily value of calcium.
  • Nutritionally, plant-based milks noted Pale in comparison to cow's milk; none contain more than a gram of protein unless fortified.

"An eight-ounce glass of cow’s milk naturally contains about eight grams of protein and almost a third of the recommended percent daily value of calcium. Cow’s milk also naturally contains nutrients like potassium and vitamin B12, and is usually fortified with vitamins A and D."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.myajc.com/news/lifestyles/food-cooking/how-nutritious-are-plant-based-milks/ns83K/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjY3NzEzYzg1MjE0ZjUwYzU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFCC1HIvy4Tvv37PC3ave07tBwlUw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3559)


You Can Repair the Adrenal Glands with the Right Diet
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Date: November 09, 2016 01:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: You Can Repair the Adrenal Glands with the Right Diet

Bored with trips to the doctor or naturopath and the costs involved as you attempt to restore the functionality of your adrenal glands? If yes, then embrace an adrenal-supportive diet plan. Apart from reducing the costs you incur to treat adrenal fatigue; you will enjoy several other benefits that come with eating right. Basically you will have to take nutritious whole foods, eat at the right time, and avoid foods that you have intolerances to. Apart from the above, you will have to reduce stressing your mind and body, eliminate toxins and embrace positive thinking at all times. The details below will give you a proper guide towards your recovery.


The Adrenal Fatigue Diet

Since the problem is already here, you have to start by removing toxins and hard-to-digest foods from your diet (embrace a Paleo or Primal diet). This means you have to eliminate legumes, grains, vegetable oils, caffeine, microwaved and processed foods, and refined sugar.

After that, take foods that help replenish the energy of your adrenal glands. They include avocado, olives, Cruciferous vegetables, coconut, Fatty fish, turkey and chicken, seeds (like flax, chia and pumpkin), seaweed and kelp, Himalayan or Celtic sea salt, nuts (like almonds and walnuts), and food fats. These foods have low sugar levels, they are nutrient-dense, and contain healthy fiber and fat.


Taking the Required Adrenal Fatigue Recovery Supplements

Remember that if these supplements are taken in their whole-food form, the symptoms of your adrenal insufficiency could greatly be improved. The supplements to take include Holy basil, Vitamin B5, fish oil (DHA/EPA), Ashwagandha, Magnesium, Vitamin C, Zinc, Vitamin D3 and Vitamin B12. Where your adrenal fatigue is severe, get an experienced doctor to prescribe the correct levels of Pregnenolone, DHEA, Progesterone, B6, Licorice Extract, and L-tyrosine

Once you follow the above and embrace good lifestyle changes to promote your recovery you will now have a solution to the full recovery of your adrenal glands. Good lifestyle in this case, means you sleep regularly or about 8-10 hours a night, exercise, rest whenever you feel tired, reduce relational and work stress, laugh and have time to relax. Also, always ensure that you are eating regularly. You can now live a happy and fulfilling life with your adrenal glands working perfectly.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3411)


Myrrh oil health benefits
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Date: February 21, 2014 05:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Myrrh oil health benefits

Know what Myrrh essential oil is

myrrh resinAs you have probably read somewhere else, Myrrh oil is an aromatic resin that comes from trees belonging to the genus commiphora. It has a unique sweet and smoky aroma. Myrrha, hirabol myrrh and bola are other alternative names that people use frequently when referring to myrrh oil. Known to contain cadinene, cuminaldehyde, a-pinene, acetic acid, m-cresol, eugenol and formic acid, this Pale yellow oil has been the source of debate due to its many benefits which go back to the time of ancient Egyptians.

Why take myrrh oil?

Modern scientific research has found evidence suggesting that myrrh has a wide range of uses that are beneficial to boost the health condition of an individual. Myrrh is an amazing extract that can be used in aromatherapy to effectively treat colds, coughs, insomnia and sore throat. In the digestive system, the oil is widely used for indigestion and ulcers treatment. Women and young girls find it necessary to increase their menstrual flow using normal remedies but have failed. However, this sap-like oil does not only increase the menstrual flow but it also relieve painful periods and ease difficult labor in childbirth.

For all medical dental infections, the oil is included when mixing a mouthwash. On the skin, it has great success when wiping out bedsores, boils, cracked skin, skin ulcers, athlete's foot and eczema. As a matter of fact, it is sometimes used as an ingredient in many skincare products, creams and lotions.

Myrrh is also purported to treat certain cancers and tumors. The extract from Commiphora trees is highly effective against the gynecologic cancer cells. When used as an anti-oxidant, amazing results are achieved in protecting against lead induced hepatotoxicity.

When can you start taking myrrh resin?

It is recommended to take myrrh essential oil three times in a day or as needed. Pregnant and nursing women should start using it after consulting a qualified practitioner. It can be used as a dietary supplement for children when they reach the age of six years.

Sources

  1. //www.essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/myrrh.htm
  2. //www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-570-MYRRH.aspx?activeIngredientId=570&activeIngredientName=MYRRH
  3. //altmedicine.about.com/od/aromatherapy/a/Myrrh-Essential-Oil.htm
  4. //www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/267107.php
  5. //www.youngliving.com/en_US/products/essential-oils/singles/myrrh-essential-oil


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3030)


Castor oil
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Date: December 29, 2013 05:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Castor oil

What is Castor Oil

castor oilCastor oil is an inflammatory and anti oxidant oil. A very Pale yellow liquid extracted from castrol seed, with high concentration of unsaturated fatty acid,although with unpleasantand strong taste castor oil is used as medicine.

Benefits of castor oil

Castor oil have been found to help in many day to day problems, they include:

Yeast infection constipation: Castor oil has strong laxative thus very effective when it comes to constipation, you can mix with some juice to take away the bitterness.

Arthritis Natural remedy: Castor oil contains anti- inflammatory properties making it an excellent massage for reliving arthritic joints, nerve inflammation and sole muscles.

Acne: The medicinal content in castor oil makes the skin healthy and minimizes a menstrual disorder castor oil consist of ricinolec acid which is anti-inflammatory, oral consumption of 2 spoonful will reduce menstrual pains and other body pains.

Hair growth: Fatty acids and vitamin E aids in hair growth.

Anti allergic: Castor oil is anti allergic in nature thus helps in allergies related to skin ans naso-pharyngeal.

Increases immunity: Castor oil increases white blood cells thus fights infections.

Labor induction: When castor oil is given to pregnant female who are at full time pregnancy it induces labor by pushing of uterus contraction giving easy child birth.

Chemotherapy drugs: Castor oil acts as medium chemotherapy drug to some cancerous tumors. Castor oil is used to reduce warts, moles and cysts, apply castor oil with a pinch of banking soda and wait for the desired results. Ringworm's known to be the most stubborn fungal infection castor oil has a compound known as undercylenic acid which is known to be effective in treating the fungal infections.

Castor oil thickens eye brows and eye lashes, since castor oil enhances hair growth just apply castor oil in your eye brows and lids everyday.

References:

  • www.stylecraze.com and //castoroil.org

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2941)


Flaxseed oil benefits
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Date: July 09, 2012 08:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Flaxseed oil benefits

Flaxseed oil

Flaxseed oil is extracted from the flax plant which is native to Europe. The flaxseed plant has the botanical name of Linum Usitsissimum and also goes by the name linseed plant. The flax plant is an annual plant which grows to a height of around 1.2 meters. It has glaucous green leaves and normally produces Pale blue flowers with five petals. The seeds from this plant are normally brown in color and are contained in a round capsule, these seeds are the ones normally used to produce flaxseed oil. Flaxseed oil has also very many health benefits associated with it.

Flaxseed oil extraction

Oil has to be first extracted from the flax plant before it can be used. The oil is usually obtained from the flax seed through a certain physical and chemical processes that are usually aimed at increasing its purity.

The normal procedure is usually to mechanically cold press the seeds so as to produce the oil. Solvent extraction usually follows up if the oil required is to have a high level of purity. The oil obtained is normally clear to yellowish color depending on the level of purity.

Components of flaxseed oil

Linseed oil or flaxseed oil is triglyceride in nature like many other types of essential oils. The main components of the oil include: Omega 3 fatty acid this acid is very essential to the body but has to be obtained from external sources since the body cannot make it. Omega 9 or oleic fatty acid, Omega 6 fatty acid or linoleic acid, Vitamin E which acts as an antioxidant for the body system.

The combined effect of these compounds usually provides the body with a lot of health benefits. The health benefits associated with linseed oil have been known for thousands of years and there is documented cases of its use amongst the ancient Romans.

Some of the benefits associated with linseed oil include Cardiovascular well being.

This is one of the most important health benefits associated with the use of this kid of oil. Omega 3 or alpha-linoleic fatty acid is the compound which is attributed to a healthy heart and cardiovascular well being of an individual. This fatty acid acts as a lubricating cushion and hence helps to counteract the stresses the body might undergo. It also has anti inflammatory properties.

It is also important in maintaining the rigidity of cell membranes and also lowers the amount of harmful cholesterol within the body.

Anti-inflammatory

The omega 3 that is contained in flaxseed oil has got anti inflammatory properties that makes it an effective tool against arthritis as it reduces the inflammation of joints.

Reduces risk of cancer

Vitamin E contained within flaxseed oil has got anti-oxidant properties which make sit effective against the occurrence of cancer. Omega 3 has also got anticancer propertiesHealthy skin The compounds that make up flaxseed oil are very effective in the elimination of eczema and acne. Therefore, the use of cosmetic products which have linseed oil incorporated in them can go a long way in ensuring that an individual has a young and beautiful skin.

Increases calcium absorption

Research has shown that linseed oil increases calcium absorption within the body. This is very important for women who are in the post- menopausal period as their bone density normally drops during this period and they require increased calcium intake. Linseed oil has also instrumental in burning calories and also increases the body's metabolic rate. It is therefore recommended that an individual should incorporate this oil into h9is or her diet.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2664)


What Are herbs For Hypoglycemia?
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Date: December 21, 2011 07:38 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are herbs For Hypoglycemia?

Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia)

As people, as human beings we are built for action not for sitting down and be a couch potato all day long. We were created or our body is created with activity in mind and not luxury and laziness. Our body is able to adjust to almost any environment or any change in the environment for that matter if given enough time however the changes that is happening in the world today may be too fast for our body to cope with.

If you notice all these advancements are supposed to make things easier but it seems like it made thing harder and in turn we try to balance, we are obligated to do more work so we try to keep up by exercising a little bit more and by watching our weight and what we eat a little bit more. But in all this time one thing remains the same, our body needs sugar to burn for us to be able to do all those things, even the simplest of brain functions needs sugar or glucose to have it functioning right. Any imbalance between the body’s requirement and the blood sugar supply will cause health problems and one of them is Hypoglycemia.

Hypoglycemia

This is a condition in which the imbalance of the blood glucose levels in the body is pointing more towards on the lower side. Meaning this a condition caused by unusually low sugar levels in the blood. Commonly this is caused by not eating enough as the body requires or maybe too much insulin is taken as why “insulin shock” is a term commonly used for cases of severe hypoglycaemia. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this condition are Paleness and sweatiness of the skin, shakiness, heart palpitations and anxiety as commonly caused by high adrenaline levels in the blood as this is the body’s way of counteracting low blood sugar levels.

Other symptoms include weakness, fatigue, double vision, extreme hunger and headaches and these sets of symptoms are caused by brain function impairment which is caused by low glucose levels in the blood. In fact the brain is the organ that suffers the most when it is not able to get the glucose it needs.

Herbs that can help against Hypoglycemia just to name a few…

Ginseng – this wonder herb which has long been used and has been noted to have been effective in Chinese natural medicine is able to aid in sugar absorption in the body. If taken for longer periods of time the logic behind it is that it will be able to regulate blood sugar levels which will help with symptoms like fatigue.

Holy Basil – will be helpful for people with hypoglycaemia through aiding in the management of stress which has been known to worsen the conditions of hypoglycemic individuals.

Gentian – is a bitter tasting herb that has antiseptic and appetite stimulating properties. Its main function though is to be able to stimulate adrenaline production from the adrenal gland which will help in the regulating blood sugar levels.

Gymnema Sylvestre is an ayruvedic herb that has also been shown to help maintain good blood sugar levels.

Chromium picolinate, although not an herb but a mineral can also help maintain good blood sugar levels.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2548)


What Is The HerbThyme Good For?
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Date: December 16, 2011 02:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is The HerbThyme Good For?

What is Thyme?

Thyme is the common name for the plant known as Thymus vulgaris. This herb has a sharp aroma. Its leaves are small and curled in appearance. Such leaves measure about 3 to 5 millimeters in length and 1 to 3 millimeters in width. The color of the leaves is green to gray on the upper part and Pale green to whitish in the proximal part. This herb is abundantly found in several places in Asia, Europe and Mediterranean countries. And because of influences, nowadays, thyme is also widely cultivated in North America. It grows best in tropical areas with humid soils. It can thrive even in drought and can also grow in mountain areas.

Thyme has many culinary uses as well as health benefits to the human body. During the ancient times, thyme is commonly used as an embalming agent. It is popularly used in Egypt to preserve the mummies of their deceased rulers or pharaohs. In Greece, it was widely employed in temples because of its soothing and relaxing aromatic property. For the Romans, thyme is widely used as a flavoring to their cheese and liquors. It adds an aromatic flavor to the food or beverage, making it more palatable. Other traditions use this herb as incense for the dead to guide the soul of the dead and guarantee its journey into the next life.

In addition, thyme also has an antiseptic property. During wars in the ancient times, this herb is popular as a topical application on wounds. Today, this herb can is also used as a mouthwash for sores and oral wounds.

The active ingredient in thyme is called thymol. An oil extract of thyme consists of about 15 to 60 % thymol. The most promising property of thymol is its antiseptic quality. In fact, thymol is the considered to be the main ingredient of many popular mouthwashes and toothpastes. Before the discovery of many antibiotics, thyme extracts was popularly used as a medication for wounds and certain skin irritations. Also, thyme extracts can also be employed as an anti – fungal agent on conditions such as Athlete’s foot and toenail fungal infections. Commercially, thymol is also used as an ingredient among many hand sanitizers and cleansers which are alcohol – free and all – natural.

Aside from it external use as an antiseptic, thyme extracts can also be made into tea and used as a relief treatment for respiratory problems such as coughs and bronchitis. And because of its antiseptic property, thyme extract made into a tincture has a promising effect to improve inflammations of the throat. This can also be used as gargles about three times per day to improve sores in the oral mucous membranes. It cans show improvement after three to five days of use.

Another health use of thyme is that it can also be used to help in maternal labor and childbirth. Clinical studies have shown that thyme has an oxytocin – like property which can induce uterine contractions during labor. After childbirth, it can also be useful in facilitating a faster delivery of the placenta. Its antiseptic property is also useful in the prevention of maternal infections brought about by childbirth.

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Can Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Cholesterol And Triglycerides?
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Date: December 05, 2011 09:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Cholesterol And Triglycerides?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Cholesterol

Apple cider vinegar is a classification of vinegar which is derived from apple or cider. As you can observe, apple has an acidic taste which makes it possible to be processed into a type of vinegar. Apple cider vinegar is Pale yellow to amber in color. This kind of vinegar may be pasteurized or unpasteurized. Non - processed or unpasteurized form of apple cider vinegar has a semi - solid or firm appearance because of its thickness and cobweb - like make - up. This form of apple cider vinegar is considered to be the “mother of vinegar”.

Apple cider vinegar is yielded by mashing the fruit and squeezing out the juice it contains. Friendly microorganisms such as bacteria and yeasts are usually combined into the extracted juice to allow alcoholic fermentation. These microorganisms are the ones responsible for converting the sugar contained in the apple extracted juice into its alcohol form. Apple cider vinegar undergoes a second fermentation process. The alcohol produced from the first fermentation process is converted into its vinegar form by adding an ample amount of acetic acid – forming bacteria specifically known as Acetobacter. As a result, the juice extract will have a sour taste because of the acetic acid and malic acid it contains after several fermentations.

In the food industry, apple cider vinegar is commonly used as an ingredient of salads, marinades, food preservatives and the like. Aside from its acetic acid content, apple cider vinegar also contains amino acids, vitamins and minerals.

Clinical studies on whether apple cider vinegar can help control the amount of bad cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood have shown significant results. Yes, apple cider vinegar can have promising effects on the regulation of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. However, the studies also revealed that this fruit extract must not serve as a substitute for the medications prescribed by your doctor to regulate blood cholesterol and maintain or improve cardiovascular health. In animal studies, apple cider vinegar has shown positive effects on lowering triglycerides by almost 50 %. However, effects on Low Density Lipoprotein or the so – called “bad cholesterol” are not that efficient.

Needless to say, the American Heart Association stated that a good lifestyle and balanced diet can effectively reduce the amount of bad cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood. Apple cider vinegar will also greatly help in lowering these substances in the blood.

Other studies have also revealed that the acetic acid content in apple cider vinegar stimulates the expression of the genetic material which activates fatty acid oxidation enzymes. As a result of this biological process, there will be a significant lowering or control of body fat accumulation by the liver. This is the reason why apple cider vinegar can also be employed as a weight loss agent.

Apple cider vinegar is all – natural. Therefore, safety is relatively established. However, health experts still suggest that before you start using this product, you have to consult your doctor and discuss your current and past health condition as well as the other medications you are taking. This will reduce the incidence of adverse health reactions and drug to drug interactions.

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How Does Prickly Pear Leaf Help with Blood Sugar Control?
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Date: August 02, 2011 02:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Does Prickly Pear Leaf Help with Blood Sugar Control?

Prickly pear leaf is obtained from a group of cacti known for their positive effect on blood sugar. It is an important source of food and medication for Native Americans since prehistory. It contains unique compounds that display potent antioxidant activity. Studies have shown that its phytochemical content displays potential in the management of blood sugar and the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Also known as noPales in its place of origin, all plant species referred to as prickly pear belong to the genus Opuntia. This genus comprises more than 200 species, but only a few are noted for their culinary uses. In Mexico and most of Latin America, it is consumed as a vegetable in general. The juice extracted from the prickly pear leaf is utilized in different niches of many industries. In food and drug industries, it is highly valued for its alkaloids and polyphenols that exhibit bioactive properties.

Many health problems recorded in the past few decades have been linked to uncontrolled blood sugar levels. Complex carbohydrates present in the human diet are broken down into simple sugars. In particular, glucose refers to the sugar that enters the systemic circulation. Glucose takes on a central role at the cellular level. It fuels the physiological functions of all cells and tissues, including the brain and the heart. That being said, diets high in simple sugars have been tied to elevated blood sugar.

Researchers and medical professionals have noted several factors that lead to metabolic disorders. Genetic abnormalities are something we don’t have control of. On the other hand, lifestyle factors are quite the opposite. It has been reported that sedentary lifestyle and food choices play a major part in the development of illnesses related to glucose metabolism. Experts are convinced that some foods are detrimental to health, but there are sources of nutrition that help maintain healthy glucose levels.

Prickly pear leaf belongs to the group of foods that are good for blood sugar. Glycemic index measures how carbohydrates present in our diet influence blood sugar concentration. Simple sugars are always considered unhealthy forms of carbohydrates in that all of them possess a high glycemic index, which means glucose is released into the bloodstream at a very rapid rate. Foods that are easily digested to simple sugars, such as white bread and sweetened beverages, affect blood sugar in the same manner. Organic compounds that occur naturally in prickly pear leaf have a twofold effect. First, it helps lower the glycemic index of carbohydrates in our diet, and thus promotes a gradual release of glucose into the bloodstream. Second, it improves the hormone activity of insulin and fights its functional decline that results in insulin resistance, a common medical condition that precedes type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Grab some prickly pear leaf and take control of your life.

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Bad Cholesterol, High Blood Sugar ? - Try Prickly Pear!
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Date: March 29, 2011 04:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bad Cholesterol, High Blood Sugar ? - Try Prickly Pear!

Prickly Pear Cactus And Your Health

Prickly pear refers to a large genus of cactuses known for their culinary and medicinal uses. It is also known as nopal, a popular vegetable from the young pad segments with the spines removed that originated from Central America. NoPales are sold fresh in Mexico and neighboring countries and largely derived from the species Opuntia ficus-indica. This edible cactus is rich in fiber and flavonoids, making it not only a healthy source of but also a potent medicinal herb. In recent years it has enjoyed a much-publicized association with the therapeutic treatment of diabetes and high cholesterol. Also, its age-old preparations for indigestion and other digestive problems remain in wide use.

Cleanses the Digestive Tract

Prickly pear has long been used as a digestive and an herbal remedy for illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract. In certain regions of Central America, eating noPales is considered the most viable treatment for indigestion, diarrhea, and constipation simple because it works, not to mention noPales are delicious. Of course it is now common knowledge that its high fiber content is the reason why it aids digestion and allays digestive problems. Furthermore, the phytochemical it contains serves as natural cleansers of the entire alimentary canal.

Lowers Blood Lipid Levels

Bad cholesterol is notoriously named so because of the fact that they are a reliable indicator of cardiovascular diseases, notably atherosclerosis. Recent studies have linked prickly pear, especially Opuntia ficus-indica, to better management of high cholesterol. The exact mechanism of action is still under scrutiny, but it is postulated that it interferes with the conversion of very-low-density lipoproteins into low-density lipoproteins, or bad cholesterol, in the liver. It is also suggested that prickly pear may promote the releases of high-density lipoproteins, or good cholesterol.

Enhances Insulin Sensitivity

Among all the health benefits of prickly pear, its effect on diabetes may well be the best studied. Type 2 diabetes results from a metabolic disorder that impairs the capacity of cells to respond to the hormone insulin. Cells that have become resistance to the physiological effects of insulin significantly contribute to escalating levels of sugar in the blood, which often leads to diabetes. Prickly pear works on the principle of reversing this metabolic disorder by promoting the uptake of glucose.

Neutralizes Free Radicals

Free radicals are by-products of oxygen metabolism that damage cells and tissues, the reason why cells have endogenous antioxidants to fight them off. When there is an imbalance between endogenous antioxidants and free radicals, the body needs help in the form of exogenous antioxidant in our diet to contain the damage free radicals cause.

There have been numerous reports about the antioxidant properties of the herb prickly pear. In fact, Opuntia species contain a diverse variety of polyphenols that are not present in a single plant species. NoPales are particularly rich in betalains and flavonoids, both of which are organic compounds naturally occurring in nature that have been well investigated due to their active antioxidant properties inside the human body.

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Royal Jelly As An Anti-Aging Supplement
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Date: February 27, 2010 11:45 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Royal Jelly As An Anti-Aging Supplement

Royal Jelly in Honey from Premier OneRoyal jelly is considered to be the treasure of the beehive. It has the ability to promote longevity by helping to maintain healthy, beauty, and youth. This natural food is extremely potent and highly nutritional. Royal jelly is an incredibly rich, creamy, oPalescent white liquid. It is produced by the worker bees specifically for the nourishment and cultivation of the queen bee. This fantastic material converts a common honeybee into a queen bee, extending the bee’s lifetime from six weeks to five years. This substance is full of natural hormones and B-vitamins. Additionally, it contains a variety of seventeen amino acids. Eight of these amino acids are essential. Royal jelly is particularly rich in cystine, lysine, and arginine and is also composed of 16.1 percent aspartic acid, which is crucial for proper tissue growth and regeneration.

Gelatin is another component of royal jelly and one of the primary precursors of collagen. It is a potent anti-aging compound that helps to keep the youthful, while supporting the organs, glands, and muscular systems. It contains vital fatty acids, sugars, sterols, phosphorus compounds, and acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is essential in order to properly transmit nerve impulses. It is also important for the proper functioning of the endocrine system. An insufficient amount of acetylcholine often leads to a susceptibility to a variety of nerve disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and multiple sclerosis.Royal Jelly 500mg 30ct from Premier One

Royal jelly has many properties. Among which include: antibacterial, antiviral, antibiotic, tonic, nutritive, and anti-aging. It is very beneficial to the immune, cardiovascular, endocrine, integumentary, nervous, reproductive, cellular, skeletal, hepatic, and respiratory systems.

Although aging is inevitable, the process can be slowed significantly with supplements. Researchers in Argentina have been working to document the ability of royal jelly to both slow down tissue deterioration and even reverse it. For example, the story of Noel Johnson should be noted, as he experienced of rebirth of health at age eighty. In 1964, at age sixty-five he was refused life insurance because of a weak and damaged heart. At this point he was also cautioned to restrict his physical activity in order to prevent death. In 1989, at age ninety, Johnson discussed the book he wrote, The Living Proof… I Have Found the Fountain of Youth, which claims that his use of bee products, along with a solid nutritional program, is responsible for changing his life. Despite the additional exercise and diet changes, Johnson attributes most of his vitality to the bee products he used. He claims that he discovered bee’s gift at age seventy, as the foods restored his manhood, brought him to full vigor and sexual potency, and continue to nourish every cell in his body. Johnson claims to be improving in every way without spending any money on medicine.

Royal jelly has been found to help with many conditions. Some of these include menopause, impotence, infertility, chronic fatigue, skin blemishes, wrinkles, immune system problems, viral and bacterial infections, endocrine disorders, hormonal balance, cardiovascular disease, weight control, inflammation, liver ailments, cancer, arthritis, memory, depression, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, asthma, and mental exhaustion.

In order to obtain the best results when using this, or any bee product, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by royal jelly, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions. Always buy Name brands like Premier One Royal Jelly to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

~video~

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Pleurisy Root
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Date: September 24, 2009 10:50 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pleurisy Root

The pleurisy plant is a perennial herb that has several stems. It can be found growing three feet high, with branches at the top. The leaves are dark green on the upper surface and Pale green on the underside. The flowers are richly colored orange and are found blooming from June through September. This plant is a member of the milkweed family. Monarchs, swallowtails, and other butterflies are especially attracted to the pleurisy plant when it is in flower. The plant prefers open, dry fields. It is often growing in abundance in the southern United States. Similar to other milkweeds, pleurisy root produces pods that reveal rows of silky reeds that drift in the wind in autumn. However, unlike most milkweeds, this species does not produce a milky sap.

This plant is native to North America. It was long used by Indians and pioneers. Often, it was spread onto sores after being powdered and mixed into a paste. Indians of several regions brewed a tea from the leaves to induce vomiting in certain rituals, while settlers and Indians alike made a tea from the root to induce perspiration and expectoration in severe respiratory conditions. Pleurisy was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopeia in the 19th century.

Pleurisy root developed its name because of its use for treating lung conditions. The name comes from the Greek root word pleura, which means “lung membranes.” This name implies that this herb is extremely valuable for treating pleurisy. This is because it relieves chest pain and eases breathing difficulties. Pleurisy was used by Native Americans. Then, they introduced it to the European settlers who were suffering from numerous respiratory problems.

This herb works primarily as an expectorant. Pleurisy helps to expel phlegm from bronchial and nasal passages. The herb is responsible for opening lung capillaries. This aids in the release of mucus, which thins discharge. This process helps to reduce lung congestion and improve breathing.

In addition to its uses for pulmonary problems, pleurisy root is also used as a gentle tonic. This tonic helps with stomach pain that is caused by gas, indigestion, and dysentery.

Additionally, pleurisy root is a powerful diaphoretic. It increases body temperature and opens pores to induce perspiration. It has also been used against poisoning and acute rheumatism. Unfortunately, this is not recommended for children.

The root of the pleurisy plant is used to provide alterative, anodyne, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, expectorant, febrifuge, nervine, mild purgative, and stimulant properties. Primarily, pleurisy is extremely beneficial in treating spasmodic asthma, bronchitis, acute dysentery, emphysema, fevers, indigestion, lung disorders, pleurisy, and pneumonia. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with croup, contagious diseases, flu, gas, kidney problems, measles, and excessive mucus, absent perspiration, poisoning, acute rheumatism, scarlet fever, tuberculosis, and typhus.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by pleurisy, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Pumpkin Seed Oil
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Date: September 15, 2009 11:15 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pumpkin Seed Oil

The word pumpkin comes from the Greek word pepon, which means large melon. This word was adapted by the French to pompon. Then, the British changed to pumpion and the American colonists later changed that to the word that we use today. The origin of pumpkins is not definitely known. However, they are thought to have originated in North America. The oldest evidence of pumpkins dated back to between 7000 and 5500 B.C. in Mexico. The pumpkin is a squash-like fruit that ranges in sizes of less than one pound to over 1,000 pounds.

Because some squash have the same botanical classifications as pumpkins the names are often used interchangeably. Pumpkins generally have stems that are more rigid, pricklier, and squarer than squash stems. Squash stems on the other hand are more often softer, more rounded, and more flared when joined to the fruit. Generally, pumpkins weigh somewhere between nine to eighteen pounds, although the largest species is capable of reaching a weight of over seventy-five pounds. The shape of the pumpkin varies greatly, ranging from oblate through oblong. Even though pumpkins are generally orange or yellow, some are dark green, Pale green, orange-yellow, white, red, and gray. Pumpkins have bright and colorful flowers that have an extremely short life span. Some may only open for as short a time as one day. The color of pumpkins comes from the orange pigments that are abundant in them.

The pumpkin is associated with autumn holidays such as Halloween and Thanksgiving in the United States. Generally, the seeds are thrown away as waste. However, pumpkin seeds and their oil possess great beneficial properties. There are especially for ridding the body of intestinal parasites.

Research has determined that various squash, including pumpkin, have great parasite-fighting capabilities. Although scientists are not exactly sure which compound in pumpkin seeds is responsible for expelling the worms, the seeds are known for their ability to do so quickly and safely. They are even safe for children. Pumpkin seeds work best when a laxative is taken an hour after they are used.

Pumpkin seeds are used to strengthen the prostate gland. They are also great for promoting male hormone function. They have long been used to treat an enlarged prostate. Myosin, which is found in pumpkin seeds, is known for its ability to be essential for muscular contractions.

One can apply the oil of the pumpkin seed to wounds, burns, and chapped skin. This helps to soothe and help heal injured skin. The seeds and oil of the pumpkin plant are used to provide anthelmintic, demulcent, diuretic, nutritive, parasiticide, and mild purgative properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are amino acids, beta-carotene, magnesium, zinc, essential fatty acids, vitamin E, and carotenoids. Primarily, pumpkin is extremely beneficial in treating intestinal problems, parasites, and tapeworm.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with burns, gastric disorders, nausea, prostate problems, roundworms, chapped skin, uterine problems, and wounds. In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on prescription medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by pumpkin, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Horsetail
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Date: August 31, 2009 01:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horsetail

Horsetail has been used for healing in both Chinese and Asian cultures. During times of famine, the Romans ate horsetail shoots, while Native Americans used horsetail as a diuretic for kidney problems, cancer, and dropsy to increase blood circulation. The Hopi tribe in New Mexico mixed horsetail and cornmeal as a mush and in their bread. One of the oldest plants on the earth, horsetail is approximately two hundred million years old. It used to be a giant fernlike plant. However, there are now around twenty species of the original plant living today. These species are small in comparison to the original plant and are usually considered to be a nuisance. The species Equisetum arvense is a small perennial fern plant that is most common in North America.

The horsetail plant is a descendent of huge tree-like plants that thrived 400 million years ago during the Paleozoic era. The plant is a non-flowering weed that can be found throughout parts of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North America. This plant returns each year with hollow stems and shoots that resemble asparagus. As the plant dries, silica crystals, which form in the stems and branches, give the plant the scratching effect that made it historically useful for polishing metal.

Horsetail is believed to aid the immune system and the nervous system because of its silica content. The nerves contain almost the same amount of silica as does the albumin in the blood. The pancreas is especially rich in silica. Silica is found combined with fluorine in the enamel of the teeth. Additionally, hair needs silica to grow, and it is needed as a protection for the skin and cell walls. This herb helps in treating urinary tract problems. It contains silicic acid, which is responsible for helping with circulation of the blood. This herb is also credited with helping coagulate the blood and decreasing blood flow. An externally-applied decoction has the ability to stop bleeding of wounds and help with healing. Horsetail can also be used as a mouthwash for mouth infections. Often found in calcium combinations, horsetail is helpful in building the skeletal system and improving bone structure. The silica that is found in horsetail also helps in healing bones, keeping the arteries clean, and facilitating the absorption of calcium in the body.

This herb is known for its antibiotic properties and its contribution to the overall healing process. Horsetail is also thought to help with bleeding, urinary and prostate disorders, bed-wetting, skin problems, and lung disease. Horsetail also possesses a weak diuretic effect, which is most notably due to the equisetonin and the flavone glycosides.

In short, the entire horsetail herb is used to provide alterative, antilithic, antineoplastic, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, galactogogue, lithotriptic, nephritic, nutritive, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are flavonoids, iodine, iron, manganese, PABA, pantothenic acid, silicon, sodium, and vitamin E. Primarily, this herb is extremely beneficial in treating arthritis, poor circulation, diabetes, glandular problems, weak hair, kidney stones, weak nails, nervousness, osteoporosis, parasites, rheumatism, and urinary problems.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with edema, eyestrain, gas, gout, heart problems, hemorrhage, incontinence, liver disorders, membrane irritations, neuralgia, palsy, skin disorders, tumors, and water retention. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horsetail, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Caraway Herb
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Date: August 25, 2009 12:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Caraway Herb

The caraway plant, also known as Persian cumin, is a biennial plant that is found in the Apiaceae family. This plant is native to Europe and western Asia. The plant is very similar in appearance to a carrot plant, with finely divided, feathery leaves that have thread-like divisions that grow on twenty to thirty centimeter stems. The main flower stem is forty to sixty centimeters tall and has small white or pink flowers that are in the shape of umbels. The caraway fruits, which are erroneously called seeds, are crescent-shaped and about two millimeters in length and have five Pale ridges. The caraway plant prefers warm, sunny locations and a well-drained soil as well.

The fruits of the caraway plant are usually used whole. They have a pungent, anise-like flavor and an aroma that is derived from the essential oils carvone and limonene. These oils are used as a spice in breads, especially rye bread, which is denser due to the yeast killing properties of the essential oil, limonene. Caraway is also used in liquors, casseroles, and other foods, especially in Central European and Northern European cuisine, like sauerkraut. This herb is also used to add flavor to cheeses. A substance made from the seeds is used as a remedy for colic, loss of appetite, digestive disorders, and to dispel worms.

Caraway herbs have been used as a flavoring in foods such as rye bread for thousands of years. It has also been used medicinally by the Romans, Germans, and the English. Generally, it was used to treat flatulence and indigestion. It was also used to relieve colic in babies.

Caraway is very similar to anise. Both of them are recommended for the same purposes. This herb is a powerful antiseptic. It is especially effective in relieving toothaches. When it is applied locally to the skin, it also acts as an anesthetic. This herb can be mixed with other herbs such as mandrake and culver’s root in order to help modify its purgative action. Caraway is also useful in treating stomach problems. Additionally, it helps prevent fermentation in the stomach. It can help to settle stomach after people have taken medication that causes nausea. Caraway also helps to relieve intestinal cramps and colic in babies.

This herb is known to encourage menstruation and the flow of milk in nursing mothers. Caraway also helps to ease uterine cramps.

The root and seed of the caraway plant are used to provide anesthetic, antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, galactagogue, mild purgative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, cobalt, copper, iodine, iron, lead, magnesium, potassium, silicon, vitamin B-complex, and zinc. It is important to consult your local health care professional before taking this, or any supplement in order to obtain the best results. Priamrily, caraway is extremely beneficial in treating loss of appetite, colic, uterine and intestinal cramps, gastric disorders, indigestion, and spasms.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with colds, absent lactation, absent menstruation, upset stomach, and toothaches. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by caraway, feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Birch
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Date: August 21, 2009 12:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Birch

The birch species are generally small to medium-size trees or shrubs. They are mostly found in northern temperate climates. The leaves are simple and may be toothed or pointed. The fruit is a small samara, although the wings may be obscure in some species. The bark of all birches is characteristically marked with long historical lenticels and often separates into thin papery plates. The plant is practically imperishable because of the resinous oil that it contains. Its decided color gives the plant the common names Red, White, Black, Silver, and Yellow to different species. The buds of the tree form early and are full grown by midsummer. The branch is prolonged by the upper bud. The wood of all the species is close-grained and has a satiny texture that is capable of taking a fine polish. The leaves of the different species vary little.

The flowers of the birch plant are monoecious, and open with or before the leaves. They are borne on three-flowered clusters. The staminate aments are pendulous, and clustered or solitary in the axils of the last leaves of the branch of the year. They form in early autumn and remain rigid during the winter. The scales of the staminate aments are broadly ovate, rounded, and yellow or orange in color when mature. Each scale has two bractlets and three sterile flowers. These scales bear two or three fertile flowers. Each flower consists of a bare ovary. The ovary is compresed, two-celled, and grouped with two slender styles. The ovule is solitary. The ripenened pistillate ament bears tiny winged nuts, packed in the protecting curve of each brown and woody scale. These nuts are Pale chestnut brown and compressed. The seed fills the cavity of the nut. All of the birch species are easily grown from seed.

Birch bark tea was used by Native Americans to relieve headaches. Some people also used this tea, which was made from the leaves and bark, for fevers and abdominal cramps.

The properties that birch bark possesses allow it to help to heal burns and wound. It also is able to cleanse the blood. Birch bark also contains a glycoside that decomposes to methyl salicylate. This is a remedy for rheumatism that is used both in Canada and in the United States. A decoction of birch leaves is also recommended for baldness. Additionally, this herb works as a mild sedative for insomnia.

The bark and leaves of the birch plant are used to provide anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic, astringent, blood purifier, diaphoretic, diuretic, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, chlorine, copper, fluoride, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, and vitamins A, C, E, B1, and B2. Primarily, birch is extremely beneficial in dealing with blood impurities, eczema, pain, rheumatism, and urinary problems.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating canker sores, cholera, diarrhea, dysentery, edema, fevers, gout, and bleeding gums. One should consult their health care provider before considering supplementing with any medications. This will insure that a person obtains the best results possible. For more information on the many benefits provided by birch, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with more questions.

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Nopal Prickly Pear And Your Health
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Date: August 18, 2009 12:41 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nopal Prickly Pear And Your Health

Nopal is also referred to as the prickly pear cactus. The broad, thick, succulent leaves of the cactus are used for medicinal purposes. The nopal prickly pear herb is the most commonly found in the southwestern United States.

The nopal prickly pear is a vegetable that is made from the young cladophyll, pad-like, segments of the prickly pear plant. These are carefully peeled to remove the spines. The nopal prickly pear is extremely common in its native Mexico. Although the pads of almost all Opuntia species are edible, farmed noPales are most often of the species Opuntia ficus-indica. Generally, a nopal is sold fresh, bottled, or canned. Less often, it is sold dried. It is used to prepare nopalitos. The nopal has a light, slightly tart flavor, and a crisp, mucilaginous texture. This herb is commonly used in Mexican cuisine dishes include huevos con noPales, which is eggs with nopal; carne con noPales, also known as meat with nopal; or tacos de noPales. NoPales are also an important ingredient in New Mexican cuisine. Currently, the nopal is gaining popularity elsewhere in the United States.

De-thorned nopal stems are used as food in Mexico and among Native Americans. Early settlers used the stems in wound dressing after they had been peeled. The gel that comes from the cactus pads was used to soften the skin. This lessened tension against the wound and alleviated pain. Nopal juice is valued as an anti-inflammatory diuretic. Practitioners of folk medicine recommend this herb fore use against painful urination. The mashed pulp of the cactus was traditionally eaten by the West Coast Indians in order to ease childbirth. Additionally, the pulp was used as a lung remedy and as a cardiac aid.

The nopal prickly pear herb contains a variety of phytochemicals. Among these components are pectin, mucilage, and gums that assist the digestive system. This herb also contains nutrients which inhibit bowel absorption of dietary fat and excess sugars. Nopal is responsible for fortifying the liver and pancreas. This enhances insulin’s ability to move glucose from the blood into the cells, where it is able to produce energy. Research has determined that nopal prickly pear has hypoglycemic benefits as well. This could be extremely helpful for those people suffereing from diabetes. Other studies have determined that nopal lowers serum levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Additionally, it may inhibit cancer growth and prevent cancer development. Laboratory animals that were treated with cactus juice showed an increase immune response regarding tumor growth, Epstein-Barr virus, and suppressed immune function.

The leaves of the nopal plant are used to provide antiasthmatic, astringent, laxative, pectoral, and vemrifuge properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are mucilage, pectin, and phytochemicals. Primarily, nopal is extremely beneficial in dealing with cancer, diabetes, high cholesterol, and immune function. This herb also acts as a great digestive aid.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by nopal prickly pear, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Marshmallow Root Herb
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Date: August 12, 2009 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Marshmallow Root Herb

The marshmallow plant can be found in southern and western Europe, western Asia, and the northeastern region of North America. The plant originally grew in salty soils, but now it thrives in moist, uncultivated ground. The fleshy, upright stems of the marshmallow plant reach a height of three to four feet. The Pale yellow roots are tapered, long, and thick. They have a tough, yet flexible, exterior. The short-stemmed leaves are round, with irregularly toothed margins and three to five lobes. The leaves and stem are covered with a soft and velvety down. The flowers have five reddish-white petals. The whole plant, especially the root, is filled with a mild mucilage.

Since ancient Egyptian times, marshmallow has been used as food and medicine. One of the herbs found in the grave of a Neanderthal man in a cave in Iraq was marshmallow. This herb was used anciently for irritated throats and intestinal tracts. The Europeans used marshmallow for bronchitis, colds, and coughs. This was because of its soothing and healing properties. Native Americans also used marshmallow to treat snakebites and wounds.

This herb is responsible for helping to expel phlegm and relax the bronchial tubes while soothing and healing. The herb aids in healing lung ailments such as asthma and inflammation. The soothing and healing properties that are found in the mucilage in marshmallow make it a valuable herb for many lung ailments. Also, it is useful on sore throats, infections, diarrhea, dysentery, skin irritations, and for coughs. This herb is a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant. This fact makes it good for both the joints and the gastrointestinal tract. Marshmallow is used as a poultice with cayenne, which allows it to help with gangrene, blood poisoning, burns, bruises, and wounds.

Studies have found that the mucilaginous properties of marshmallow yield a soothing effect on the mucous membranes. A study that was done on animals showed some indication of a reduction in blood sugar levels and hypoglycemia activity. This may be beneficial for diabetics.

The root of the marshmallow plant are used to provide alterative, anticatarrhal, anti-inflamamtory, antilithic, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, galactagogue, lithotriptic, mucilant, nutritive, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iodine, iron, pantothenic acid, sodium, and vitamins A and B-complex. Primarily, marshmallow is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, bed-wetting, bleeding, boils, bronchitis, emphysema, kidney problems, lung congestion, nervous disorders, pneumonia, urinary incontinence, urinary problems, uterine problems, whooping cough, and wounds. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with allergies, breast problems, burns, constipation, coughs, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery, sore eyes, gangrene, gastric disorders, glandular problems, inflammation, intestinal problems, kidney stones, absent lactation, liver disorders, irritated membranes, excessive mucus, and skin disorders.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by marshmallow, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Royal Jelly
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Date: June 23, 2009 11:02 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Royal Jelly

Royal jelly is an incredibly rich, creamy, oPalescent, white liquid that is synthesized by the worker bees exclusively for the nourishment and cultivation of the queen bee. It is considered the most precious gift of the hive, as it extends the longevity of a bee’s life from six weeks to five years. is incomparable in its ability to enhance both physical and mental performance. Put in a simple manner, royal jelly promotes longevity by helping to maintain health, beauty, and youth.

It is extremely potent, highly nutritional, and very natural. Royal jelly is extremely difficult for scientists to completely breakdown its components or synthesize its compounds. No matter how Royal Jelly is studied, certain components of the substance still seem to mystify even the most brilliant scientists. Because of this, duplicating what is thought to be the exact chemistry of royal jelly does not duplicate its effects in the human body. This means that only honeybees can make royal jelly.

Royal jelly is rich in proteins and B-complex vitamins, especially pantothenic acid, which is often associated with reversing some of the major effects of aging. Although the chemical makeup of royal jelly may vary slightly according to the location it is found in, the United States Department of Agriculture has analyzed one gram of royal jelly and found in to contain vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, inositol, folic acid, and vitamin C. Royal jelly also contains vital fatty acids, sugars, sterols, phosphorus compounds, and acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is responsible for the proper transmission of nerve impulses and the proper functioning of the endocrine system. A lack of acetylcholine in the body can make us susceptible to a number of nerve disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Multiple Sclerosis.

Royal jelly can be purchased in a pure jelly-like material that must be kept frozen or refrigerated. It is also available in capsules, tablets, soft gels, and in honey chewable. Royal jelly is at its ideal best when it is combined with other natural beehive products and complementary botanicals. Because royal jelly spoils very easy, much research has been done on the ability to preserve this key nutrient. One good way to present and preserve royal jelly is within its natural medium of pure honey. By taking freeze-dried varieties of royal jelly, one can also obtain their supplemental dose. A capsulated, freeze-dried variety is an excellent and convenient way to ingest royal jelly.

It is necessary to purchase quality bee products in order to obtain the potent and pure varieties of any type of bee food or by-product. It should be noted that a relatively small percentage of the population can experience a laxative effect from royal jelly or bee pollen. Additionally, allergic reactions can happen. However, they are quite rare. Some of these allergies are due to poor quality pollen, as it has been gathered from commercially sprayed flowers or improperly cleaned, dried, or stored. Anyway taking bee products should begin slowly, in small amounts to be sure that an allergic reaction will not occur.

Natural bee pollen and royal jelly can be found at VitaNet ®, LLC health food store. Always purchase name brands to ensure that you receive a high quality and pure product.



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Passion Flower
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Date: March 26, 2009 03:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Passion Flower

Passion flower has been long known and appreciated for its nervine abilities. The Aztecs used this herb as a sedative as well as for pain. From 1916 until 1936, it was listed in the National Formulary as a sedative. During the early twentieth century, passionflower was included in many over-the-counter sedative and sleep aids. Today, passionflower is available as an over-the-counter sedative in Germany. It is also used in many German homeopathic medicines to treat pain, insomnia, and nervous restlessness. Professional herbalists use passionflower today in combination with other calming herbs to help treat insomnia, tension, and other health problems that are related to anxiety and nervousness.

Passion flower is a perennial climbing vine that grows to a length of nearly ten meters. Each leaf on the passionflower has petals that vary in color from white to Pale red. It possesses a fruit that is orange-colored, multi-seeded, and egg-shaped. This fruit is edible, containing a sweetish yellow pulp. According to folklore, the passionflower was given its name because it resembles the crown of thorns worn by Jesus during the crucifixion.

Recent research on passion flower has concluded that it is also useful for insomnia, fatigue, spasms, and nervous tension. The majority of the research done on this herb has focused on its sedative action and found good results. Studies have even found that an extract of passionflower can reduce locomotor activity and prolong sleeping. Some additional tests indicate that this herb has pain reliving abilities as well as sedative effects. It also contains anti-inflammatory properties which make it useful for those who are suffering from arthritis.

This plant contains passiflorine, which is thought to be the active ingredient, as its principles are similar to that of morphine. This herb is even occasionally referred to as the nonpoisonous, safe opium of the natural physician. It is extremely soothing to the nervous system. It is a good way to treat hysteria, anxiety, and hyperactivity. This herb possesses the ability to depress the central nervous system and also lower high blood pressure. Herbal combinations that contain valerian and passionflower are considered to be very useful as a natural tranquilizer. Additionally, passionflower contains calcium and magnesium, both of which are essential for the nervous system. This herb has been proven safe for both children and the elderly.

Passion flower remedies are made from either fresh or dried flowers as well as other ground parts of the plant. Whole and raw plant materials are used. The flowering shoots, which grow 10 to 15 centimeters above the ground, are harvested after the first fruits have matured. They are then either air-dried or hay dried. Passion flower is available as an infusion, tea, liquid extract, or tincture. For adults taking an infusion, the recommended amount is 2 to 5 grams of dried herb three times a day.

Fluid extracts should be taken three times a day, using about 10 to 30 drops, while a tincture should also be taken three times a day using 10 to 60 drops. For children, the recommended adult dose should be adjusted to account for the child’s weight. Since most herbal dosages for adults are calculated on a 150 pound adult, a child who weighs 50 lbs should receive an appropriate dose of passionflower of 1/3 of an adult dosage. Generally speaking, passionflower is considered to be safe and nontoxic. Passionflower should not be taken if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Passion flower can be found at your local and internet health food store and available in capsule, tablet, and powder form. When looking to purchase this supplement, stick with name brands such as Solaray and Source Naturals. Name brand companies back their product for any reason and put in pure quality ingredients in each bottle.

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Inositol And Choline
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Date: December 11, 2008 12:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Inositol And Choline

Inositol is a member of the vitamin B complex family, being referred to as vitamin B8, but is not strictly a vitamin because it is biosynthesized in your body. Vitamins are essential substances that are not manufactured by your natural biochemistry, and must be taken in your diet. However, to all intents and purposes it works like a member of the vitamin B family.

The main function of myo-inositol (the commonest isomer of inositol) is in the health of cell membranes, particularly those that comprise the marrow, eyes, intestines and the brain. Without proper regulation of the cell membrane, the cell cannot function effectively. Some of its effects include healthy hair and controlling estrogen levels. It is also believed to help to reduce cholesterol levels in the blood.

A deficiency will result in hair loss, eczema, increased blood cholesterol levels and eye abnormalities. You might also suffer constipation, although this is not as serious a condition as those preceding. It is present at highest levels in the heart and brain, which indicates where it is mostly used, although it also helps the liver to break down fats and enables the nerves and muscles to operate as they should.

Those that are depressed are frequently found to have low inositol levels in their spinal fluid, so it is believed to play a part in that condition. It is known that the substance takes part in the function of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which is known to play a part in depression, and initial signs are that its use in the treatment of depression could be effective. Neurotransmitters are responsible for passing messages across the gap (synapses) between nerve cells, their messages being decoded by the neuroreceptors. A healthy nervous system depends on healthy neurotransmitters.

For these reasons, inositol has also been tried on other conditions of the nervous system. These include bipolar disorder, bulimia, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and attention deficit disorder. So far, results have been inconclusive as to its effectiveness, but it is early days yet and field tests are continuing.

A test carried out in Beersheva, Israel, in 1997, found that treatment with inositol produced significant improvement in the depression of 28 patients after four weeks on the Hamilton Depression Scale1, and 21 patients tested with panic disorder (with and without agoraphobia) showed significant improvements in their condition, including agoraphobia. Results on 13 patients with obsessive compulsive disorder also showed significant improvement. These were all double-blind tests.

However, not all tests have been so conclusive, and a study on 42 people with sever depression who did not respond to conventional antidepressant, also failed to respond when inositol was added to their medication.2 Results are therefore not conclusive.

Four hundred people took part in a double-blind test that indicated a possible improvement in the symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome when treated with inositol 3,4 and another that inositol treatment on patients taking lithium could help reduce the symptoms of psoriasis, a skin condition believed to be caused by a reaction of the immune system and nerves.5

The supplement has also been found to be just as effective as Luvox (fluvoxamine – similar to Prozac) after four weeks treatment. Although these results are good, they are inconclusive, and more data is need before any indisputable conclusions can be drawn. However, treatment with inositol might be worth considering if conventional treatment for these conditions has been unsuccessful.

The most common natural form of inositol is myo-inositol, an isomer of cyclohehexanehexol, a carbocyclic polyol that form the structural basis for secondary messengers in the cells of eukaryotes.

A secondary messenger system is one whereby a signaling molecule is released in response to a signal from a primary messenger such as a neuroreceptor, which then activates certain intracellular proteins known as effector proteins that exert a response from the cell. An example is cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) that is a secondary messenger that activates protein kinases and allows them to phosphorylated proteins.

Eukaryotes are organisms that contain cells composed of complex components contained within a cellular membrane, and that also contain a nucleus. Examples are fungi, plants and all animals. Examples of non eukaryotes include the bacteria family.

It is frequently recommended that inositol is most effective when taken with an equal amount of choline, although this might be due to the fact that when inositol deficiency is detected, choline is also frequently deficient. Both are vitamin B family like, and both are lipotropic, in that they aid the breakdown of fats in the body. It is not clear whether this is true or not, but taking both would certainly not harm you, and might be of great benefit.

Inositol is not essential, because it can be obtained from beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains, cantaloupe, brewer’s yeast, liver and vegetables. Bacteria in the gut also act on the phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate) contained in citrus fruits to form inositol.

However, be careful if you drink a lot of coffee. It destroys inositol, and if you are taking the supplement medicinally, steer clear of coffee during your period of treatment because it will lose its effect. Excessive coffee drinking can also result in a general depletion of inositol from your diet, and hence a deficiency. In such a case you are advised to take a supplement, preferably along with choline that might also be deficient.

Although there have been no adverse side effects reported, no specific longer term safety studies have been carried out on inositol. Because of the way it works, inositol should be avoided by people with liver or kidney disease, and also by expectant or nursing women. It should be avoided by young children until safety tests have been carried out, and it is believed that it can cause manic effects in those suffering bipolar disorder.

Other than for these specific cases, trials with many times the average daily intake of the substance, it currently appears safe to take inositol as a long-term supplement. However, as with all such supplements intended for specific disorders, you should seek the advice of your physician.

References: 1. Levine J: Ministry of Health Mental Health Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev,Beersheva, Israel ur Neuropsychopharmacol, 1997 May, 7:2, 147-55

2. Nemets B, Mishory A, Levine J, et al. Inositol addition does not improve depression in SSRI treatment failures. J Neural Transm. 1999;106:795-798.

3. Gerli S, Mignosa M, Di Renzo GC. Effects of inositol on ovarian function and metabolic factors in women with PCOS: a randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2003;7:151-9.

4. Gerli S, PaPaleo E, Ferrari A, et al. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial: effects of myo-inositol on ovarian function and metabolic factors in women with PCOS. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2007;11:347-354.

5. Allan SJ, Kavanagh GM, Herd RM, et al. The effect of inositol supplements on the psoriasis of patients taking lithium: arandomized, placebo-controlled trial. Br J Dermatol. 2004;150:966-969.

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Fennel
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Date: June 30, 2008 04:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fennel

If there has ever been an overlooked vegetable, it would definitely be fennel. Some people have an aversion to its licorice-like scent, while others feel as if fennel is a bizarre and obscure vegetable that they have no interest in learning how to prepare. However, those who have discovered it know that ignoring fennel is a waste of a versatile vegetable’s amazing flavor and healthful benefits. Even those who already cook with fennel might find that they aren’t taking advantage of its versatility. For example, many people use only the delicate, lacy parts of fennel as a flavor-enhancing garnish for soups or salads. Others stick to just using the green-white bulbs, while tossing the remaining pieces aside. However, there’s no season like now to start using and enjoying all the parts of fennel.

Fennel is available from autumn until early spring and both its stems and bulbs have been found to contain many nutrients. Fennel spice, which is made from the vegetable’s seeds, can be found year round, as it is one of five spices in Chinese five-spice powder. One cup of raw, sliced fennel is a huge source of vitamin C, folic acid, fiber, and potassium. History has shown that fennel can be taken to alleviate bad breath, indigestion, intestinal spasms, cramps, and gas. It is thought that Puritans chewed the seeds in order to tame hunger during fasts. Recently, scientists have found that fennel contains antioxidants which promote good health.

In order to gain these healthful benefits, be sure to purchase white or Pale-green fennel that has clean, firm bulbs. The bulbs should not be split, bruised, or spotted, while the stalks that grow from the bulb should be relatively straight. Additionally, the vegetable’s fronds would be green but not flowering because blooms indicate that the bulb is past maturity. When consumed right away, fennel is at its best. But, it can be kept in the crisper for up to four days. Be sure to wash it before using its base in hors d’oeuvres, salads, and gratins. Also, make sure to reserve its fronds in order to enhance dishes in a potent way. With such versatility in the kitchen, there is absolutely no excuse not to include fennel in your meals this season.

Once you discover that fennel is both crunchy and slightly sweet, you will want to incorporate it into many of your daily meals. Thankfully, fennel can enhance many dishes and make them extraordinary. Here are some quick ideas for using fennel this season. You can thinly shave the desired amount of a fennel bulb and toss it with a bit of olive oil, fresh lemon juice, and a small amount of Parmesan cheese to make a fennel salad at moment’s notice. Another option is sauté sliced fennel with equal parts of onion and bell pepper in order to make a simple vegetarian side dish. One can take advantage of fennel’s ability to enhance flavors by adding fennel with tuna or grilled sea bass. Fennel can also be cut vertically, leaving bulb, stalk, and leaves intact and then brushed with olive oil and grilled until lightly browned. Another idea is to garnish your favorite vegetable soup with coarsely chopped fennel fronds.



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Detox your Body with Wasabi Rhizome
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Date: January 29, 2008 10:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Detox your Body with Wasabi Rhizome

The Wasabi rhizome, the underground fleshy stem of the wasabia japonica plant, is prized not only for its fiery flavour but also its effect in detoxifying the liver. However, make sure that you are getting the real McCoy since many restaurants in the USA do not use the genuine paste.

The wasabi is a plant of the cruciferous family, the same family as cabbage, broccoli, turnip, radish, horseradish and mustard, and is native to Japan and Korea and now grown on the Pacific coast of Canada. It grows best in temperate to cold climates, especially in mountainous areas where there are plenty of cold streams.

Anybody who regularly enjoys sashimi and sushi should be familiar with the wasabi rhizome, that green lump of paste lying on the side of the plate. It is hot and fiery, although not in the same way as the chilli pepper that is fiery on the tongue and in the mouth. This tends to affect the sinuses more, and leaves a sweetish taste once the initial heat has dissipated. However, it is not always what it should be.

The last comment there refers to the practise, especially in the USA, of using dyed common horseradish as wasabi paste, so be careful of that since the two are not equivalent in the health benefits they impart to your body. Although of the same family as the horseradish, and sometimes termed the Japanese horseradish, ordinary horseradish does not have the same health benefits as genuine wasabi, and does not contain the same active ingredients so do not confuse the two.

Real wasabi is normally used grated, and there are specific techniques that should be used to grate wasabi rhizomes to bring out the fullness of the flavour. True grated wasabi should be of a natural Pale greenish color rather than the brighter green normally associated with sushi restaurant wasabi.

Traditionally, wasabi rhizome is used as a condiment with sushi, although their leaves can also be used in salad dressings and or as a delicacy pickled in soy sauce or sake brine. The genuine vegetable is difficult to cultivate which explains why ordinary horseradish is dyed and used in its stead, and the vast majority of non-Japanese do not know the difference because it is likely to be all they have consumed under the name of wasabi. The health benefits of the genuine article, however, are considerable greater.

So that’s what it is, but what does it do? What are the health benefits of wasabi rhizomes and why are they considered to be so good for your liver? Wasabi rhizomes contain substances that are very effective in detoxifying you liver, and that are also very strong antioxidants that provide you with good overall health benefits in their capacity to destroy the free radicals created by the pollution of modern living.

The active antioxidants in the rhizome are precursors of isothiocyanates, which are known as phytochemicals. These are chemicals that can protect or prevent diseases through its antioxidant properties. The term ‘precursor’ means that the isothiocyanates are synthesized by your body from the nutrients contained in the wasabi rhizome. Other examples of phytochemicals that you may have heard of are carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols that also possess antioxidant properties.

Other antioxidants are vitamins A and E, which is why these are used in anti-wrinkle creams, since their anti-oxidant effect helps to prevent the free radicals destroying the skin cells in the dermis and epidermis that leads to the wrinkles associated with aging. Wasabi is equally effective as an antioxidant, although it has other properties that are important to your liver.

The liver is your body’s chemical plant. That is where most of the chemical reactions take place that are essential for life. If your liver is unhealthy you can develop diseases such as hepatitis and cirrhosis, and a healthy liver is essential for life let alone a healthy life. Wasabi helps to detoxify and clean out your liver.

Apart from creating the wide variety of enzymes needed to process your food, and controlling the vast majority of the biochemistry of your body, your liver is also your detoxification plant that coverts toxins into biodegradable molecules that your waste disposal system can evacuate without harm. This occurs in two phases.

Phase I coverts the toxin to a form that your body can further process (the bioactive form), and Phase II breaks it down into a form that your kidneys can handle and eject it in your urine. Isothiocyanates are involved in the production of the enzymes that enable the chemical reactions of Phase II to proceed. They allow your body to cleanse itself of toxins, and without this process you would be less healthy and more prone to cancers and other undesirable conditions and diseases in your body.

It is becoming more important in this modern age with its increasing natural and synthetic pollution that your liver is working at peak efficiency. Your liver is equally as important to you as your heart and brain, and without it you cannot survive. Wasabi also contains glucosinolates that help the isothiocyanates to induce the production of Phase II enzymes, and it is general believed that eating this tuber cab help protect you against stomach, colon and breast cancers as well as help your cardiovascular system and blood clotting.

An interesting fact is how wasabi rhizome came to be traditionally served with raw fish. The isothiocyanates precursors, and the glucosinolates that wasabi also contains, apparently help to destroy the bacteria associated with raw fish, and help prevent disease and illness. It was likely found healthier to include a dollop of this green paste with your sushi than not, and so the use of common horseradish might be somewhat questionable if it has less of an effect.

Make sure, therefore, that your have the real thing, and apart from any specific health considerations associated with eating raw fish, you are best advised to take it as a supplement to help Detox your liver rather than visit sushi bars for your consumption. It will also help your wallet!



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Mushrooms are good for the Immune System
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Date: January 26, 2007 06:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Mushrooms are good for the Immune System

Medicinal Mushrooms Grown on Purple Kculli Corn Yield Life Changing Results

Even though we treat them like vegetables, mushrooms aren’t really plants. They’re fungi and fungi grow much differently than fruits and vegetables. Most food plants, like strawberries, broccoli, and red bell peppers make chlorophyll from sunlight to gain the nutrients they need to grow. Mushrooms don’t make chlorophyll; to get the nutrients they need to grow, mushrooms release enzymes into the forest floor or flora they’re living on to break down the organic matter into a form the mushroom can absorb.

Because most mushrooms that we eat or use today are raised as crops, or cultivated, they are grown on a variety of substrates. Similar to the commercial potting soils you can buy at nurseries and garden stores, mushroom substrates vary widely in quality and the kinds of nutrients within. Mushrooms are really unique in that they can grow on almost anything, such as sawdust, shredded newspaper, and straw.

However, mushrooms are only as nutritious as the substrate they were grown on-even those unique varieties called medicinal mushrooms. While the simple button mushrooms found on pizza are most often eaten for their woodsy taste and texture, the use of medicinal mushrooms is much more complex. These mushrooms are valued because they contain numerous compounds that have been extensively studies by researchers for their ability to activate cells of the immune system.

Researchers have recently discovered that when medicinal mushrooms are grown on a Purple Kculli (pronounced ka-coo-lee) Corn substrate, the resulting mushrooms are jam-packed with powerful and potent disease-fighting compounds. Beautiful Purple Kculli Corn has long been used by the people of the Peruvian Andes as a tasty vegetable, natural food color, and powerful functional food-keeping them healthy and free of disease.

In this issue of Ask the Medicine Hunter, we’re going to talk about four powerful medicinal mushrooms that, when grown on Purple Kculli Corn, have even more potent compounds to prevent and treat cancer and other serious health problems.

Q. How exactly do medicinal mushrooms prevent and treat cancer?

A. Medicinal mushrooms are very complex. They contain numerous compounds that have been extensively studied for their ability to activate cells of the immune system. Some of the most amazing immune boosting compounds in medicinal mushrooms are beta-glucans 1-3, beta glucans 1-6, arabinogalactins, and arabinoxylans – compounds that work “hand-in-hand” with certain cells of the immune system. But to get abundant amounts of these compounds, medicinal mushrooms must be grown on substrates with high levels of nutrients. And the most nutrient dense substrate of all comes from Purple Kculli Corn.

Q. Why is Purple Kculli Corn extract good for growing medicinal mushrooms?

A. You’ve probably heard that brightly colored fruits and vegetables (like beets, broccoli, and blueberries), have more antioxidant power than Paler fruits and vegetables (like iceberg lettuce, onions, and garlic). In fact, the deeper the color, the better. And there is no deeper color in nature than the deep purple of Purple Kculli Corn grown in the lush coastal plains of Peru. The kernels from Purple Kculli Corn are not only naturally beautiful, the pigment itself is extremely healthy and have been used by the people of the Peruvian Andes for centuries as both food and food coloring.

Once harvested, the Purple Kculli Corn is naturally processed into an antioxidant-rich extract. When certain medicinal mushrooms are grown on Purple Kculli Corn extract, the Purple Kculli Corn becomes a super-substrate, producing medicinal mushrooms with incredible amounts of the immune-boosting compounds. And when Purple Kculli Corn extract is added to medicinal mushroom formulas the antioxidant power increases, too.

Q. How do the medicinal mushroom compounds fight disease?

A. When bacteria, viruses, or other pathogens are present in the body, white blood cells, or leukocytes, swing into action. Leukocytes work together to defend the body against infections, like colds or the flu, as well as diseases that start within us, like cancer. These disease fighting cells are the backbone of the body’s defense system. And each type of cell works in different ways.

The macrophage, a name that means “big eater,” is a first-strike leukocyte that protects us from disease by, quit literally, devouring invading pathogens. Natural Killer (NK) cells act like sentries – constantly prowling for cancer cells, killing them quickly when they’re discovered. B-cells are the immune system’s military intelligence, seeking out targets and communicating their coordinates, while T-cells are the foot soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has identified.

Scientists have long known that medicinal mushrooms help make white blood cells more deadly. But until recently, they weren’t sure how. Research has now shown that macrophages and NK cells have receptor sites specifically for beta-glucans 1-3 and beta-glucans 1-6. When the beta-glucans bind to the macrophages and NK cells, they make the lymphocytes stronger and more lethal. By increasing the lymphocytes’ strength, beta-glucans help them churn out more of the specialized chemical messengers, too.

Arabinogalactins and arabinoxylans, powerful polysaccharides found in medicinal mushrooms, are potent stimulators of the immune system. These compounds increase the activity of interleukins, interferons, and a tumor necrosis factor, all key components in a healthy immune system. When medicinal mushroom extracts with high amounts of Arabinogalactins and arabinoxylans are taken, diseases are dramatically reduced.

Researchers found that complex polysaccharides in four varieties of medicinal mushrooms – Agaricus blazei (Agaricus), Grifola frondosa (Maitake), Coriolus versicolor (Coriolus or Turkey Tail), and Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) – are serious cancer fighters. The chart below explains how:

Mushroom Health Benefit

Agaricus (Agaricus Blazei)

Agaricus not only contains the greatest number of medicinal compounds, it also contains a powerful anti-tumor polysaccharide that all other medicinal mushrooms are lacking. Recently, 100 women who were receiving carboplatin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat ovarian cancer, volunteered for an important study. Half of the women were given an extract of Agaricus mushrooms, while the other half were given a placebo or dummy pill. The researchers discovered that NK cell activity was significantly higher in the Agaricus group. The women in this group were also less nauseated, fatigued, and wear than the women taking the placebo, an important consideration for people with cancer.

Maitake (Grifola Frondosa)

Maitake is one of the most researched of all medicinal mushrooms. In one clinical study, the effect of Maitake mushroom compounds were studied in ten patients with cancer who were not currently taking any chemotherapeutic drugs. The researchers found that the Maitake not only significantly stimulated NK cell activity, it also repressed the cancer’s growth, and stopped the tumors’ ability to metastasize, or spread to other parts of the body. And in another clinical study, 165 patients with various types of advanced cancer were given Maitake mushroom compounds alone or with chemotherapy. Cancer regression or significant symptom improvement was observed in 58% of liver cancer patients, 69% of breast cancer patients, and 62% of lung cancer patients. Plus, when Maitake was taken in addition to chemotherapy, the immune cell activities were enhanced 1.2 to 1.4 times, compared with chemotherapy alone.

Coriolus(Coriolus Versicolor)

Versicolor compounds show great promise as cancer immunotherapy agents in all cancer stages. In one clinical trial, 34 patients with advanced terminal lung cancer were given Coriolus versicolor polysaccharides or a placebo (dummy pill) for 28 days. While the group getting the Versicolor felt less fatigued and sick, very important considerations at the end-of-life, there were no changes in the placebo group.

Reishi (Ganoderma Lucidum)

Reishi mushrooms are too tough to eat, but they’ve been used medicinally for centuries and have been extensively researched. In a safety study to determine Reishi’s effect on blood thinning mechanisms, healthy volunteers received 1.5 gm Reishi or placebo daily for 4 weeks. There were no significant changes in either group and all blood clotting measurements remained within the normal range, demonstrating its safety. In a recent clinical study, researchers determined that Reishi increased the number of cancer killing white blood cells and made them more deadly to cancer cells.

Not only do Agaricus, Maitake, Coriolus, and Reishi have incredible amounts of immune boosting polysaccharides, when they are grown on Purple Kculli Corn, they also have a much higher ORAC value than mushrooms grown on other substrates.

Q. What are ORAC values?

A. ORAC, or Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity, is a measurement of the antioxidant power in fruits and vegetables. The higher the power, or ORAC value, the stronger the antioxidant is against free radicals. While free radicals are made by breathing oxygen and digesting food, and are simply the consequences of being alive, the older we get the more free radicals we make. And the more free radicals we make the more destructive they can be. Free radicals will rip membranes, wreck cells, cripple mitochondria, and ruin DNA. As this damage accumulates, even more free radicals are made. And if not stopped or slowed, this might lead to heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, dementia, and cancer.

Q. How does Purple Kculli Corn increase the ORAC value of medicinal mushrooms?

A. All brightly colored fruits and vegetables have very high ORAC values; and the higher the ORAC value – the greater the antioxidant power. Not only can we measure the ORAC values of fruits and vegetables, we can also measure the ORAC values of mushroom substrate extracts. Purple Kculli Corn extract has an ORAC value of 1789 (measured in umolesTE/gram). Now, remember that mushrooms are fungi, not fruits and vegetables, and they gain most of their nutrients from the ground (or substrate) they are grown on. When mushrooms are cultivated or “farmed” on substrates with a high ORAC value, they will absorb compounds from the substrate giving them a higher ORAC value, too. So growing mushrooms on antioxidant rich, high ORAC value, Purple Kculli Corn yields medicinal mushrooms with high ORAC values as well.

Q. Some mushroom supplements have more than four medicinal mushrooms. Wouldn’t a mushroom supplement with seven mushrooms or more have a higher ORAC value than a supplement with only four?

A. Well, more is not always better – especially when it comes to medicinal mushrooms. Some supplements have a “kitchen sink” selection of mushrooms. The makers of these supplements hope that by adding modest amounts of many mushrooms, they will end up with a product that just might have some health benefits.

Clearly, it’s not how many or how exotic the mushrooms are in a medicinal mushroom supplement, it’s the substrate that mushrooms are grown on that makes the difference.

Q. How can I make sure the medicinal mushroom supplement I buy contains natural and organic mushrooms grown on Purple Kculli Corn substrate?

A. Become a label reader! Medicinal mushroom formulas have a statement showing accreditation from a certifying agency, such as the American Food Safety Institute, International; California Organic Farmer Association, Minnesota; or Crop Improvement Association, on the label, and have met certain criteria. They must be grown without chemicals or pesticides. The growers must be certified as organic mushroom produces by an accredited third party. And the growers must keep a record of their production and handling practices.

Conclusion

Of the nearly 38,000 varieties of mushrooms, Agaricus blazei, Grifola frondosa, Coriolus versicolor, and Ganoderma lucidum have impressive medicinal properties. With a little help from Purple Kculli Corn, these mushrooms can provide even more potent and powerful cancer preventing properties for superior mushroom supplements.



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Wasabi Rhizome Cleanse - Supports Phase II Liver Detoxification - Wasabi Health Benefits
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Date: August 01, 2006 10:41 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Wasabi Rhizome Cleanse - Supports Phase II Liver Detoxification - Wasabi Health Benefits

Most people know of it as a Pale-green lump on the side of their plates in Japanese restaurants—a hot, spicy accompaniment to sushi or sashimi. The fiery yet sweet taste perfectly compliments the saltiness of soy sauce and the cool delicacy of raw fish. But wasabi is much more than a burst of culinary flavor, it has been used by traditional herbalists of Japan since the 10th century and is now being rediscovered by modern health practitioners for its stunning health benefits.

Wasabi has powerful detoxification properties, in particular, it supports the immune system and cleanses the liver. Wasabi contains precursors to phytochemicals called isothiocyanates that help remove toxic substances that are stored in the liver’s fatty tissues.

The rare wasabi plant is a natural, potent support to a healthy, cleansed liver that in turn affects the detoxification and cleansing of the entire body. Source Naturals is pleased to bring you this convenient, effective addition to your wellness program.

Wasabia Japonica - Rooted In Health

The wasabi plant (Wasabia japonica) grows naturally in the mountains of Japan in the gravel and sandbars of coldwater streams and rivers. Rare and difficult to grow, it takes three years for a wasabi root or rhizome to reach maturity. Because of its popularity, wasabi is now cultivated hydroponically and in cold, wet environments outside of Japan, such as in New Zealand and Oregon. Traditionally, the rhizome was freshly grated at the table with a sharkskin grater, popular with dishes such as seafood or udon noodles. Now wasabi is usually dried into powder form and made into the Pale green paste familiar to most westerners. Often, however, restaurants do not serve real wasabi; since it is so rare and expensive, a dyed horseradish paste is served in most American restaurants.

What makes wasabi so special? It comes from a good family; the brassica vegetables in the cruciferae family include such health giants as broccoli, horseradish, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower and kale. All of these are well-known detoxifying plants, and wasabi appears to be the most amazing of them all, with detox capacities far beyond the others in the family because it is loaded with isothiocyanate precursors. This chemical not only gives wasabi its famous “fire,” it is likewise a fireball of detoxification properties.

Phase II Detox

The liver detoxifies the by-products of digestion and other harmful substances through a complex series of chemical reactions often referred to as Phase I and Phase II Detoxification. Phase I enzymes begin the process by taking the toxic molecule and changing it into a bioactive form. This process breaks down toxins. A second set of enzymes, Phase II, then neutralizes the toxin and makes it water soluble for elimination. Wasabi, with its long-chain isothiocyanate precursors, induces the Phase II enzymes. Simply stated, it is the sparkplug that starts Phase II enzymes on their work. This process, all done in the liver, supports the body’s ability to clean itself of impurities.

Part of a Complete Wellness Program

In the modern world, with so many pollutants, it is critical to your health and longevity that you cleanse these toxic compounds from your body. Wasabi, along with a whole food, high-fiber diet and reduction of alcohol consumption, supports the liver— the largest of the vital organs and the key to the digestion and elimination systems and most particularly, the body’s ability to cleanse itself. Source Naturals is pleased to bring you this exceptional product as part of your wellness program.

Research

Depree, JA (1999) Flavour and pharmaceutical properties of the volatile sulphur compounds of Wasabia japonica. Food Research International: 31(5):329-337.

Morimitsu Y, et al. (2002) A sulforaphane analogue that potently activates the Nrf2-dependent detoxification pathway. J Biol Chem: 277:3456-3463.

Munday, R (2002) Selective induction of phase II enzymes in the urinary bladder of rats by allyl isothiocyanate, a compound derived from Brassica vegetables.

Nutrition and Cancer: 44(1):52-59.

Watanabe, M (2003) Identification of 6-methylsulfinylhexyl isothiocyanate as an apoptosis-inducing component in wasabi. Phytochemistry: 62(5):733-739.

Rose, P (2000) 7-methylsulfinylheptyl and 8- methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates from watercress are potent inducers of phase II enzymes. Carcinogenesis: 21(11):1983-1988.

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Curcumin - Turmeric Extract
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Date: August 19, 2005 12:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Curcumin - Turmeric Extract

Curcumin

Turmeric- History and Traditional Usage

Native to Southeast Asia, Curcuma longa is a tall
tropical shrub with large oblong leaves and Pale yellow flowers.
The genus “Curcuma” belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, which
includes ginger.1 The plant possesses a large root structure
with fleshy, bulbous underground parts called “rhizomes.” These
rhizomes, known as turmeric root, are harvested at maturity,
dried and cured for commercial use. Chemical analysis shows that
dried turmeric contains essential and volatile oils, with a
curcuminoid content of 2.5 to 5.0 %.2

In addition to its
popularity as a spice, turmeric is used as a dye for cloth and
coloring agent in foods and cosmetics, thanks to its rich yellow
color. Turmeric also serves as a preservative, probably owing to
the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of curcumin.
Extracts of Curcuma longa have demonstrated in vitro
antibacterial and anti-fungal effects.3

Turmeric is named in
ancient Ayurvedic and Chinese herbal texts as a traditional folk
remedy. Historically, turmeric was used externally for wounds,
and sprains, and internally for digestive complaints,
rheumatism, liver disorders, coughs and colds.4
Benefits

Protects cells and tissues by fighting free radicals.*

Supports joint function*

The numerous beneficial
effects attributed to turmeric stem in large measure from the
antioxidant properties of curcumin. Antioxidants neutralize free
radicals, which are highly unstable molecules that can damage
cellular structures through abnormal oxidative reactions.
Curcumin is a potent “scavenger” of the superoxide radical, a
free radical that initiates potentially harmful oxidative
processes such as lipid peroxidation.5 Through this activity,
curcumin has been shown to protect skin cells from the injurious
effect of nitroblue tetrazolium, a toxin that generates
superoxide radicals. Curcumin also increases survival of cells
exposed in vitro to the enzyme hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase,
which stimulates superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production.
Curcumin itself is not toxic to cells, even at high
concentrations. Pure curcumin was shown to be less protective
than a mixture of curcuminoids, indicating a possible synergism
among curcuminoids.6 Because free radicals are involved in aging
and exert harmful effects on skin, these results suggest
curcumin may help slow skin aging.

Curcumin demonstrates
several other in vitro effects linked to free radical
scavenging. Curcumin scavenges nitric oxide, a compound
associated with the body’s inflammatory response.7 Pure curcumin
and turmeric extracts protect red blood cells from lipid
peroxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide.8 Curcumin has been
shown to protect DNA from oxidative damage, inhibit binding of
toxic metabolites to DNA, and reduce DNA mutations in the Ames’
test.9 Although additional studies suggest an anticarcinogenic
effect of curcumin, through protection of DNA,10 one in vitro
study found that curcumin induced DNA damage in human gastric
mucosal cells.11 It is speculated that curcumin may act as a
pro-oxidant in the presence of transition metal ions such as
copper and iron. (This is true for other antioxidants, including
vitamin C.) Curcumin also demonstrates in vitro inhibition of
COX-I and COX-II enzymes, which are involved in the inflammatory
reaction.12 Together these results strongly suggest that
curcumin is a potent bioprotectant with a potentially wide range
of therapeutic applications.

Animal studies- In vivo protective effects

Through its free radical scavenging
properties, curcumin has shown bioprotective effects in animals.
In one study, rats were treated with isoproterenol, a chemical
that causes cardiac hypertrophy (enlargement of the heart) due
to abnormal collagen metabolism. Co-treatment with curcumin
reversed the degradation of collagen and cardiac hypertrophy
induced by isoproterenol.13 Curcumin protects mice from
detrimental effects of radiation, by stabilizing the glyoxalase
system, a biological system that regulates cell division.14
Curcumin protects livers of rats from the damaging effects of
carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a potent hepatoxin that injures the
liver via its free radical metabolite, CCl3.15,16 Curcumin
protected rats from alcohol-induced brain damage, in a study in
which oral administration of curcumin reversed lipid
peroxidation, reduced levels of free-radical metabolites and
increased levels of glutathione, a major physiologic
antioxidant.17 Curcuma longa extracts have shown
anti-inflammatory effects in rats.18

Human Trials

Curcumin exhibits free-radical scavenging ability when
administered to humans. In an open trial (uncontrolled), 18
healthy individuals ranging in age from 27 to 67 years consumed
a Curcuma longa extract, at a dose supplying 20 mg curcuminoids,
for 45 days. Before and after blood tests showed a statistically
significant decrease in lipid peroxides.19 Preliminary trials
have tested the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin, with
results that verify the traditional use of turmeric as an
anti-rheumatic herb. In a short-term double-blind, cross-over,
comparative study, 18 people received curcumin (1200 mg daily)
or phenylbutazone for two week periods. Both curcumin and
phenylbutazone produced measurable improvements in joint
flexibility and walking time. The subjects reported results only
with phenylbutazone, which may be explained by the short
duration of the trial.20 In a small placebo-controlled trial
comparing curcumin to phenylbutazone, 45 patients with
post-operative inflammation received curcumin, phenylbutazone or
placebo. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin and
phenylbutazone were comparable and superior to placebo.21
Curcumin has not been found to produce an analgesic (pain
relieving) effect.

Bioperine-Nature’s Absorption Enhancer
Boosts Curcumin Absorption*

Traditional Ayurvedic herbal
formulas often include black pepper and long pepper as
synergistic herbs. The active ingredient in both black pepper
and long pepper is the alkaloid, piperine. Experiments carried
out to evaluate the scientific basis for the use of peppers have
shown that piperine significantly enhances bioavailability when
consumed with other substances.22 Several double-blind clinical
studies have confirmed that Bioperine® increases absorption of
nutrients.23

Curcumin is poorly absorbed in the intestinal
tract, limiting its therapeutic effectiveness. Oral doses are
largely excreted in feces, and only trace amounts appear in the
blood. Concomitant administration of 20 mg of piperine with 2
grams of curcumin increases the bioavailability of curcumin by
2000%.24

Scientific References


1. Majeed, M., Badmaev,
V., Shivakumar, U., Rajendran, R. Curcuminoids. 1995.
Piscataway, NJ: NutriScience Publishers.
2. Srimal, R.C.
Turmeric: a brief review of its medicinal properties.
Fitoterapia 1997;68(6):483-93.
3. Ammon, H.P.T., Wahl, M.A.
Pharmacology of Curcuma longa. Planta Medica 1991;57:1-7.
4.
Snow, J.M. Herbal Monograph: Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae).
The Protocol Journal of Botanical Medicine, Autumn
1995:43-46.
5. Rao, N.S., Rao, M.N.A. Free radical scavenging
activity of curcuminoids. Arzneim.-Forsch./Drug Res.
1996;46(2):169-171.
6. Bonté. F. et al. Protective effect of
curcuminoids on epidermal skin cells under free oxygen radical
stress. Planta Medica 1997;63:265-66.
7. Rao, S., Rao, M.N.A.
Nitric oxide scavenging by curcuminoids. J Pharm. Pharmacol.
1997;49:105-7.
8. Lalitha, S., Selvam, R. Prevention of
H2Os-induced red blood cell lipid peroxidation by aqueous
extracted turmeric. Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr
1999;8(2):113-14.
9. Deshpande, S.S., Maru, G.B. Effects of
curcumin on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene derived DNA adducts
in vitro. Cancer Letters 1995;96:71-80.
10. Subramanian, M., et
al. Diminution of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage by curcumin
and related antioxidants. Mutation Research
1994;311:249-55.
11. Blasiak, J., Trzeciak, A., Kowalik, J.
Curcumin damages DNA in human gastric mucosa cells and
lymphocytes. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and
Oncology 1999;18(4):271-76.
12. Ramsewak, R.S., DeWitt, D.L.,
Nair, M.G. Cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory
activities of Curcumins I-III from Curcuma longa. Phytomedicine
2000;7(4):303-308.
13. Nirmala, C. Anand, S., Puvanakrishnan,
R. Curcumin treatment modulates collagen metabolism in
isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Molecular and
Cellular Biochemistry 1999;197:31-37.
14. Choudhary, D.,
Chandra, D. Kale, R.K. Modulation of radioresponse of glyoxalase
system by curcumin. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1999;64:1-7.
15. Park, E-J. et al. Protective effect of
curcumin in rat liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride. J
Pharm. Pharmacol. 2000;52:437-40.
16. Deshpande, U.R. et al.
Protective effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract on
carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in rats. Indian
Journal of Experimental Biology 1998;36:573-77.
17.
Rajakrishnan, V. et al. Neuroprotective role of curcumin from
Curcuma longa on ethanol-induced brain damage. Phytotherapy
Research 1999;13:571-74.
18. Arora, R.B. Basu, N., Kapoor, V.,
Jain, A.P. Anti-inflammatory studies on Curcuma longa
(Turmeric). Indian J Med Res 1971;59(8):1289-95.
19.
Ramirez-Bosca, A. et al. Antioxidant curcuma extracts decrease
the blood peroxide levels of human subjects. Age
1995;18:167-69.
20. Deodhar, S.D., Sethi, R. Srimal. R.C.
Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin
(diferoyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.
21.
Satoskar, R.R., Shah, S J. Shenoy, S.G. Evaluation of
anti-inflammatory property of curcumin (diferoyl methane) in
patients with postoperative inflammation. International Journal
of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy and Toxicolgy
1986;24(12):651-54.
22. Atal, C., Zutshi, U., Rao, P.
Scientific evidence on the role of Ayurvedic herbals on
bioavailability of drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1981;4:229-232.
23. Bioperine®–Nature's Bioavailability
Enhancing Thermonutrient. Executive Summary. 1996; Sabinsa
Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.
24. Shoba, G., et al. Influence
of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and
human volunteers. Planta Medica 1998;64(4):353-6.

© 2002
Doctor's Best, Inc. Revised 8/13/02

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.



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MORE RESEARCH ON FEVERFEW and EXERCISE MAY PREVENT DIABETES
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Date: July 14, 2005 05:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: MORE RESEARCH ON FEVERFEW and EXERCISE MAY PREVENT DIABETES

MORE RESEARCH ON FEVERFEW

Studies have been ongoing as to the benefits of feverfew in relieving migraine pain since the 1970’s. The latest clinical study confirms the beneficial effects of feverfew. Researchers in Israel reported on a clinical trial involving 57 individuals, none of which had ever tried feverfew. Half of the group were given the feverfew supplement while the others a placebo. Those taking the feverfew reported a significant reduction in migraine pain and accompanying symptoms such as sensitivity to light, vomiting and nausea. The treatment was switched during the study giving the placebo group the feverfew supplements. Again, the group taking the feverfew had a reduction in migraines (D. Palevitch, G. Earon and R. Carasso. “Feverfew as a prophylactic treatment for migraine: A double-blinded placebo-controlled study.” Phytotherapy Research, 1997, 11 (7): 506-11).

EXERCISE MAY PREVENT DIABETES

Exercise is important for health and prevention of illness. One study lead by Michael Brown of the Un i versity of Pittsburgh followed 12 overweight women who had a condition which often leads to diabetes. Exercise has been thought to help prevent diabetes, but just how much was necessary has not been determined. Exercise such as brisk walking practiced for 30 minutes for at least four days a week is thought to help.

In a related study reported by CNN March, 4, 1998, walking was found to help improve insulin sensitivity. Elizabeth Mayer-Davie of the University of South Carolina reported the result of her research. The study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association followed 1,400 women between the ages of 40 to 69. Some had normal blood sugar levels and others had a mild form of diabetes. Those who exercised moderately and regularly were less likely to have impaired insulin-using capacity which is involved with diabetes.



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History
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Date: June 24, 2005 01:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: History

HISTORY

Because 20th century medical practices have routinely over - prescribed antibiotics, the notion of a natural antibiotic with virtually no side-effects is intriguing to say the least. Echinacea is one of several herbs which possesses antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. In a time when new life-threatening microbes are evolving and pose the threat of modern-day plagues, herbs such as echinacea are particularly valuable. More and more health practitioners are focusing on fortifying the immune system to fight off potential infections rather than just treating infection after it has developed.

Echinacea is enjoying a renaissance today. During the late 1980’s, echinacea re-emerged as a remarkable medicinal plant. In addition to its infection fighting properties, echinacea is known for its healing properties as well. As was the case with so many herbs, echinacea lost its prestige as a medicinal treatment with the advent of antibiotics. It has experienced a resurgence over the last two decades.

Echinacea has several other much more romantic names including Purple Coneflower, Black Sampson and Red Sunflower. It has also become the common name for a number of echinacea species like E. angustifolia, E. purpurea, and E. pallida. The genus derives its name from the Greek word echinos which refers to sea urchin. This particular association evolved from the prickly spiny scales of the seed head section of the flower. Historically, echinacea has sometimes become confused with Parthenium integrifolium.

The word echinacea is actually apart of the scientific latin term, echinacea angustifolia, which literally translated means a narrow - leafed sucker. The plant grows wild as a perennial exclusively in the midwestern plains states, but can be cultivated almost anywhere . Echinacea leaves are Pale to dark green, coarse and pointy. Its florets are purple and its roots, black and long.

Echinacea has a strong Native American link in the Central Plains. Native Americans are credited with discovering the usefulness of this botanical without knowing its specific chemical properties. It was routinely used by Na t i ve Americans to treat toothaches, snakebite, fevers and old stubborn wounds.

Native Americans thought of echinacea as a versatile herb that not only helped to fight infection, but increased the appetite and s t rengthened the sexual organs as well. The juice of the plant was used to bathe burns and was sprinkled on hot coals during traditional “sweats” used for purification purposes. It is also believed that some Native Americans used echinacea juice to protect their hands, feet and mouths from the heat of hot coals and ceremonial fires.1 According to Melvin Gilmore, An American anthropologist who studied Native American medicine in the early part of this century, Echinacea was used as a remedy by Native Americans more than any other plant in the central plains area.

In time, early white settlers learned of its healing powers and used the plant as a home remedy for colds, influenza, tumors, syphillis, hemorrhoids and wounds. Dr. John King, in his medical journal of 1887 mentioned that echinacea had value as a blood purifier and alterative. It was used in various blood tonics and gained the reputation of being good for almost every conceivable malady. It has been called the king of blood purifiers due to its ability to improve lymphatic filtration and drainage. In time, echinacea became popular with 19th century Eclectics, who were followers of a botanic system founded by Dr. Wooster Beech in the 1830’s. They used it as an anesthetic, deodorant, and stimulant.

By 1898, echinacea had become one of the top natural treatments in America. During these years, echinacea was used to treat fevers, malignant carbuncles, ulcerations, pyorrhea, snake bites and dermatitis. In the early twentieth century, echinacea had gained a formidable reputation for treating a long list of infectious disease ranging from the commonplace to the exotic. The Lloyd Brothers Pharmaceutical House developed more sophisticated versions of the herb in order to meet escalating demands for echinacea.

Ironically, it was medical doctors who considered echinacea more valuable than eclectic practitioners. Several articles on echinacea appeared from time to time in various publications. Its attributes we re re v i ewed and, at times, its curative abilities ranged from the sublime to the ridiculous. In 1909, the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association decided against recognizing echinacea as an official drug, claiming that it lacked scientific credibility. It was added to the National Formulary of the United States despite this type of negative reaction and remained on this list until 1950.

Over the past 50 years, echinacea has earned a formidable reputation achieving worldwide fame for its antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial actions. Consumer interest in echinacea has greatly increased, particularly in relation to its role in treating candida, chronic fatigue syndrome, AIDS and malignancies. Practitioners of natural medicine in Eu rope and America have long valued its attributes. In recent, years, German research has confirmed its ability to augment the human immune system. Extensive research on echinacea has occurred over the last twenty years. Test results have s h own that the herb has an antibiotic, cortisone-like activity.

Echinacea has the ability to boost cell membrane healing, protect collagen, and suppress tumor growth. Because of its immuno-enhancing activity, it has recently been used in AIDS therapy. Research has proven that echinacea may have p rofound value in stimulating immune function and may be particularly beneficial for colds and sore throats.3

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Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion
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Date: June 21, 2005 05:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion

Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion

By Fred Pescatore, M.D.

Aside from tax forms, it's hard to find anything more confusing to consumers than fats and oils. Fat-free diehards still don't know that fat is essential for the brain, hormones, cellular membranes: life itself. The clueless still use shortening, margarine and damaged grocery store vegetable oils. But what worries me more is that supposedly educated consumers aren't even getting it right. Should we be surprised since their doctors probably don't know the truth?

Mistakes made by your customers. They:

  • * Don't know monounsaturated fats are the key to health.
  • * Think olive oil is the healthiest choice.
  • * Buy junk olive oil without knowing it.
  • * Make olive oil toxic with misuse.
  • * Use grapeseed oil for its smoke point without regard to its pro-inflammatory fatty acids.
  • * Think all polyunsaturated fats are created equal.
  • * Believe flax oil is just the same as fish oil.
  • * Think healthy oil must be heavy and flavorless or strongly flavored.
  • * Don't know that oil has zero carbs.
  • * Don't know that all oils have the same number of calories.

    Let's clear up these myths so consumers can get busy being confused about something else:

  • * A compelling number of studies clearly demonstrate that we should get about 80% of our fats as monounsaturated fats, a key to the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet. Monounsaturated fats (omega 9) have been shown to lower total cholesterol, increase HDL, improve blood sugar management and help prevent cancer.
  • * Properly prepared olive oil is a decent choice because it is relatively high (around 70%) in monounsaturated fats. However, macadamia nut oil is much higher (84%). Macadamia nut oil is also lower in saturated fat and significantly higher in vitamin E, already making it a healthier choice.
  • * Any time something becomes quite popular, pretenders ride the wave. It is beyond suspicious that more Italian olive oil is sold than is actually produced. Much of what consumers think is "Extra Virgin" olive oil is actually a blend of refined olive (health benefits dramatically reduced) and even other oils (hmm, allergies anyone?). I review this in greater detail in The Hamptons Diet, my latest book, due out in May. For increasingly obvious reasons, the specific oil I recommend in it is MacNut™ Oil. It is the genuine article and the only product processed in the plant in Australia so there is no chance of contamination with another nut. This is a premium oil with processing quite superior to that from other countries.
  • * Overheating oil causes the formation of toxic free radicals and trans fats. Many don't realize that olive oil's smoke point is only 300-325:; so grilling, stir-fry and even baking become problematic. MacNut™ Oil is blessed with a 410: smoke point and great shelf stability.

  • * Grapeseed oil is 74% polyunsaturated omega 6. If that doesn't concern you, please read the next section.
  • * Recall that omega 3 and omega 6 fats, both polyunsaturated, have relatively opposite effects. Among the many virtues of omega 3, is that it is anti-inflammatory. The majority of omega 6 is pro-inflammatory. Yes, omega 6 is the source of beneficial GLA. However, GLA is just a very tiny variant the body should make if all circumstances are right. Our Paleolithic ancestors ate a diet that balanced the 3's and 6's ideally at 1:1. Now, because of vegetable oil use, junk food and animal feeding practices, Americans consume a 20:1 imbalance of pro-inflammatory omega 6. My recent book, The Allergy and Asthma Cure, tells more about the many health conditions worsened by inflammation. Now you can see that grapeseed oil is literally adding fuel to the fire. In MacNutTM Oil, the 3's and 6's are 1:1, as nature intended.
  • * Flax oil is great stuff if you buy it fresh, keep it cold and use it promptly. However, the EPA and DHA we prize so much in fish oil is not present in flax oil. To convert omega 3 to EPA and DHA, first be genetically adept and then avoid illness, age, stress, alcohol, aspirin, bad fats or sugar and deficiencies of the B's, C, Zinc and Magnesium. The same factors affect conversion of omega 6 into GLA.
  • * Some consumers have become accustomed to flavorless oils. Others grin and bear food that all tastes like olives. (Good olive oil tastes like olives.) Yet another reason I head the Scientific Advisory Panel for MacNutTM Oil is that it delicious cold or hot. It enhances recipes with a buttery richness but doesn't mask other ingredients.
  • * How can we tell consumers and not sound sassy that all oils are all zero carbs. They are oils, okay? There are only 3 classes of macronutrients: proteins, fats and carbs.
  • * Likewise, oil is oil when it comes to calories. Even 10-W-40 has 9 calories per gram. Protein and sugar are about half that. What is important is the type of fat in the oil and monounsaturated is the best.

    I hope this helps you educate consumers about the proper use of fats. Unfortunately, that still leaves a long list of other things they've been misled about.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Centering Your Heart
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    Date: June 13, 2005 10:15 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Centering Your Heart

    Centering Your Heart by Lisa James Energy Times, January 4, 2004

    The romantic view of the human heart conjures up vivid images: The gallant lover, the committed enthusiast, the wise sage. When the romantic philosophy speaks of the heart, it speaks of things that lie at the very center of what it means to be human.

    Western medical science, though, views the heart as a biomechanical pump-marvelously engineered to be sure, but a physical device amenable to surgical and pharmaceutical tinkering.

    Between romance and technology lies the Eastern path. Eastern medical traditions, including Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and India's Ayurveda, see the heart as a seat of energy that must be kept in right relationship with the rest of the body.

    TCM: Yin, Yang and Qi

    The two great polarities of yin and yang are always shifting and rebalancing, according to Chinese philosophy, in our bodies as in everything else. Yin is dark, inward, cold, passive and downward; yang is light, outward, warm, active and upward.

    The energy that keeps us alive is called qi, or life force. Organs, including the heart, are seen as places where qi resides. Organs supply and restrain each other's qi, which flows along carefully mapped meridians, or channels. Disease occurs when disturbances in qi interrupt the flow of energy so that an organ experiences either a deficiency or excess of yin/yang.

    Circulatory Disturbances

    According to Chinese precepts, disturbances in the heart affect the whole body. "The movement of the blood throughout the body, TCM circulation, is managed by multiple organs, which in turn interact with one another. A failure in any one part of this system can result in pathology," says Jonathan Simon, LAc, an acupuncture expert in private practice and at the Mind-Body Digestive Center, in New York.

    "If there's a circulation issue, all the organ systems are going to be deprived of the nourishment supplied by the blood. The heart seems to have a dramatic effect on everything else in the body," says Ross Rosen, JD, LAc, CA, MSTOM, Dipl AC & CH (NCCAOM), of The Center for Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine P.A. in Westfield, New Jersey.

    Connecting the Dots

    While Western medicine probes the heart's physical functioning, TCM searches for energy imbalances by looking for patterns in a person's complaints.

    "The wrong approach, in my opinion, is to try to relieve a Western ailment before you have established the proper pattern," Simon notes. "For example, I once had a 20-year-old, slim patient who came to me complaining of hypertension. She had seen several other acupuncturists before she got to my clinic, all of whom had prescribed the number-one formula for hypertension in TCM. When I interviewed her, I discerned a very different pattern from the classic one for hypertension. I gave her the formula associated with her pattern, not her symptom, and she had great relief over the next three weeks. After consultation with her Western physician, she began to cut back on her medication, and is now off of her meds."

    TCM emphasizes taking a thorough medical history and using a sophisticated pulse-taking technique called the shen hammer method. Rosen calls pulse "the blueprint of one's health."

    Root Causes

    As in conventional Western medicine, TCM sees diet as a major culprit in heart disease. "Poor diet will cause problems depending upon on the constitution of the person," explains Simon. "For example, if one eats an excess of greasy and spicy food, that may build up and generate excess heat in the body. That may manifest itself as someone with a quick temper, red face and high blood pressure. On the other hand, a vegetarian who eats only salads may have low energy, a sallow complexion and low blood pressure. I try to tell my patients to keep balance in their diets, but to avoid cold, raw and greasy foods."

    TCM also sees unsettled emotions as a source of illness. Stress "creates stagnation in qi and in the blood, eventually," Rosen says. "When stagnation is long or severe, heat starts being produced. We say that heat goes into the blood and steams the body, and heat starts to dry out the vessels. This process winds up turning into atherosclerosis-it kind of vulcanizes the vessel wall. It deprives the vessel of its moisture, which deprives it of its elasticity. Blood pressure starts to increase."

    Managing one's emotions and not overworking body or mind is key, says Rosen: "The heart houses the spirit, the shen. When we see people with imbalances in emotion, the spirit starts to become agitated; once the spirit becomes agitated, the whole heart system goes out of balance."

    Signs of agitation include insomnia, anxiety and an inability to feel joy, along with chest pain and heart palpitations. TCM uses nutrition, herbs and acupuncture to bring the body back into balance.

    Ayurveda: Constitutional Energies

    Like TCM, Ayurveda sees health as a matter of balancing the subtle energies that power our bodies. In Ayurveda, these energies exist as three doshas, or basic constitutions:

    * Vata is cold, dry, light, clear and astringent. The skin of vata individuals is generally dry, thin, dark and cool, with hair that's curly, dark and coarse. Vatas change their minds readily and crave warmth.

    * Pitta is sharp, light, hot, oily and pungent. Pitta people tend to have skin that's soft, fair, warm and freckled, along with fine, fair hair. Quick-witted, pittas hold strong convictions. They prefer coolness, since they tend to perspire profusely.

    * Kapha is cold, heavy, oily, slow and soft. Kapha skin is Pale, cold and thick, and kapha hair, which is usually brown, is thick and lustrous. Stable and compassionate, kaphas don't like the cold.

    Few people are one, pure dosha. Most contain varying levels of vata, pitta and kapha (abbreviated VPK), generally with one predominating.

    Doshas Unbalanced

    Ayurveda views the heart as "governing emotions and circulating blood," according to Sophia Simon, MS, LAc, of the Karma Healing Center in Newtown, Pennsylvania. In Ayurveda "heart problems arise mainly due to improper diet and stressful lifestyles," which causes a "derangement of vata dosha. This leads to thickening of the arteries, resulting in angio-obstruction."

    "Stress reduction is very important in heart disease," says Simon. "Meditation helps a lot with stress reduction, especially simple breathing exercises, yoga, etc." Some of Simon's recommendations have a familiar ring: Don't smoke, do exercise, eat a plant-based, low-fat diet. In addition, she says you should:

    * Avoid coffee and other beverages that contain caffeine.

    * Be loving and compassionate to all mankind.

    * Do things in a casual way. Speak softly. Avoid anger, especially holding anger for a long time.

    * Indulge in healthy, whole-hearted laughter.

    In addition, Simon notes that garlic is an Ayurvedic herb "most useful for heart problems.

    Keep your balance: In the great Eastern healing traditions, it is the key to keeping your heart healthy.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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    Stevia, Xylitol Sugar alternatives ...
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    Date: June 09, 2005 06:15 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Stevia, Xylitol Sugar alternatives ...

    Xylitol

    Stevia

    Sugar Solution by Kristin Daniels Energy Times, January 4, 2002

    Sugar Solution by Kristin Daniels

    Low blood sugar-a blood sugar recession-can make the good times recede. While you can't live without blood sugar, too much or too little wreaks havoc on your body and mind. And when blood sugar dips low enough to cause hypoglycemia you may feel like your emotions have been shredded. Knowing how the body regulates blood sugar allows you a measure of control in keeping blood sugar in the proper groove, and makes life a little sweeter. Hypoglycemia occurs when you feel dragged out because of low blood sugar. Ironically, this low blood sugar syndrome may be caused by an overabundance of sugar in your meals and snacks. Those who point to hypoglycemia as a widespread problem claim that up to two of three women in America suffer from hypoglycemia. That would make it an epidemic of monstrous proportions. In a survey of 1000 folks complaining of hypoglycemia, published in the Hypoglycemia Support Foundation's winter 2000 edition, researchers found that low blood sugar sufferers complained of hypoglycemic discomforts in several main categories: 94% of the people in the study reported nervousness, 89% mentioned irritability, exhaustion affected 87%, depression struck 86% and drowsiness hit 73%. Other miseries included fatigue, cold sweats, tinnitus (ringing of the ears), rapid heart rate, blurry or double vision, confusion, sudden hunger, convulsions, sweating, sleeping problems, Paleness, muscle pain, memory loss, crying jags, fainting and dizziness.

    Body of Evidence
    Hypoglycemia may result from munching endless sweets and never exercising (physical activity improves your body's handling of sugar). Many sufferers of hypoglycemia may view it as a disease, but the experts pigeonhole it, technically, as a condition or syndrome. R. Paul St. Amand, MD, Professor of Endocrinology at UCLA, points out that "in certain people, the body is unable to process carbohydrates without adverse consequences. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the name often used to denote a whole disease. But more accurately it is only one of a cluster of symptoms that together make up a syndrome." According to herbalist Cynthia Hartson, ND, at Better Health Chiropractic and Natural Family Health Care in Mission Viejo, California, when you eat too many processed foods you set yourself up for a big fall in blood sugar. "...As with many conditions out there, you don't catch diseases, this one or any; you create an environment in your body that allows these symptoms (and conditions) to occur." Your body breaks down carbohydrates, including those in vegetables, fruits, breads and grains, into simpler sugars. As these carbohydrates pour into the blood in the form of glucose, cells in the pancreas secrete the hormone-like substance insulin. Insulin is supposed to persuade cells to take up this in-flow of glucose and use it as fuel. But if, during this process, blood sugar drops too low, the pancreas releases glucagon, which stimulates the release of glucose into the blood to bring blood sugar levels back up. Overindulging in sweets and processed foods may upset this blood sugar balancing act. Americans consume about 120 pounds of sugar per person annually, a voluminous avalanche compared to preindustrial times when we only took in about seven pounds a year. When you eat your way through this much sugar, Dr. St. Amand claims, your body's "...excess amounts of carbohydrates (generate) an overproduction of insulin. As your blood sugar drops, your brain tunes out. Because a massive amount of carbohydrates drives your insulin and glucagon down, the fats (stored as carbohydrates) in your body can't be released (for energy) and you crave more carbohydrates." As you continue to consume large amounts of carbohydrates, the pancreas secretes greater amounts of insulin to properly transport the excesses of circulating blood sugar. Eventually, every time you eat sugar, your pancreas may release excessive insulin, which drives and keeps your blood sugar low enough to make you feel like lying down in a corner and telling the world to go away. And there's more bad physiological news: Your adrenal glands respond to this stress by producing adrenaline and dumping it into the bloodstream in overabundance, causing anxiety, trembling and panic attacks: frequent signs of a hypoglycemic reaction. Adrenaline is supposed to stimulate the liver to release glycogen (stored sugar) to get your blood sugar back to a functioning level. But once again, as your sugar cycle degenerates, the pancreas increasingly produces more insulin to drive down your blood sugar level. Your blood sugar may drop and stay down.

    Numbers Game
    Many conventional doctors dismiss hypoglycemia as an illusion. But Dr. St. Amand states that doctors are "hung up on numbers." The glucose tolerance test, typically used to diagnose hypoglycemia, is based on numbers and the numbers often don't add up. Signs of hypoglycemia typically show up to two to three hours after a meal or snack containing lots of processed foods, when there is a rapid release of sugar into the small intestine, followed by rapid glucose absorption into the bloodstream and the consequent production of a large amount of insulin. These reactions occur so rapidly and unpredictably that catching them in a glucose tolerance test is often impossible. (Of course, see your health practitioner if you suffer persistent health problems that may be caused by a serious underlying condition or disease.)

    Diary of a Maddening Condition
    Keeping a food diary can help you discover what foods set off your hypoglycemia. Be honest, and record everything: your food, drinks, even breath mints! Note the time you eat, the time you sleep, the exercise you do, and your moods to see what triggers low blood sugar. Once you identify your triggers, remove them. When recommending ways to dodge hypoglycemia, Dr. St. Amand says, "It is not what you add but what you remove" that's most important. Items that often cause problems include:

  • * Sugar (obviously) of all kinds: table sugar, corn syrup, honey, sucrose, glucose, dextrose or maltose.
  • * Starches such as potatoes, rice, pasta and processed white breads.
  • * Fruit juices.
  • * Caffeine (coffee, tea, chocolate and soft drinks), which intensifies the action of insulin. The National Hypoglycemia Association says that foods which many hypoglycemia sufferers find to be helpful are those high in soluble dietary fiber and complex carbohydrates: whole grains, legumes and vegetables, which may be absorbed more gradually than processed items. Slower carbohydrate absorption may help prevent the major swings in blood sugar levels that foments hypoglycemia. Eating smaller meals and snacking often may ease blood sugar fluctuations. Incorporate fats into your snacks to decrease the flow of carbohydrates into your bloodstream and decrease carbohydrate cravings. Whole-wheat crackers with natural peanut butter, vegetables dipped in organic olive oil, packaged nuts and seeds, rice cakes, and soy cheese may slow sugar absorption. Your food diary should also record your activity level, the amount of water you drink, and indicate the times you feel stressed. While your diary may show that the stresses and lifestyle items that most frequently trigger your hypoglycemia are different than those that cause problems in others, you will probably discover that exercise significantly helps to dispel low blood sugar discomforts. Exercise tones your muscles, improves circulation and aids in digestion. It increases circulation and helps your muscles metabolize sugars more effectively.

    Review Time
    Ask your relatives to find others in your family who suffer diabetes, hyperinsulism or hypoglycemia. Roberta Ruggiero, president of the Hypoglycemia Support Foundation, Inc., and author of the book The Dos and Don'ts of Low Blood Sugar (Lifetime), notes that genetics plays a large role in reactive hypoglycemia. "In a survey of confirmed hypoglycemics," she states, "it was found that approximately 64 percent of them had one or more family members who had been diagnosed with diabetes." If you know someone in your family suffers this kind of problem, you can find it helpful to see what works for them to relieve the discomforts of low blood sugar. And you can share with them what works for you. Together, you can slip the shackles of hypoglycemia and sweeten your days.

    --
    VitaNet ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

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