SearchBox:

Search Term: " Tonalin "

  Messages 1-2 from 2 matching the search criteria.
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/22/05
Tonalin CLA and Diet Tonalin CLA - May Help Loose Weight ... Darrell Miller 6/1/05



Betancourt Nutrition CLA ELITE TONALIN
   90 SOFTGELS $31.99 21% OFF $ 25.27
MET-RX CLA TONALIN 1000
   90 SOFTGELS $29.99 28% OFF $ 21.59
SOURCE NATURALS Diet Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   90 SG $34.50 29% OFF $ 24.49
SOURCE NATURALS Diet Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   30 SG $12.50 29% OFF $ 8.88
SOURCE NATURALS Diet Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   60 SG $23.50 29% OFF $ 16.69
SOURCE NATURALS Diet Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   120 SG $45.50 29% OFF $ 32.31
SOURCE NATURALS Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   30 softgels $12.50 29% OFF $ 8.88
SOURCE NATURALS Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   60 softgels $23.50 29% OFF $ 16.69
SOURCE NATURALS Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   120 softgels $45.50 29% OFF $ 32.31
SOURCE NATURALS Tonalin CLA 1000 mg
   90 sg $34.50 29% OFF $ 24.49
NATROL Tonalin CLA 1000mg
   60 softgels $19.29 34% OFF $ 12.73
NATROL Tonalin CLA 1000mg
   90 softgels $27.09 34% OFF $ 17.88

REFERENCES
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 22, 2005 09:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: REFERENCES

REFERENCES


1. Interview with Dr. Michael Pariza, July 3, 1997.
2. “Effects of Temperature and Time on Mutagen Formation in Pan-Fried Hamburger,” by M. Pariza, Samy Ashoor, Fun Chu and Daryl Lund, March 10, 1979, Cancer Letters, 7 (1979) 63-69.
3. “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, August 25, 1987. IRL Press limited, Oxford, England.
4. Interview with Dr. Mark Cook, July 3, 1997.
5. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Cancer Prevention Research: A Report of Current Status and Issues,” A special report prepared for the National Live Stock and Meat Board, Ip, Clement, Ph.D., May 1994. See also “Conjugated linoleic acid, a newly recognised nutrient” in the June 17, 1997, issue of Chemistry and Industry by M. Pariza, pp. 464-466.
6. Op.Cit. Pariza, Chemistry and Industry.
7. Op. Cit. Ip, National Live Stock and Meat Board. See also, “Conjugated Linoleic Acid (9,11 and 10,12-Octadecadienoic Acid) is Produced in Conventional by Not Germ-Free Rats Fed Linleic Acid,” Sou F. Chin, Et. Al, Dec. 16, 1993, Journal of Nutrition 124: 694-701 1994.
8. Ibid.
9. Interview with Cook. 10. Op. Cit. Ip, National Live Stock and Meat Board.
11. Ibid.
12. Op. Cit., interview with Pariza., and “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L. Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, Aug. 25, 1987, IRL Press Limited, Oxford England.
13. “Conjugated linoleic acid: An anticarcinogenic fatty acid present in mile fat,” by Peter Parodi, Australian Journal of DairyTechnology. Nov. 1994, 49 p. 93-94.
14. The Washington Post “Now We’re a Nation of Lite Heavyweights,” Sept. 1, 1994, Sec. B. P. 10.
15. “A beef-derived mutagenesis modulator inhibits initiation of mouse epidermal tumors by 7, 12 dimethylbens[a]anthracene,” by M. Pariza and W. Hargraves, Jan. 2, 1985, Carcinogenesis, vol 6., no. 4 pp. 591-593, 1985, IRL Press, Limited, Oxford, England.
16. Op. Cit. Pariza, Chemistry and Industry.
17. “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L. Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, Aug. 25, 1987, IRL Press Limited, Oxford England.
18. “Mammary Cancer Prevention by Conjugated Dienoic Derivative of Linoleic Acid,” Clement Ip, Sou Fe Chin, Joseph Scimeca and Michael Pariza, Cancer Research, 51, 6118-6124, Nov. 15, 1991.
19. “Refiguring the Odds: What’s a woman’s real chance of suffering breast cancer?” Facklemann, K.A., Science News 144 (1993) 76-77.
20. “Inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene-induced mouse forestomach neoplasia by conjugated dienoic derivatives of linoleic acid.” Ha, Y.L, Storkson, J., Pariza, M.W. Cancer Research 50: 1097-1101; 1990.
21. “Protection of Conjugated linoleic acid against 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline-induced colon carcinogenesis in the f344 rat: a study of inhibitory mechanisims,” Liew, C.; Schut, H.A.J., chin, S.F., Pariza, M.W., and Dashwood, R.H. (1995), Carcinogenesis 16, 3037-3044.
22. Op. Cit., Ip, Cancer Research, 1991.
23. “Potential of Food Modification in Cancer Prevention,” Ip, C.; Lisk, Donald J. and J. Scimeca, Cancer Research, 54, 1957-1959, April 1, 1994.
24. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA), A Newly Re c o g n i ze d Anitcarcinogenic Nutrient,” unpublished paper by Michael Pariza.
25. “Effects of conjugated dienoic linoleic acid on lipid metabolism in mouse liver,” Belury, M.A. and Vanden Heuvel, J.P. (1996), Proc. Am. Assoc. Cancer Res. 37: 1918.
26. “Protection Against Cancer and Heart Disease by Dietary Fatty Acid, Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Potential Mechanisms of Action,” Belury, M.A.; Vanden Heuvel, J.P; Submitted to Nutrition and Disease Update Journal, Sept. 28, 1996.
27. Interveiw with Pariza.
28. Op. Cit., Pariza, Cancer Research, 1990.
29. “Fatty Acids that Inhibit Cancer,” unpublished paper by M. Pariza.
30. Op. Cit. Liew.
31. “Reinvestigation of the antioxidant properties of conjugated linoleic acid,” van den Berg J.J.; Cook, N.E.; Tribble D.L.; Lipids, 73, 1995, Jul 30 (7), 595-598.
32. “Furan Fatty acids detrmined as oxidation products of conjugated octadecadienoic acid,” Yurawecz, M.P., Hood, J.K., Mossoba, MM., Roach, J.A.G., and Ku, Y. Lipids 30, 595-598.
33. Interview with Pariza.
34. “Vital Statistics of the United States” from the Centers for Disease Control for 1989.
35. “Conjugated linoleic acid and atherosclerosis in rabbits.” Lee, K.N., Kritchevsky, D. And Pariza, M.W.; Atherosclerosis 108, 19-25.
36. Interview with Pariza.
37. “Dietary conjugated linoleic acid reduces aortic fatty streak formation greater than linoleic acid in hypercholesterolemic hamsters,” Nicolosi, R.J., and Laitinen, L. (1996), FASEB J. 10 A477.
38. “Ionic Basis of Hypertension, Insulin in Resistance, Vascular Disease and Related Disorders. The Mechanism of ‘Syndrome X”, Resnick, LM, American Journal of Hypertension. 1993 (4Suppl) 123S-134S.
39. “Protection by coenzyme Q10 from myocardial reperfusion injury during coronary artery bypass grafting,” Chello-M, et. Al, Ann-Thorac. Surg., 1994, Nov; 58(5): 1427-32.
40. “Immune Modulation by Altered Nutrient Metabolism: Nutritional Control of Immune-Induced Growth Depression,” M.E. Cook, C.C. Miller, Y. Park and Ma Pariza, Poultry Science 72: 1301-1305 (1993).
41. “Feeding Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Animals Partially Overcomes Catabolic Responses Due to Endotoxin Injection,” Miller, C.C., Park, Y., Pariza, M, and Cook, M. Feb. 15, 1994, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, pages 1107-1112.
42. Op. Cit. Cook, Poultry Science, 1993.
43. Interview with Cook.
44. Ibid.
45. Op. Cit. Washington Post.
46. “Obesity, Pathogenesis & Treatment, a series of reports on obesisy issues edited by G. Enzi, et. Al, 1981, Academic Press.
47. William Howard Taft: The President who became Chief Justice, by Severn, Bill 1970, David McKay company.
48. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduces Body Fat,” abstract only of a speech g i ven at En v i ronmental Bi o l o g y, 96. See also U.S. Patent Nu m b e r 5,554,646, dated Sep. 10, 1996.
49. Interveiw with Cook.
50. Information of Dr. Parizi provided to PharmaNutrients, Inc.
51. Interview with Cook.
52. Op. Cit. Parodi.
53. Obesity & Weight Control: The Health Pro f e s s i o n a l’s Guide to Understanding & Treatment. Edited by Frankle, R. T. 1988.
54. Ibid.
55. Op. Cit. The Washington Post.
56. Interview with Pariza.
57. Pariza in information to Pharmnutrients, Inc., indicates a Dr. Reid studied content in 1963 of milk fat.
58. Op Cit. Parodi.
59. Bill Phillips, Supplement Review, 3rd Edition.
60. Interview with Pariza.
61. Interview with Cook.
62. Interviews with Cook, Pariza.
63. Research conducted by Medstat Research Ltd., Lillestrom, Norway for the Herbal Marketing Group, HMG, Ltd., Oslo, Norway. “A pilot study with the aim of stydying the efficacy and tolerability of CLA (Tonalin) on the body composition in humans.) by Erling Thom Ph.D., Medstate Research Ltd., Liilestrom, Norway, July 1997.



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=401)


Tonalin CLA and Diet Tonalin CLA - May Help Loose Weight ...
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 01, 2005 12:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Tonalin CLA and Diet Tonalin CLA - May Help Loose Weight ...

Tonalin CLA and Diet Tonalin CLA

Dramatic new research has identified a fatty acid that may positively influence body composition. Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA), found mainly in meat and dairy products, used to be abundant in our diets. But with the trend to lower fat diets, our CLA intake also is declining. It is an irony that so many Americans seem to be getting fatter, even as we eat less fatty foods. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin may have found an explanation for this paradox. Their studies suggest CLA may be an important nutrient for optimal body composition, possibly helping to reduce body fat and increase muscle. Aware consumers are unlikely to go back to the unhealthy, meat-laden diets of the past. But today CLA is available from pure sunflower oil. Introducing: Source Naturals Tonalin CLA.

Research Uncovers an Unrecognized Fatty Acid

CLA is a term referring to a group of derivatives of the essential fatty acid, linoleic acid. CLA, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is found naturally in certain foods, especially meat and dairy products. CLA has been known for more than 18 years, but studies of its relationship to body composition are more recent. Studies now suggest that CLA may positively influence our bodies’ efficiency in using food, and have a beneficial effect on the balance between fat and muscle in our bodies. Clinical trials are now underway to explore the mechanism by which CLA works, and to determine whether the results of these laboratory and animal tests are also applicable to humans.

Additional Benefits

CLA may have a number of other benefits for our bodily systems. In fact, the University of Wisconsin researchers first discovered CLA’s role in influencing body composition as a result of research they were carrying out on CLA’s other properties. Among other important functions, CLA may be beneficial for our cardiovascular system due to its role in helping maintain normal cholesterol levels.

CLA: Insufficient in Today’s Diet

CLA used to be abundant in our diets. Today, however, Americans are eating less beef and full-fat dairy products. This translates to lower levels of CLA in our diets. CLA content is also much lower than it used to be in beef. Researchers believe this may be related to changes in the way cattle are fed. The green grass eaten by grazing cows is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids including linoleic acid. Cows have a unique digestive system that converts linoleic acid to CLA - a close chemical relative of linoleic acid. The CLA is then stored in the cows’ tissues. It is possible that, since cattle today are predominantly fed oats, barley and hay rather than grazing on grass, they are no longer producing as much CLA.

A Plant-Based Alternative

Now, with Source Naturals Tonalin™ CLA, you can derive the benefits of CLA without consuming large amounts of animal fat. Tonalin CLA is manufactured by a proprietary process from sunflower oil. Source Naturals Tonalin CLA is available in 1000 mg softgels, consisting of 600 mg of CLA standardized to contain 40% cis-9-trans-11-octadecadienoic acid, one of CLA’s most important constituents. Three softgels - the suggested daily use - provide approximately the same amount of CLA as eating five pounds of beef, or 45 one-ounce slices of processed American cheese, or almost a gallon of ice cream every day! Source Naturals Tonalin™ CLA is available in 30, 60 and 120-capsule bottles.

References
Belury, Martha A. & Vanden Heuvel, John P. (1997). Nutrition & Disease Update Journal: 1(2) (in press). Chin, S. F. et al. (1992). Journal of Food Composition and Analysis:5. 185-97. Pariza, M. et al. (1996). Abstract of Speech at Environmental Biology ‘96, Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin: Madison. Parodi, P.W. (1994). Australian Journal of Dairy Technology. Dairy Research and Development Corporation: Victoria. Conjugated Linoleic Acid is licensed under U.S. patents: 5,428,072; 5,430,066; and 5,554,646. Tonalin™ is a trademark of Pharmanutrients USA.



--
VitaNet ®
VitaNet ® Staff

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=141)



VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.