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  Messages 1-20 from 20 matching the search criteria.
Ways to Decrease the Risk of Heart Attack Darrell Miller 2/20/17
Are Sytrinol and Plant Sterols a good Combination? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
Who can benefit from Sytrinol? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
What sets Sytrinol apart? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
Do I have to diet and exercise? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
How often should I take Sytrinol? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
Is Sytrinol safe? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
How does Sytrinol work? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
What will Sytrinol do for me? Darrell Miller 2/27/07
Sytrinol Darrell Miller 2/27/07
Sytrinol 150mg - Now Vitamins Darrell Miller 8/29/06
Sytrinol can lower Cholesterol by 27% - 34% Darrell Miller 9/20/05
New* Improved formula - Cholest-Response Lower Cholesterol Darrell Miller 7/8/05
CHOLESTEROL RESCUE - Maintain Your Cholesterol Wellness Darrell Miller 6/29/05
SYTRINOL - For Heart Health, Don’t Be Confused About Cholesterol... Darrell Miller 6/29/05
Sytrinol - A Natural Solution for Addressing Cholesterol Darrell Miller 6/21/05
Sytrinol -- Natures way to lowering cholesterol up to 40% Darrell Miller 5/20/05
Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control. Darrell Miller 5/12/05
Guggul – New Benefits for Heart Health Darrell Miller 5/11/05
Re: Its in the Blood Darrell Miller 5/9/05



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Ways to Decrease the Risk of Heart Attack
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Date: February 20, 2017 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ways to Decrease the Risk of Heart Attack





There are ways to decrease the risk of having a heart attack. A heart attack is a life changing event that hurts a lot of people and getting rid of the risks is one important way to avoid having this terrible thing happen. Eating right and exercise are two really important things. Replace burger with something like fish and eat more fruits and veggies.

Key Takeaways:

  • Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health report the magic ingredient in fish is omega-3 fatty acids. Fatty acids, like Aspirin, add oil to the blood, making it less likely that platelets will stick together to form a fatal clot.
  • Dr. Ernst Schaefer, chief of the Lipid Metabolism Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston, says the best way to lower CRP is to lose weight, and to keep away from processed foods and many dessert items that are high in pro-inflammatory omega - 6 fatty acids.
  • Sytrinol consists of citrus and palm fruit extract, known as plant sterols. This remedy is shown to be effective in decreasing total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL the bad cholesterol, and in increasing HDL, the good cholesterol.

"New evidence shows that an enteric-coated 81 milligram Aspirin daily decreases the risk of a second coronary attack."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//canadafreepress.com/article/ways-to-decrease-the-risk-of-heart-attack&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNGflVp8jNuKNf9UCAovSU1ygB9oFg

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Are Sytrinol and Plant Sterols a good Combination?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:28 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Are Sytrinol and Plant Sterols a good Combination?

Yes, the research on plant sterols for the maintenance of healthy cholesterol levels is quite compelling and provides a sound basis for a Sytrinol and sterol formulation.



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Who can benefit from Sytrinol?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:27 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Who can benefit from Sytrinol?

Sytrinol provides nutritional support for anyone who wants to maintain a healthy heart without the negative side effects that can occur with other supplements and statin drugs.

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What sets Sytrinol apart?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:24 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What sets Sytrinol apart?

While other cholesterol improving supplements fail to consistently deliver on their claims, Sytrinol has repeatedly succeeded in clinical studies. Some products say they are clinically proven, but the ingredient used in the trial is not available to the consumer. Furthermore, too often the effective dose used in the clinical trials is not the same dosage that is found in the supplement at retail. Sytrinol delivers the same ingredient at the same effective dose used in clinical trials.

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Do I have to diet and exercise?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Do I have to diet and exercise?

Sytrinol works independent of diet and exercise, but we recommend proper nutrition and exercise as an important component of a total approach to developing good heart health.

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How often should I take Sytrinol?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:22 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How often should I take Sytrinol?

Sytrinol is one of the easiest ways to promote healthy cholesterol levels. Simply take two 150 mg servings per day, with or without meals. Since Sytrinol works in the liver, it does not need to be taken prior to, immediately following, or directly with meals and it will not upset your stomach like other products.

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Is Sytrinol safe?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:22 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Sytrinol safe?

Sytrinol was developed after 12 years of extensive research on the cardiovascular effects of polymethoxylated flavonoids and tocotrienols. The safety on Sytrinol has been demonstrated in vitro, in vivo, and multiple clinical studies. The clinical studies demonstrated that consuming 300 mg of Sytrinol per day is safe with no adverse effects reported. Animal toxicity studies resulted in a maximum tolerated dose for Sytrinol of 14 grams per day; this translates to greater than 14 grams per day for a 150 pound individual.

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How does Sytrinol work?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:21 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How does Sytrinol work?

Unlike dietary supplements that attempt to block the absorption of cholesterol from the foods we consume, Sytrinol works to balance cholesterol production in the liver naturally. The Sytrinol formula has three different and complementary mechanism of action in the body that deliver heart health benefits without the depletion of CoQ10 common with statin drugs.

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What will Sytrinol do for me?
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:21 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What will Sytrinol do for me?

Clinical results have demonstrated that Sytrinol can improve total cholesterol levels up to 30%, LDL cholesterol levels up to 27%, and triglyceride levels up to 34% within four to twelve weeks. Additionally, clinicals have demonstrated Sytrinol can have a positive impact on apoprotein B and apoprotein AI levels as well as playing a significant role as an anti-inflammatory. Sytrinol can do all this without the negative side effects associated with pharmaceutical drugs. The tocotrienols in Sytrinol have been shown to reduce arterial plaque build-up.

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Sytrinol
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Date: February 27, 2007 09:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sytrinol

Sytrinol is a patented proprietary formula based on twelve years of research that include 250 scientific in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. Derived from natural citrus and palm fruit extracts, Sytrinol targets different mechanisms and bio-pathways to produce synergistic results for the promotion of healthy total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Additionally, Sytrinol is a powerful antioxidant with numerous heart health benefits that help control anti-inflammatory responses.

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Sytrinol 150mg - Now Vitamins
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Date: August 29, 2006 03:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sytrinol 150mg - Now Vitamins

Sytrinol 150mg – Cholesterol Formula

 

Now Vitamins Sytrinol is a revolutionary new dietary supplement that was carefully developed to help support healthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels.  This is made possible based on Sytrinol’s high concentration of polymethoxylated flavones (PMF’s) from citrus, palm tocotrienols and other proprietary constituents. Studies have shown that this novel blend of cardiovascular supporting compounds can help maintain cholesterol and triglyceride levels that are already within a healthy range.*

 

Polymethoxylated flavones, or simply PMF’s are a type of potent, highly active bioflavonoid commonly found in citrus fruits.  Tangeretin and nobiletin are two of the most potent, and their ability to support healthy cardiovascular function is backed by over 25 years of well-documented research.  In addition to the role they play in preserving the integrity of healthy cells, it has been theorized that Polymethoxylated flavones posses the ability to maintain healthy cholesterol levels.  They do this by inhibiting the formation of two key cholesterol building blocks – apolipoprotein-B and triglycerides.  Without these, the body loses its ability to construct LDL cholesterol, thus resulting in a more healthy total cholesterol pool.

 

Palm tocotrienols, an equally beneficial component of Sytrinol, have also been shown to affect toe production of cholesterol.  Tocotrienols, like vitamin E, has strong antioxidant properties that allow it to protect cell membranes.  Additionally, they have been shown in studies to reduce blood platelet aggregation, inhibit the formation of arterial plaque and decrease the oxidation of LDL cholesterol.*

 

This potent combination is what ultimately allows Now Vitamins Sytrinol to provide exceptional lipid profile protection.  For added support, we’ve included 50mg of Milk Thistle, 50mg of Alpha Lipoic Acid and 10mg of Policosanol, per serving.

Serving Size 1 Vcap

Chromium………………………..…….60mcg

(from Chromium Chelavite® Amino Acid Chelate)

Sytrinol®……………………………....150mg

(Proprietary Blend of Natural Citrus and Palm fruit)

Milk Thistle Extract (Silybum Marianum)80%....50mg

Alpah Lipoic Acid…………………...…50mg

Policosanol (from Sugar Cane)……………….10mg

 

Sytrinol is a proprietary and registered trademark product of Source One Global Partners.

 

 



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Sytrinol can lower Cholesterol by 27% - 34%
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Date: September 20, 2005 09:56 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sytrinol can lower Cholesterol by 27% - 34%

Sytrinol – MultiPronged Heart Health

According to the American Heart Association, more than 60 million Americans suffer from on of more forms of cardiovascular imbalances. When we add in those individuals with blood cholesterol concerns, we see over 100 million Americans who may be in need of specific diet and lifestyle recommendations for achieving and maintaining heart health.

Aside from the generalized recommendations that we typically hear for heart health (lose weight, exercise more, and eat less fat and more fruits and vegetables) There are a number of potentially beneficial dietary supplements that may help to maintain cholesterol levels in the normal range. Among supplements there is a wide range of safety and efficacy between products—but a newer product called Sytrinol stands out for its clinical effectiveness.

Sytrinol is a patented blend of polymethoxylated flavones (from citrus) and tocotrienols (from palm fruit). One of the factors that sets Sytrinol apart from existing natural products for heart health is its multipronged approach to controlling multiple factors related to overall heart health—including control of cholesterol, cellular irritation, oxidation, triglycerides, and others.

Cholesterol Conundrum

While it is unarguable that cholesterol is an important contributor to overall heart health, it couldn’t be further from the truth that cholesterol is the “only” or even the most important factor when it comes to protecting your heart. Did you know that approximately HALF of all serious heart challenges each year are experienced by people with NORMAL cholesterol levels? If Cholesterol is not to blame, then what is?

In addition to total cholesterol levels (the “number” that you may know as 200 to 240 of other values in “mg/dl” units), we know how that LDL and HDL matter a lot (Low-density lipoprotein—the “bad” cholesterol, and High-density lipoprotein—the “good” cholesterol). We also know that some forms of the bad and LDL can be “Badder” than others—specifically those with lots of structural protein called “apolipoprotein B” (which tends to encourage LDL cholesterol to become embedded in your blood vessel linings—bad!). In addition to our total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and the various apoproteins, we also need to know our triglyceride levels, our levels of cellular irritation, what our free radical load looks like, and what our antioxidant defenses are. Sytrinol addresses each of these important aspects of heart and health simultaneously.

The Sytrinol Solution

Polymethoxylated Flavones (PMFs) in Sytrinol are just what they sound like – flavonoid compounds with extra methoxy groups compared to “regular flavones. Like all flavonoids, the PMFs deliver potent antioxidant activity, but the PMF version is about three times more potent in its ability to address cholesterol levels (20% - 30% reduction in clinical Studies). The two primary PMFs are nobiletin and tangeretin.

In addition to the PMFs, Sytrinol contains palm tocotrienols—one of the most potent antioxidant nutrients known. An interesting effect of tocotrienols is a reduction in cholesterol synthesis in the liver—by a mechanism similar to (but safer than) the commonly utilized mechanism of inhibition of the HMG-CoA Reductase Enzyme.

Sytrinol is known to work via several unique mechanisms to reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL). First, by reducing DGAT activity (Diacylglycerol acetyl transferase) and increasing liver PPAR (Peroxisome porliferator-activated receptor)—Sytrinol can reduce overall synthesis of TG (DGAT inhibition). The overall effect is to reduce TG levels in the blood by two complementary mechanisms.

In terms of LDL effects, Sytrinol also reduces both Apolipoprotein B levels (ApoB—needed for the synthesis of LDL particles) and MTTP levels (microsomal triglyceride transfer protein-needed to transfer fat into the new LDL particles). By reducing levels of both these tructural LDL components, Sytrinol reduces overall LDL levels, and thus total cholesterol levels, in the blood.

The clinical results behind Sytrinol are impressive—showing a reduction in levels of total, LDL, and triglycerides by 27% - 34% within 4 weeks. In one of these studies, ApoB levels were reduced (suggesting reduced LDL) and ApoA1 levels were increased (suggesting increased HDL)—as would be expected based on the biochemistry of PMFs and tocotrienols.

Sytrinol is also wonderfully safe—and at the effective dose of 300mg daily, users will benefit from its multipronged effects. One aspect of Sytrinol safety that I especially like is the finding that, unlike some flavonoids like naringin from grapefruit, there are no known risks of drug interactions with the form of citrus derived PMFs found in Sytrinol (certain grapefruit flavonoids can interfere with liver enzymes needed to metabolize many prescription drugs).

Summary

Not since Red Yeast Rice was removed from the market by the FDA, have we had a truly effective, multimechanism solution for cholesterol control (and nearly total heart health). There are certainly other options for addressing heart health and cholesterol levels, but among the available choices, such as policosanol, guggulipid, niacin, and plant sterols, we’re looking at about half the cholesterol-lowering ability (10% - 15% in most cases) compared to Sytrinol. If youre in the “borderline” zone of cholesterol levels (about 240mg/dl and below), you should absolutely consider Sytrinol to keep your cholesterol levels under control.

References

Kurowska EM, manthey Ja. Hypolipidemic effects of absorption of citrus polymethoxylated flavones in hamsters with diet-included hypercholesterolemia. J Argic food chem.. 2004 may 19;52(10):2879-86.

Kurowska EM, manthey Ja, Casaschi A, Theriault AG. Modulation of HepG2 cell net apolipoprotein B secretion by the citrus polymethoxyflavone, Tangeretin. Lipids 2004 feb;39(2):143-51.

Manthey JA, Grohmann K, Montanari A, Ash K, Manthey CL, Polymethoxylated flavones derived from citrus suppress tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression by human moncytes. J Nat Prod. 1999 mar;62(3)441-4.

Mora A, Paya M, rios JL, Alcaraz MJ. Structure-activity relationships of polymethoxyflavones and other flavonoids as inhibitors of non-enzymic lipid peroxidation. Biochem Parmacol. 1990 Aug 15;40(4):797-7.

Takanaga H, Ohnishi A, Yamada S, Matsuo H, Morimoto S, Shoyama Y, Ohtani H, Sawada Y. Polymethoxylated flavones in orange juice are inhibitors of P-glycoprotein but not cytochrome P450 3A4. J Pharmacol exp. Ther. 2000 Apr;293(1):230-6.

By: Shawn M. Talbott, PH.D.

Disclaimer: The above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider. The information in this article has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.



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New* Improved formula - Cholest-Response Lower Cholesterol
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Date: July 08, 2005 09:27 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: New* Improved formula - Cholest-Response Lower Cholesterol

New & Improved Formula!

Cholest-Response™

  • ? Now with Sytrinol™, gamma E, policosanol, L-arginine, and selenium.
  • ? A Cholesterol Rescue™ product: helps maintain cholesterol levels already in the normal range.
  • ? Bio-Aligned Formula™: supports multiple body systems including the heart, blood vessels, nervous system, thyroid, liver and gastrointestinal tract.

    Serving Size:

    4 tablets contain:
    Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 600 mg
    Vitamin E 16 IU
    (from gamma-vitamin E complex)
    Niacin (as inositol hexanicotinate) 500 mg
    Iodine (from kelp) 150 mcg
    Selenium (as L-selenomethionine [SelenoPure™] & sodium selenite) 100 mcg
    Chromium (as chromium polynicotinate [ChromeMate®] & chromium picolinate) 100 mcg
    Phytosterol Complex 40% 750 mg
    Yielding 300 mg beta-sitosterol
    Garlic Powder Extract 600 mg
    (standardized to 8,000 ppm allicin)
    Turmeric Extract 526 mg
    Yielding 500 mg curcumin
    gamma-Vitamin E Complex 500 mg
    Inositol 350 mg
    (as inositol and inositol hexanicotinate)
    Red Yeast Rice 350 mg
    Yielding 1.5% mevinolinic acid monacolins
    Artichoke Extract 250 mg
    (standardized to 2.5% cynarins)
    L-Arginine (as L-arginine HCl) 240 mg
    Methylmethioninesulfonium Chloride 200 mg
    (vitamin U)
    Green Tea Extract 105 mg
    Yielding 100 mg polyphenols, 36 mg EGCG
    Sytrinol™ 100 mg
    (proprietary blend of citrus polymethoxylated
    flavones and palm tocotrienols)
    Soy Bean Concentrate 100 mg
    Yielding 40 mg total isoflavones
    Ginkgo Leaf 24% (50:1 Extract) 60 mg
    Guggul Extract (10% guggulsterones) 50 mg
    Dandelion Root Extract (4:1) 50 mg
    Hawthorne Berry Extract (4:1) 50 mg
    Myricetin 30 mg
    Policosanol 10 mg
    Coenzyme Q10 5 mg

    Suggested Use: Take 4 tablets each night or as recommended by your health care professional.

    CodeSize Retail UPC Code
    SN127130 tabs $12.50021078012719
    SN127260 tabs $23.50021078012726
    SN1880120 tabs $44.98021078018803

    We offer Source Naturals at 46% OFF Man. Suggested Retail



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    CHOLESTEROL RESCUE - Maintain Your Cholesterol Wellness
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    Date: June 29, 2005 01:48 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: CHOLESTEROL RESCUE - Maintain Your Cholesterol Wellness

    CHOLESTEROL RESCUE

    You live in a fat-drenched, fast food world, propped up by diets loaded with processed foods that stimulate your body to create excess bad cholesterol – or low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Your busy life is full of stress, and devoid of time for proper exercise. There are three ways to deal with cholesterol in the body, but a seemingly infinite number of lifestyle and hereditary elements that affect LDL levels. Is it any wonder you find yourself in danger of developing unwanted cholesterol levels? Source Naturals is devoted to helping you. So we developed CHOLESTEROL RESCUE as a comprehensive solution to help you keep cholesterol levels in the normal range. CHOLESTEROL RESCUE uses only natural ingredients, clinically researched to effectively maintain healthy cholesterol levels. It is scientifically formulated with the triple action of three ingredients that target the ways you can deal with your cholesterol concerns; combining the naturally occurring polymethoxylated flavone (PMF) and tocotrienol action of Sytrinol™ with the action of plant sterols. Research suggests that daily consumption of 800 mg of plant sterols, taken with food in two divided doses as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Source Naturals offers CHOLESTEROL RESCUE as part of our ongoing commitment to providing you with high quality natural supplements to support your healthy lifestyle.

    Cholesterol & Your Body

    On average, humans ingest approximately 300mg of cholesterol per day. Though an important part of a healthy body, a high level of cholesterol in the blood might be out of the normal range. Cholesterol is transported in your system by lipoproteins. There are two kinds of lipoproteins in your body, but the low-density lipoproteins, or LDL, are the major factors in developing unwanted cholesterol levels. If there are high levels of LDL circulating in your bloodstream, it can undergo oxidation by free radicals in the artery walls, which can then become trapped as imbalanced deposits. These deposits can build up, reducing critical blood-flow. CHOLESTEROL RESCUE has been specially developed to reduce LDL levels using two different methods: inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol in the liver, and reducing the absorption of dietary cholesterol.

    The Plant Sterol Effect

    Sterols are an essential component of the cell membrane, and are produced by both plants and humans. While the most common sterol produced in humans is cholesterol, plants produce phytosterols, or plant sterols. Using a complex compound of plant sterols similar to cholesterol with only slight molecular differences, CHOLESTEROL RESCUE has been formulated to balance the amount of dietary cholesterol your body absorbs.

    Plant sterols have long been known to inhibit the uptake of both dietary and bile-produced cholesterol in the intestines. The most plausible theory behind this is that, because of the similarity between plant sterols and cholesterol, the body cannot properly distinguish between the two during the absorption process, thereby displacing the uptake of cholesterol into your system. Research suggests that daily consumption of 800mg of plant sterols, taken with food in two divided doses as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

    Sytrinol™ For Heart Health

    CHOLESTEROL RESCUE also contains Sytrinol™, a proven natural alternative for maintaining cholesterol wellness. The patented blend of citrus polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs) and tocotrienols has been clinically shown to promote cardiovascular health by supporting normal cholesterol production by your liver, helping balance triglyceride production, and providing powerful antioxidant protection. The PMFs promote normal cholesterol levels by inhibiting both the production of cholesterol precursors, such as cholesteryl esters, and the activity of HMG CoA Reductase, an enzyme that synthesizes cholesterol in the liver. These PMFs can also balance the body’s production of triglycerides by inhibiting your liver’s triglyceride producing enzyme, diacylglycerol acetyltransferase. Tocotrienols help break down cholesterol building blocks, interfere with cholesterol production, and provide critical antioxidant protection. Because cholesterol becomes problematic when oxidized, the powerful antioxidant action of tocotrienols can help prevent the conditions that may affect your cardiovascular circulation.

    Spearheading the Wellness Revolution in Cholesterol Defense

    With so many ways to develop undesirable cholesterol levels in your body, you need to be proactive in maintaining your good health. In our on-going dedication to your wellness, and a commitment to delivering the benefits of our high quality supplements to the natural products marketplace, Source Naturals has produced a scientifically formulated blend of three effective ingredients in fighting unwanted cholesterol. Combining a comprehensive formula of allnatural components, clinically researched for promoting cardiovascular health, CHOLESTEROL RESCUE is available now at your local health food store.

    References
    Guthrie N, Kurowska EM. Anticancer and Cholesterol-lowering activities of citrus flavonoids. Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods. (Wildman, R.E.C., ed), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. 2001. 113-126. Packer L, Weber SU, Rimbach G. Molecular aspects of alphatocotrienol antioxidant action on cell signaling. Symposium: Molecular Mechanisms of Protective Effects of Vitamin E in Atherosclerosis. American Society for Nutritional Sciences. 2001. 131:369S-373S. Hicks KB, Moreau RA. Phytosterols and phytostanols: functional food cholesterol busters. Food Technology. 2001. 55:63-67. Middleton Jr E, Kandaswami C, Theoharides TC. The effect of plant flavonoids on mammalian cells: implications for inflammation, heart disease, and cancer. Pharmacological Review. 2000. 52:673-751. Child P, Kuksis A. Critical role of ring structure in the differential uptake of cholesterol and plant sterols by membrane preparations in vitro. Journal of Lipid Research. 1983. 24: 1196-1209



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    SYTRINOL - For Heart Health, Don’t Be Confused About Cholesterol...
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    Date: June 29, 2005 09:44 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Sytrinol - For Heart Health, Don’t Be Confused About Cholesterol...

    Sytrinol - For Heart Health, Don’t Be Confused About Cholesterol...

    Maintaining your cardiovascular health is one of the best ways you can stay fit. That means working to keep your cholesterol levels within the normal range. And contrary to popular belief, the amount of cholesterol you consume in food is not the most important factor for regulating normal cholesterol levels. It is actually the liver’s imbalanced production of cholesterol that is much more critical for your cardiovascular health.

    You can address the root cause of maintaining normal cholesterol levels today with Source Naturals Sytrinol™. This patented blend of citrus polymethoxylated flavones and tocotrienols has been clinically shown to promote cardiovascular health by supporting normal cholesterol production by your liver, promoting balanced triglyceride (fat) production, and providing antioxidant protection. Source Naturals, an industry leader in many categories, introduces the science of Sytrinol™ in the CHOLESTEROL RESCUE™ product family to support your better heart health today.

    The Truth About Cholesterol

    Cholesterol is a very confusing subject – our bodies require it but we can also get too much of it. Cholesterol is one type of the ring-shaped compounds called sterols. Other sterols include bile acids, sex hormones, adrenal hormones and vitamin D. Approximately 90% of the cholesterol in your body is in your cell membranes. The remaining 10% can be found in your blood and throughout your body.

    Liver’s Over-Production of Cholesterol

    When your body needs more cholesterol, your liver takes carbohydrates, proteins and fats (also called triglycerides) from your diet and converts them into cholesterol. The amount of cholesterol that you might consume from foods (in animal products such as eggs, milk, cheese and beef ) is minute compared to the amount of cholesterol produced by your liver. Thus, cholesterol from food isn’t as critical to your total cholesterol. But balancing the cholesterol produced by your liver is very critical to your total cholesterol and thus, your cardiovascular health.

    Oxidized LDL Cholesterol

    Despite the confusion, cholesterol is a vital component of good health that strengthens cell membranes and provides building blocks for hormones, bile and vitamin D production. However, there is one potential pathway where cholesterol can contribute to an imbalance. When cholesterol moves through the blood to individual cells, it can travel in groups such as lipoproteins, which also contain fats and proteins. When the cholesterol is moving through your blood in Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL) it can undergo oxidation by free radicals in the artery walls. Some medical experts theorize that the oxidized LDL cholesterol becomes trapped in the artery walls as imbalanced deposits instead of completing the journey to join cell membranes. These deposits can eventually reduce the size and function of the arteries, compromising blood flow. Thus, antioxidant protection, balanced triglyceride production, and normal cholesterol production by the liver can all be critically important to your good health. And Sytrinol™ provides all of these benefits.

    How Sytrinol™ Supports Heart Health

    Sytrinol is a powerful scientifically formulated blend protected by U.S. patent numbers 6,251,400, 09/ 481724. It contains natural citrus polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs) and tocotrienols that go deep to address the root causes of cholesterol wellness.

    Citrus PMFs

    Polymethoxylated flavones are types of polyphenolic compounds called flavonoids, which are the largest known category of phytonutrients. Health benefits of various flavonoids include antioxidant activity, immune system support, and cellular protection. The unique structure of polymethoxylated flavones, which naturally contain methyl groups paired with oxygen in key places, enables PMFs to interfere with cholesterol production. The citrus PMFs in Sytrinol, such as tangeretin and sinensetin, promote normal cholesterol levels by inhibiting both the production of cholesterol precursors, such as cholesteryl esters, and the activity of HMG CoA Reductase, an enzyme that synthesizes cholesterol in the liver. These PMFs can also balance the body’s production of triglycerides by inhibiting the activity of your liver’s triglyceride producing enzyme, diacylglycerol acetyltransferase. Since LDL cholesterol is made from cholesterol and triglycerides, decreasing your liver’s production of triglycerides will reduce the amount of those triglycerides available to form LDL cholesterol compounds.

    Tocotrienols

    Tocotrienols are compounds similar to vitamin E in structure and function. The tocotrienols in Sytrinol increase degradation of cholesterol building blocks such as Apolipoprotein B, interfere with cholesterol production, and provide antioxidant protection. The tocotrienols in Sytrinol are also especially protective antioxidants for LDL cholesterol compounds that have already been produced, helping to prevent the oxidized LDL cholesterol conditions that may affect your cardiovascular circulation.

    Sytrinol’s Proactive Synergy

    Sytrinol works so well because this natural blend of PMFs and tocotrienols works proactively, synergistically, and independently. In preliminary human research, Sytrinol proactively supported balanced cholesterol and triglyceride production by the liver through the synergistic effects of the PMFs and tocotrienols. Furthermore, Sytrinol promotes LDL cholesterol antioxidant protection.

    The above information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

    Other products work reactively to disable existing cholesterol and may only work in conjunction with diets. And because Sytrinol works independently of diet, you can take it anytime.

    Three Lifestyle Strategies for Cardiovascular Health

    1. Exercise regularly to increase hearthealthy HDL cholesterol and lower blood triglycerides (fats).

    2. Eat a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins to help maintain normal cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

    3. Take the right supplements to promote your cardiovascular health. In preliminary clinical studies, the amino acid L-ARGININE supported healthy blood flow to the heart and body. GARLIC OIL helps to maintain healthy cholesterol levels and promotes healthy circulation. POLICOSANOL CHOLESTEROL COMPLEX, CHOLESRESPONSE™, CHOLESFIBER™, CHOLESTREX®, and GRAPEFRUIT PECTIN all help to support normal cholesterol levels. HEART RESPONSE™ and HEART SCIENCE™ are advanced formulas that address heart health. Additionally, you can get cardiovascular system supporting compounds such as folic acid, betacarotene, CoQ10, lipoic acid, ginkgo, grapeseed extract, hawthorn extract, magnesium, vitamin E, and many other nutrients in LIFE FORCE MULTIPLE™, Source Naturals’ best-selling multiple. There is a revolution underway in natural health consciousness, and your local health food store is at the forefront. You can benefit right now – long before word spreads to the general public – with the innovative heart nutrition of Sytrinol, a CHOLESTEROL RESCUE™ product. Sytrinol™ is a trademark of KGK Synergize exclusively licensed worldwide to SourceOne Global Partners.

    References
    Guthrie, N. and Kurowska, E.M. (2000). Anticancer and Cholesterol-Lowering Activities of Citrus Flavonoids. Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Wildman, R.E.C, Ed., CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 113-126. Guthrie, N. and Kurowska, E.M. (2000). Anticancer and Cholesterol-Lowering Activities of Tocotrienols. Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods, Wildman, R.E.C, Ed., CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 269-280.



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    Sytrinol - A Natural Solution for Addressing Cholesterol
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    Date: June 21, 2005 05:16 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Sytrinol - A Natural Solution for Addressing Cholesterol

    Sytrinol - A Natural Solution For Addressing Cholesterol

    By Richard F. Staack, Ph.D., M.B.A.

    Sytrinol™, a patented proprietary formula derived from natural citrus and palm fruit extracts, combines citrus polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs), palm tocotrienols and other proprietary constituents. This combination results in a synergistic effect for maintaining cholesterol levels in the normal range, including total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, as demonstrated by a long-term, three-phase clinical trial. This trial is extremely significant because it is a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design, one of only a few in the dietary supplement industry. Sytrinol has also been shown to maintain normal levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), the beneficial cholesterol. Additionally, Sytrinol is a powerful antioxidant with numerous heart health benefits and also plays a significant role in reducing cellular irritation.

    What are polymethoxylated flavones?

    Polymethoxylated flavones are a highly methoxylated sub-classification of citrus flavonoids. This process occurs naturally and results in a more biologically active molecule. This is especially true for tangeretin and nobiletin, two of the primary polymethoxylated flavones in Sytrinol. Tocotrienols, naturally occurring analogues of tocopherol (natural vitamin E), are the other proprietary ingredient in Sytrinol and are a group of minor dietary constituents that have been studied for their effect on heart health.

    Sytrinol's Proven Benefits

    Sytrinol is the result of over 12 years of research focusing on the relationship between polymethoxylated flavonoids, tocotrienols, and cardiovascular health. Sytrinol?s benefits have been shown in vitro, in vivo, and in multiple clinical studies. In these studies, subjects consumed 150 mg of Sytrinol twice per day (300 mg/day) and were instructed to keep the same dietary habits and maintain their caloric intake. Fasting blood samples were drawn at study onset, and at 4-weeks, 8-weeks, and 12-weeks. The results of the clinical studies were all similar in their effect, with a reduction of total cholesterol up to 30 percent, LDL cholesterol up to 27 percent, and total triglycerides up to 34 percent in twelve weeks compared to the placebo group. Additionally, the LDL/HDL ratio was significantly reduced in all clinical studies up to 30 percent. Another very important benefit of Sytrinol that cannot be claimed by other cholesterol-addressing supplements is its effect on C-reactive protein (CRP), which plays a role in cardiovascular challenges. Recent research has established that inflammation may cause C-reactive protein to be produced in the body. Specific PMFs, including nobiletin and tangeretin, have been studied for their anti-inflammatory properties, suggesting that Sytrinol may have a positive effect on CRP Sytrinol has also been shown to be a powerful antioxidant. The polymethoxylated flavones have been researched for over 25 years demonstrating their antioxidant effects for heart health. Studies have shown that polymethoxylated flavonoids and their metabolites are excellent sources of dietary antioxidants that are able to suppress many of the events of free radical damage, including cellular irritation. The tocotrienols in Sytrinol have a higher antioxidant activity than tocopherols. Alpha-tocotrienol has been shown to be up to 60 times more potent than alpha-tocopherol in the prevention of lipid peroxidation. Other research has demonstrated that the delta and gamma isomers of tocotrienols also have potent antioxidant activity.

    Mechanisms

    Sytrinol has three complementary mechanisms of action in the body that delivers cardiovascular benefits. *Polymethoxylated flavones decrease apolipoprotein B, the structural protein needed for endogenous synthesis of LDL cholesterol. *Polymethoxylated flavones (tangeretin & nobiletin) decrease diacylglycerol acetyl transferase, a liver enzyme needed for endogenous synthesis of triglycerides. *Tocotrienols inhibit HMG CoA reductase, the liver enzyme responsible for endogenous synthesis of cholesterol. These mechanisms work synergistically to support normal total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, more significantly than other natural supplements on the market today. Sytrinol can also be combined with other ingredients such as phytosterols. Phytosterols help block cholesterol in the gastrointestinal tract while Sytrinol helps block cholesterol synthesis in the body. This suggests that, when combined, a more pronounced effect on maintaining normal cholesterol levels would result.

    Consumer Friendly

    The ease of compliance for consumers is a major consideration for a successful natural heart health product. Consumers do not have to take Sytrinol prior to, immediately following, or directly with their meals and, as a result, are more likely to take the correct dosage and continue using the product. Sytrinol can be taken in tablets, or softgels, which are easy to swallow because of the low dosage. Sytrinol will also be available in functional foods.

    Dr. Richard Staack is the Vice President of Business Development, Technology, and Science at SourceOne™ Global Partners. He received his Master of Science and Doctorate in Nutritional and Biochemical Toxicology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He received his Master of Business Administration with Distinction from DeVry University. Dr. Staack has received several awards and honors in the field of nutrition, is associated with numerous professional affiliations, and has published several articles on nutrition and toxicology in peer-reviewed journals.

    Disclaimer: the above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider.



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    Sytrinol -- Natures way to lowering cholesterol up to 40%
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    Date: May 20, 2005 12:12 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Sytrinol -- Natures way to lowering cholesterol up to 40%

    In a Lab experiment, cholesterol was lowered by 40%

    Abstract

    Formulations contg. citrus polymethoxylated flavones (PMF), mainly tangeretin, or citrus flavanone glucosides hesperidin and naringin were evaluated for blood cholesterol-lowering potential in hamsters with diet-induced hypercholesterolemia. PMF metabolites were also investigated. Diets contg. 1% PMF decreased blood serum total and very-low-d. lipoprotein (VLDL) + LDL cholesterol by 19-27 and 32-40%, resp., and decreased serum triacylglycerol levels. Comparable decreases were achieved by feeding 3% mixt. of hesperidin and naringin (1:1), implying lower hypolipidemic potency of the hesperidin/naringin mixt. vs. PMF. HPLC-MS anal. identified high blood serum, liver, and urine concns. of tangeretin metabolites, including dihydroxytrimethoxyflavone and monohydroxytetramethoxyflavone glucuronides and aglycons. The total liver concns. of tangeretin derivs. corresponded to hypolipidemic concns. of intact tangeretin in earlier expts. in vitro. PMF may be novel flavonoids with cholesterol- and triacylglycerol-lowering potential. Elevated liver levels of PMF metabolites may be directly responsible for their hypolipidemic effects in vivo.

  • Sytrinol 150mg 30ct

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    Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control.
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    Date: May 12, 2005 10:00 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Cholesterol control.

    Under-Reported (and Underappreciated) Solutions for Cholesterol and Triglyceride Control

    by Richard Conant, L.Ac., C.N.

    Fat and human existence are inseparable. Setting aside the fear and loathing over fat in the body that pervades our culture, we understand that fat is our friend. We cannot live without fat.

    The human body contains many different kinds of fats and fat-like molecules. Collectively known as "lipids" these fatty substances include fatty acids, lipoproteins, phospholipids, glycolipids, triglycerides, steroid hormones and the infamous, dreaded cholesterol.

    Lipids (fats) are found everywhere in the body, performing a variety of vital functions. The brain is a fat-rich organ. Brain neurons and all other nerve cells are protected by a myelin sheath, made largely out of fatty material. Cell membranes consist almost entirely of phospholipids (lipids that contain phosphorus) arranged in a sandwich-like double layer embedded with proteins. Sex hormones are lipids, belonging to the group of complex lipid molecules known as "steroids." Vitamin D is a lipid.

    The body stores and transports fatty acids in the form of triglycerides. A triglyceride contains three fatty acid molecules, which have a chain-like structure, linked to glycerol. (There are also mono- and di-glycerides, which have one and two fatty acid chains, respectively, attached to glycerol.)

    Like many other things necessary to life, fat is a two-edged sword. Fat insulates us from the cold, cushions and protects our vital organs and serves as a storehouse for energy. Yet, when present in excess to the point of obesity, fat threatens health, happiness, self-esteem, social standing and longevity. The same is true of other lipids, most notably triglycerides and cholesterol. Transported throughout the body in the bloodstream, these essential lipids become a health liability when the blood contains too much of them.

    Keeping fat in it its proper place, not eliminating or drastically reducing it, is the goal we should seek. In the blood, lipids must be maintained at healthy levels and ratios. When they are, an important foundation of good health is established.

    How do we keep the blood lipids we need——triglycerides and the various forms of cholesterol——balanced at healthy levels? Diet and exercise are indispensable, these basics must come first. Along with the recommended dietary practices, a number of nutritional approaches offer help for maintaining healthy blood lipids. We will now give several of these a closer look.

    Gugulipid

    In 1990, an herb used for centuries in the Far East was introduced to U.S. consumers. This herb, called "gum guggul," is proving to be one of the most effective natural cholesterol-lowering agents ever discovered. It also brings triglycerides down and raises HDL, the "good" cholesterol. The changes are substantial; gum guggul single-handedly normalizes the entire blood lipid profile, even in people with high starting levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

    Gum guggul, also called simply "guggul," is a gummy resin tapped from the Commiphora tree. A cousin of myrrh gum, guggul has been used by Ayurvedic herbalists of India for at least 3,000 years; texts dating from around 1,000 B.C. mention the herb. Guggul was traditionally given for rheumatism and poor health caused by excess consumption of fatty foods. One ancient Sanskrit text describes in detail what happens in the body when blood fats are out of balance, due to sedentary lifestyle and overeating. The name of this condition has been translated as "coating and obstruction of channels."

    Intrigued by the obvious similarity between "coating and obstruction of channels" and arteries clogged by fatty plaque, Indian researchers initiated a series of experimental and clinical studies in the 1960's to see if gum guggul would lower excess blood lipids.1 Both human and animal studies consistently showed cholesterol and triglyceride reductions.

    Detailed pharmacological studies showed that guggul's lipid-lowering effects are produced by compounds in the resin called "guggulsterones."2 An Indian pharmaceutical firm then patented a standardized extract of gum guggul under the trade name "Gugulipid." The product contains a uniform 2.5 percent guggulsterones, which is higher than guggul resin in its natural state.

    Because Gugulipid guarantees the necessary intake of guggulsterones needed for blood fat reduction, it has become the product used in clinical research. Phase I efficacy safety trials and Phase II efficacy trials have yielded more positive data.3,4,5 Most of the studies on gum guggul have used relatively small numbers of subjects; this tends to make mainstream medical scientists reluctant about natural remedies. A large, well-publicized double-blind Gugulipid trial on 400 to 500 people would go a long way toward giving this herb the credibility it deserves.

    Pantethine

    Another effective natural solution for blood fat control that should be better known is a relative of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5). Pantethine is the active form of pantothenic acid in the body. Pantethine forms CoA, an essential co-enzyme for utilization of fat. CoA transports "active acetate," an important byproduct of fat metabolism that provides fuel for generating cellular energy. By promoting the burning of fats for energy, pantethine helps keep triglyceride levels down.6 Pantethine also helps regulate cholesterol production, by facilitating the conversion of fat into other lipid-based molecules needed in the body.6

    Japanese researchers began studying the effect of pantethine on blood fats nearly twenty years ago. They reported their promising results at the Seventh International Symposium on Drugs Affecting Lipid Metabolism, held in Milan, Italy in 1980.7 Few in the medical or scientific communities took notice. Italian researchers followed up with several small clinical trials that confirmed the preliminary reports.6,8,9 An excellent cholesterol and triglyceride lowering agent that is safe and free of side-effects, pantethine remains, for the most part, ignored by mainstream science, although its usage is growing in alternative medicine circles. Pantethine it will no doubt prove to be one of the most important supplements for maintaining healthy blood fat levels.

    Niacin

    When taken in high enough doses, niacin (vitamin B3) substantially lowers cholesterol. This has been known to medical science for many years.10 studies on niacin as a cholesterol-lowering agent go back to the 1950's. There was a fair amount of initial enthusiasm for niacin because it improves, unlike most lipid-lowering drugs, all parameters of the blood lipid profile. Niacin reduces total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. It also raises HDL cholesterol quite well. Interest in niacin has faded, in part because the necessary dose, 1200 milligrams a day or more, can cause flushing and gastrointestinal disturbances. Very high doses may be harmful to the liver if taken for too long.

    There is a solution to the side-effect problem with niacin which, again, has failed to gain widespread attention. Inositol hexanicotinate is a flush-free form of niacin composed of six niacin molecules bonded to one molecule of inositol, another B-complex nutrient. Absorbed as an intact structure, inositol hexanicotinate is metabolized slowly, releasing free niacin into the bloodstream over a period of hours following ingestion.11 Inositol hexanicotinate has all the benefits of niacin for controlling blood fats. The flushing effect of ordinary niacin, which metabolizes much more rapidly, does not occur. Taking as much as four grams per day has not been reported to raise liver enzymes or cause other side-effects, but prudence dictates that people with liver problems should avoid very high doses of inositol hexanicotinate, or any form of niacin.12

    Tocotrienols

    We often think of vitamin E as synonymous with d-alpha tocopherol. Vitamin E is actually a whole family of compounds that includes various tocopherols and a group of lesser known but highly beneficial substances called "tocotrienols." All have vitamin E activity. Tocotrienols are similar in chemical structure to tocopherols, but they have important differences which give them unique and highly beneficial properties for human health.

    Vitamin E is one of the most recognized antioxidants, nutrients that deactivate potentially toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism known as free radicals. Vitamin E neutralizes peroxides, which result from the free radical oxidation of lipids, making it a key antioxidant in cell membranes. While d-alpha tocopherol has generally been regarded as the form of vitamin E with the strongest antioxidant activity, tocotrienols are even stronger.

    The tocotrienol story is another example of a natural product slow to gain recognition. A Univeristy of California research team discovered that d-alpha tocotrienol is over six times more effective than d-alpha tocopherol at protecting cell membranes against free radical damage.13 In the presence of vitamin C, which recycles vitamin E-like compounds, its antioxidant activity is 40 to 60 times higher than d-alpha tocopherol. This study was published in 1991. Its safe to say few cardiac physicians know about tocotrienols, and we have yet to see 60 Minutes do a piece on "the powerful new form of vitamin E."

    It would be a tremendous service to public health if they did, because the benefits of tocotrienols go far beyond their stellar antioxidant ability. Tocotrienols also lower total cholesterol and LDL, by impressive percentages. In one double-blind controlled study, tocotrienols reduced total cholesterol by 16 percent and LDL by 21 percent after twelve weeks. Another study recorded drops of 15 to 22 percent in total cholesterol along with 10 to 20 percent decreases in LDL levels.14 Now appearing on health food store shelves, tocotrienols are a health-protecting nutrients whose long overdue time has come. Derived from food oils such as palm oil and rice bran oil, tocotrienols have the same lack of toxicity as ordinary vitamin E.

    References

    1. Satyavati, G. Gugulipid: a promising hypolipidaemic agent from gum guggul (Commiphora wightii). Economic and Medicinal Plant Research 1991;5:47-82.

    2. Dev, S. A modern look at an age-old Ayurvedic drug—guggulu. Science Age July 1987:13-18.

    3. Nityanand, S., Srivastava, J.S., Asthana, O.P. Clinical trials with gugulipid. J. Ass. Physicians of India 1989;37(5):323-28.

    4. Agarwal, R.C. et. al. Clinical trial of gugulipid—a new hypolipidemic agent of plant origin in primary hyperlipidemia. Indian J Med Res 1986;84:626-34.

    5. 'Gugulipid' Drugs of the Future 1988;13(7):618-619.

    6. Maggi, G.C., Donati, C., Criscuoli, G. Pantethine: A physiological lipomodulating agent, in the treatment of hyperlipidemias. Current Therapeutic Research 1982;32(3):380-86.

    7. Kimura, S., Furukawa, Y., Wakasugi, J. Effects of pantethine on the serum lipoprotiens in rats fed a high cholesterol diet (Abstract) Seventh International Symposium on Drugs Affecting Lipid Metabolism, Milan, Italy, 1980.

    8. Arsenio, L. Bodria, P. Effectiveness of long-term treatment with pantethine in patients with dyslipidemia. Clinical Therapeutics 1986;8(5):537-45.

    9. Avogaro, P. Bittolo Bon, G. Fusello, M. Effect of pantethine on lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins in man. Current Therapeutic Research 1983;33(3):488-93.

    10. Crouse, J.R. New developments in the use of niacin for treatment of hyperlipidemia: new considerations in the use of an old drug. Coronary Artery Disease 1996;7(4):321-26.

    11. Welsh, A.L. Ede, M. Inositol hexanicotinate for improved nicotinic acid therapy. International Record of Food Medicine 1961;174(1):9-15.

    12. "Inositol hexaniacinate" (Monograph). Alternative Medicine Review 1998;3(3):222-3.

    13. Serbinova, E., et. al. Free radical recycling and intramembrane mobility in the antioxidant properties of alpha-tocopherol and alpha tocotrienol. Free Radical Biology and Medicine 1991;10:263-275.

    14. Qureshi, N. Qureshi, A.A. Tocotrienols: Novel Hypercholesterolemic Agents with Antioxidant Properties. in 'Vitamin E in Health and Disease' Lester Packer and Jürgen Fuchs, Editors. 1993; New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.

    Control Cholesterol with the following Supplements

  • Policosanol -- Reduces Production of Cholesterol by the Liver
  • Red Yeast Rice -- Reduces production of cholesterol like pharmaceutical Statins on the market today
  • Sytrinol -- Lowers Cholesterol by reducing production of cholesterol in the body like Statins on the market today
  • Fiber -- Helps elimate waste and reduce cholesterol


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    Guggul – New Benefits for Heart Health
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 11, 2005 09:00 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Guggul – New Benefits for Heart Health

    Gum Guggul–New Benefits for Heart Health from an Age-Old Herb

    by Richard Conant, L.Ac., C.N.

    The 1990's have seen a growing interest in herbs from India's ancient Ayurvedic tradition. One Ayurvedic herb in particular, "gum guggul," stands at the forefront, thanks to its rather remarkable benefits for the heart and cardiovascular health. A relative of myrrh and frankincense, gum guggul is a resin tapped from India's Commiphora mukul tree. Known more commonly in the Far East as simply "guggul," the herb has proven to be one of the most effective natural cholesterol-lowering agents ever discovered. Cholesterol reductions with guggul can be twenty percent or higher, and the herb also raises HDL, the more beneficial form of cholesterol. Studies also show guggul may help prevent atherosclerosis, by retarding the formation of fatty, cholesterol-laden deposits in blood vessel tissues.

    Recent research on guggul has revealed that guggul also blocks the oxidation of LDL cholesterol, by acting as an antioxidant. LDL, which carries cholesterol from the liver to the rest of the body, is generally regarded as a key element in the development of atherosclerosis. But only when it is oxidized by free radicals does LDL accumulate in arteries. It its unoxidized or "native" state, LDL is more or less benign. Checking LDL oxidation is vital to keeping blood vessels free of plaque.1 (This is one of the major reasons why antioxidants are so important.) Guggul, by both lowering blood cholesterol and acting against LDL oxidation, now stands out as one of the world's most valuable herbs for heart health.

    Guggul first caught the attention of the scientific world in1966, thanks to an Indian medical researcher who submitted a doctoral thesis on gum guggul.2 Her interest had been kindled by references to the herb in a centuries-old Ayurvedic text. Apparently, poor cardiovascular health and atherosclerosis were a problem back then just as they are today. Translated from Sanskrit, this text describes, in elegant detail, a condition called "coating and obstruction of channels." The cause, according to the ancient writers? Faulty metabolism due to overeating of fatty foods and lack of exercise. Death was said to be the end result of leaving this condition uncorrected. The recommended treatment plan emphasized diet and herbs, chiefly gum guggul.3

    References to guggul in ancient literature actually go back even farther. The herb is mentioned in the Vedas, the holy scriptures of India believed to be anywhere from 3,000 to 10,000 years old. One stanza is translated as follows: "Disease (consumption) does not afflict and the curse never affects whom the delicious odor of the healing Guggul penetrates (spreads). The diseases also flee away in all directions from him like horses and deer, O Gugulu! Either born from Sindhu or from the sea. I chant your name for the removal of diseases."3

    Struck by the obvious similarity between "coating and obstruction of channels" and atherosclerosis, the Indian researcher decided to study gum guggul's effect on blood fats in rabbits. Over a two-year period, the animals were fed hydrogenated vegetable oil to artificially raise their cholesterol levels. Guggul was administered to one group of rabbits, while the rest served as controls. At the end of the study the rabbits given guggul had normal cholesterol and blood lipid levels. Their arteries showed no fatty streaks or plague deposits. This caught the attention of the Indian scientific community, and numerous clinical trials ensued, both on animals and humans. In study after study, guggul consistently produced substantial reductions in cholesterol and triglyceride levels, while raising HDL.

    The active ingredients in guggul are a group of natural plant sterols. Among these, substances called "guggulsterones" are the most important ingredients for the cholesterol and blood fat lowering properties of guggul, with the other sterols acting as a synergistic supporting cast.4 A number of mechanisms are suggested, although not definitely proven, for how the herb works; these include reducing the synthesis of cholesterol in the liver, enhancing cholesterol removal from the gut, stimulating thyroid function and increasing the number of receptors in the liver for uptake of LDL.3,5

    Guggul extracts are now standardized for guggulsterone content. The herb naturally contains about 2 percent guggulsterones. Quality extracts contain a minimum of 2.5 percent, which assures the user is getting a product potent enough to produce results. Since the late 1980's clinical trials have used the standardized extract.6,7,8 The product is readily available in the U.S.

    The ability of guggulsterones to prevent oxidation of LDL was discovered in a 1997 study done by scientists at the Central Drug Research Institute in Lucknow, India.9 This study sheds light on how guggul works against "coating and obstruction of channels." Remember that oxidized LDL forms the plaque that coats and eventually obstructs blood vessels. The researchers mixed LDL from human blood with a free radical promoting agent, either alone or in combination with guggulsterones. Samples were then analyzed for the presence LDL oxidation byproducts. The results showed that guggulsterones strongly protect LDL from being oxidized. Guggulsterones block the formation of hydroxyl radicals, a potent type of free-radical that attacks cell membranes.

    Guggulsterones may also help keep the heart muscle itself healthy. When the heart muscle is deprived of oxygen, a condition known as "myocardial ischemia," it can be severely damaged by free radicals. The body tries to counter this with SOD, a key enzyme present in cells that neutralizes free radicals. SOD levels are significantly reduced in damaged heart tissues. Guggulsterones have been found to reverse this decrease by more than two-fold.10

    Like the writer of that age-old verse found in the Vedas, contemporary herbalists hold gum guggul in the highest regard. Backed as it is by scientific research linked to centuries of traditional use, gum guggul has a bright future as a natural resource for maintaining normal cholesterol and blood fats, and for protecting heart health.

    References

    1. Heinecke, J.W. Free radical modification of low density lipoprotein: mechanisms and biological consequences. Free Radical Biology & Medicine 1987;3:65-73.

    2. Satyavati, G.V. Effect of an indigenous drug on disorders of lipid metabolism with special reference to atherosclerosis and obesity (Medoroga) M.D. thesis (Doctor of Ayurvedic Medicine). Banaras Hindu University, varanasi, 1966.

    3. Satyavati, G. Gugulipid: a promising hypolipidaemic agent from gum guggul (Commiphora wightii). Economic and Medicinal Plant Research 1991;5:47-82.

    4. Dev, S. A modern look at an age-old Ayurvedic drug-guggulu. Science Age July 1987:13-18.

    5. Singh, V. et. al. Stimulation of low density lipoprotein receptor activity in liver membrane of guggulsterone treated rats. Pharmacological Research 1990;22(1):37-44.

    6. Nityanand, S., Srivastava, J.S., Asthana, O.P. Clinical trials with gugulipid. J. Ass. Physicians of India 1989;37(5):323-28.

    7. Agarwal, R.C. et. al. Clinical trial of gugulipid-a new hypolipidemic agent of plant origin in primary hyperlipidemia. Indian J Med Res 1986;84:626-34.

    8. 'Gugulipid' Drugs of the Future 1988;13(7):618-619.

    9. Singh, K., Chandler, R. Kapoor, N.K. Guggulsterone, a potent hypolipidaemic, prevents oxidation of low density lipoprotein. Phytotherapy Research 1997;11:291-94.

    10. Kaul, S. Kapoor, N.K. Reversal of chnages of lipid peroxide, xanthine oxidase and superoxide dismutase by cardio-protective drugs in isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Indian Journal of Experimental Biology 1989;27:625-627.

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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 09, 2005 06:10 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    It's in the Blood

    Natural alternatives abound for managing cholesterol levels, backed by a growing body of research ©VR By Paul Bubny

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) last July lowered the threshold for considering the use of statin drugs—a move which some say was motivated more by profits than scientific evidence. For example, the Center for Science in the Public Interest pointed out that eight of the nine authors behind the new recommendations had financial ties to statin manufacturers, which stand to reap billions of dollars more from a category that grossed $14 billion in the U.S. last year. And though the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in January decided against authorizing over-the-counter (OTC) sales of statin drugs, drug companies would still like to see this happen.

    “The medical establishment’s pushing of these drugs to becoming the number one category of prescribed drugs in the world has led them to keep lowering the total cholesterol number that triggers the drug recommendation,” said Neil E. Levin, C.C.N., D.A.N.L.A., nutrition educator, product formulator, and “Truth Advocate” for NOW Foods (Bloomingdale, IL), which produces a number of supplements for addressing cholesterol. “This is despite the lack of evidence that total cholesterol means much as regards cardiovascular risks.

    “Other tests are much more important in terms of predicting risks, including CRP (C-reactive protein), the balance of different cholesterol fractions, and homocysteine,” he continued. “Add adult-onset diabetes to the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD).”

    At the same time, the allegation that enormous sales potential lay behind the lower threshold for prescribing statin drugs illustrates how widespread the problem of hypercholesterolemia (elevated total cholesterol) is. More than 100 million Americans have elevated cholesterol (total cholesterol values of 200 mg/dl and higher), and of these, more than a third have high cholesterol (levels of 240 mg/dl and higher), according to the American Heart Association. Those numbers have unfavorable implications for the incidence of CVD, as high cholesterol is considered a risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke.

    While statin drugs haven’t garnered the same degree of negative publicity that COX-2 inhibitors have suffered lately, safety concerns have arisen nonetheless. For one thing, these drugs lower the liver’s production of coenzyme Q10 (coQ10) along with its production of cholesterol. “CoQ10 is related to energy production and immune functions, is an antioxidant, and [is] an important cardiovascular nutrient,” Levin said. “It is not good to lower one’s coQ10 levels by half!”

    Moreover, said Levin, statins increase the tendency of muscle tissues to break down. “Combined with inactivity or certain drugs, this can stimulate muscle wasting,” he said. “Muscle is where a good deal of calories are burned, so a loss of muscle could affect mobility and energy production, potentially adding to obesity problems. These muscle changes occurred in patients and persisted for years after treatment was discontinued, as shown by muscle biopsies, even if no obvious muscle problems were observed by the patients.”

    And the last word on the subject may not have been spoken. Predicted Dr. Frank King, Jr. president of King Bio Natural Medicine (Asheville, NC), “Once the appropriate studies are finished, these drugs, along with hypertensives, will hit the fan bigger than the COX-2 inhibitors.”

    Also looking toward the future, Levin said that of the 20 million Americans who will be “targeted” for statin drug prescriptions under the new NCEP guidelines, “Some of these will want to try natural methods first. Others will rebel at the side effects of the drugs and experiment with alternative products.”

    King and Levin both saw opportunity for natural products in the fallout from drug safety concerns, with King projecting that sales of his company’s cholesterol-related homeopathic remedies will double in 2005. “The reports of deaths from drugs will always overshadow the trumped-up studies and news reports blasting dietary supplements,” said Levin. “Vioxx knocked vitamin E off the media’s radar screens pretty rapidly, though we still see ignorant reporters citing that [Johns Hopkins] vitamin E analysis as if it were true. But the comparable safety of supplements means that open-minded people will want to at least try natural therapies before signing in to a lifetime of drug therapies. Meanwhile, the studies on natural products will continue to build our credibility.”

    Those studies keep coming in, with at least four major findings published in the past few months, plus a heart-health claim on walnuts authorized by FDA. They join a raft of earlier findings that link natural products—branded and otherwise—to healthy cholesterol levels.

    "Blur of Products"

    With so many natural alternatives to cholesterol drugs available, it can be hard to keep track. “As with any other category, the blur of products as they cascade over several shelves means that the retailer needs to have a good sense of what works and what they want to recommend to their customers,” Levin said. “Really, each person needs a protocol that would include antioxidants, fiber, vitamins, herbs, and oils. The pre-mixed cholesterol support formulas are a good starting place.”

    To help retailers get a sense of “what works,” here is an alphabetical discussion of several nutrients that have demonstrated benefits in serum cholesterol levels. They include the following:

    Barley may help lower cholesterol, according to a report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2004, vol.80, no.5: 1185-1193). Twenty-five adults with mild hypercholesterolemia consumed a controlled diet low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol for 19 weeks. They then added whole-grain products containing barley to their diets that contained low (0 g), medium (3 g), or high (6 g) amount of beta-glucan per day for five weeks. Total cholesterol was reduced by 4 percent 9 percent, and 10 percent, respectively. The diet with the highest amount of beta-glucan led to a decrease in LDL cholesterol of 17 percent.

    Chromium. There’s evidence, Levin said, that chromium in doses of 500 mg a day may decrease levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the so-called “bad” cholesterol) and total cholesterol while raising levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good” cholesterol). At the annual meeting of the American College of Nutrition last October, a poster presentation on the safety of Benicia, CA-based InterHealth Nutraceuticals’ ChromeMate niacin-bound chromium won first prize; among other things, the presentation cited chromium’s role in maintaining healthy blood lipid levels.

    Fatty Acids. The latest in a long line of studies demonstrating the benefits of fatty acids in heart health is a study published in The International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics in December 2004. It showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid, can restore normal blood vessel function in children with inherited high cholesterol. The study, which used Martek DHA produced from microalgae, concluded that restoration of normal blood vessel function has the “potential for preventing the progression of early coronary heart disease in high-risk children.”

    “The evidence continues to accumulate on the cardiovascular benefits of DHA for people of all ages,” said Henry “Pete” Linsert, Jr., chairman and CEO of Martek Biosciences, an ingredient supplier based in Columbia, MD. “This study clearly indicates that DHA played an important role in healthy blood vessel function in the children in this study.”

    On the Omega-Research.com Website maintained by fish oil manufacturer Nordic Naturals (Watsonville, CA) can be found summaries of several earlier studies linking omega-3 fatty acids to maintaining healthy blood lipid levels, as well as related benefits such as elasticity of the arteries. In a 2003 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, it was found that women receiving a mixture of 4 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and DHA along with 2 g of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) had lower levels of LDL cholesterol after 28 days compared to those who received either the EPA/DHA supplements without DHA, EPA/DHA with a smaller dose of GLA, or GLA alone.

    Flax is another source of omega-3s, and Arkopharma/Health From The Sun (Bedford, MA) offers FiProFLAX in a variety of forms. Marketing director Hugues P. Mas said the flax is “QAI [Quality Assurance International] certified organic and guaranteed GMO [genetically modified organism]-free.” On its Website, the company offers a cholesterol quiz geared to consumers, discussing the importance of omega-3s as well as other nutrients.

    Garlic. Adding to an already considerable body of research demonstrating that garlic can lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides while increasing HDL cholesterol, researchers at UCLA in 2003 reported that Kyolic aged garlic extract reduced or inhibited plaque formation in the arteries of 19 cardiac patients taking statin drugs.

    Lead researcher Matthew Budoff, Ph.D. commented at the time that the study “suggests that aged garlic extract may be a useful and beneficial dietary addition for the people who have high cardiovascular risk or who have undergone heart surgery.” Budoff has since presented several trade show seminars sponsored by Los Angeles-based Wakunaga of America, the makers of Kyolic.

    Guggul. In use for centuries as a component of Ayurvedic medicine, guggul—a gummy resin tapped from the Commiphora mukul tree, which is native to India—has been studied since the early 1960s for its hypolidemic (blood-lipid lowering) properties. Sabinsa Corp. (Piscataway, NJ), an ingredient supplier which produces a standardized extract under the brand name Gugulipid, says the studies on guggul indicate that its hypolipidemic activity can be attributed to more than one mechanism of action.

    Among the possible mechanisms are: inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, enhancing the rate of excretion of cholesterol, promoting rapid degradation of cholesterol, thyroid stimulation, alteration of biogenic amines, and “high affinity binding and anion exchange.”

    Homeopathy. “Homeopathy activates the body’s own control system to work properly,” said King. “This is the safest and most curative approach to take.

    “Forcing the body into biochemical change even naturally doesn’t actually have the curative action of homeopathy,” King continued. “Homeopathy can even correct the genetic predispositions to disease we may have inherited from as deep as a thousand years into our family chain.” King Bio makes Artery/Cholesterol/BP, a homeopathic formula intended to help tone heart muscles and blood vessels.

    Low glycemic index foods. In a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that high glycemic load is negatively correlated to serum levels of HDL cholesterol. Assessing the relationship between blood levels of lipids and diet in a test population of 32 healthy males and females ages 11 to 25, the researchers found that glycemic load accounted for 21.1 percent of the variation in HDL cholesterol. They concluded that glycemic load appears to be an important independent predictor of HDL cholesterol in youth and noted that dietary restrictions without attention to glycemic load could unfavorably influence blood lipids.

    Medicinal Mushrooms. Although its product SX-Fraction is intended primarily to address high blood sugar, Maitake Products, Inc. (MPI, Ridgefield Park, NJ) found in a clinical study that LDL cholesterol in diabetic patients declined modestly (from 142 mg/dl to 133 mg/dl) over a two-month period. Those taking SX-Fraction also lost about 7 lbs. in the same time period.

    “The more impressive lowering of cholesterol, however, comes from the dietary fiber that is found in all medicinal mushrooms,” said Ellen Shnidman, manager of scientific affairs at MPI. She cited animal studies which documented the cholesterol-lowering properties of four different mushrooms: maitake, shiitake, agaricus, and enokitake.

    For example, a study reported in the September 1996 issue of Alternative Therapies showed “a 44 percent reduction in total cholesterol in rats consuming maitake mushroom in their diet,” said Shnidman. “This cholesterol reduction is accompanied by weight loss, relative to rats eating a similar high-choelsterol diet without mushrooms. Apparently, cholesterol is excreted by the rats in sufficient quantity to aid in weight loss.”

    Oat bran. A 2004 consumer study conducted by the Natural Marketing Institute (NMI, Harleysville, PA) for Nurture, Inc. (Devon, PA), which produces the ingredient OatVantage, found that 63 percent of consumers managing their cholesterol levels prefer oat-based ingredients.

    Oat bran is the subject of a health claim authorized by FDA in 1999, and NMI research found that 69 percent of respondents preferred the FDA-permitted health claim, “Helps Lower Cholesterol,” over the model structure-function claim, “Helps Maintain Healthy Cholesterol Levels.” “This is significant for food, beverage, and dietary supplement manufacturers who want to increase sales by using a more consumer-desired claim on the product label,” said Griff Parker, Nurture CEO.

    Plant sterols. Also the subject of an FDA-approved claim for heart health, plant sterols (structurally similar to cholesterol in humans) can block the absorption of cholesterol, according to a number of studies. In an “Ask the Doctor” publication (available online at www.atdonline.org), Decker Weiss, N.M.D. noted that sterols enter the same receptor sites that cholesterol enters on its way to the bloodstream. “The cholesterol, being blocked from absorption, remains in our intestines where it is eventually excreted,” Weiss wrote. General Mills has just introduced Yoplait Healthy Heart, a yogurt high in plant sterols.

    Policosanol. A mixture of fatty alcohols derived from sugar cane or beeswax, policosanol has been favorably compared in clinical studies to several types of prescription drugs for managing cholesterol. On its own, policosanol was found in a 1999 study to reduce LDL cholesterol while raising levels of HDL cholesterol.

    Probiotics. “Several studies have indicated that consumption of certain cultured dairy products resulted in reduction of serum cholesterol, as well as triglycerides,” wrote Dr. S.K. Dash, president of probiotic manufacturer UAS Laboratories (Eden Prairie, MN), in his Consumer Guide to Probiotics. Among other studies, Dash cited two controlled clinical studies from the VA Medical Center at the University of Kentucky.

    “In the first study, fermented milk containing [Lactobacillus] acidophilus was accompanied by a 2.4 percent reduction of serum cholesterol concentration,” he wrote. “In the second study, a different L. acidophilus strain reduced serum cholesterol concentration by 3.2 percent. Since every 1 percent reduction in serum cholesterol concentration is associated with an estimated 2 to 3 percent reduction in risk for coronary heart disease [CHD], regular intake of fermented milk containing an appropriate strain of L. acidophilus has the potential of reducing risk for [CHD] by 6 to 10 percent.”

    Dash said his company’s DDS Probiotics contain DDS-1 L. acidophilus, “which has been researched and demonstrated to show cholesterol-lowering effect.”

    Psyllium. “Internal cleansing is very important” in maintaining healthy cholesterol levels, “especially if you do it with a lot of fiber,” said Sunil Kohli, vice president of Chino, CA-based Health Plus, Inc. The cholesterol-managing ability of fiber in general and psyllium in particular is “very well-established,” he said.

    However, Kohli said, “It will probably do you no good if it’s random. It should be done on a regular basis, and it should be supervised. Consulting the doctor or pharmacist is important.”

    Soy. The protein in soy “has evidence of lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, based on reviews of studies using over 20 g of soy protein per day,” said Levin. “Soy isoflavones are considered only partly responsible for this effect.”

    Sytrinol. A patented proprietary formula derived from natural citrus and palm fruit extracts and containing citrus polymethoxylated flavones and palm tocotrienols, Sytrinol has been shown in clinical trials to improve total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides by up to 30 percent, 27 percent, and 33 percent, respectively. Having just wrapped up Phase III of a long-term trial of Sytrinol, Chicago-based SourceOne Global Partners, which owns the exclusive worldwide license for intellectual property associated with the ingredient, is commencing a study that combines Sytrinol with plant sterols.

    Tocotrienols. On its Website discussing the science and benefits of tocotrienols (www.tocotrienol.org), ingredient supplier Carotech Inc. (Edison, NJ) identifies several benefits for blood lipid levels. Tocotrienols, according to the Website, have been shown to “inhibit cholesterol production in the liver, thereby lowering total blood cholesterol;” “[suppress] hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity [and result in] the lowering of LDL cholesterol levels;” and “inhibit cholesterogenesis by suppressing HMG-CoA reductase.”

    New Weapons

    There are also nutrients that are emerging as potential weapons in the fight against cholesterol. Levin cited rice bran oil, resveratrol, pantethine, l-carnitine, and niacin as showing promise.

    With all of this, Levin said, it’s important for retailers to remember that “they are not allowed to discuss diseases and remedies unless there is an approved FDA health claim allowed on the label, as with soy protein and plant sterols. What is allowed are structure-function claims such as ‘cholesterol support,’ ‘promoting normal, healthy circulation,’ ‘homocysteine regulators,’ etc.”

    Supplementation is only one tool for managing cholesterol levels, manufacturers pointed out. “Besides nutrition, lifestyle is a key to controlling cholesterol,” Levin said. “Eating a variety of antioxidant-rich foods will prevent the liver from churning out cholesterol as a ‘cheap’ antioxidant. The body uses oxidized cholesterol to patch leaky and damaged blood vessels, so the ability to build healthy collagen is a must, using nutrients like vitamin C, Pycnogenol, rutin, hyaluronic acid, and MSM.

    “Don’t forget exercise and stress reduction,” he added. “Stress results in high cortisol levels—usually accompanied by poor blood lipid levels—and a lack of good sleep to produce unhealthy people.” VR

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