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  Messages 1-13 from 13 matching the search criteria.
Tea drinkers can take comfort in new study about heart benefits Darrell Miller 5/12/17
Vitamin D Pumps Up Muscles Darrell Miller 2/18/17
How vitamins help lower blood pressure naturally Darrell Miller 12/8/13
How vitamins help lower blood pressure naturally Darrell Miller 12/8/13
How to manage high blood pressure with herbs and vitamins Darrell Miller 2/20/12
How Can I Raise Blood Pressure Naturally? Darrell Miller 10/18/11
Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally Darrell Miller 3/28/07
Pain - Post Op and Relaxation Darrell Miller 7/13/05
GARLIC IS A POWERFUL DETOXIFIER Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Garlic for the Ages - eat garlic because it's good for your heart... Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Higher Mind - Smart Nutrients for the Performance of a Lifetime... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
COENZYME Q10 - Transforming food into energy Darrell Miller 6/1/05




Tea drinkers can take comfort in new study about heart benefits
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Date: May 12, 2017 06:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Tea drinkers can take comfort in new study about heart benefits





Tea is sometimes talked about negatively because some of it contains caffeine but it also has benefits. This talks about a study which links tea drinking to positive affects on the heart. This is important because the heart pumps blood all throughout the body. If drinking tea helps with that many are benefiting without even knowing about it. This will make you feel a bit better if you drink tea and worry about doing so.

Read more: Tea drinkers can take comfort in new study about heart benefits

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Vitamin D Pumps Up Muscles
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Date: February 18, 2017 05:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vitamin D Pumps Up Muscles





It turns out that Vitamin D Pumps up muscles. People that have higher active levels of the vitamin in the bloodstream had more muscle mass. This was found in a study. Researchers looked at multiple forms of Vitamin D in the study and found a very complex relationship than was thought previously.

Vitamin D Pumps Up Muscles

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How vitamins help lower blood pressure naturally
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Date: December 08, 2013 11:20 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How vitamins help lower blood pressure naturally

Blood Pressure

Blood pressure can be described as the force of blood as it goes through or Pumps in your blood vessels while circulating throughout your body. Those who have narrow arteries normally have a higher blood pressure, because the blood needs to be pumped much harder through their smaller passage-ways. Generally, high blood-pressure is usually caused by too much exercise or stress, but there are some people who may have chronic high blood-pressure. High blood-pressure symptoms can include; headaches, dizziness, and sometimes even nosebleeds. There are situations when there are no any symptoms and you won't know you've any problem until you get a stroke or have a heart attack, and this is why it's important for you to get your blood pressure checked regularly.

Below are some vitamins one can use to naturally lower their blood pressure:

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is a fat soluble which works primarily in body fat tissues. It prevents the LDL cholesterol and also prevents the build up of any plaque on your body's arteries. It can at times be quite toxic if you take too much of it, the recommended amount is only up to 5,000-IUs a day.

Vitamin C
Vitamin C will help in lowering and controlling your body's blood pressure in many ways. It will reduce the generation of all free radicals which can damage the artery walls. It will also help in fixing any damaged blood arteries, and will help elevate the levels of the HDL-cholesterol. If you happen to suffer from high blood-pressure, you should take a minimum of about 2,500-milligrams of vitamin-C every day. Vitamin C rich-foods can include; Oranges, red bell peppers, grape fruit,spinach, and tomatoes.


Vitamin E
Vitamin E will reduce the risk of suffering from heart disease and will also lower your blood pressure. Vitamin E will help protect your arteries from all effects of the LDL cholesterol. It's the most active anti-oxidant in the body. It's recommended you take up to 800 international units (IUs) of all natural vitamin E every day if you have a high blood pressure and want to lower it.


References:

  1. //www.ehow.com/about_5415684_natural-vitamins-high-blood-pressure.html
  2. //www.ehow.com/about_5208471_vitamins-high-blood-pressure.html

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How vitamins help lower blood pressure naturally
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Date: December 08, 2013 10:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How vitamins help lower blood pressure naturally

Blood Pressure as Described

highblood pressureBlood pressure can be described as the force of blood as it goes through or Pumps in your blood vessels while circulating throughout your body. Those who have narrow arteries normally have a higher blood pressure, because the blood needs to be pumped much harder through their smaller passage-ways. Generally, high blood-pressure is usually caused by too much exercise or stress, but there are some people who may have chronic high blood-pressure. High blood-pressure symptoms can include; headaches, dizziness, and sometimes even nosebleeds. There are situations when there are no any symptoms and you won't know you've any problem until you get a stroke or have a heart attack, and this is why it's important for you to get your blood pressure checked regularly.

Below are some vitamins one can use to naturally lower their blood pressure:

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is a fat soluble which works primarily in body fat tissues. It prevents the LDL cholesterol and also prevents the build up of any plaque on your body's arteries. It can at times be quite toxic if you take too much of it, the recommended amount is only up to 5,000-IUs a day.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C will help in lowering and controlling your body's blood pressure in many ways. It will reduce the generation of all free radicals which can damage the artery walls. It will also help in fixing any damaged blood arteries, and will help elevate the levels of the HDL-cholesterol. If you happen to suffer from high blood-pressure, you should take a minimum of about 2,500-milligrams of vitamin-C every day. Vitamin C rich-foods can include; Oranges, red bell peppers, grape fruit,spinach, and tomatoes.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E will reduce the risk of suffering from heart disease and will also lower your blood pressure. Vitamin E will help protect your arteries from all effects of the LDL cholesterol. It's the most active anti-oxidant in the body. It's recommended you take up to 800 international units (IUs) of all natural vitamin E every day if you have a high blood pressure and want to lower it.

References:

  1. //www.ehow.com/about_5415684_natural-vitamins-high-blood-pressure.html
  2. //www.ehow.com/about_5208471_vitamins-high-blood-pressure.html

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How to manage high blood pressure with herbs and vitamins
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Date: February 20, 2012 06:42 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to manage high blood pressure with herbs and vitamins

What is high blood pressure?

High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is a very common health condition whereby one's blood is pumped through the arteries at a higher than normal pressure. High blood pressure may lead to serious health problems like heart disease and stroke.

The quantity of blood pumped by the heart and the level of resistance to the flow of blood in the arteries. The more one's heart Pumps blood and the narrower their arteries, the higher will be their blood pressure.

Many people have hypertension without even knowing it for years. This is because the condition does not usually show any symptoms. Having uncontrolled hypertension increases a person's risk of developing serious medical conditions, for example heart disease or stroke.

Typically, high blood pressure develops over a long period of time, usually for years and can affect almost everybody eventually. Thankfully, the condition can easily be detected. And once somebody knows they have it, they can get medical advice on how to control it from a doctor.

Causes of high blood pressure

There are two well known types of hypertension-primary/essential high blood pressure and secondary hypertension.

The first type of high blood pressure occurs in most adults and has no identifiable cause. It tends to develop slowly over a number of years. On the other hand, secondary hypertension is a condition that seems to appear suddenly and is usually caused by an underlying health condition. This type of blood pressure is higher in intensity compared to primary hypertension. Some medications and conditions can lead to secondary hypertension and they include:

Kidney disorders

Congenital blood vessel defects

Adrenal gland tumors

Certain medications, for example cold remedies, birth control pills, decongestants, pain relief tablets bought over the counter as well as prescription medicines Illegal drugs like amphetamines and cocaine

What are the symptoms of high blood pressure?

Most people who have hypertension do not have any signs or symptoms, no matter the seriousness of the condition.

Even though a small fraction of people with early-stage hypertension may get dizzy spells, dull headaches, or even heavy nose bleeding from time to time, these signs as well as symptoms normally do not appear until the condition has reached a critical and even life-threatening stage.

How high blood pressure can be controlled with vitamins and herbs Vitamins

Certain vitamins are said to lower high blood pressure as well as support one's cardiovascular system. One of the vitamins that can help is vitamin C. it is an important vitamin that can help to manage hypertension as it is rich in antioxidants, which help in prevention of stroke and heart attack. Other vitamins that can help to prevent or control high blood pressure include vitamins A, E, D and B6.

Whole grains, green leafy vegetables, fresh fruits, nuts, chicken, corn, salmon, just to mention a few, are good sources of essential vitamins that help in controlling hypertension.

Herbs

Herbs such as Hawthorn, Rauwolfia Serpentina/Indian snakeroot, and Ginkgo Biloba etc can also be used in lowering blood pressure. All these herbs can also strengthen your cardiovascular system to help in lowering the blood pressure and allow for better circulation. However, make sure you consult an experienced herbalist or healthcare specialist before you use any of the above herbs to control your hypertension.

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How Can I Raise Blood Pressure Naturally?
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Date: October 18, 2011 05:25 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Can I Raise Blood Pressure Naturally?

Overview

One of the leading causes linked to most illnesses in some form or the other is an imbalanced blood pressure. Statistics have shown that 1 out of 3 adults in the US have imbalanced blood pressure. So much of our bodily functions rely on normal blood pressure to work well. Let us put it this way, if your blood pressure is higher than it is supposed to be that means it is giving your body more workload than it is supposed to have, so in turn what will happened is, your body’s degeneration will be amplified. A lot of your systems will be overworked, your heart will be overworked and eventually depending on the cause your arteries will take a beating causing other organ failures in more severe cases. Now on the other hand if blood pressure is too low, you may feel fatigued all the time, light headedness, dizziness, nausea, close to fainting or anxiety and these are all things that we want to avoid.

Blood Pressure

This is the process in which the blood is carried from the heart towards other parts of your body. This is done through blood vessels called arteries and ultimately blood pressure is defined as the force of the blood in which it pushes the arterial walls. How much pressure is experienced is also directly proportional to how much the heart beats per minute in other words blood pressure is also directly proportional to the rate of your heart beat. The faster it beats the higher your blood pressure is. The blood pressure form of measurement is based on systolic over diastolic rates. Simply put the systolic rate is when the heart Pumps blood and the diastolic is when the heart is at rest in between Pumps or beats and that is why the diastolic is usually lower than the systolic rate. With that said by now you probably are able to make the conclusion that blood pressure will be at its highest when you are active, nervous, or excited and on the other hand it is at its lowest when you’re a sleep.

Why would you want to increase your blood pressure?

Most of us will probably think that, that idea is ludicrous since most of us would like to avoid high blood pressure and a lot of us are taking medications to support that effort and do things like exercising and all the other stuff to help fight against high blood pressure. However there is also a problem when blood pressure is too low as stated above and that is why some people need to increase blood pressure. There are a couple of ways to do it. First and foremost is for you to make sure you are hydrated well. High liquid volume in the body will promote higher blood pressure. Second is to lie down and elevate your feet. This will increase the return of blood to the heart therefore increasing blood pressure. Eat smaller meals so that the body will not divert so much blood to your digestive tract for digestion. Some studies also have shown that small amounts of caffeine daily may help increase low blood pressure.

You can also try herbs like bitter melon and yohimbe to elevate the heart rate. An elevated heart rate will effectively raise blood pressure. If you have low blood pressure or high, make sure you get tested every other day and record the results. Maintaining a BP level of 80/120 is optimal for good health.

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Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally
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Date: March 28, 2007 10:29 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally

Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally

 

High blood pressure (also known as hypertension) affects about 65 million Americans, or about 1 in 3 adults. There are many potential causes of hypertension, but not necessarily any symptoms. In fact, 30% of the people who have high blood pressure don’t even realize it.

In other words, just because you don’t have symptoms doesn’t mean you don’t have high blood pressure. That’s why it’s called “The Silent Killer.” And, make no mistake about it: high blood pressure is dangerous. It is the number one modifiable cause of stroke. Just lowering blood pressure reduces the chance of stroke by 35 to 40 percent. Other conditions, including heart attack and heart failure can be reduced from 25 to 50 percent, respectively.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor, we’re going to talk about high blood pressure and an exciting natural treatment for lowering blood pressure safely and effectively.

Of course, changing blood pressure numbers depends, in a large part, on the choices we make every day – how much we exercise, the foods we eat, and our lifestyle overall. But, for those times we need extra help, there is a new, scientifically-studied supplement to help us along our path to better health and lower blood pressure.

 

Blood pressure guidelines from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Category

Systolic (mm/Hg)

Diastolic (mm/Hg)

Result

Normal

Less than 120

And Less than 80

Excellent!

Prehypertension

120-139

Or 80-89

Make changes in eating and drinking habits, get more exercise and lose any extra pounds.

Hypertension

140 or higher

Or 90 or higher

You have high blood pressure. Talk to your healthcare professional on how to control it.

 

Q. What exactly is blood pressure?

A. Blood pressure is divided into two parts, systolic and diastolic. Systolic is the pressure of the heart beating. Diastolic is the pressure of the heart and vessels filling. When blood pressure numbers are written out, like “120/80,” 120 is the systolic pressure and 80 is the diastolic pressure. The unit of measurement for blood pressure is millimeters of mercury, written as “mm/Hg.”

 

Q. What is considered high blood pressure?

A. A person’s blood pressure can naturally vary throughout the day – even between heartbeats.

However, if the numbers are consistently high (over 120 systolic and 80 diastolic), after multiple visits to your healthcare practitioner, you may have either pre-hypertension or high blood pressure.

Young arteries and arteries that are kept young through healthy diet and exercise are typically more elastic and unclogged. Blood flows through them easily and without much effort. However, as we age, our arteries become more prone to plaque buildup (due to diets high in saturated fat and sedentary lifestyles) and don’t “flex” as well under pressure. The result is faster blood flow, all the time. Over the long term, it damages heart tissue, arteries, kidney and other major organs.

To get a better idea of high blood pressure, compare your arteries to a garden hose. When unblocked, a garden hose allows water to flow through it quickly and easily – without any real rush or stress. However, if you block the end of the hose with your thumb, closing it off even a little, water rushes out much more quickly.

For many years, high diastolic pressure was considered even more of a threat than high systolic pressure. That thinking has changed somewhat but high diastolic numbers could still mean organ damage in your body – especially for individuals under 50.

 

Q. What courses high blood pressure?

A. The reasons for hypertension aren’t always clear. However, there are lifestyle factors that contribute to high blood pressure that you can change:

 

Body type: Weight isn’t always a reliable indicator of whether or not you’ll have high blood pressure – but the type of weight is. Lean body mass – muscle – doesn’t increase blood pressure levels the way that fat can. However, fat body mass, especially fat around your middle, can contribute to high blood pressure.

 

Sedentary lifestyle: Too often, many of us sit down all day at work, and then sit down all night at home. Over time, this inactivity usually leads to weight gain, making the heart work harder to pump blood through the body. In a way, it almost seems contradictory, but inactivity usually leads to higher heart rates.

 

Sodium intake: Sometimes it’s hard to believe how much salt there is in processed foods. However, salt intake in itself is not necessarily bad. For people with a history of congestive heart failure, ischemia, and high blood pressure, sodium is definitely out. For those individuals, it leads to more water retention, which increases blood pressure. (Salt’s effect on water retention is one reason that so many sports drinks have fairly high sodium content – the sodium in the drink prevents your body from sweating out too much water.) But, for healthy individuals, moderate salt intake, especially a mixed mineral salt like sea salt or Celtic salt (good salt should never be white) is fine.

 

Low potassium intake: Unlike sodium, potassium is a mineral which most Americans get too little of. Potassium helps regulate the amount of sodium in our cells, expelling excess amounts through the kidneys. Low levels of this mineral can allow too much sodium to build up in the body.

 

Heavy alcohol intake: Having three or more alcoholic drinks a day (two or more for women) nearly doubles an individual’s chance of developing high blood pressure. Over time, heavy drinking puts a lot of stress on the organs, including the heart, liver, pancreas and brain.

 

Unhealthy eating: Eating a lot of processed or fatty foods contributes to high blood pressure. Adapting a diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grain products, fish, nuts and magnesium and potassium (like the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, known as the “DASH” diet) can bring it back down.

 

Smoking: If you smoke, stop. Smoking damages the heart and arteries – period. Nicotine constricts blood vessels, increases heart rate, and raises blood pressure. This in turn, increases hormone production and adrenaline levels, further stressing the body.

 

As if that weren’t bad enough, the carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke replaces the oxygen in the blood, making the heart work even harder to make up the difference. Since the effect of a single cigarette can last for an hour, smoking throughout the day leads to continuously revved-up blood pressure.

 

Some of these factors might sound like a lot to overcome. The important thing to remember is that all of these behaviors are changeable. If you have high blood pressure, modifying any of these can significantly lower blood pressure as part of an overall plan.

 

Q. What are the blood pressure numbers I should see?

A. Experts consider healthy blood pressure numbers to be 115/75 mm/Hg. The reason? They found that the risk of cardiovascular disease doubles at each increment of 20/10 mmHg over 115/75 mm/Hg. Even small jumps in blood pressure numbers increase the risk of stroke and heart attack.

 

Q. Okay, so other than diet, exercise and lifestyle changes are there other natural ways or supplements I can use to lower my blood pressure?

A. Yes, in fact, you hear about some of them in the news all the time – fish oil, CoQ10, and garlic. As effective as these symptoms are, they typically lower systolic pressure much more than diastolic pressure.

However, there is a blend of scientifically and clinically studied natural ingredients that lower high blood pressure separately, and work even better when they’re combined. This combination blend contains: dandelion leaf extract, lycopene, stevia extract, olive leaf extract and hawthorn extract.

Every one of these ingredients has been studied and recommended for years. But now, a scientific study on a supplement that combines them in one synergistic formula shows encouraging results for lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Let’s take a look at each:

Stevia leaf extract

Supports healthy blood pressure levels according to clinical studies.

Hawthorn extract

Supports the heart and balance sodium and fluid levels.

Olive leaf extract

Scientifically shown to support healthy blood pressure.

Dandelion leaf

Helps reduce fluid retention

Lycopene

Clinically shown to support arteries, circulation and heart health.

 

Stevia:

Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) originated in South America, and is often used as a sweetener. Glycosides in stevia, particularly stevoside, give the plan its sweet flavor 0 anywhere from 100 to 200 times sweeter than sugar.

The leaf of stevia is considered the medicinal part of the plant. Research shows that extracts of the leaf relax arteries and help prevent the buildup of calcium on artery walls – keeping them healthy and reducing blood pressure.

In a long-term, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study, stevia reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure. On average, participants’ blood pressure reduced from baseline 150 mm/Hg to 140 mm/Hg systolic and 95 mm/Hg to 89 mm/Hg diastolic.

And, in another double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, stevia lowered blood pressure quite significantly – by an average of 14 millimeters of mercury in both systolic and diastolic readings. Those are impressive numbers!

Despite its role as a sweetener, stevia may have a side benefit to for those with hypertension – blood sugar regulation. Scientific studies show that extracts of stevia regulated blood sugar and reduced blood pressure.

A clinical study showed that stevia extract actually improved glucose tolerance by decreasing plasma glucose levels during the test and after overnight fasting in all participants. Regulating blood sugar is very important for those with high blood pressure. When blood sugar levels are high, blood vessels are inflamed. Many people with diabetes have high blood pressure as well. In a paired, cross-over clinical study, stevioside (one of the compounds in stevia) reduced glucose levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Further scientific studies show that stevia works to control blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin secretion by the pancreatic beta cells. It shows great potential in treating type 2 diabetes. Further scientific studies show that stevia works to control blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin secretion by the pancreatic beta cells. Its shows great potential in treating type 2 diabetes as well as hypertension.

 

Hawthorn extract:

Hawthorn (Crataegus spp. Oxycantha) has been used since ancient ties as a medicinal herb – even being mentioned by the Greek herbalist Dioscorides, in the first century AD. Traditionally, it has generally been used for support of the heart. Modern research points to bioflavonoid-like complexes in hawthorn leaf and flower that seem to be most responsible for its benefits on cardiac health, like blood vessel elasticity.

The bioflavonoids found in hawthorn include oligomeric procyanidins, vitexin, quercetin, and hyperoside. They have numerous benefits on the cardiovascular system. Hawthorn can improve coronary artery blood flow and the contractions of the heart muscle. Scientific studies show that the procyanidins in hawthorn are responsible for its ability to make the aorta and other blood vessels more flexible and relaxed, so that blood Pumps more slowly and with less effort – sparing the cardiovascular system such a hard workout.

The procyanidins in hawthorn also have antioxidant properties – protecting against free radical cellular damage.

And, hawthorn may also inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme. Angiotensin-converting enzyme is responsible for retaining sodium and water, and may have roots in our evolutionary development. It influences blood vessel contraction and dilation, sodium and water balance and heart cell development – just about everything that has to do with blood pressure. This may have developed as a way of dealing with periods of drought and stress. By narrowing the blood vessels, the body could guarantee an adequate supply of blood and focus on repairing tissue.

Unfortunately, that can lead to real problems these days. Since many of us live in an industrialized society, and frequently have pretty sedentary lifestyles, conserving sodium just makes the conditions for high blood pressure that much worse.

Like the other ingredients in this combination, hawthorn showed benefits on other body systems, too. In clinical and scientific studies, it not only lowered blood pressure, but also showed anti-anxiety properties and regulated blood sugar.

 

Olive leaf extract:

Olive leaf (Olea europaea) comes up again and again in scientific and clinical studies as having beneficial effects on hypertension. One of olive leaf’s most beneficial compounds is oleuropein – the same compound that makes olive oil so helpful in reducing blood pressure. Here again, we have to look at the traditional Mediterranean diet, which features voluminous use of olives and olive oil. Not surprisingly, blood pressure is generally much lower in Greek and Italian populations.

But it’s not just the diet – scientific studies showed that oleuropein lowered blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels and prevented buildup of plaque in arteries. Plus, whether in olive leaf extract or in olive oil, oleuropein works as an antioxidant, too.

 

Dandelion leaf extract:

Dandelion (Taraxacum offinale) leaves provide a healthy supply of vitamins, much like spinach. In fact, although it has become the bane of North American gardeners and lawn owners, dandelion greens are a component of many gourmet salads.

Medicinally, dandelion has been used for centuries, dating back to ancient Greece. Leaves intended for medicinal use are harvested before flowering, to ensure the most nutrients.

They are a very rich source of vitamin A, and contain vitamin D, vitamin C, carious B vitamins, iron, silicon, magnesium, zinc and manganese, too. Dandelion leaves produce a diuretic effect in the body, similar to a prescription drug. Since one of dandelion leaf’s traditional uses was the treatment of water retention, it’s really not too surprising. Dandelion leaf is also rich in potassium – one of the vital minerals many Americans lack in their diet. So, even though it may act as a diuretic, it replaces more potassium than the body expels.

The diuretic effect of dandelion can relieve hypertension by drawing excess water and sodium from the body and releasing it through the kidneys as urine. Getting rid of extra water and sodium allows the blood vessels to relax – lowering blood pressure.

 

Lycopene:

If a nutrient can be called exciting, lycopene is it. Lycopene is found mostly in tomatoes and processed tomato products, like pasta and pizza sauce. Related to beta-carotene lycopene shows great antioxidant abilities among its many talents. In fact, it shows even greater free-radical scavenging properties than beta-carotene, its more famous cousin. Healthy intakes of lycopene can guard against a variety of chronic conditions, including lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol, lowering homocysteine levels and reducing blood platelet stickiness that can lead to clogged arteries. It’s even being studied for its protective effect against prostate cancer.

And, for proof, you don’t have to look too far to see the amazing effect lycopene intake can have on health. The Mediterranean diet provides an excellent example. Its high intakes of vegetables, (tomatoes, of course, playing a central role) fish, and whole grains improve cholesterol levels and lower blood pressure. The research on lycopene as a stand-alone nutrient has been compelling. A randomized clinical trial found that not having enough lycopene was associated with early thickening of the arteries.

So, it makes sense that other clinical trials, showed that higher intakes of lycopene frequently meant less thickening of arteries, and a reduced risk of heart attack. In one study, the risk of heart attack was 60% lower in individuals with the highest levels of lycopene. In a multicenter study, similar results were found – men with the highest levels of lycopene had a 48% lower risk of heart attack.

 

Q. What can I expect taking this herbal combination?

A. You should notice both systolic and diastolic numbers lowering in about two weeks. The scientific study showed that for pre-hypertensive and stage I, (early hypertensive individuals) this combination for ingredients lowers both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

When you’re taking herbs to support your blood pressure, it’s important to keep it monitored so you have an accurate reading (and record) of your numbers. If you need to, you can pick up a home blood pressure monitoring device. These can retail for anywhere from $30 all the way up to $200, but buying one in the $30 to $50 range is a good idea and money well spent. Consider taking the machine to your local doctor’s office or fire department to have it tested for accuracy against a professional blood pressure monitor. See the chart below for tips on getting an accurate reading from a home monitor.

 

Tips for Accurate Blood Pressure Monitoring:

-Relax for about 5 to 10 minutes before measurement.

-If you have just come inside from cold outdoors allow yourself to warm up.

-Remove tight-fitting clothing and jewelry.

-Unless your physician recommends otherwise, use left arm to measure pressure.

-Sit, don’t stand.

-Remain still and do not talk while using the monitor.

 

Q. Are there any side effects?

A. There were no side effects noted in the study. However, because of the mild diuretic effect of dandelion leaf extract, you may notice an increase in trips to the bathroom. It’s always important to make sure you don’t get dehydrated, so you may want to drink more water during the day.

 

Conclusion:

High blood pressure doesn’t happen overnight. As we get older, the likelihood of developing hypertension increases. And, stressful, fast-forward lifestyles, bad diets and no exercise conspire to raise our blood pressure.

 

In my own practice I have helped patients move toward a healthier lifestyle, including diet, exercise, and blood-pressure reducing supplements. They live better, more vibrant lives as a result, and their blood pressure normalizes. It really can happen – you can bring your blood pressure back to normal, and this combination of scientifically and clinically validated ingredients can help.



--
Buy Supplements to lower Blood Pressure at Vitanet ®

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Pain - Post Op and Relaxation
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Date: July 13, 2005 09:24 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pain - Post Op and Relaxation

Relaxation, Music Reduce Post-Op Pain. New research has found that relaxation and music, separately or together, significantly reduce patients' pain following major abdominal surgery. The study, published in the May issue of the journal Pain, found that these methods reduce pain more than pain medication alone. Led by Marion Good, PhD, RN, of Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, the study is supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), at the National Institutes of Health. "This is important news for the millions of Americans who undergo surgery and experience postoperative pain each year," said Dr. Patricia A. Grady, director of the NINR.

"Better pain management can reduce hospital stays and speed recovery, ultimately improving patients' quality of life." Dr. Good and her research team studied three groups of patients undergoing abdominal surgery. In addition to the usual pain medication, one group used a jaw relaxation technique, another group listened to music, and a third group received a combination of relaxation and music.

Findings revealed that, after surgery, the three treatment groups had significantly less pain than the control group, which received only pain medication. "Both medication and self-care methods which involve patient participation are needed for relief," said Dr. Good.

"These relaxation and music self-care methods provide more complete relief without the undesired side effects of some pain medications." The findings have important implications for the 23 million people who undergo surgery and experience postoperative pain annually in the United States. Pain can hamper recovery by heightening the body's response to the stress of surgery and increasing tissue breakdown, coagulation and fluid retention. Pain also interferes with appetite and sleep and can lead to complications that prolong hospitalization.

Dr. Good and her research staff worked with 500 patients aged 18-70, who were undergoing gynecological, gastrointestinal, exploratory or urinary surgery. Prior to surgery, those in the music, relaxation or combination groups practiced the techniques. The relaxation technique consisted of letting the lower jaw drop slightly, softening the lips, resting the tongue in the bottom of the mouth, and breathing slowly and rhythmically with a three-rhythm pattern of inhale, exhale and rest. Patients in the music group chose one of five kinds of soothing music--harp, piano, synthesizer, orchestral or slow jazz.

On the first and second days after surgery, all patients received morphine or Demerol for pain relief by pressing a button connected to their intravenous patient controlled analgesia Pumps. The groups receiving the additional intervention used earphones to listen to music and relaxation tapes during walking and rest, while the control group did not. The research team measured the patients' pain before and after 15 minutes of bed rest and four times during walking to see if the sensation and distress of pain changed.

Dr. Good found that during these two days postsurgery the three treatment groups had significantly less pain than the control group during both walking and rest. "Patients can take more control of their postoperative pain using these self-care methods," says Dr. Good. "Nurses and physicians preparing patients for surgery and caring for them afterwards should encourage patients to use relaxation and music to enhance the effectiveness of pain medication and hasten recovery."

Dr. Good's findings have implications for future research into the effectiveness of self-care methods on other types of pain, including chronic pain, cancer pain, and pain of the critically ill.

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Vitamin D Lack Linked to Hip Fracture. Vitamin D deficiency in post-menopausal women is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass. In a group of women with osteoporosis hospitalized for hip fracture, 50 percent were found to have a previously undetected vitamin D deficiency. In the control group, women who had not suffered a hip fracture but who were hospitalized for an elective hip replacement, only a very small percentage had vitamin D deficiency, although one-fourth of those women also had osteoporosis. These findings were reported in the April 28, 1999, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study, conducted by Meryl S. LeBoff, MD; Lynn Kohlmeier, MD; Shelley Hurwitz, PhD; Jennifer Franklin, BA; John Wright, MD; and Julie Glowacki, PhD; of the Endocrine Hypertension Division, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, was supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR. These investigators studied women admitted to either Brigham and Women's Hospital or the New England Baptist Hospital, both in Boston, between January 1995 and June 1998.

A group of 98 postmenopausal women who normally reside in their own homes were chosen for the study. Women with bone deterioration from other causes were excluded from the study.

There were 30 women with hip fractures caused by osteoporosis and 68 hospitalized for elective joint replacement. Of these 68, 17 women also had osteoporosis as determined by the World Health Organization bone density criteria. All the participants answered questions regarding their lifestyle, reproductive history, calcium in their diet, and physical activity.

Bone mineral density of the spine, hip, and total body were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) technique, as was body composition. Blood chemistry and urinary calcium levels were analyzed. The two groups of women with osteoporosis did not differ significantly in either time since menopause or bone density in the spine or hip. They did, however, differ in total bone density.

The women admitted for a hip fracture had fewer hours of exercise than the control group. Fifty percent of the women with hip fractures were deficient in vitamin D, 36.7 percent had elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels (a hormone which can stimulate loss of calcium from bone), and 81.8 percent had calcium in their urine, suggesting inappropriate calcium loss. Blood levels of calcium were lower in the women with hip fractures than in either elective group.

These researchers propose that vitamin D supplementation at the time of fracture may speed up recovery and reduce risk of fracture in the future. Current Dietary Reference Intake Guidelines contain a daily recommendation of 400 IU of vitamin D for people aged 51 through 70 and 600 IU for those over age 70.

"We know that a calcium-rich diet and regular weight-bearing exercise can help prevent osteoporosis. This new research suggests that an adequate intake of vitamin D, which the body uses to help absorb calcium, may help women to reduce their risk of hip fracture, even when osteoporosis is present," observed Dr. Evan C. Hadley, NIA Associate Director for geriatrics research.

"Osteoporosis leads to more than 300,000 hip fractures each year, causing pain, frequent disability, and costly hospitalizations or long-term care. "Prevention of such fractures would greatly improve the quality of life for many older women and men, as well as significantly reduce medical costs." The bones in the body often undergo rebuilding. Some cells, osteoclasts, dissolve older parts of the bones. Then, bone-building cells known as osteoblasts create new bone using calcium and phosphorus.

As people age, if osteoporosis develops, more bone is dissolved than is rebuilt, and the bones weaken and become prone to fracture. Also in many older persons, levels of vitamin D in the blood are low because they eat less or spend less time in the sun, which stimulates the body's own production of vitamin D.

Experts do not understand fully the causes of osteoporosis. However, they do know that lack of estrogen which accompanies menopause, diets low in calcium, and lack of exercise contribute to the problem. Eighty percent of older Americans who face the possibility of pain and debilitation from an osteoporosis-related fracture are women. One out of every two women and one in eight men over the age of 50 will have such a fracture sometime in the future. These fractures usually occur in the hip, wrist, and spine.

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Sleep Apnea, Diabetes Link Found. Adults who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea are three times more likely to also have diabetes and more likely to suffer a stroke in the future, according to a new UCLA School of Dentistry/Department of Veterans Affairs study published today in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Sleep apnea, a serious condition marked by loud snoring, irregular breathing and interrupted oxygen intake, affects an estimated nine million Americans. The culprit? Carrying too many extra pounds.

"The blame falls squarely on excess weight gain," said Dr. Arthur H. Friedlander, associate professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery at the UCLA School of Dentistry and associate chief of staff at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Los Angeles. Surplus weight interferes with insulin's ability to propel sugars from digested food across the cell membrane, robbing the cells of needed carbohydrates. Diabetes results when glucose builds up in the bloodstream and can't be utilized by the body. Being overweight can also lead to obstructive sleep apnea, according to Friedlander.

"When people gain too much weight, fatty deposits build up along the throat and line the breathing passages," he explained. "The muscles in this region slacken during sleep, forcing the airway to narrow and often close altogether." Reclining on one's back magnifies the situation. "When an overweight person lies down and goes to sleep," Friedlander said, "gravity shoves the fat in the neck backwards. This blocks the airway and can bring breathing to a halt."

Friedlander tested the blood sugar of 54 randomly selected male veterans whom doctors had previously diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. He discovered that 17 of the 54 patients, or 31 percent, unknowingly suffered from adult-onset diabetes. Using the same sample, Friedlander also took panoramic X-rays of the men's necks and jaws. The X-rays indicated that 12 of the 54 patients, or 22 percent, revealed calcified plaques in the carotid artery leading to the brain.

These plaques block blood flow, significantly increasing patients' risk for stroke. Seven of the 12, or 58 percent, were also diagnosed with diabetes. In dramatic comparison, the 17 patients diagnosed with diabetes showed nearly twice the incidence of blockage. Seven of the 17 men, or 41 percent, had carotid plaques. Only five of the 54 patients who displayed plaques did not have also diabetes. If he conducted this study today, Friedlander notes, he would likely find a higher number of diabetic patients. After he completed the study in 1997, the American Diabetes Association lowered its definition for diabetes from 140 to 126 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood.

"This is the first time that science has uncovered a link between sleep apnea and diabetes," said Friedlander. "The data suggest that someone afflicted with both diabetes and sleep apnea is more likely to suffer a stroke in the future." "Persons going to the doctor for a sleep-apnea exam should request that their blood be screened for diabetes, especially if they are overweight," he cautioned. More than half of the individuals who develop diabetes as adults will need to modify their diet and take daily insulin in order to control the disease, he added.

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Stress, Surgery May Increase CA Tumors. Stress and surgery may increase the growth of cancerous tumors by suppressing natural killer cell activity, says a Johns Hopkins researcher.

Malignancies and viral infections are in part controlled by the immune system's natural killer (NK) cells, a sub-population of white blood cells that seek out and kill certain tumor and virally infected cells. In a study using animal models, natural killer cell activity was suppressed by physical stress or surgery, resulting in a significant increase in tumor development.

These findings suggest that protective measures should be considered to prevent metastasis for patients undergoing surgery to remove a cancerous tumor, according to Gayle Page, D.N.Sc., R.N., associate professor and Independence Foundation chair at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. "Human studies have already found a connection between the level of NK activity and susceptibility to several different types of cancer," says Page, an author of the study.

"We sought to determine the importance of stress-induced suppression of NK activity and thus learn the effects of stress and surgery on tumor development. "Many patients undergo surgery to remove cancerous tumors that have the potential to spread. If our findings in rats can be generalized to such clinical settings, then these circumstances could increase tumor growth during or shortly after surgery." The research was conducted at Ohio State University College of Nursing and the Department of Psychology at UCLA, where Page held previous positions, and at Tel Aviv University.

Results of the study are published in the March issue of the International Journal of Cancer. In laboratory studies, Page and her colleagues subjected rats to either abdominal surgery or physical stress, and then inoculated them with cancer cells. In the rats that had undergone surgery, the researchers observed a 200 to 500 percent increase in the incidence of lung tumor cells, an early indicator of metastasis, compared with rats that had not received surgery.

The experiment also showed that stress increased lung tumor incidence and significantly increased the mortality in the animals inoculated with cancer cells. "Our results show that, under specific circumstances, resistance to tumor development is compromised by physical stress and surgical intervention," says Page.

"Because surgical procedures are life-saving and cannot be withheld, protective measures should be considered that will prevent suppression of the natural killer cell activity and additional tumor development. "Researchers do not yet know how to prevent surgery-induced immune suppression, but early animal studies have shown increased use of analgesia reduces the risk."

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, and the Chief Scientist of the Israeli Ministry of Health. Lead author was Shamgar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D., and other authors were Raz Yirmiya, Ph.D., and Guy Shakhar.

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GARLIC IS A POWERFUL DETOXIFIER
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Date: June 25, 2005 10:21 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: GARLIC IS A POWERFUL DETOXIFIER

GARLIC IS A POWERFUL DETOXIFIER

One of the most difficult toxins to neutralize in the body is heavy metal poisoning. Lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic and copper pollutants threaten our health on a daily basis. Industrial pollution Pumps out enormous quantities of lead and mercury, not to mention the contribution of certain paints and amalgam fillings. Fish are frequently contaminated and copper can enter our bodies form metal water pipes commonly installed in our homes and work places. Treating heavy metal poisoning has involved a process called chelation. Japanese research has discovered, however, that raw garlic extract can effectively protect the body from metal tox i c i t y. Controlled studies performed on both animal and humans concluded that arlic can prevent the toxic effect of heavy metals from damaging and destroying erythrocyte membrane (certain type of blood cell).

“In another study, conducted in Russia, a drug made from Garlic extract was given to workers in industrial plants who were suffering from chronic lead poisoning. The daily doses of Garlic improved the symptoms of chronic lead poisoning and lowered the high porphyrin levels in the urine. The preparation also normalized elevated blood pressure in the majority of workers.”46

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Garlic for the Ages - eat garlic because it's good for your heart...
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Date: June 13, 2005 09:58 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Garlic for the Ages - eat garlic because it's good for your heart...

Garlic for the Ages by Phyllis D. Light, RH Energy Times, January 1 , 2004

If you eat garlic because it's good for your heart, you swallow a plant renowned through human history: Garlic was eaten by Roman soldiers for courage; Egyptian slaves ate it to build strength; Christians, Moslems and Hindus include it in their sacred books. Others have used it as an aphrodisiac, a vampire deterrent and a magical charm.

Garlic has a long history as a culinary and medicinal herb that people either love or hate. Its pungent aroma and warming flavor captivates or repels, but its wealth of natural chemicals does great things for your heart.

Garlic (Allium sativum), a member of the onion family, is native to Siberia but, in modern times, has become a treasured naturalized citizen grown all over the world. Garlic's use in folk medicine dates back about 7,000 years, making it one of the oldest known medicinal foods or herbs.

In modern times, garlic is generally used as a condiment lending a unique, pungent flavor to dishes, but in medieval times, garlic was cooked and eaten as a vegetable in its own right. Today you can revel in a wealth of garlic choices, consuming garlic raw, cooked in various recipes, as a dried concentrated powder, as a fresh liquid extract or as aged garlic powder.

Powerhouse Herb

Each little clove of garlic is a powerhouse of good-for-you natural compounds, vitamins and minerals. The biologically active constituents of garlic include allyl sulfur compounds as well as the minerals germanium and selenium.

When you chop up raw garlic and allowed it to stand for about 10 minutes or more, the herb's fragments release an enzyme that converts its compounds from allyl sulfur to another natural chemical called allicin.

Although some allicin is found in garlic before it is cut apart, the yield multiplies considerably when the garlic clove is chopped or pressed and exposed to water (Garlic Conference, Newport Beach, 11/15/98; Penn State).

Many researchers believe that the more allicin produced, the better the health benefits. (Although this is still being debated among the garlic cognoscenti.)

But garlic's benefits don't end meekly on the kitchen counter with its allicin content rising.

Cooked garlic and aged garlic contain other helpful chemicals called diallyl sulphides. Consequently, in any form, garlic produces beneficial health effects.

Fortunately, since raw garlic juice or oil can often irritate the stomach lining, especially in people with sensitive stomachs and delicate digestive systems, garlic supplements and cooked garlic are both helpful for heart health.

Aged Garlic Extract

Aging garlic significantly reduces its irritating compounds and makes it easier on the stomach.

In the aged form, all of garlic's healthy sulfur-containing compounds are converted to water- soluble compounds that retain garlic's natural health benefits. In addition, the pungent odor of the garlic is greatly reduced, an outcome many people desire.

When a group of researchers at Brown University studied the effects of aged garlic extract on people's cholesterol levels, they found that after six months, cholesterol dropped about 6% (Am J Clin Nutr 1996; 64:866-70).

In another study from Brown, researchers found that aged garlic extract reduced platelet adhesion, a sticky blood problem that can cause vessel blockages (New Drug Clin 45(3):456-66). When platelets are less sticky, they are less likely to form blood clots that can cause heart attacks.

Garlic and Heart Disease

A growing body of research shows that a clove of garlic a day can significantly reduce your risk of heart disease.

A four-year study of 280 people who took dried garlic powder three times a day found a striking reduction in the types of arterial plaque blockages that threaten the blood supply to your heart. Interestingly, in this particular study, women displayed a greater reduction in plaque than men (Atherosclerosis 2000; 150:437-8).

Another study found that garlic may also keep important blood vessels more supple and less likely to spasm. Arterial spasms have been linked to heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems in women.

Aortic Complications

As you age, the aorta, one of the main arteries that carries blood, may harden, reducing blood flow from the heart and placing damaging stress on a number of other bodily organs. In research at Ohio State University, people who took garlic supplements had 15% less aortic stiffness than people who avoided garlic (Circulation).

In this study, scientists found that the older people enjoyed the greatest cardiovascular benefits from daily garlic use.

Researchers believe this extra benefit is linked to the fact that as you age, the endothelial tissue in the linings of the aorta and other blood vessels become less responsive to the need to dilate (expand). As a result, when more blood flow is required, and the heart Pumps faster, these vessels take more of a beating from the friction of blood passing through them.

That restriction in dilation has two damaging consequences: In one instance, vessel walls can be injured. In response to these injuries, cholesterol collects on artery walls, plaque forms and the blood supply to the heart muscle can be restricted, leading to a heart attack. In other cases, arteries can restrict blood flow to the heart simply because of the inability to expand sufficiently.

The Ohio State researchers found that arteries in folks aged 70 to 80 benefited the most from taking garlic. But those in their 60s also benefited significantly.

Garlic's natural antioxidant properties can also help protect the heart from damage after surgery (BMC Pharmacology 9/02).

In a study performed on lab animals, researchers found that oxidative stress, a source of cell damage that takes place after surgery, dropped when the animals ate a diet that included garlic.

Oxidative stress can seriously reduce cardiac function, limit the amount of blood the heart can pump and cause permanent damage to the heart muscle.

Garlic Against Blood Clots

Under normal circumstances, blood clots serve a useful purpose: Cut yourself and a blood clot stops the bleeding. Without this clotting ability, you might bleed to death. But if your blood is too prone to clotting, these clumps can cut off blood supply to your heart and other organs, endangering your life.

In a study of apparently healthy individuals whose relatives had already suffered from heart disease, researchers found that their blood formed thick, tangled blood clots, increasing their risk of heart problems (Circulation rapid access 9/23/02). These blood clots are made of a substance called fibrin, a protein in the plasma that can form elastic threads that cut off blood flow.

While these researchers recommended aspirin as an anti-clotting measure for people at risk of heart disease, garlic can also help break up fibrin and possibly lower your chance of heart problems (Pharmatherapy 5(2): 83).

The fibrin that forms clots is produced by blood cells called platelets. Other scientists who have looked into garlic's benefits believe that one of its natural chemicals called ajoene may keep platelets from producing excessive fibrin and gumming up the flow of blood through arteries.

If you've rarely indulged in garlic, you may need a period of adjustment in growing accustomed to its unique taste and aroma. But its heart benefits confirm the long-ago observation by Pliny, an ancient Roman naturalist, that "garlic has powerful properties."



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Higher Mind - Smart Nutrients for the Performance of a Lifetime...
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Date: June 02, 2005 12:18 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Higher Mind - Smart Nutrients for the Performance of a Lifetime...

Our adult years are the time to reap the fruit of an active, meaningful life – appreciated by family and friends who value our experience and knowledge. For some, however, their later years are clouded by a mental decline that erodes their capacity to enjoy life. More of us are becoming apprehensive about the future health of our minds. Will we still be able to communicate our needs as well as our wisdom? As science focuses its investigative might on the workings of the human brain, new findings suggest that it is possible to enjoy a vital, healthy brain and mind – well into old age. Based on compelling research, Source Naturals formulated HIGHER MIND. It contains the most important Neuroceuticals™ now recognized by nutrition scientists – including phosphatidyl serine, a natural nutrient that promotes cognitive function. The connection is clear: nourish your brain; enrich your life.

To have a healthy, well-functioning brain and nervous system, we need the correct nutrients. Our diets must provide the necessary raw materials for nerve cells to grow, for the synthesis of neurochemicals, and for the maintenance of nerve cell membranes. Nutritional deficiencies can alter the brain’s metabolism, which is expressed by changes in perception and thinking, behavior and mood.

Brain Cells – Issued at Birth

Before birth, neurons (nerve cells) are created at the amazing rate of 15 million per hour. As infants, we have over 100 billion neurons, but this is the most we will ever have because – unlike most other cells in our body – nerve cells do not reproduce. A different strategy is used to replace the neurons that are naturally lost throughout life: nerve cells repair themselves and grow by extending branches of nerve fibers called dendrites (from the Latin word for tree). These are the communication links with other neurons that form the circuitry of the brain. A single neuron may be in contact with up to a hundred thousand others! When the density of this fragile organic communication network decreases, we experience a corresponding decline in mental acuity.

Brain Cell Membranes

The membrane is the working surface of a cell. It needs to be strong yet flexible, so the cell can maintain its integrity and be able to move and change shape. The membrane regulates the flow of nutrients into the cell and the removal of waste, plus controls the passage of molecular messages from outside the cell to its interior. Membrane ion Pumps use a third of the cell’s energy just to maintain the correct ratio of sodium to potassium. In neurons, a rapid exchange of sodium and potassium ions across the nerve membrane is responsible for their unique ability to generate the electrical impulses that are the basis of all communication in the nervous system. As cells age, their membranes become less fluid and more rigid. Key membrane molecules called phospholipids are crucial to the health of neuron membranes, allowing the brain to maintain its youthful quality. The phospholipids in HIGHER MIND – especially phosphatidyl serine and phosphatidyl choline – are essential nutritional supplements for the aging brain.

Phosphatidyl Serine – Key to Cognition

For the past decade, researchers have been investigating the role in brain health of a remarkable neuroceutical, phosphatidyl serine (PS). This key structural molecule is integral to the matrix of fats and proteins that compose cell membranes. Although PS is found in all the cells of the body, its highest concentration is in nerve cell membranes. PS is rarely found in the foods we eat, so the body has to synthesize it, but the process is energy- intensive and becomes less efficient with age. Consequently, our levels of PS tend to decline as we get older. PS taken as a dietary supplement is well-absorbed, readily reaching the brain, where it helps create more effective, well-structured nerve cell membranes. The positive effects of PS supplementation have been demonstrated by 23 clinical studies with over 1200 human subjects, ages 43 to 90. Consistent and statistically significant results have confirmed the value of PS in improving age-related cognitive decline, as well as in improving behavioral aspects such as apathy and withdrawal.1 A major study concluded that for one particular measurable parameter of higher mental functions, PS recipients achieved scores of persons roughly 12 years younger.2 Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is one of the most important proteins the body makes. It enables neurons to extend dendrites out to other neurons, allowing the brain to maintain an effective communication network. In experiments, PS enhanced the production and reception of NGF, which tend to drop off radically with age.3 The effects of PS at the cellular level are manifest in the performance of the brain as a whole. Subjects taking PS showed increased levels of brain energy metabolism. This enhancement corresponded to higher performances on cognitive tests.4

The Chemistry of Thought

Science now understands the role of neurotransmitters in regulating the body’s complex network of behavior. Neurotransmitters are the chemicals used by neurons to communicate with each other. Activated by a neuron’s electrical impulse, neurotransmitters travel between nerve cells, where they excite or inhibit (in various degrees) the electrical impulse in neighboring cells. One of HIGHER MIND’S key strategies is to improve the brain’s ability to produce and use acetylcholine, a key excitatory neurotransmitter. Acetylcholine is essential for both the storage and recall of memory, and partly responsible for concentration and focus. It also plays a significant role in muscular coordination. Patients showing cognitive decline may exhibit reduced ability to synthesize and utilize acetylcholine.5 The chemical building blocks of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters are called precursors. The most important one for acetylcholine is DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol). This natural substance is found in various fish, such as anchovies and sardines. Supplements of DMAE (and phosphatidyl choline) promote increased levels of choline in the brain. Acetylcholine is created when an acetyl group is attached to the choline molecule, with the help of choline acetyl transferase (CAT), a key brain enzyme. Acetyl L-carnitine is an amino acid that activates this enzyme. Acetyl L-carnitine may also help reduce lipofuscin deposits in the brain because of its involvement in the metabolism of fatty acids.6 Lipofuscin is composed of oxidized fats and proteins; the brown “age spots” on the back of an elderly person’s hand are made of lipofuscin. The amino acid L-pyroglutamic acid sensitizes the acetylcholine receptor sites on a neuron membrane. A given amount of acetylcholine will then have a larger, more powerful effect. Studies have shown that supplements of L-pyroglutamic acid seem to enhance the ability to focus, remember, and learn.

Total Nutrition for the Brain

The neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenalin are critical to motor coordination, motivation, concentration, and alertness. Like acetylcholine, their production tends to decline with age. The precursors and activators of dopamine and noradrenalin included in HIGHER MIND are the amino acids N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine and DL-phenylalanine (DLPA), plus folic acid, vitamins B-3, B-6, and C. DLPA is also a precursor to PEA, a neuroamine that has a stimulating effect on the brain. Glutamine is an amino acid precursor to glutamic acid, a major excitatory neurotransmitter involved in mental activity and learning. Glutamine acts as an alternative fuel source for the brain when blood sugar levels are low. It also helps the brain dispose of waste ammonia, which is a natural result of protein breakdown but is irritating to neurons even at low levels. GABA is a dietary amino acid which is also an inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABA works to calm and balance the mind, enhancing mental focus. Along with taurine, these two relaxing neurotransmitters provide a balancing influence to the other, excitatory neurotransmitters. Taurine is found in brain tissue more than anywhere else in the body. It has antioxidant properties and serves as a nerve cell membrane stabilizer, preventing excessive or erratic electrical activity in the brain.

The Importance of Magnesium

Magnesium must be present in adequate amounts in the synaptic gaps between neurons or the neurons become hyper-reactive: causing noises to sound excessively loud and emotional reactions to be extreme. Magnesium also activates a key enzyme responsible for maintaining cellular sodium- potassium balance, which is absolutely essential to the electrical activity of nerve cells, as well as to the existence of the cell itself. (Cells would burst if the sodium-potassium ratio were wrong.) Magnesium also helps relax cerebral blood vessels and is important to the manufacture of ATP, the chief energy molecule of the brain. A buildup of aluminum has been found in the brains of some elderly. In 1989, the British medical journal Lancet published a study showing that drinking water with aluminum can increase the risk of damage by up to 50%. An abundant natural element, aluminum is now a common feature in our culture. It’s found in tap water, cookware, deodorants, beverage containers, baked goods, and of course as aluminum foil. In the brain, aluminum breaks down the structure of neurons – causing them to starve – by displacing magnesium from tubulin, a glycoprotein responsible for making microtubules. These tiny pipe-like structures within a neuron provide needed rigidity, as well as transport nutrients from the nucleus down the dendrites to the ends of the nerve cell. Magnesium malate is an excellent form of magnesium that ensures neurons receive this vital mineral.

B is for Brain Vitamins

HIGHER MIND also contains a high profile of B vitamins and other key nutrients that are often N A T U R A L S S O U R C E Strategies for Wellness SM ¤ lacking in older individuals. A deficiency in any of the B vitamins can alter nerve function and psychological well-being. Thiamine (B-1), known as the “nerve vitamin,” was first recognized because its deficiency caused beriberi, a degenerative nerve disease. Thiamine is part of the structure of nerve cell membranes and is important to the reparative process that neurons need to offset the stress of continual firing of the electrical impulse. Low amounts of thiamine can cause cell malnutrition in the hypothalamus, the brain’s memory center. 7 NAD and NADH, two coenzyme forms of Niacin (B-3), are the most plentiful coenzymes in the brain. They are essential to hundreds of enzymatic reactions, including ones that produce energy. NADH can stimulate the synthesis of key mood-elevating neurotransmitters. It is also one of the body’s most potent antioxidants. Pantothenic acid (B-5), cyanocobalamin (B-12), and folic acid are required to form the myelin sheath – the insulating covering of nerve fibers. A diet low in pantothenic acid has been shown to make test subjects emotionally upset, irritable, and depressed.7 A lack of B-12 can result in poor concentration and, in severe deficiencies, hallucinations. Pyridoxine (B-6) is precursor to over 60 enzymatic reactions and is involved in the synthesis of several neurotransmitters.

Brain Power

Brain cells almost exclusively burn glucose for their energy (other cells can also burn fat), and typically require 50% of all the glucose in the blood. Two B-like vitamins help in the utilization of glucose: PAK (pyridoxine alpha-ketoglutarate) may potentiate the effects of insulin and improve glucose utilization to the cells;8 Biotin is important for the transformation of glucose into energy in the brain. Lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 are metabolic energizers that help produce ATP, the primary energy molecule in the body. Since the brain uses 20% of the body’s total energy supply, efficient ATP production is vital. Lipoic acid and CoQ10 are also powerful antioxidants that help regenerate other antioxidants in the body. The blood vessels feeding the brain become less efficient as we pass middle age. Since the brain depends on the bloodstream to deliver nutrients and oxygen and to remove waste, the quality of this blood flow is paramount to proper brain nutrition. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown in scientific studies to increase blood flow to the brain by helping vessels to dilate. It also promotes the smoothness and healthy integrity of blood vessel linings.

For the Life of Your Mind Without proper nutrition, the brain will deteriorate; therefore strategies are needed to both enhance current brain function and protect it throughout life. Based on the latest scientific findings, Source Naturals HIGHER MIND is formulated with neuroceuticals that support the mental functions that tend to decline with age. They give your brain the nourishment it needs to integrate perception, memory, and learning into a more comprehensive awareness – so you can excel for a lifetime.

References
1. Palmieri, G., et al. (1987). Clin. Trials J. 24: 73- 83.
2. Crook, T.H., et al. (1991). Neurol. 41: 644-49.
3. Nunzi, M.G., et al. In Phospholipids: Biochemical, Pharmaceutical and Analytical Considerations (ed. I. Hanin and G. Pepeu).
New York: Plenum Press, 1990.
4. Heiss, W.D., et al. (1993). Annals N.Y. Acad. Sci. 695: 327-31.
5. Passeri, M., et al. (1990). Int. J. Clin. Pharm. Res. X(1/2): 75-79.
6. Kohjimoto, Y., et al. (1988). Japanese Journal of Pharmacology 48(3): 365-71.
7. Philpott, William H. Brain Allergies: the Psychonutrient Connection. New Canaan: Keats, 1987.
8. Passariello, N., et al. (1983). Int. J. Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. Toxicol. 21: 252-56.



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Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ...
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Date: June 02, 2005 12:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ...

Heart Science 30 tabs

Your heart is crucial to every function of your body. It is the sole organ which Pumps oxygen-rich blood through the entire circulatory system, feeding your cells and making life possible. Only recently are Americans realizing the importance of a proper low-fat diet, regular exercise, giving up cigarette smoking, and cutting down alcohol consumption to maintaining a healthy heart. Unfortunately, there has been a huge gap in the number of nutritional supplements which provide nutrients and herbs to support normal heart function. That’s where Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE comes in. Two years in the making, and backed by numerous scientific studies, the nutrients in HEART SCIENCE are some of the most soundly researched of all. Combining high potencies of these super-nutrients, HEART SCIENCE is the most comprehensive, cutting edge nutritional approach to proper heart care available.

Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE— The Five Tiered Approach to Heart Health

Your heart never rests. Even while you sleep, your heart must keep working, relying on the constant generation of energy by the body for its very survival. If this vital organ stops beating for even a short amount of time, all bodily functions cease and life ends. Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE helps support heart function on the chemical, cellular, structural, and energetic levels. This broad spectrum formula includes ingredients specifically geared for
1) generating energy,
2) decreasing harmful homocysteine levels,
3) fighting oxidized cholesterol,
4) maintaining the heart’s electrical rhythm, and
5) protecting artery and capillary linings.

Energy Generators for An Energetic Organ

Every day, the human heart beats about 104,000 times, pumping over 8,000 liters of blood through the body! Because it requires so much energy to perform efficiently, the experts at Source Naturals included specialty nutrients in HEART SCIENCE such as Coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine — integral factors in the body’s energy production cycles — to enhance the body’s energy supply.

There are three main interconnected energy generating cycles in our cells — the Glycolytic (sugar-burning) cycle, the Krebs’ (citric acid) cycle, and the Electron Transport Chain. Together they supply about 90 to 95% of our body’s entire energy supply, using fats, sugars, and amino acids as fuel. Coenzyme Q10 is one of the non-vitamin nutrients needed to maximally convert food into ATP (the energy producing molecule). It is the vital connecting link for three of the four main enzyme complexes in the Electron Transport Chain, the next step in energy generation after the Krebs’ cycle. Using the raw materials generated by the Krebs’ cycle, the Electron Transport Chain produces most of the body’s total energy! The heart is one of the bodily organs which contains the highest levels of CoQ10, precisely because it needs so much energy to function efficiently.

CoQ10 is one of the most promising nutrients for the heart under investigation today. It has been postulated that as a result of its participation in energy production, CoQ10 improves heart muscle metabolism and the electrical functioning of the heart by enhancing its pumping capacity.8 Many factors such as a high fat diet, lack of exercise, and cigarette smoking can lead to suboptimal functioning of the heart, and therefore failure of the heart to maintain adequate circulation of blood. Interestingly, people whose lifestyles reflect the above factors also tend to have depleted levels of CoQ10 in the heart muscle.10

Researchers suggest taking between 10-100 mg per day of CoQ10;18,29 HEART SCIENCE provides an impressive 60 mg of CoQ10 per 6 tablets. Similar to CoQ10, L-Carnitine is important for energy production in heart cells. It is a natural amino acid-like substance which plays a key role in transporting fatty acids, the heart’s main source of energy, to the mitochondria, the “power plants” of each cell, where they are utilized for the production of ATP. Heart and skeletal muscles are particularly vulnerable to L-Carnitine deficiency. Studies have shown that supplementation with LCarnitine improves exercise tolerance in individuals with suboptimal heart and circulatory function, and seems to lower blood lipid status and increase HDL (good) cholesterol.16, 22 Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE contains 500 mg of this extremely important compound.

Like CoQ10 and L-Carnitine, B Vitamins help improve the ability of the heart muscle to function optimally. Each B Vitamin, after being converted to its active coenzyme form, acts as a catalytic “spark plug” for the body’s production of energy. Vitamin B-1, for example, is converted to Cocarboxylase, which serves as a critical link between the Glycolytic and Krebs’ Cycles, and also participates in the conversion of amino acids into energy. A deficiency of B coenzymes within contracting muscle cells can lead to a weakened pumping of the heart.21

HEART SCIENCE is formulated with high quantities of the most absorbable forms of B Vitamins providing maximum nutrition for the high energy demands of heart cells.

Homocysteine Regulators

B Vitamins also play a crucial role in the conversion of homocysteine, a group of potentially harmful amino acids produced by the body, to methionine, another more beneficial amino acid. While it is normal for the body to produce some homocysteine, even a small elevation in homocysteine levels can have negative implications. It is well documented that individuals who are genetically predisposed to having elevated homocysteine levels (homocysteinemics) tend to have excessive plaque accumulation in the arteries and premature damage to endothelial cells (cells lining the blood vessels and heart).26 Researchers have found that even those without this genetic abnormality, whose homocysteine levels are much lower than those of homocysteinemics, still have an increased risk for premature endothelial damage and the development of plaque in the arteries.24, 26 One study conducted among normal men and women found that those with the highest levels of homocysteine were twice as likely to have clogged arteries as were those with the lowest levels.24 Furthermore, it was found that the lower the research subjects’ blood levels of folate and B-6, the higher their homocysteine levels.24 Another study found that Folic Acid administered to normal men and women who were not even deficient in folate caused a significant reduction in plasma concentrations of homocysteine!3 In order to regulate homocysteine levels, it is critical to provide the body with sufficient amounts of B-6, B-12, and Folate, whether through the diet or through supplementation. HEART SCIENCE includes high levels of these three nutrients, providing B-6 in the regular and coenzyme form for maximum utilization.

The Dangers of Oxidized LDL Cholesterol

While many people have heard that high cholesterol levels may negatively affect normal heart function, few people understand exactly what cholesterol is, or how it can become harmful. Cholesterol is a white, waxy substance produced in the liver by all animals, and used for a variety of necessary activities in the body. Your liver also manufactures two main kinds of carrier molecules which transport cholesterol throughout the system: Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and High Density Lipoprotein (HDL). Cholesterol is either carried out by LDL from the liver to all tissues in the body where it is deposited, or carried back by HDLs which remove cholesterol deposits from the arteries and carry them to the liver for disposal. Because of this, LDL cholesterol is considered damaging, while HDL is considered protective. Problems occur when there is too much LDL cholesterol in the body and not enough HDL.

When the body becomes overloaded with fat, an over-abundance of LDL particles are manufactured to process it, and they in turn become elevated in the body to a degree that the liver cannot handle. Rich in fatty acids and cholesterol, these particles are highly susceptible to free radical attack (oxidation). Once oxidized, LDL particles are no longer recognized by the body, which attacks them with immune cells. Immune cells which are bloated by oxidized lipids (called foam cells) are a key factor in the development of “fatty streaks” — the first sign of excess arterial fat accumulation. The bloated immune cells accumulate in artery lesions and create plaque in blood vessels, leading to obstruction and constriction of the vessels. Plus, these lodged foam cells continue to secrete free radicals into the bloodstream, making the problem worse.

The development of lesions in the arteries is not an uncommon problem. Arterial (and all blood vessel) walls are composed of a chemical matrix which holds the endothelial cells in place. That endothelial layer is the first and most important line of defense in preventing large molecules, such as cholesterol and fat, from entering the vessel wall. This matrix is composed of proteins, collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans (amino sugars). Arterial lesions can be caused by suboptimal collagen and elastin synthesis due to three factors: 1. Vitamin C deficiency (since Vitamin C is a key building block for collagen and elastin); 2. excessive consumption of rancid fats, or heavy usage of alcohol or cigarettes; and 3. free radical damage. Once these lesions are created, the body attempts to repair them by depositing LDL cholesterol — similar to the way one would patch a tire. If that cholesterol is not oxidized, i.e. chemically changed to a harmful, unstable molecule, then this process does not create a problem. But when arterial lesions are “patched” with foam cells, arterial walls suffer page 3 page 4 even more damage, because those foam cells release free radicals which can further damage cell membranes.

Unfortunately, most people have a lot of oxidized cholesterol floating through the bloodstream. The typical American diet, with its low antioxidant intake and overconsumption of fried and overcooked foods, contributes to the overall levels of harmful oxidized cholesterol. In fact, the average American intake of antioxidants is low even by USRDA standards, making Americans particularly prone to having high levels of oxidized cholesterol.

Cholesterol Fighters

Fortunately, there are concrete steps you can take to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol, and its subsequent ill effects on health. In addition to cutting out high-cholesterol and fatty foods, supplementation can protect existing cholesterol and all tissue cells — from oxidation. Antioxidants, substances which scavenge and neutralize free radicals, protect the cardiovascular system by halting the oxidation of cholesterol, and helping to prevent plaque accumulation in the arteries and the continual secretion of free radicals by foam cells. Supplementing the diet with high amounts of Vitamin C, a key antioxidant, also encourages a more healthy “patching” of existing lesions by using collagen (made from Vitamin C) instead of cholesterol. HEART SCIENCE contains generous amounts of the following antioxidants for their protective benefits:

  • • Beta Carotene, a plant pigment, is the naturally occurring precursor to Vitamin A. When the body takes in high enough amounts of Beta Carotene, this lipid-soluble free radical scavenger concentrates in circulating lipoproteins and atherosclerotic plaques, where it performs its antioxidant functions. Beta Carotene is particularly unique and powerful as an antioxidant because it is capable of trapping a very toxic form of di-oxygen, called singlet oxygen, which can result in severe tissue damage. Beta Carotene is one of the most efficient quenchers of singlet oxygen thus far discovered. Six tablets of HEART SCIENCE provide an unprecedented 45,000 IU of Beta Carotene!
  • • Vitamin C is found in plasma, the watery component of blood, where it functions as a potent antioxidant. In addition to strengthening artery linings through collagen manufacture, Vitamin C is involved in the regeneration of Vitamin E within LDL particles. Vitamin C also plays an important role in the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids by the liver, a crucial step in reducing blood cholesterol levels. Once converted into bile acids, and then into bile salts, cholesterol can be excreted from the body, preventing build-up. Supplementation with Vitamin C may lower levels of LDL cholesterol and increase those of HDL cholesterol.25 It may also have a part in actually removing cholesterol deposits from artery walls — good news for people who are already experiencing plaque buildup.25 Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE provides 1,500 mg of Vitamin C in its bioactive mineral ascorbate form.
  • • Vitamin E, together with Beta Carotene, protects lipids from free radical attack. It is the major antioxidant vitamin that is carried in the lipid fraction of the LDL particle, where it protects the LDL particle from damaging oxidation. Within an LDL particle, one molecule of Vitamin E has the ability to protect about 200 molecules of polyunsaturated fatty acids from free radical damage! Vitamin E also aids in protecting the heart by interfering with the abnormal clumping of blood cell fragments, called platelets, within blood vessels.4 It has been shown to inhibit the formation of thromboxanes and increase the production of prostacyclins, which together decrease abnormal platelet aggregation.11 A high potency of Vitamin E — 400 IU’s — is included in six tablets of HEART SCIENCE in the natural d-alpha succinate form, recognized by scientific researchers to be the most absorbable form!
  • • Selenium is an important mineral which has only recently gained attention. When incorporated into the enzyme Glutathione Peroxidase, it has highly powerful free radical-scavenging abilities, and has been shown to work synergistically with Vitamins A, C, and E. An essential mineral, Selenium used to be derived from eating foods grown in Selenium-rich soil. However, modern agricultural practices have depleted soil of its natural Selenium content, leaving many Americans deficient in this vital nutrient. Several epidemiological studies show that the incidence of advanced fatty deposits in blood vessels is much greater in individuals living in geographic areas of the United States and other parts of the world where the Selenium content of the soil is very low.27
  • Proanthodyn,™ an extract of grape seeds, is being called the most powerful antioxidant yet discovered. This highly potent, water-soluble bioflavonoid contains between 93-95% proanthocyanidins, the highest concentration of any nutrient available today. The protective actions of proanthocyanidins may help to prevent the development of plaque in artery walls by inhibiting the free radicals which are produced during the oxidation of cholesterol. The optimal daily amount (100 mg) of Proanthodyn is included in six tablets of HEART SCIENCE. In addition to the protective actions of antioxidants, several other nutrients can contribute to healthier cholesterol ratios.
  • • Chromium is a trace mineral which functions to aid the entrance of glucose into cells. Six tablets of HEART SCIENCE provide 300 mcg of Chromium in the form of Chromate® Chromium Polynicotinate and Chromium Picolinate — the most bioactive forms of Chromium. Not many people are familiar with the vital role Copper plays in the body. This trace mineral is found in all tissues of the body, and is particularly concentrated in the heart. Copper is part of several enzymes, and, in this capacity, is necessary for the development and maintenance of the cardiovascular system, including the heart, arteries, and other blood vessels. Because of its role in elastin production, Copper deficiency can severely damage blood vessels and heart tissue. In fact, researchers have found an inverse relationship between Copper status and increased risk for heart damage.10
  • • L-Proline and L-Lysine are two natural amino acids which show exciting promise in helping to prevent fatty deposits in blood vessels. Researchers have recently identified a particle associated with LDL called apoprotein (a) which is believed to be a main culprit in plaque development. 17 Scientific investigation has revealed that the lipoprotein (a) particle has an adhesive quality that makes the lipoprotein fat globule stick inside blood vessels. The sticky fat globules accumulate, leading to fatty deposits in blood vessels and the subsequent clogging of the arteries. L-Proline and L-Lysine tend to form a barrierlike layer around the apoprotein (a) particle, helping to push it away from the blood vessel wall, and impeding deposit.21

    The Regulating Trio

    Three nutrients — Magnesium, Potassium, and Taurine — work closely together in the body to help maintain the normal electrical rhythm of the heart, promote proper fluid balance, and prevent excessive Calcium levels from building up in the heart and artery linings.

  • • Magnesium is one of the single most important nutrients for maintaining a healthy heart. It plays an extremely vital role in maintaining the electrical and physical integrity of the heart muscle. It has been well established that Magnesium deficiency predisposes humans to serious disruptions of normal cardiac rhythm. One theory is that because Magnesium has a relaxing effect on muscle tissue, inadequate Magnesium stores may make the coronary arteries more susceptible to muscle spasm.10 Too little Magnesium can cause a Calcium/Magnesium imbalance, which can lead to the influx of too much Calcium into heart cells, and potentiate spasms in heart tissue. Another point for consideration is that because it relaxes the blood vessels, Magnesium keeps these vessels open, allowing for maximum blood flow to the heart. Magnesium also has the unique ability to stop unnecessary blood clotting by helping to reduce platelet adhesion.31 Blood clots are naturally produced by the body as a protective device to stop excessive blood flow when the body is injured. The clotting response happens when the body senses that the normally smooth blood vessel linings are rough, indicating that there is a cut. However, sometimes the body mistakes the rough surface of plaque-covered arteries as cuts, and creates unnecessary blood clots. Or, if a high fat meal has just been eaten, tiny fat globules called chylomicrons enter the bloodstream and can cause platelets to become abnormally sticky, possibly creating clots. When these clots flow through the bloodstream and reach a part of the artery which has plaque buildup, normal blood flow is blocked, and the amount of blood which reaches the heart is severely compromised. Magnesium is also crucial for the entrance of Potassium — a key mineral for many bodily functions — into the cells. Even if the body’s Potassium stores are high, without enough Magnesium, the Potassium will not be able to enter the cells and be utilized by the body. 300 mg of Magnesium (75% of the U.S.RDA) are contained in each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE. Along with Magnesium, Potassium helps to regulate normal heartbeat and blood pressure, and is necessary for the contraction and relaxation of muscle tissue. Potassium and Sodium are present in all body fluids; Potassium is found primarily within cell fluids, while Sodium is usually present in fluids surrounding cells. Together, they function to maintain the normal balance and distribution of fluids throughout the body. The body ideally should have a Potassium/Sodium balance of about 1:1; however, because the body holds onto Sodium, yet eliminates Potassium quickly, it is important that the dietary ratio of these two minerals be at least 3:1. Unfortunately, the typical American diet, with its emphasis on processed, salty (Sodiumrich) foods and lack of fresh fruits and vegetables, severely alters the body’s natural Potassium/ Sodium balance. Diets in the United States are extremely high in Sodium — sometimes containing as much as 15 times the recommended daily intake! A high Sodium/low Potassium diet interferes with the normal regulation of heartbeat and blood pressure, and has been linked with elevated blood pressure.25 Taurine is an amino acid which helps normalize electrical and mechanical activity of the heart muscle by regulating Potassium flux in and out of the heart muscle cells.

    Artery Lining Protectors

    Your arteries form an integral part of your cardiovascular system, carrying blood away from the heart to nourish other parts of the body. In a healthy heart, blood surges through the arteries with every beat of the heart. The arteries expand with each pulse to accommodate the flow of blood. When arteries become hardened and narrowed by the build-up of plaque, they can’t expand and are not able to transport blood efficiently throughout the body. This inability to open up increases blood pressure, putting a strain on the heart as well as the arteries. HEART SCIENCE includes ingredients specifically geared to protect against plaque formation within arteries and maintain the flexibility of these vital blood vessels. N-Acetyl Glucosamine (NAG) is a key amino sugar which forms the building blocks of mucopolysaccharides. Mucopolysaccharides, which are long chain sugars, are an integral component of connective tissue. They combine to form gel-like matrixes which are present throughout tissues in the body, helping to maintain the elasticity of blood vessels which must continually adapt to the changing pressures of blood flow. Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE provides 500 mg — a substantial amount — of this vital tissue building block. There is evidence indicating that Silicon, a natural mineral, may protect against plaque formation in the arteries. Silicon is found mainly in connective tissues, where it helps bind the body’s chemical matrix. Bound Silicon is found in high amounts in arterial walls. Researchers have found that there is a steady decline in the Silicon content of the aorta and other arteries as we age. This may be due to the low fiber content of the typical American diet, since fiber is a key dietary source of Silicon.23 HEART SCIENCE includes 400 mg of Horsetail herb extract, a natural source of Silicon. Hawthorn Berry is without question the herb most widely used to encourage normal heart function. The beneficial actions of Hawthorn Berry on cardiac function have been repeatedly demonstrated in experimental studies. Supplementation with Hawthorn Berry has been shown to improve both the blood supply to the heart by dilating coronary vessels, and the metabolic processes in the heart, resulting in normal, strong contractions of the heart muscle.34 Also, Hawthorn may inhibit the angiotensen converting enzyme, which is responsible for converting angiotensen I to angiotensen II, a powerful constrictor of blood vessels.34 Bromelain, a natural enzyme derived from pineapples, has become well-known for its neuromuscular relaxing properties. Researchers have reported favorable results when using Bromelain for soothing vascular linings. Initial research also indicates that Bromelain may break down fibrin, the glue which holds platelets together to form blood clots.6

    Capillary Strengtheners

    Capillaries are the smallest, yet some of the most important, blood vessels. If you think of your cardiovascular system as a series of roads which transport blood and oxygen, then your arteries are akin to interstate highways, your arterioles are the main city boulevards, and your capillaries are local residential streets. Capillaries are so small, in fact, that single red blood cells actually have to fold up to fit through them. Because of their tiny size and the intricate nature of their network throughout the body, capillaries are responsible for actually nourishing each individual tissue cell! Along the length of the capillaries are small openings called slit pores through which oxygen, glucose, and nutrients leave the capillaries and enter the surrounding interstitial fluid. From there, they cross cell membranes and nourish the cells. Similarly, the waste products of cells enter the fluid and cross over into the capillaries, where they are then transported to the liver and kidneys for disposal. If the capillary slit pores are torn or have lesions, then blood proteins and Sodium will leak out and cause the interstitial fluid to take on a more gel-like nature. This makes the transfer of oxygen and nutrients to the cells more difficult, as well as the disposal of cell waste products, turning the fluid into a stagnant swamp instead of a flowing river. In addition to its powerful antioxidant actions, Proanthodyn also helps protect collagen and elastin, the main constituents of tissue in the capillaries, and throughout the body. It is absolutely essential for capillary walls — which are only one cell thick — to be strong and stable, so that they do not allow blood proteins to leak into the interstitial fluid. Once the interstitial fluid takes on a gel-like consistency, the surrounding cells literally become starved from lack of nutrition. The exciting news is that the proanthocyanidins contained in Proanthodyn are among the few substances yet discovered which can help strengthen capillary walls, ensuring the liquid nature of the interstitial fluid.2 Plus, proanthocyanidins help keep capillary and artery walls flexible, allowing for proper blood flow to the heart.

    Heart Smarts

    The 1990’s mark a decade of increased awareness among Americans of important health issues. Much of the discussion has revolved around protecting that precious center of life we call the heart. Simple lifestyle change is one of the most effective ways to maintain and protect the functioning of the cardiovascular system. In order to take a holistic approach to heart care, make sure you include plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, if possible) in your diet, and cut down on fatty and cholesterol-forming foods. Reduce your salt and alcohol intake to a minimum. Try to get regular, sustained aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes three times a week. Don’t smoke – or if you do smoke, try to eat even more fresh fruits and antioxidant-rich vegetables to counter the amount of free radicals being produced in your body. Lastly, consider adding Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE to your health regimen. HEART SCIENCE, the most comprehensive formula of its kind, provides targeted protection to the entire cardiovascular system. By approaching the promotion of normal heart function on five different levels — through the inclusion of ingredients which supply energy, decrease harmful homocysteine levels, fight cholesterol build-up, help regulate electrical rhythm, and protect artery and capillary linings — HEART SCIENCE is the perfect addition to a holistic approach to heart care.

    Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE™


    The Five Tiered Approach to Heart Health
    Six tablets contain:
    Vitamins and Minerals %USRDA
    Pro-Vit A (Beta Carotene) 45,000 IU 900%
    Vit B1 (Thiamine) 50 mg 3333%
    Vit B3 (Inositol Hexanicotinate) 500 mg 2500%
    Vit B6 (Pyridoxine HCl) 25 mg 1250%
    Coenzyme B6 (Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate)
    25 mg yielding: 16.9 mg of Vit B6 845% (Total Vitamin B6 Activity) (41.9 mg) (2095%)
    Vit B12 (Cyanocobalamin) 500 mcg 8333%
    Folic Acid 800 mcg 200%
    Vit C (Magnesium Ascorbate) 1500 mg 2500%
    Vit E (d-alpha Tocopheryl Succinate) 400 IU 1333%
    Chromium (ChromeMate® †Polynicotinate-150 mcg & Chromium Picolinate††-150 mcg) 300 mcg *
    Copper (Sebacate) 750 mcg 37.5%
    Magnesium (Ascorbate, Taurinate & Oxide) 300 mg 75%
    Potassium (Citrate) 99 mg *
    Selenium (L-Selenomethionine) 200 mcg *
    Silicon (From 400 mg of Horsetail Extract) 13mg *
    * U.S. RDA not established.
    Other Ingredients and Herbs
    Coenzyme Q10 (Ubiquinone) 60 mg
    L-Carnitine (L-Tartrate) 500 mg
    Hawthorn Berry Extract 400 mg
    Proanthodyn™ (Yielding 95 mg of Proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract) 100 mg
    L-Proline 500 mg
    L-Lysine (HCl) 500 mg
    NAG™ (N-Acetyl Glucosamine) 500 mg
    Bromelain (2000 G.D.U. per gram) 1200 G.D.U.
    Taurine (Magnesium Taurinate) 500 mg
    Horsetail Extract (Yielding 31 mg of Silica) 400 mg
    Inositol (Hexanicotinate) 50 mg

    Reference:
    1. Azuma, J., Sawamura, A., & Awata, N. (1992, Jan). “Usefulness of Taurine... and its Prospective Application.” Japanese Circulation Journal, 56(1), 95-9.
    2. Blazso, G and Gabor, M. (1980). “Odema-inhibiting Effect of Procyanidin.” Acta Physiologica Academiae ScientiarumHungaricae, 56(2), 235-240.
    3. Brattstrom, E. L, Hultberg, L. B., & Hardebo, E. J. (1985, Nov.). “Folic Acid Responsive Postmenopausal Homocysteinemia.” Metabolism, (34)11, 1073-1077.
    4. Colette, C., et al., (1988). “Platelet Function in Type I Diabetes: Effects of Supplementation with Large Doses of Vitamin E.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 47, 256-61.
    5. England, M. R., et al. (1992, Nov. 4). “Magnesium Administration and Dysrhythmias...A Placebo-controlled, Double-blind, Randomized Trial.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 268(17), 2395-402.
    6. Felton, G. E. (1980, Nov.). “Fibrinolytic and Antithrombotic Action of Bromelain...” Medical Hypotheses (11)6, 1123-33.
    7. Grundy, S. M. (1993, Apr.). “Oxidized LDL and Atherogenesis: Relation to Risk Factors...” Clinical Cardiology, 16 (4 Suppl.I), I3-5.
    8. Hano, O. et al. (1994, June). “Coenzyme Q10 Enhances Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Recovery and Reduces Ca2+ Overload during Postischemic Reperfusion.” American Journal of Physiology, 266(6 Pt 2), H2174-81.
    9. Heineke, et al. (1972). “Effect of Bromelain (Ananase) on Human Platelet Aggregation.” Experientia V. 23, 844-45.
    10. Hendler, S. S. (1991). The Doctors’ Vitamin and Mineral Encyclopedia. NewYork: Fireside.
    11. Jandak, et al. (1988, Dec. 15). “Reduction of Platelet Adhesiveness by Vitamin E Supplementation in Humans.” Thrombosis Research 49(4), 393-404.
    12. Jialal, I., et al. (1991, Oct. 15). “Beta-Carotene Inhibits the Oxidative Modification of Low-density Lipoprotein.” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 1086(1), 134-8.
    13. Jialal, I. & Fuller, C. J. (1993, Apr. 16). “Oxidized LDL and Antioxidants.” Clinical Cardiology, Vol. 16 (Suppl. I), I6-9.
    14. Jialal, I., & Grundy, S.M. (1991, Feb.). “Preservation of the Endogenous Antioxidants in Low Density Lipoprotein...” Journal of Clinical Investigation, 87(2), 597-601.
    15. Kamikawa, T., et al. (1985). “Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Exercise Tolerance...” American Journal of Cardiology, 56, 247-251.
    16. Kosolcharoen, P., et al. (1981, Nov.). “Improved Exercise Tolerance after Administration of Carnitine.” Current Therapeutic Research, 753-764.
    17. Lawn, R. (1992, June). “Lipoprotein (a) in ...” Medicine, 12-18.
    18. Mortensen, S.A.et al. (1985). “Long-term coenzyme Q10 therapy: A major advance in the management of resistant myocardial failure.” Drugs Exp. Clin. Res., 11(8), 581-93.
    19. Nayler, W. G. (1980). “The Use of Coenzyme Q10 to Protect Ischemic Heart Muscle.” In: Yamamura Y., Folkners K., Ito Y., eds. Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Vol. 2, Amsterdam: Elsevier/North-Holland Biochemical Press, 409-425.
    20. Press, R.I., & Geller, J., (1990, Jan.). “The Effect of Chromium Picolinate on Serum Cholesterol and Apolipoprotein Fractions in Human Subjects.” Western Journal of Medicine, 152, 41-45.
    21. Rath, M. (1993). Eradicating Heart Disease. San Francisco: Health Now.
    22. Rossi, C. S., & Silliprandi, N. (1982, Feb.). “Effect of Carnitine on Serum HDL Cholesterol: Report of Two Cases.” Johns Hopkins Medical Journal, 150(2), 51-4.
    23. Schwarz, K. (1977, Feb. 2). “Silicon, Fibre, and Atherosclerosis.” The Lancet, 454-456.
    24. Selhub, J., et al. (1995, Feb. 2). “Association Between Plasma Homocysteine Concentrations and Extracranial Carotid-artery Stenosis.” New England Journal of Medicine, 332(5), 286-291.
    25. Somer, Elizabeth. (1992). The Essential Guide to Vitamins and Minerals. New York: Health Media of America.
    26. Stampfer, M. J., et al. (1992, Aug. 19). “A Prospective Study of Plasma Homocyst(e)ine...” Journal of the American Medical Association, 268(7), 877-881.
    27. Suadicani, P., Hein, H. O., & Gyntelberg, F. (1992, Sept.). “Serum Selenium Concentration...in a Prospective Cohort Study of 3000 Males.” Atherosclerosis, 96(1), 33-42.
    28. Thomas, C. L. (Eds.). (1985). Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, (15th ed.). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
    29. Tsuyusaki, T. et al. “Mechanocardiography of ischemic or hypertensive heart failure,” in Yamaura Y et al., Biomed. & Clin. Aspects of Coenzyme Q.2 Amsterdam, Elsevier/North Holland Biomedical Press, 1980, 273-88.
    30. Verlangieri, A. J., & Stevens, J. W. (1979). “L-Ascorbic Acid: Effects on Aortic Glycosaminoglycan S Incorporation...” Blood Vessels, 16(4), 177-185.
    31. Werbach, M. R. (1987). Nutritional Influences on Illness: A Sourcebook of Clinical Research. New Canaan: Keats Publishing, Inc.
    32. White, R.R., et al. (1988, Jul-Aug.). “Bioavailability of 125I Bromelain after Oral Administration to Rats.” Biopharmaceutics and Drug Disposition, 9(4), 397-403.
    33. Whitney, E. N., Hamilton, Nunnelly, E. M. (1984). Understanding Nutrition, (3rd ed.). St. Paul: West Publishing Company.
    34. Willard, Terry, Ph.D. (1992). Textbook of Advanced Herbology. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: Wild Rose College of Natural Healing.
    35. Xiang, H., Heyliger, et al. (1988, Nov.). “Effect of Myo-inositol and T3 on Myocardial Lipids and Cardiac Function in Streptozocin-induced Diabetic Rats.” Diabetes, 37(11), 1542-8.



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    COENZYME Q10 - Transforming food into energy
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 01, 2005 11:06 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: COENZYME Q10 - Transforming food into energy

    Coenzyme Q10

    It’s 3:30 p.m. and you feel irritable; you can’t seem to concentrate. You were so busy you skipped lunch. At last you bite into the sandwich that you were ready for 3 hours ago. By the time you have eaten half of it, energy is starting to flow through you. What happened? The answer to that question is both extremely complex and very simple. In essence, your body transformed the food into useable energy. CoQ10 is a crucial component of the primary energy generating cycle that takes place in each of the trillions of cells in our bodies. CoQ10 is essential for human life.

    To transform that lunchtime sandwich into useable energy your body essentially has to burn it - just the way a car burns gasoline to drive its engine. This energy generating process takes place in structures called mitochondria - tiny power plants which are within every cell. Inside these energy generating stations, fats, sugars, and amino acids are transformed into ATP, an energy-rich molecule sometimes called the “energy currency” of the body.

    Energy Generation Requires Nutrients

    The body requires many nutrients in order to perform the complex biochemical processes that convert food into ATP “energy currency.” Some of these nutrients such as the B-vitamins are familiar to us. However, there are many other substances which are essential to this process. Coenzyme Q10 is one of these.

    Functions of CoQ10

    Several complex metabolic pathways are required in order for the body to transform that lunchtime sandwich into energy that you can feel and use. First glycolysis and the Krebs’ cycle break down large molecules of protein, carbohydrate and fat into smaller components. CoQ10 is a key enzyme in the Electron Transport Chain - the final stage in this extraordinary design. This pathway generates 90% of the ATP needed by the body from the food we eat. ATP provides the “energy currency” for the following crucial metabolic functions: 1) synthesis of cellular components including cholesterol and proteins (formed primarily by the liver), 2) nerve conduction (in the brain and peripheral nerves), and 3) energy for muscular contraction (of the heart and skeletal muscles). The Heart: The heart muscle (myocardium) consumes a tremendous amount of energy. Your heart beats over 100,000 times and Pumps 1,000 gallons of blood each day! CoQ10 is necessary for the generation of the energy required by the heart. Numerous scientific studies have demonstrated that supplementation with this nutrient may support normal heart function. Its presence is necessary for cardiac performance during exercise as exemplified by criteria including: blood flow, oxygen utilization, contractility and exercise tolerance. In addition, CoQ10 may play a role in the regulation of blood pressure. The Gums: Since the 1970’s scientists have been researching the effects of CoQ10 on the health of the oral tissues. Although the mechanism of action is not known, research has established that CoQ10 has a profound ability to preserve and maintain the health of the gums. Antioxidant Properties: CoQ10 plays an additional vital role in our metabolism as a protector of lipids in cell membranes. Laboratory studies have also shown that CoQ10 is more efficient than vitamin E, beta carotene or lycopene in safeguarding LDL cholesterol from oxidation by peroxides. This process is important for maintaining the health of our blood vessels.

    Energy Insurance

    CoQ10 is needed in body tissues where energy production is critical, such as the liver, brain and muscles. Therefore we include CoQ10 in significant potencies in many of our premium formulas, such as Life Force Multiple™, Élan Vitàl™, Heart Science™, Liver Guard™, MenoBalance™, Higher Mind™, MegaMind™ and Wellness Multiple™. We also offer a combination of CoQ10 and Lipoic Acid (30 mg each), CoQ10 Sublingual (30 mg and 60 mg), 30 mg CoQ10 Softgels with Bioperine® and 30 mg CoQ10 NutraSpray™. Our single CoQ10 products are CoQ10 in 15 mg, 30 mg, 75 mg, 100 mg, and Ultra Potency 125 mg caps.

    References
    1) Folkers et al., BCACQ, Elsevier, 1977
    2) Judy et al., BCACQ, Elsevier, 1984.
    3) Kamikawa, T. et al., American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 56, August 1, 1985, p. 247-250.
    4) Nohara et al., Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Elsevier, 1984.
    5) Packer, L., Oxidative Stress and Aging, Birkhauser Verlad, 1995.
    6) Stocker, et al., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 88, pp 1646-1650, March 1991.
    7) Tortora, G. Principles of Human Anatomy, 4th Ed., Harper & Row, New York, 1986, p. 301.
    8) Wilkinson and Arnold, Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Elsevier, 1977.
    9) Yamagami et al., Biomedical and Clinical Aspects of Coenzyme Q, Elsevier, 1977.



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