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What Herbs Are Good For Boosting The Immune System? Darrell Miller 3/25/12
What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea? Darrell Miller 12/18/11
What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea? Darrell Miller 7/6/11
Dolce digestive - Digestion support tonic Darrell Miller 5/6/06
Echinacea - Choosing The Ideal Immune Support Darrell Miller 6/30/05
Wellness Herbal Kids Liquid - Immune Support for Children–Ages 2 & Up Darrell Miller 6/29/05
References Darrell Miller 6/24/05
History Darrell Miller 6/24/05
Echinacea Darrell Miller 6/24/05



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What Herbs Are Good For Boosting The Immune System?
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Date: March 25, 2012 03:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Herbs Are Good For Boosting The Immune System?

Herbs for Immunity

The immunity system comprises a network of organs, cells and tissues that are responsible for your overall wellness. The status of your immunity system mainly depends on your feeding habits. The foods you eat supply you with vital nutrients and minerals that help protect you from diseases. The white blood cells in your body are also endowed with the role of defending your body against diseases. There are herbs that help increase the number of white blood cells, while others produce immunity cells thus boosting your immunity system. The following are the best herbs that are good for boosting the immune system:

Astragalus

Astragalus is a traditional Chinese herb that is locally known as Huang-Qi. The roots of this herb are used for a wide range of purposes, one of which is to boost the immune system. This is because of its ability to increase the number of T-cells and interferon.

Astragalus is also used to treat inflammatory conditions, liver problems, viral and bacterial infections, lack of appetite, short breath, stomach ulcers, flu, common cold, diabetes, stress, hypertension and body weakness. This herb also interferes with the growth of cancerous tumors, and has thus been used as a natural aid during chemotherapy treatments.

Echinacea

Echinacea is a group of herbs popular within the American market, which are also known as black susans, Indian head, American cone flower, or Kansas snake root. The popular species of Echinacea are E. pallid, E. purpurea and E. angustifolia.

These herbs have been used for ages as natural immune boosters because of their ability to increase the number of WBC as well as spleen cells in your body. They also increase the number of natural immune chemicals such as immuno globin, interferon and interleukin. When White Blood Cells increase, they give your body maximum protection against antigens that interfere with your overall wellness. The phenolic compounds found in the flowers, roots and leaves of Echinacea herbs are the ones that facilitate this immuno stimulating function.

They are also natural remedies for common colds, respiratory infections, skin complications and Urinary tract infections. These herbs can suppress your immunity if taken habitually. Therefore, it is recommended that you use the herb only when you suspect infection. It is also advisable for you to limit the intake of Echinacea to a week because overuse may generate unbearable symptoms.

Golden seal

This herb is also known as Ground Raspberry, Yellow Root, Orange Root, Wild Curcuma, Indian Dye, Indian Paint, Jaundice Root or Indian Plant. It is a medicinal herb that contains berberine, canadine and hydrastine alkanoids. Golden seal also contains vital vitamins and minerals that are needed for strong immunity system.

One of the benefits of Golden Seal is that it serves as an immuno stimulant, especially when blended with echinacea. It has also been used to treat various medical conditions such as inflammation, herpes and common cold. It also has tonic and antiseptic qualities. You can also use it externally to cure sores and itchy sensations.

So if you want an immune boost, give one of these herbs a try!

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What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea?
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Date: December 18, 2011 08:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is The Difference Between Echinacea angustifolia And Purpurea?

In the advent of natural medicine these days it is important for us to also know what we are dealing with. We may feel that it is better because it is all natural but still, just like prescription drugs, herbal medicine also has its attractiveness to those who want to take advantage of people’s needs and momentary lapses of judgement. It does not mean that it is all natural it is good for the body right away, we also need to find out if it is exactly what we need or what we expect it to be. These herbal medicines and supplements in the market today come from plants and they are derived from it by various types of processing. As an example, we can look at Echinacea angustifolia And Purpurea and what the differences are.

Echinacea

Both of them are species of this plant and we will only be able to understand more about those two if we are able to know their mother so to speak. It is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants and those two are part of the family and it has 7 other brothers and sisters so to speak because there are 9 species all in all including both the E angustifolia and E. Purpurea. In modern natural medicine it has been known to have a lot of health benefits and the main one being its ability to support the immune system and help activate white blood cells to improve bodily functions. Other studies have learned that it has the ability to influence the increased production of interferon which is an essential part of the body’s defensive response to any viral attacks that may cause infections.

Echinacea angustifolia

This flowering plant is believed by some to be a miracle plant especially in the natural medicine world. It has shown to have amazing healing powers and this is what makes it a popular part of alternative medicine. Throughout US history it has been used by native Americans and frontiersmen as tonic and somewhat of a cure all treatment for various ailments and rightfully so because in modern science it has been proven to have amazing antiviral and antifungal properties which makes it an effective treatment against infections, certain diseases, common colds and flu. Other uses that it may have are being a treatment for inflammation, skin ulcers and upper respiratory infection which needs more studies to be done but early results seem promising.

Echinacea Purpurea

This specie is not as popular as the other but it also can be effective. It basically is a perennial with long stems and long lasting lavender coloured flowers. It also has the power to help the immune system be stronger and is commonly made as a tea. Studies have shown that it has a mild natural antibiotic characteristic and its extracts has been known to have the ability to increase white blood cell count as well however it is helpful to note that it is better in smaller doses than in large ones.

Both forms posses the same properties primarily immune boosting properties; either one is good to use to help strengthen the body in times of cold and flu and disease.

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What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?
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Date: July 06, 2011 10:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?

Echinacea Health Benefits

Echinacea is a group of plant species that belongs to the same family as dandelion, sunflower, and daisy. These flowering shrubs are best known as ornamental plants in gardens. Also, they are widely recognized as medicinal herbs in alternative medicine. Modern herbalists have attributed a diverse variety of healing properties to this herb, drawing on its traditional uses among the Native Americans.

Echinacea angustifolia

Elk root, black samson echinacea, or narrow-leaved purple cornflower refers to Echinacea angustifolia. Its native range stretches from Manitoba in the north to Texas in the south. It is an herbaceous plant, as all species of echinacea are. It grows up to 28 inches in height, extending from a branched taproot. Its stems and leaves are hairy while other species are smooth. Its flowers resemble a cone in shape.

Echinacea angustifolia is so named in the vernacular due to the fact that elks knowingly consume the plant when sick or wounded. Elk root is an herb important to folk medicine practices of Plain Indians, such as the Cheyenne and Apache. It displays analgesic properties, and thus has been in use as a pain reliever for external wounds and internal inflammation, including allergies, rheumatism, and arthritis.

Research on elk root has been promising. It is one of the species of echinacea believed to enhance the immune system and improve immune responses. In particular, it is good for the respiratory system. It has been used in the treatment of the common cold, sore throat, and nasal congestion. In addition, it exhibits antimicrobial properties, which effectively wards off infections of the respiratory tract.

Echinacea purpurea

Eastern purple cornflower, or simply purple cornflower, refers to Echinacea purpurea. It enjoys a wide distribution in North America, though they thrive in large concentrations in the wild in regions close to the east coast. Unlike all other species of echinacea, it grows from a woody base with fibrous roots instead of a taproot. Its flowers are arranged in a cone, sitting atop a stem that grows up to 40 inches.

Echinacea purpurea is arguably the most extensively studied of all species of echinacea. Traditionally, it has been utilized by many different tribes in North America as a cure-all medicinal herb. Clinical trials have shown that juice extracts obtained from this plant species are useful for the short term treatment of cold infections, though contraindications in children and pregnant women were noted.

Echinacea purpurea displays chemopreventive potential. Laboratory studies have discovered that it contains alkamides, which bind to cannabinoid receptors and inhibit tumor growth and pain chemicals in the process. Also, it has been linked to immunotherapy largely owing to its properties that appear to increase the activity of immune cells. It shows promise as an adjunct treatment for cancer.

Either way, Echinacea can help boost the body so the body can fight back against disease. Make sure you have some in your medicine cabinet just in case you feel a cold coming on!

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Dolce digestive - Digestion support tonic
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Date: May 06, 2006 01:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Dolce digestive - Digestion support tonic

Dolce digestive - Digestion support tonic

Ingredients: Licorice (root), marshmallow (root), chamomile (flower), peppermint (leaf), star abuse (seed), bitter fennel (fruit), lemon balm (leaf), juniper (bark), butter orange (flower), wild yam (leaf), calendula (flower), European goldenrod (grass), Echinacea angustifolia (root), meadowsweet (whole plant).

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Echinacea - Choosing The Ideal Immune Support
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Date: June 30, 2005 09:27 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea - Choosing The Ideal Immune Support

Echinacea By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt Echinacea, pronounced ek-i-NAY-see-a, is one herb that has become a “household” name in the 1990’s. Many refer to it as “Purple Cone Flower” because of its large purple daisy petals, which contain a hard and spiny center cone. These spines probably give the plant its name, since sea animals with spines are called “echinoderms”. Echinacea is indigenous to the U.S., and can be found both growing wild in many areas as well as in cultivated gardens. There are actually nine different species of the plant; two are most popular as remedies: Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea. Echinacea has a long history of use by Native Americans, who have utilized the herb for a wide variety of treatments ranging from stings, poisoning, toothaches and swollen glands to colds and sore throats. It has also been touted as an ideal natural remedy for snake bites. In particular, the benefit of Echinacea as a treatment for snake bites brought national attention to the herb in the last half of the 1800’s. Dr. H.F.C. Meyer of Pawnee City, Nebraska first tried to interest Eclectic Physicians (doctors who used natural medicines) to use Echinacea as an herbal remedy for snake bites by volunteering to be bitten by a rattlesnake to prove its effectiveness. Although his dramatic offer was rejected, his enthusiasm and concerted efforts led to renewed interest and investigative studies on Echinacea, resulting in the herb’s emergence as one of the most popular natural plant therapies by the turn of the century.

Extensive studies on Echinacea’s medicinal properties continue to mirror the earlier usages of the herb as experienced by indigenous people. In fact, Echinacea is part of the official materia medica listed in the German Commission E. Monographs, a universally recognized publication reputed to be the official information authority on herbal medicines. The Commission lists a number of medicinal applications for Echinacea as an ideal treatment for such conditions as colds, chronic infections of the respiratory tract and lower urinary tract ailments, as well as topically for chronic ulcerations and slow healing wounds.

Echinacea has been shown to be a potent immune system stimulant. Nature’s Answer® offers an outstanding Echinacea fluid herbal extract formula in a unique blend that contains both Echinacea angustifolia root and Echinacea purpurea whole plant. Fluid extracts that feature both whole plant and root parts in the formula insure that the highest levels of the whole herb’s active constituents are maintained. A further advantage to this kind of supplement lies in its delivery system– liquids are faster to absorb and easier to assimilate by the body than tablets or capsules. Nature’s Answer®’s Echinacea formulas are available in either alcohol-free or organic alcohol forms. In addition, the alcohol-free supplements are also offered in a tasty grape or tangy orange flavor.

Two popular blends featuring Echinacea with other supportive herbs are Immune Boost™ and Re-Zist™. Immune Boost™ combines Echinacea with Wild Indigo and Maitake Mushroom. Re-Zist™ contains Echinacea, Goldenseal, Wild Indigo, Cayenne and Myrrh for potent support.

Echinacea is also recognized for its ability to enhance the resistance of cells to viruses, especially when used after cells have been exposed to colds and flus. As a preventative, formulas such as Nature’s Answer®’s Echinacea/Goldenseal (alcohol-free, organic alcohol) are ideal. This is an excellent supplement for soothing sore throats and helping to shrink swollen glands. An added benefit to the formula is the presence to berberine, the active ingredient in Goldenseal, which provides further wellness enhancement.

Many studies have focused on Echinacea’s possible use for ailments such as psoriasis and early rheumatoid arthritis. The herb also acts as an overall anti-inflammatory tonic. Nature’s Answer®’s Blood Support™ (alcohol-free) combines Echinacea with Dandelion, Licorice and other herbs for an anti-inflammatory effect. Allertone™ (alcohol-free) blends Echinacea with Mullein Leaf to help support the respiratory and sinus areas.

Most herbal practitioners suggest using Echinacea for short-term periods. There has been evidence to suggest that the herb loses its effectiveness when used over longer periods of time. Also, in the case of autoimmune illnesses, some people believe Echinacea may OVER-stimulate the immune system, although there is no solid research to back this contention. Echinacea is probably most effective if used in frequent doses for 5-7 days at the early onset of symptoms. It may also serve as a preventative during periods after known exposure or during extra stress, taking it two to three times a day every other or every third day. The German Commission E lists no known drug interactions or side effects with Echinacea. It is indeed one of the safest and most effective herbs for natural immune support today.

Echinacea seems well suited to life in the 90’s with all the stresses upon our immune systems. Its importance and effectiveness as an immune stimulant is as true today as it was in 1927 when Dr. Liebstein stated:

“Nature has probably destined Echinacea to be used for remedial purposes only, as a sustainer of vitality, an organizer of the defensive powers of the system, to such an extent as to be justly crowned the greatest immunizing agent in the entire vegetable kingdom....” written in 1927 by Dr. A. M. Liebstein (Foster, 1991)

  • These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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    Vitanet ®

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    Wellness Herbal Kids Liquid - Immune Support for Children–Ages 2 & Up
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    Date: June 29, 2005 12:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Wellness Herbal Kids Liquid - Immune Support for Children–Ages 2 & Up

    For parents, nothing is more important than ensuring the wellbeing of our children. That’s why Source Naturals developed WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS.

    WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS is the only herbal liquid for children with the Wellness name behind it. This unique and powerful cold weather blend features the prime immune herbs, echinacea and goldenseal. Unlike typical formulas, WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS also contains the famed Yin Chiao Chinese herbal complex, plus uncommon winter botanicals from around the world. And WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS is alcohol-free, with a great kidapproved taste. Source NaturalsWELLNESS HERBAL KIDS: because nothing is too good for your child.

    Echinacea & Goldenseal: Botanical Immune Support

    Echinacea, one of the most popular herbs in the United States, has been used to support natural defenses for more than 5,000 years. A highly valued Native American botanical, it has been shown in modern research to support immune function, specifically the activity of macrophages. Echinacea’s beneficial activity is due to a number of constituents, including polysaccharides and echinacosides, a group of compounds found only in echinacea. WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS features a standardized extract of Echinacea purpurea and Echinacea angustifolia. Goldenseal, another Native American botanical, has been used for centuries to soothe sensitive mucous membranes, including those in the respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems. Its beneficial properties are attributed to its alkaloids, especially berberine.

    Yin Chiao: Classic Chinese Formula

    According to traditional Chinese herbalism, Yin Chiao is best taken at the first signs of internal imbalance. Yin Chiao features herbs like lonicera (honeysuckle), forsythia, peppermint, and licorice.

    Supporting Herbs

    WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS includes other traditional botanicals. Elderberry has been used for winter health for centuries. It is a rich source of nutrients, especially bioflavonoids and anthocyanins. The phytonutrients in elderberry positively influence cell function and protection, and support the immune system. Isatis contains glycosides that help support your body’s innate defenses; it is valued by herbalists as a complement to echinacea and goldsenseal. The formula also includes the traditional Native American botanicals boneset and horehound, warming ginger, the renowned adaptogen Eleutherococcus senticosus, and bayberry.

    The Wellness Family™:

    Comprehensive Winter Support WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS, an important member of Source Naturals’ Wellness Family of natural immune system products, is available in 2, 4 and 8 fl oz bottles. You can also try Source Naturals’ other fine Wellness products. Look for WELLNESS EARACHE™ homeopathic kids’ formula, WELLNESS COLD & FLU™, WELLNESS COUGH SYRUP, WELLNESS ZINC™ Lozenges and Throat Spray, WELLNESS ELDERBERRY™ and lots more—including, of course, original WELLNESS FORMULA®.

    WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS: Part of the Wellness Revolution

    There is a revolution underway in natural health consciousness, and health food stores are in the forefront. You can benefit right now—long before word spreads to the general public—with the innovative child nutrition of WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS.

    References:
    Bensky, Dan & Barolet, Randall, compilers/translators. Chinese Herbal Medicine: Formulas & Strategies. Seattle: Eastland Press; 1990; pp. 44-46. Pizzorno, Joseph E., N.D. & Murray, Michael T., N.D. A Textbook of Natural Medicine. Seattle: John Bastyr College Publications; 1987. V. 2: Echin 1-2, V. 2: Hydras 1-4.



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    Vitanet ®

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    References
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    Date: June 24, 2005 04:34 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: References

    References

    1Claire Kowalchik and William H. Hylton, Editors, Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia. (Emmaus, Pennsylvania: Rodale Press, 1987), 176. 2Louise Tenney, “Echinacea”, To day’s Herbs. ( Provo, Utah: Woodland Publishing, Vol. XIII, Number 1, 1993), 1. 3Family Guide to Na t u ral Medicine. ( Pleasantville, New Yo rk : Reader’s Digest, 1993), 303. 4Andrew Weil, MD, Natural Health, Natural Medicine. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1990) 236. 5Gary Gillum, Editor, “Echinacea” To day’s Herbs. ( Provo, Utah : Woodland Books, Vol. I Issue 11, July, 1981), 1. 6PenelopeOdy, The Complete Medicinal Herbal. ( New York : Dorling-Kindersley, 1993), 53. 7Michael Murray, ND and Joseph Pizzorno, ND, Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1991), 58. 8V.H. Wagner and A. Proksch., “Immunostimulatory Drugs of Fungi and Higher Plants”, Economic Medicinal Plant Research . (1985), 1, 113-53. 9Louise Tenney, The Encyclopedia of Natural Remedies. ( Pleasant Grove, Utah: Woodland Publishing, 1995), 50. 10Ibid. 1 1Daniel B. Mowre y, The Scientific Validation of Herbs. ( New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, 1986), 119. 12Murray, 59. 13Michael T. Murray, N.D.. The Healing Power of Herbs. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1995), 100. 14J. Mose, “Effect of Echinacin on Phagocytosis and Natural Killer Cells”, Med. Welt. (1983), 34, 1,463-7. 1 5M. Stimple, A. Proksch, H. Wagner, etal., “Macrophage Activation and Induction of Macrophage Cytotoxicity by Purified Polysaccharide Fractions From the Plant Echinacea Purpurea”, Infection Immunity. (1984), 46, 845-9. 16Mowrey, 119. 17Ibid., 250 18Ibid., 119 19Ibid. 20Ody, 176 21Velma J. Keith and Monteen Gordon, The How To Herb Book. (Pleasant Grove, Utah: Mayfield Publishing, 1983), 29. 2 2Louise Tenney, To day’s Herbal Health. ( Pleasant Grove, Utah: Woodland Publishing, 1992), 60. 2 3Daniel B. Mow re y, Ph.D., Echinacea. ( New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, 1995), 31. 24Ibid., 33. 25Ibid., 41. 26C. Steinmuller, J. Roesler, E. Grottrup, G. Franke, H. Wagner and Matthes Lohmann, “Polysacharides Isolated From Plant Cell Cultures of Echinacea Purpurea Enhance the Resistance of Immunosupproes Mice Against Systemic Infections with Candida Albicans and Listeria Monicytogens,” Int-J-Immunpharmacol. 1993, July: 15(5): 605-14. 27Ibid., 43. 2 8U. Mengs, C. Clare and J. Poiley, “Toxicity of Echinacea Purpurea. Acute, Subacute and Genotoxicity Studies , Arzneimittelforschung. 1991, Oct. 41(10): 1076-81.

    ADDITIONAL REFERENCES

    Becker, V. H. Against snakebites and influenza: use and components of echinacea angustifolia and e. purpurea.. Deutsche Apotheker Zeitung, 122 (45), 1982, 2020-2323. Buesing, K.H. Inhibition of hyaluronidase by echinacin. Arzneimittel- Forschung. 2, 1952, 467-469. Foster, S. Echinacea, Nature’s Immune Enhancer. Healing Arts Press, Rochester, VT., 1991. Hobbs, C. The Echinacea Handbook. Eclectic Medical Publications, Portland, Oregon, 1989. Keller, H. Recovery of active agents from aqueous extracts of the species of echinacea. Chemie Gruenenthal G.M.B.H., GER. Oct . 11, 1956, 950, 674. Kuhn, O. Echinacea and Phagocytosis. Arzneimittel - Fo rxchung, 3, 1953, 194-200. Mc Gregor R.L. The taxonomy of the genus Echinacea (Compositae). Univ. Kansas Sci. Bull. 48, 1968, 113-142.



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    History
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    Date: June 24, 2005 01:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: History

    HISTORY

    Because 20th century medical practices have routinely over - prescribed antibiotics, the notion of a natural antibiotic with virtually no side-effects is intriguing to say the least. Echinacea is one of several herbs which possesses antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. In a time when new life-threatening microbes are evolving and pose the threat of modern-day plagues, herbs such as echinacea are particularly valuable. More and more health practitioners are focusing on fortifying the immune system to fight off potential infections rather than just treating infection after it has developed.

    Echinacea is enjoying a renaissance today. During the late 1980’s, echinacea re-emerged as a remarkable medicinal plant. In addition to its infection fighting properties, echinacea is known for its healing properties as well. As was the case with so many herbs, echinacea lost its prestige as a medicinal treatment with the advent of antibiotics. It has experienced a resurgence over the last two decades.

    Echinacea has several other much more romantic names including Purple Coneflower, Black Sampson and Red Sunflower. It has also become the common name for a number of echinacea species like E. angustifolia, E. purpurea, and E. pallida. The genus derives its name from the Greek word echinos which refers to sea urchin. This particular association evolved from the prickly spiny scales of the seed head section of the flower. Historically, echinacea has sometimes become confused with Parthenium integrifolium.

    The word echinacea is actually apart of the scientific latin term, echinacea angustifolia, which literally translated means a narrow - leafed sucker. The plant grows wild as a perennial exclusively in the midwestern plains states, but can be cultivated almost anywhere . Echinacea leaves are pale to dark green, coarse and pointy. Its florets are purple and its roots, black and long.

    Echinacea has a strong Native American link in the Central Plains. Native Americans are credited with discovering the usefulness of this botanical without knowing its specific chemical properties. It was routinely used by Na t i ve Americans to treat toothaches, snakebite, fevers and old stubborn wounds.

    Native Americans thought of echinacea as a versatile herb that not only helped to fight infection, but increased the appetite and s t rengthened the sexual organs as well. The juice of the plant was used to bathe burns and was sprinkled on hot coals during traditional “sweats” used for purification purposes. It is also believed that some Native Americans used echinacea juice to protect their hands, feet and mouths from the heat of hot coals and ceremonial fires.1 According to Melvin Gilmore, An American anthropologist who studied Native American medicine in the early part of this century, Echinacea was used as a remedy by Native Americans more than any other plant in the central plains area.

    In time, early white settlers learned of its healing powers and used the plant as a home remedy for colds, influenza, tumors, syphillis, hemorrhoids and wounds. Dr. John King, in his medical journal of 1887 mentioned that echinacea had value as a blood purifier and alterative. It was used in various blood tonics and gained the reputation of being good for almost every conceivable malady. It has been called the king of blood purifiers due to its ability to improve lymphatic filtration and drainage. In time, echinacea became popular with 19th century Eclectics, who were followers of a botanic system founded by Dr. Wooster Beech in the 1830’s. They used it as an anesthetic, deodorant, and stimulant.

    By 1898, echinacea had become one of the top natural treatments in America. During these years, echinacea was used to treat fevers, malignant carbuncles, ulcerations, pyorrhea, snake bites and dermatitis. In the early twentieth century, echinacea had gained a formidable reputation for treating a long list of infectious disease ranging from the commonplace to the exotic. The Lloyd Brothers Pharmaceutical House developed more sophisticated versions of the herb in order to meet escalating demands for echinacea.

    Ironically, it was medical doctors who considered echinacea more valuable than eclectic practitioners. Several articles on echinacea appeared from time to time in various publications. Its attributes we re re v i ewed and, at times, its curative abilities ranged from the sublime to the ridiculous. In 1909, the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association decided against recognizing echinacea as an official drug, claiming that it lacked scientific credibility. It was added to the National Formulary of the United States despite this type of negative reaction and remained on this list until 1950.

    Over the past 50 years, echinacea has earned a formidable reputation achieving worldwide fame for its antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial actions. Consumer interest in echinacea has greatly increased, particularly in relation to its role in treating candida, chronic fatigue syndrome, AIDS and malignancies. Practitioners of natural medicine in Eu rope and America have long valued its attributes. In recent, years, German research has confirmed its ability to augment the human immune system. Extensive research on echinacea has occurred over the last twenty years. Test results have s h own that the herb has an antibiotic, cortisone-like activity.

    Echinacea has the ability to boost cell membrane healing, protect collagen, and suppress tumor growth. Because of its immuno-enhancing activity, it has recently been used in AIDS therapy. Research has proven that echinacea may have p rofound value in stimulating immune function and may be particularly beneficial for colds and sore throats.3

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    Echinacea
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    Date: June 24, 2005 01:07 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Echinacea

    ECHINACEA (Echinacea angustifolia)

    Common Names: Black Sampson, Purple Coneflower, Rud beckia , Missouri Snakeroot, Red Sunflower

    Plant Parts: roots, rhizome

    Active Compounds: echinacoside, polysaccharides (echinacin), antibiotic polyacetylenes, betaine, caffeic acid glycosides, inulin, isobutyl amides, ess ential oil (humulene, caryophylene), isobutyl-alkylamines, resin, flavonoids (in leaves and stems), sesquiterpene esters (echinadiole, epoxy - echinadiole, echinax-anthole, and dihydor-xynardole). Pharmacology: Echinacea contains a variety of chemical compounds which have significant pharmacological functions. It has been the subject of hundreds of clinical and scientific studies which have primarily used an extract of the plant portion of the botanical. The rich content of polysaccharides and phytosterols in echinacea are what make it a strong immune system stimulant. The sesquiterpene esters also have immunostimulatory effects. Glycoside echinacoside is found in the roots of the plant. Echinacin has also been found to possess anti-fungal and antibiotic properties. This component of echinacea also has cortisone-like actions which can help promote the healing of wounds and helps to control the inflammatory reactions of allergies.

    Vitamin and Mineral Content: vitamins A, E, C, iron, iodine, copper, sulphur and potassium

    Regulatory Status

    US: None
    UK: General Sales List
    CANADA: Over-the-Counter drug status
    FRANCE: None
    GERMANY: Commission E approved as drug

    Recommended Usage: Echinacea works best if it is taken right at the onset of an infection in substantial doses and then tapere d off. It can be used in higher quantities as a preventative during winter months when colds and flu are prevalent. If using it to maintain the immune system, periodic use is believed to be more effective than continual usage. Typically, one should use echinacea for seven to eight weeks on followed by one week off. Guaranteed potency echinacea is currently available in capsule form only. Safety: High doses can occasionally cause nausea and dizziness. Echinacea has not exhibited any observed toxicity even in high dosages. Anyone who is suffering from any type of kidney disorder should restrict taking echinacea to one week maximum. Very heavy use of echinacea may temporarily cause male infertility.



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