SearchBox:

Search Term: " asparagus "

  Messages 1-35 from 35 matching the search criteria.
The Best Keto Fiber Foods & Why You Need Them Darrell Miller 4/18/19
Health benefits of inulin. Darrell Miller 3/8/19
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) VitaNet, LLC Staff 9/17/18
Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often VitaNet, LLC Staff 8/19/18
Asparagus tops the list for nutritious food Darrell Miller 5/27/18
Asparagus: The Cancer-Fighting, Fibrous Superfood Darrell Miller 5/26/18
Nutritionist Reveals Five Prebiotic Foods That Can Feed Your Gut Darrell Miller 8/15/17
Fantastic Natural Sleep Aid – This Drink Will Help You Fight Insomnia!! Darrell Miller 6/27/17
28 Healthiest “Bad” Foods: “Burgers,” “Fried Chicken,” “Fries” and “Pizza”! Darrell Miller 5/11/17
Take This Vitamin to Repel Mosquitoes All Summer Long Darrell Miller 4/17/17
Eating prebiotics may improve sleep, cut impact of stress Darrell Miller 3/1/17
The Best Foods For Your Age, According To Science Darrell Miller 2/14/17
Simple Clever Ways To Clear Clogged Arteries Research Darrell Miller 1/31/17
How to eat to get lean Darrell Miller 1/4/17
Here's Why Some Miss Out on the Asparagus Effect Darrell Miller 12/26/16
Anemia Causes, Prevention And Supplements. Darrell Miller 8/7/14
What you may need to know about Vitamin B2 Darrell Miller 1/5/14
All that you may need to know about antioxidants Darrell Miller 11/5/13
Can Butcher's Broom Boost Cardiovascular Health? Darrell Miller 10/30/13
Can Butcher's Broom Help Fight Varicose Veins? Darrell Miller 1/11/13
What Are A List Of Detox Foods? Darrell Miller 1/3/13
Can our health benefit from supplmenting choline? Darrell Miller 11/18/12
The Benefits of Phytoestrogen for Hot Flashes Darrell Miller 4/16/12
What Is Glutathione Good For? Darrell Miller 4/14/12
If I am A Vegetarian, Do I Need Extra Iodine For Proper Thyroid Function? Darrell Miller 10/26/11
What Herbs Are Vein Strengtheners? Darrell Miller 9/28/11
Can Herbs and Prunes Help with Constipation Darrell Miller 3/30/11
Horsetail Darrell Miller 8/31/09
What Is Fiber? Darrell Miller 7/21/08
Ester-E Darrell Miller 6/7/08
Galactose Darrell Miller 3/8/07
Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen Darrell Miller 7/27/05
Natural Health for a Healthy Heart Darrell Miller 7/13/05
Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus... Darrell Miller 7/11/05
America's Most Wanted Darrell Miller 6/14/05



Solaray GP Asparagus
   60ct 175mg $21.39 45% OFF $ 11.76

The Best Keto Fiber Foods & Why You Need Them
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 18, 2019 01:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Best Keto Fiber Foods & Why You Need Them





The Keto diet is well-known for emphasizing the value of healthy fats, but that doesn't mean it neglects the importance of fiber. It is not uncommon for those transitioning to the low-carb, high fat Keto diet to experience problems with digestion. The solution is to consume high fiber foods that keep you in a state of ketosis. These include non-starchy vegetables (e.g., cabbage and asparagus) as well as seeds and nuts. Keto fiber supplements - such as Gum arabic and Chia seeds - can also serve to maintain digestive regularity.

Key Takeaways:

  • Avocado is full of both healthy fats and dietary fiber, making it a valuable staple for people on keto diets.
  • Non-starchy vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and zucchini can provide lots of fiber, vitamins and antioxidants.
  • When eaten in moderation, high-fiber nuts like pistachios, walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts can provide fiber and nutrients and help digestion.

"Eighty percent of your total daily calories should be coming from foods like olive oil, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, nuts and seeds."

Read more: https://draxe.com/best-keto-fiber-foods/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6139)


Health benefits of inulin.
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 08, 2019 08:02 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health benefits of inulin.





Fiber can improve digestion and promote a healthy gut. Inulin is a type of soluble fiber that is found in plants and contains a variety of health benefits, such as acting as a critical source of prebiotic bacteria in the digestive system. On top of this, inulin can support weight loss, help prevent bowel disorders such as IBS or colon cancer, and has the potential to control blood sugar. Side effects of inulin are incredibly rare- so be sure to fill up on inulin-rich foods, such as leeks, asparagus, wheat, or oats to get your daily fix.

Key Takeaways:

  • Inulin is a form of soluble fiber that is beneficial for weight loss, digestion, and stabilizing blood sugar levels.
  • Inulin acts as a pre-biotic in the large intestine, providing the good bacteria with food to grow.
  • Garlic, asparagus, bananas, onions, and leeks are all rich in inulin.

"Here, learn everything you need to know about inulin fiber's health benefits, where it’s found naturally in food, and how to incorporate more into your diet."

Read more: https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/inulin-foods-and-benefits

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6068)


Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 17, 2018 08:52 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)





Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Vitamin B1, which is also known as thiamine, is a vital nutrient when it comes to human nutrition. In fact, Thiamine is a vital nutrient for the human nervous system. Within this capacity, it moderates appetite, prevents memory loss and reduces the possibility of nerve inflammation.

Thiamine has the intrinsic capacity to aid in maintaining energy levels, because its used at the cellular level throughout the body. That said, it stands to reason that a Thiamine deficiency can show itself as a significant lack of endurance and in a tendency to exhaustion. Besides its profound effect on the central nervous system, Thiamine also has a decided effect on the gastrointestinal system. Fortunately, besides supplementing with vitamins, Thiamine is amply available in natural foods. High protein sources include lean pork, fish and dry roasted soybeans. Vegans can get their thiamine on too. Besides soybeans, the nutrient is available in good quantity in wheat bread, asparagus and green peas.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamin B1 also helps to regulate appetite and improve memory, besides being of use to the digestive system.
  • Thiamine boosts energy at the cellular level, which is why a severe lack of the nutrient can lead to exhaustion and a lack of endurance.
  • Lean pork, fish, green peas, roasted dry soybeans, wheat bread and cooked asparagus are all good sources of Thiamine.

"Vitamin B1 also called Thiamine, helps in maintaining cellular functions and boosts the functions of the central nervous system."

Read more: https://crazytalker.com/vitamin-b1-thiamine/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5765)


Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 19, 2018 05:53 PM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often





Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often

Okra is so good for you. Many people do not realize the benefits of vegetables and what they offer you. People need to have vegetables as part of their daily diet due to the nutrients that they provide. Overall, they are so healthy for the mind and for the physical body. They help speed up the metabolism and allow for fats to be released from the body. The more people eat things like okra, the better they will feel!

Key Takeaways:

  • Eat as many vegetables as you possibly can as they are so healthy!
  • Eating foods like this can really help speed up metabolism which can rid fat.
  • Okra is very healthy and is a vegetable that is often forgotten about.

"Multiple studies have also shown that the benefits of okra aren’t limited solely to improving overall digestive health. A study made by the Agricultural Research Service of the USDA indicated that okra, together with other vegetables like beets, asparagus, eggplants, and cauliflower, handled the binding of bile acids better than the reference drug cholestyramine."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-08-18-okra-is-a-gut-friendly-vegetable-you-need-to-be-taking-more-often.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5714)


Asparagus tops the list for nutritious food
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 27, 2018 09:16 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: asparagus tops the list for nutritious food





Asparagus tops the list for nutritious food

Asparagus has been used for centuries due to its medicinal properties such as being a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory vegetable. Asparagus contains a compound called inulin, which becomes a form of good bacteria after the large intestine leaves it undigested after consumption. It also can help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease due to how much fiber it has. Cooking asparagus can be quite effortless, requiring only lemon and a pinch of olive oil in a pan.

Key Takeaways:

  • Asparagus has the two main forms of fiber packed inside of it: soluble and insoluble. Both play a vital role in digestive health.
  • Due to the high levels of fiber in asparagus, it has the ability to lower the risk of diabetes.
  • There are many routes to go about cooking asparagus such as grilling, pan-frying, or even roasting.

"Packed with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, asparagus has been used as a medicinal vegetable for 2,500 years."

Read more: https://www.prestoncitizen.com/opinion/asparagus-tops-the-list-for-nutritious-food/article_6d6912d6-4813-11e8-bdda-8339f8e68768.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5610)


Asparagus: The Cancer-Fighting, Fibrous Superfood
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 26, 2018 05:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: asparagus: The Cancer-Fighting, Fibrous Superfood





Asparagus: The Cancer-Fighting, Fibrous Superfood

Asparagus does more than just help promote digestive health. It also is known for containing something called rutin, which is a flavonoid that has the ability to help reduce the risk of blood clots. Studies with rats have also shown that consumption of asparagus over a ten week time span can result in more regulated blood pressure in those who are suffering from hypertensive symptoms. Asparagus also contains glutathione, which is known for boosting the human immune system.

Key Takeaways:

  • Fiber is known for helping cardiovascular health in humans, so the fiber content in asparagus can contribute to heart health.
  • Asparagus is high in folate levels which is essential in helping fetuses thrive while in-utero.
  • Asparagus is also high in potassium levels which can help regulate blood pressure.

"Asparagus is a low-calorie vegetable rich in antioxidants, minerals and anti-inflammatory properties. Asparagus also contains rutin – a flavonoid that helps to treat haemorrhoids and prevent blood clots."

Read more: http://www.longevitylive.com/anti-aging-beauty/anti-aging-health-studies/asparagus-superfood/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5609)


Nutritionist Reveals Five Prebiotic Foods That Can Feed Your Gut
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 15, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nutritionist Reveals Five Prebiotic Foods That Can Feed Your Gut





You could be doing your best to make sure that you are ingesting healthy probiotics, but without prebiotics, foods that fuel probiotics, you are not receiving the benefits you are expecting. A nutritionist shares the foods that you need to feed the good bacteria in your gut to maintain your gut and overall health. These foods are easily found in your local supermarkets and can be incorporated into your daily meal plans and beside being prebiotics, they have other health benefits as well.

Key Takeaways:

  • Psyllium can be purchased at local grocery stores or health food stores and can be incorporated into your diet in a variety of ways
  • Leeks and asparagus are sources of the prebiotic fibre called inulin along with other health benefits
  • Garlic and oats also have important prebiotic fibres present in them and can be added to a variety of meals for an added health boost

"Prebiotics feed the good bacteria we already have in our digestive system,"

Read more: https://www.womenshealth.com.au/article/food/five-prebiotic-foods-you-need-for-good-gut-health

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5127)


Fantastic Natural Sleep Aid – This Drink Will Help You Fight Insomnia!!
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 27, 2017 05:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fantastic Natural Sleep Aid – This Drink Will Help You Fight Insomnia!!





Suffering from insomnia? The information provided in this video can help! Not only does it tell you what can happen to your body because of insomnia, but it tells you a way to help combat it as well. Insomnia can cause side effects to life, so it's important to find a way to fight it. This all natural drink can help you to relax after a stressful, physical day, when you follow the recipe herein.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=augctgu99Rk&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • A healthful drink can be made from ginger, lemon, celery, green apple, asparagus and cucumber.
  • The asparagus should be soaked in cold water, while the other items are chopped and then blended well.
  • The asparagus can be added to the blender as well, and the water discarded, after it's soaked for an hour.

"These veggies positively affect the most common causes of insomnia, indigestion, high blood pressure and stress."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4888)


28 Healthiest “Bad” Foods: “Burgers,” “Fried Chicken,” “Fries” and “Pizza”!
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 11, 2017 11:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 28 Healthiest “Bad” Foods: “Burgers,” “Fried Chicken,” “Fries” and “Pizza”!





The term 'bad foods' is a relative one here. These foods could be considered unhealthy but they are at least better than others. There are 28 foods mentioned here. They are the healthiest of the supposed unhealthy foods peope love. If you want to still eat good comforting foods, the kind you enjoy but often feel guilty about, it will help to have this list so you can at least try to eat the best ones for you.

Key Takeaways:

  • There are multiple healthy options for traditional bad foods. Get your indulgence on without risking your health!
  • Low carb avocado burgers are a great alternative to the traditional high carb burgers.
  • Asparagus fries are a great alternative to traditional french fries they are healthy and yet taste amazing.

"Turkey burgers have a reputation for being dry, bland versions of their beef counterparts, but not in this case. Adding chopped veggies like onions, mushrooms or peppers right into the ground turkey means that, as the burger cooks, the veggies will release their own moisture, keeping patties nice and juicy."

Read more: https://draxe.com/healthiest-bad-foods/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4590)


Take This Vitamin to Repel Mosquitoes All Summer Long
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 17, 2017 11:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Take This Vitamin to Repel Mosquitoes All Summer Long





Summer is a time when mosquitos are at their worst. Many people can deal with mosquitos by using repellent, but others are worried about the DEET and dislike smelling like the spray. For the latter, Vitamin B1 could be a solution. Vitamin B1 can change the way a person smells to mosquitos and makes the person unappealing to bite. However, the Vitamin B1 does not change a person's smell to other humans. The research is not definitive, but Vitamin B1 causes no adverse effects so it could be worth a try if you want to avoid repellent this summer.

Key Takeaways:

  • -Vitamin B1 (also known as thiamine) is an essential vitamin your body needs. It can be found in foods such as yeast, oatmeal, brown rice, asparagus, kale, liver and eggs and is important in fighting
  • -As one of the water-soluble vitamins, any excess that your body doesn’t use gets flushed out when you urinate, so there’s no need to worry about taking too much.
  • -It doesn’t, however, change the way you smell to other humans, so don’t worry about smelling like old bread around your friends.

"But, if you’re like me at all and you not only want to stop smelling like the burnt remains of a chemical plant after using repellent, but also are scared of the adverse effects of DEET in sprays and are more prone to getting bit (seriously though, mosquitoes seemed to love me and only me at parties), then taking Vitamin B1 could be your saving grace."

Read more: http://www.healthnutnews.com/take-vitamin-repel-mosquitoes-summer-long-2/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4422)


Eating prebiotics may improve sleep, cut impact of stress
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 01, 2017 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating prebiotics may improve sleep, cut impact of stress





Prebiotics are dietary fibers that are found naturally in foods such as asparagus, leeks, chickory and other foods. Prebiotics are non digestible fibers and they are what probiotics feed on. A diet that includes foods with prebiotics is shown to be better for sleep patterns especially in youngsters. It improves REM sleep and also improves REM sleep for stress.

Key Takeaways:

  • Intake of probiotics may help improve sleep and act as a buffer against the physiological impacts of stress, a study shows.
  • Prebiotics are certain types of non-digestible fibers that probiotic bacteria feed on.
  • REM sleep is believed to be critical for promoting recovery from stress.

"Prebiotics are certain types of non-digestible fibers that probiotic bacteria feed on, such as the fibers found in many plant sources like asparagus, oatmeal, and legumes as well as in breast milk."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/diet/eating-prebiotics-may-improve-sleep-cut-impact-of-stress/articleshow/57343552.cms&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjBhMmIxOTgxN2IyMDM3NjI6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNH6hqib3y_xC1S9lIwgw7D13nQNvQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4051)


The Best Foods For Your Age, According To Science
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 14, 2017 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Best Foods For Your Age, According To Science





Did you know that some foods may be better for you than others, based upon your age bracket? It is true and now is the perfect time to discover this life changing news for your age bracket. The list of foods might surprise you but there is no question that making the new additions and transitions is a worthwhile decision to your health.

Key Takeaways:

  • Eating healthfully is always important, but the nutrients you need most can vary by the decade.
  • In your 20s: Yogurt, Eggs In your 30s: Sunflower seeds, asparagus
  • In your 40s: Lentils, Grilled chicken breast In your 50s: Cottage cheese, Salmon In your 60s and beyond: Shellfish

"Swordfish has lots of vitamin D, but it’s also among the highest-mercury fish, so eat it sparingly."



Reference:

//www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/best-foods-for-your-age_us_5825e25ae4b060adb56e08b7

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3942)


Simple Clever Ways To Clear Clogged Arteries Research
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 31, 2017 04:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Simple Clever Ways To Clear Clogged Arteries Research





7 Simple Ways to Unclog Your Arteries Naturally ... to prevent and in some casesreverse the #1 cause of death in the modern world? Statistically, atherosclerosis (the progressiveclogging of the arteries) is the #1 killer on the planet. ... Here is the peer-reviewed, publishedresearch proving the fact:. 21 Foods That Naturally Unclog Arteries - Natural Living Ideas

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jl2E7UayEU&rel=0

<vid1>

Key Takeaways:

  • Turmeric. Turmeric is another spice that can help treat clogged arteries and make your heart healthy and more functional. ... Cayenne Pepper.
  • One of the best vegetables for clearing arteries, asparagus is full of fiber and ...Studies have shown that the daily consumption of avocado result in
  • earn how to naturally reverse hardened arteries. ... Many studies show that the damage caused by high blood sugar — from eating too much sugar and grains — scars the insides of the arteries

"There are natural ways to help treat clogged arteries and make your heart healthy and more functional."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3859)


How to eat to get lean
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 04, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to eat to get lean





Do you love food but want to lose some inches off your waistline? Let me tell you, this is the article for you. Whether you want to lose fat or build muscle, this article will provide you some insight as to how to accomplish your goals without sacrificing your love of food.

Key Takeaways:

  • Drink water like a fish. Drinking water is associated with faster fat loss and decreased hunger. Even a small level of dehydration can decrease physical and mental performance.
  • Multiply your current body weight in pounds by 10. That is the healthy calorie deficit for most moderately active guys.
  • A study last year in PLOS Medicine found the most beneficial vegetables for weight loss were the non-starchy kinds such as lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, spinach, peppers, and tomatoes.

"We’re going to shoot it straight: Cutting calories is going to really suck for the entire first week."



Reference:

//www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what-to-eat/how-eat-get-lean

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3739)


Here's Why Some Miss Out on the Asparagus Effect
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 26, 2016 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Here's Why Some Miss Out on the asparagus Effect





If you have ever eaten a hearty helping of asparagus, you may or may not have noticed that your urine smelled pungent afterwards. A study in the British Medical Journal states that only 40% of people can smell this. This study showed that all the people who could not smell asparagus in urine had the same gene anomaly. Scientists are also hoping to raise awareness of how healthy the vegetable is. This stalky plant is rich in fiber, zinc, iron, folate, and vitamins A, C, and E.

Key Takeaways:

  • The groundbreaking study may pave the way to genetic engineering that would allow more people to detect the distinctive odor, the team at the Harvard School of Public Health said.
  • The firmly tongue-in-cheek study is published in the mostly humorous end-of-year holiday issue of the British Medical Journal.
  • The team used two big studies of 6,900 men and women to find out why some people can smell the asparagus effect and others cannot.

""Outstanding questions on this topic remain; first and foremost perhaps is why a delicacy such as asparagus results in such a strong odor?""



Reference:

//www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/why-can-t-some-people-smell-asparagus-their-pee-n695641?cid=public-rss_20161219

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3705)


Anemia Causes, Prevention And Supplements.
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 07, 2014 05:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Anemia Causes, Prevention And Supplements.

foord for anemiaWhat is an anemia?

Anemia is the most widely recognized issue of the blood. It is a condition in which the blood is: inadequate in red platelets or lacking in hemoglobin. Both of these conditions can result in an absence of oxygen to be conveyed to all parts of the body. Bringing about symptoms, for example, weakness, frosty hands, loss of voracity, whiteness and shortcoming. Below are illustration of causes of anemia, prevention measures and iron supplements that can help.

Causes of anemia

Causes include loss blood, unreasonable destruction of red platelets or inadequate creation of red platelets.

Insufficient creation of red platelets is the most widely recognized class of pallor, and poor sustenance is the most well-known reason. The most successive sorts of supplement inadequate sickness are those identified with an insufficiency of iron, folic corrosive (vitamin B9), copper or vitamin B12.

Iron insufficiency pallor is frequently seen in babies more youthful than two years of age, adolescent young ladies, pregnant ladies and the elderly. This kind of weakness incorporate elements connected with poor dietary admission of iron, an expanded requirement for iron, diminished iron assimilation, blood misfortune or a consolidation of these circumstances.

Folic corrosive is the most as often as possible discovered vitamin lack on earth. The gatherings of individuals well on the way to have folic corrosive insufficiency are dipsomaniacs, individuals with mal-ingestion conditions or perpetual loose bowels and pregnant ladies. A folic corrosive insufficiency can likewise cause despondency, the runs and a swollen, red tongue.

Copper inadequacy is exceptional, be that as it may, it can happen in individuals who take a zinc supplement without expanding their copper admission in light of the fact that zinc can meddle with copper ingestion.

anemia symptomsHow to prevent anemia?

To avoid you have to consume overall adjusted dinners including iron rich nourishment. In the event that you have weakness, keep away from refreshments and sustenance holding juice, it meddles with the body's capacity to ingest iron. Maintain a strategic distance from tannins, they additionally hinder iron ingestion and nourishment high in oxalic acids; which incorporate almonds, asparagus, beans, beets, cashews, chocolate, kale and rhubarb.

While most instances of pallor are created by straightforward nourishment lacks, it can additionally be an indication of a more genuine restorative issue. The best way to get a clear judgment of sickness is to get a blood test. In the event that you think you have iron deficiency, don't start a supplement program until you have a finding from your doctor.

Supplements

Iron - helps avert iron insufficiency weakness. Take 30 milligrams fumarate, gluconate or succinate press twice a day between dinners. In the event that this reasons stomach trouble, switch to 30 milligrams with suppers three times each day.

Folic corrosive (vitamin B9) - aides anticipate iron deficiency brought about by folic corrosive inadequacy. Take 800 to 1,200 micrograms three times every day.

Vitamin B12 - aides anticipate vitamin B12 inadequacy pallor. Take 2,000 micrograms sublingual (set under the tongue) three times every day for 30 days, then 1,000 micrograms methylcobalamin (the dynamic type of B12) once a day, in addition to folic corrosive.

Vitamin C - helps the body assimilate iron. Studies have demonstrated that you can almost twofold your ingestion of iron from plant sources by devouring vitamin C with the iron. Take 1,000 milligrams 3 times each day with dinners.

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic corrosive) - assists with the creation of red platelets. Take 100 milligrams every day.

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) - assists with the creation of red platelets. Take 50 milligrams 3 times each day.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3154)


What you may need to know about Vitamin B2
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 05, 2014 09:06 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What you may need to know about Vitamin B2

What you may need to know about Vitamin B2

riboflavinVitamin B2, also called riboflavin or additive E101, is one of the eight (8) B vitamins that are necessary for maintaining proper human health. This nutrient serves several roles in the body. Most important of all, vitamin B2 helps in breaking down food components, including proteins, carbohydrates and fats. Secondly, it plays a critical role in maintaining the body’s energy supply. Thirdly, it is necessary for maintaining body tissues.

There are two types of vitamins:

Water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins. On its part, vitamin B2 is a water-soluble vitamin. Generally, these types of vitamins get absorbed fast into the bloodstream and any excess eliminated through urine. This means that regular replenishment is required.

Luckily, there is a long list of foods from which vitamin B2 can be obtained. These foods belong to such categories are animal products, grains, fruits, and plants. Animal products rich in riboflavin include turkey, chicken, liver, beef kidneys, and dairy products. Fruits and vegetables rich in this vitamin B2 include avocado, asparagus, broccoli, and brussels sprouts. Other plant products rich in the nutrient include fortified cereals, spinach, sweet potatoes, peas, nuts, and mushrooms.

Vitamin B2 deficiency

As vitamin B2 is a vital nutrient, its deficiency may lead to several health complications. Some of the symptoms of the nutrient’s deficiency include sore throats, mouth ulcers, abnormally red lips, inflammation of the tongue, cracks at the corners of the mouth (technically known as angular cheilitis), inflammation of the lining of the mouth, and iron-deficiency anemia.

Although the body is equipped to synthesize foods into vitamin B2 nutrient, certain health conditions may prevent it from doing so. In such a case, you are advised to get the nutrient from supplements. Luckily, vitamins in supplement form are absorbed directly into the blood without requiring any form of synthesis. Be informed that it is advisable to go for supplements immediately after realizing any of the riboflavin deficiency symptoms discussed here. Trying to get the nutrients from foods may sometimes take longer than expected. In such a case, your symptoms will continue to worsen instead of getting better.

References:

  1. //www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/219561.php
  2. //whfoods.com
  3. //www.healthaliciousness.com


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2952)


All that you may need to know about antioxidants
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 05, 2013 10:00 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: All that you may need to know about antioxidants

 antioxidant foodsAll that you may need to know about antioxidants

Oxidants are elements whose main role is to protect your cells from the harmful effects of free radicals. Free radicals, on their part, are molecules that may be produced by the body when it breaks down food. These molecules may also be produced when your body is exposed to environmental factors like tobacco smoking and radiation. It is worth noting that free radicals have the ability of wrecking damage to cells and causing such diseases as cancers and heart complications. Over the years, studies have consistently revealed that diets high in antioxidants are essential in preventing diseases like Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular diseases.

Main Source of Antioxidant

The main source of antioxidants is fruits and vegetables. Amazingly, all foods rich in antioxidants are high in fiber, low fat, and are also excellent sources of important vitamins and minerals. It is also important to add that fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants have bright colors, including purple, yellow, red and orange.

Type of Antioxidant

The five main types of antioxidants are beta carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, Zinc, and selenium. Others are lucopene and lutein. Beta-carotene (and other carotenoids), can be derived from a long list of fruits and vegetables. Some of these are asparagus, apricot, broccoli, water melon, sweet potato, kale, mango, turnip and peaches.

Vitamin C, as a major and critical antioxidant, can be obtained from kiwi, broccoli, honeydew, kale, orange, papaya, nectarines, strawberries, and snow peas among others.

Vitamin E, another major vitamin antioxidant, can be derived from spinach, red peppers, sunflower seeds, papaya, pumpkin and carrots among others.

Zinc and selenium are other antioxidants that are essential in maintaining overall body health and boosting the immune system. Common sources of zinc include red meat, poultry, oysters, dairy products, and whole grain foods. Selenium, on the other hand, can be obtained from foods such as tuna, nuts, whole grains, and beef.

Fact About Antioxidant

The most important fact to realize is that popular sources of antioxidants are fruits and vegetables. Where possible, these foods should be eaten raw or steamed. Boiling will do more harm than good.

References:

  1. //www.webmd.com/food-recipes/antioxidants-your-immune-system-super-foods-optimal-health

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2878)


Can Butcher's Broom Boost Cardiovascular Health?
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 30, 2013 09:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Butcher's Broom Boost Cardiovascular Health?

 

Where to find Butchers Broom


butchers broomThe butcher’s broom also known as ruscus aculeatus is an evergreen low shrub that grows in the Eurasian region. It is known to produce greenish flowers that are small sized and blooms during Spring. It has leaves that produce red berries after the falling off of its female flowers. It is reputed among native cultures as much as asparagus, with the roots been eaten in various preparations.


It is mainly recurrent in woodland as a result of bird-spread though is now grown as a garden plant in regions across the world. It has general names like the pettigree, Jews’myrtle, sweet broom, petit houx and knee holly. Its roots are deployed as medicines in different remedies.


Application


It has been used as an effective tool to constrict capillaries and blood vessels by herbal and alternative medicine practitioners. Its efficiency in constricting blood vessels is considered to result from the constituent chemicals. This prevents the veins from pooling blood thereby improving the flow of blood in the hands, brain and legs.

It has been used to heal fractures and reduce swelling, as well as treatment for hemorrhoids and gallstones. It is reputed for constipation relief and ease of urine ejection.


Result


As a result of its wide application and effectiveness, the German Health Commission listed it as a useful for the treatment of hemorrhoids. It is advised in medical circles that its use by pregnant women should be subject to consultation of a qualified medical practitioner to avoid possible contraindications and safeguard the fetal balance.


Clinical research is still open in several fronts to ascertain its virility and possible side effects as a result of the widespread usage across the globe by alternative medicine practitioners for a variety of medical conditions. This evidently will provide clues as to acceptable dosage and prescription in the years to come.


References:


1. //www.rxlist.com/butchers_broom-page2

2. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruscus_aculeatus

3. //www.webmd.com

4. botanical.com: Broom, Butcher's

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2866)


Can Butcher's Broom Help Fight Varicose Veins?
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 11, 2013 12:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Butcher's Broom Help Fight Varicose Veins?

Varicose Veins are abnormally thick veins that are twisted and enlarged. This problem occurs mostly in the leg and thigh veins. The thickened and twisted veins are called varicose veins. They can occur anywhere, but they mostly form in the legs because the legs work against gravity. Standing all day can increase the pressure on leg veins and cause varicose veins.

Causes

The normal function of veins is to carry blood from the outer body parts to the heart and lungs. The veins are provided with one-way valves, which prevent the blood from flowing backward within the vein. Defective or damaged valves are the main reason for varicose veins, as they allow the blood to flow backward, when it should be actually flowing up towards the heart. As the muscles contract to empty the veins, pressure builds up and this causes in the flow of more blood in the wrong way. Thus the pressure on the veins is increased and this causes varicose veins.

Factors that Aggravate Varicose Veins

  • * Pregnancy: During pregnancy, the blood volume increases and the growing uterus adds to the vein pressure in the legs, moreover, estrogen and progesterone relax the vein walls. All this lead to varicose vein formation during pregnancy
  • * Standing for long
  • * Obesity
  • * Straining: Any bodily condition, such as chronic cough, chronic constipation or urinary retention, which may cause strain can increase the chances for varicose veins.
  • * Age: Mostly elderly people are more prone to varicose vein occurrence.
  • * Surgery or trauma: Surgery can sometimes interrupt in the normal flow of blood.

Treatment

There are different types of treatments available to shrink varicose veins and to improve circulation, from simple home remedies to surgeries or medications for severe cases. Natural supplements like Butcher's broom are considered to be a very effective treatment for varicosities.

Butcher's Broom

Butcher's broom is a small, clump-forming evergreen shrub with tiny green flowers. It is an aromatic, diuretic and mildly laxative herb that helps reduce inflammation, increase perspiration and constrict the veins. The whole plant, young shoots and roots are used medically. Young shoots can be eaten like asparagus. It grows commonly in woodlands and hedgerows, and also on coastal cliffs. It is widely grown from Iran to the Mediterranean and the United States.

Its scientific name is Ruscus aculeatus, but it is commonly known as butcher's broom because butcher's used the stiff twigs to clean their cutting boards. The herb has been used for nearly 2000 years, but its medicinal uses have become common only from the last century. Investigations conducted in the 1950s indicated that butcher's broom can induce vasoconstriction and thus might be useful in treating circulatory diseases.

How It Works?

The two primary chemicals in butcher's broom, ruscogenin and neoruscogenin, can cause the blood vessels to narrow or constrict. Their anti-inflammatory properties help improve blood circulation in legs by preventing pooling of blood and reduce swelling.

  • * The flavonoids and ruscogenins in butcher's broom cause the vessels to constrict, reduce blood collection and protect the capillaries. It strengthens blood vessels and improves circulatory health.
  • * Butcher's broom helps the blood vessels to release the accumulated blood, and thus reduces the size of the veins.

Therapeutic Uses

Butcher's broom is used internally to treat venous problems that vary from varicose veins to hemorrhoids. It is also used to strengthen the veins and capillaries. Butcher's broom may be the best natural solution for varicose vein treatment, because it helps with blood flow and circulation.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2810)


What Are A List Of Detox Foods?
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 03, 2013 12:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are A List Of Detox Foods?

A quick search online will undoubtedly result in you managing to come across a list of detox foods that various experts claim will help you to just cleanse your body of various toxins in an entirely natural way. There are clearly a number of health benefits associated with doing this, but prior to starting you do need to have a firm understanding as to which foods or herbs are the best and indeed some of these will now be discussed below.

Eating practices

First on the list is fruit in general and you should look at eating several pieces every single day in order to really get the benefit from them. The reason why they are so good is due to the amount of liquid that is contained within them and this helps the body to flush out those toxins and when you combine this with the number of vitamins, fiber, antioxidants and nutrients, then you get a powerful food that can do you a lot of good.

Greens:

Another food group that deserves to be on a list are your greens and the reason why the likes of spinach, kale, and chard are so good is thanks to the amount of chlorophyll that is contained within them. Chlorophyll is great as it boosts your digestive system, but more than that it has been shown to help your liver to detox itself and this is key since the liver plays a central role in your system due to it filtering waste and toxins and processing them correctly. You will also find that chlorophyll helps your body to clear out various environmental toxins that we breathe in on a daily basis and this alone can really improve your body.

One type of food that deserves to be mentioned on its own is garlic and you should certainly look at eating more of it on a regular basis due to the positive effects it has on your body. It is so important because it entices your liver into producing more of the correct enzymes that will lead to your body being able to detoxify itself and in particular to help remove those toxins from the digestive system, so do add it to your recipes as much as you can and you will certainly benefit from doing so. 

Raw Vegetables:

Other types of foods that you may wish to consider include some raw vegetables and you may wish to juice them and have them that way rather than simply eating them. The main ones to look at include:

  • onion
  • carrots
  • cabbage
  • beet
  • asparagus
  • kale

As with other things listed above they work by helping your liver to deal with the various toxins in your system. These vegetables are also good because of their naturally high levels of things such as glutathione and sulphur, so consider just eating them as nature intended to really benefit from doing so.

Finally, you should also consider using more herbs if you wish to detox and there are several that should play a key role due to their various properties. Two that you will have heard of are ginger and turmeric and they will tackle your immune system and your digestion process and by balancing them out it helps your body when it comes to getting rid of the toxins.

Others that should be included are gymnena due to it being good for your blood sugar levels, neem due to it helping to purify your blood, guduchi as it will cleanse your liver, and mangistha as this will boost your lymphatic system and since this is linked to your immune system you are going to need to have both working perfectly if you want your body to cleanse itself.

What has been attempted here is to point you in the direction of certain types of foods that can help you to detox rather than simply listing one after the other. You are advised to try to include as many as possible when going through the detox process and by doing so you will feel the benefit that comes from removing those toxins from your system and enjoy the increase in health and energy that comes with it.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2799)


Can our health benefit from supplmenting choline?
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 18, 2012 11:01 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can our health benefit from supplmenting choline?

Discovery

Choline, discovered in 1864 by the German chemist, Adolph Strecker, is an essential nutrient, usually grouped under the vitamin B family. While the human body does synthesize small amounts of choline, dietary consumption is a must in order to maintain a healthy body. Deficiency of choline can lead to a number of serious health issues including neurological problems, insomnia, accumulation of fat in the liver, damage to the kidneys and also cardiovascular disease. There are a range of important functions that choline performs in the body.

Some of the key health benefits of choline are:

Maintenance of brain health: The neurotransmitter or the messenger molecule, acetylcholine, that transmits signals from the brain to the muscles and various organs in the body such as the liver, heart, lungs etc, is synthesized using choline. Thus, it plays a very important role in memory and muscle control. Research also suggests that choline has a calming effect on the brain and helps reduce panic and anxiety attacks.

Maintenance of cell membranes: The integrity and flexibility of cell membranes depends on the presence of satisfactory amounts of choline thus making it a prerequisite for appropriate cell metabolism.

Maintenance of Liver health: Choline is responsible for preventing the accumulation of cholesterol and fat deposits in the liver hence preventing hepatosteatosis, a condition more commonly known as fatty liver.

Anti inflammatory benefits: Studies have revealed that inflammatory markers such as Interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, Homocysteine, etc., which are associated with various illnesses such as Diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, Cardiovascular disease, Osteoporosis and also various cancers, show reduced levels if adequate amounts of choline are consumed in the diet. 

Food Sources

Apart from those stated above there are many more health benefits of choline and hence it is very important to consume foods that are rich in this nutrient. In addition to seafood and meat, foods that have high choline content include, Dairy and poultry products like Skim milk and Egg yolk, peanut butter; Vegetables such as Cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, asparagus, Green beans and Fruits like Bananas and Oranges. Soybeans, due to their high lecithin content, are also a fantastic source of choline. Seeds like flax seed, sesame seeds and grains like corn, barley and oats are also rich in choline content.

Maintenance of adequate levels of choline is imperative in order to maintain optimal health. It is therefore very important to have periodic health checkups so that any deficiencies are identified and addressed as soon as possible.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2722)


The Benefits of Phytoestrogen for Hot Flashes
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 16, 2012 07:38 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Benefits of Phytoestrogen for Hot Flashes

How Does Phytoestrogen Help With Hot Flash?

Phytoestrogen is a natural compound found in several plants. It has many benefits. Therefore, it sometimes is made into a supplement by deriving it from those plants. The compound consists of three categories; lignans, coumestans, and isoflavones.

Phytoestrogen can be used to prevent Alzheimer and breast cancer. A published journal called “Neurotoxicology and Teratology” found that a diet program with this compound can improve visual-spatial memory. And as for the breast cancer, it is because of the isoflavones and lignans which are effective in protecting the breast against the cancer cell development in adult.

Phytoestrogen: Reproductive System

On the other side, phytoestrogen has the similar structure with estrogen, a hormone found in a female body that influences the function of reproductive system. Therefore, it can be used as a natural solution for female reproductive system such as menopause symptoms.

The most common disturbing symptom in menopause is hot flash. Hot flash is a warm feeling that spreads all over the body. It usually starts from the area around the head and neck. It is cause by drastic hormonal changes that cause the body temperature to drop. To stabilize the body temperature, the brain sends a signal to the entire body to warm it all up. And then, the warmth is sent to all over the body through the blood vessel. When your whole body has warmed up, the blood will return its temperature to its regular level.

Hot Flashes

As mentioned above, phytoestrogen can be a natural solution to mend hot flashes in menopause. This theory has been proved by a research done by Mayo Clinic where the fifteen menopausal women are given a phytoestrogen diet while the other fifteen women were not. The result shows that the first fifteen women with the diet suffer from hot flashes 57% less than the women with no diet.

Besides hot flashes, another problem may occur to menopausal women is the loss of bone mineral density. This problem can also be avoided with the benefits of phytoestrogen. The compound can also decrease the cholesterol level of menopausal women. Consume 30-60 milligrams of this compound per day can be effective to lower the cholesterol during the menopause.

Benefits

For those benefits, it is recommended for menopausal women to consume foods that are rich in phytoestrogen, such as;

- Beans

The bean that contains most of this compound is soy. Soy contains the most phytoestrogen than any other food. It mainly contains isoflavones. Consuming 100 g of soybeans per day is enough for a menopausal remedy. Other beans are lentil, yellow peas, navy, fava beans, etc.

- Vegetables

The vegetable that contains most this compound is flaxseed, alfalfa sprout and red clover. Flaxseed also contains omega-3 and fiber which are beneficial for body. Other vegetables are broccoli, cabbage, asparagus, potatoes, carrots, and zucchini.

- Fruits

The fruit that contains most of this compound is dried prunes. Other fruits are peaches, strawberries, and raspberries.

- Grains

Many kinds of grains are rich in phytoestrogen, such as brown rice, wheat, oats, and barleys.

Consuming fresh foods as your menopausal diet is very healthy and low in risk. However, if it is difficult for you to eat them in a structured schedule, you can simply get the phytoestrogen supplements from a drug store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2634)


What Is Glutathione Good For?
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 14, 2012 08:03 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Glutathione Good For?

What is Glutathione?

Glutathione (GSH)is a tripeptide derived from non-proteinaceous amino acids. Contains apeptide bond between the group unusual amino of the cysteine group and the carboxylside chain of glutamate. Glutathione, an antioxidant, helps protect cells from reactive species of oxygen such as free radicals and peroxides. Glutathione is nucleophilic at sulfuracceptors and conjugated electrophilic attack poisonous. Groups thiolare maintained in a reduced state to a concentration of about ~ 5 mM in animal cells. Indeed, glutathione reduces any link disulfideformed with in proteins cytoplasmic cysteines by acting as a donor of electrons.In the process, glutathione is converted to its oxidized form glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Glutathione is found almost exclusively in its reduced form, since the enzyme that turns its oxidized form, glutathione reductase,is constitutively active and inducible to oxidative stress.In fact, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione in cells is often used scientifically as a measure of cellular toxicity. H2O2+ GSSG + 2 ------- 2GSH H2O.

Advantages of the Glutathione

Before discussing the benefits of L-Glutathione, let's first talk a little about the nutrient. Glutathione is an antioxidant enzyme dominant which is soluble in water.It is absorbed mainly in the liver.It helps fight against free radical damage.The free radical damage is harmful relatives. Glutathione is involved in a variety of other functions in the body.

The function of Glutathione - Benefits of Glutathione

Glutathione works in DNA synthesis and repair, protein and prostaglandin synthesis, and amino acid transport.It helps in the metabolism of carcinogens and toxins.Immune system is improved through the use of Glutathione, and contributes to the prevention of cellular oxidative damage, and activation of enzymes. Glutathione also helps and maintains the functions of other antioxidants.

Glutathione deficiency

There is the possibility of a deficiency of glutathione. It usually occurs during aging.For example, it is seen in macular degeneration related to age, diabetes, and lung and gastrointestinal diseases. It may be the cause of pre-eclampsia, Parkinson's, AIDS and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Where to get Glutathione

Some sources of glutathione include fruits such as tomatoes, watermelon, grapefruit, oranges, peaches and cantaloupe.It is found in vegetables such as avocados, potatoes, spinach, okra, acorn squash, and asparagus.It is found in most meats as well. Other sources of vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, parsley, and not only provide GSH - glutathione peroxidase, but it also stimulates the body to make more BA.Since cooking destroys much of glutathione, you will get more to eat raw or steamed vegetables for the best benefits of Glutathione.

Reduced glutathione is in a supplementation that we personally use a company called source naturals a Natural Product meeting the above requirements.The nutrient content in their signature product - Total Balance.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2633)


If I am A Vegetarian, Do I Need Extra Iodine For Proper Thyroid Function?
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 26, 2011 07:26 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: If I am A Vegetarian, Do I Need Extra Iodine For Proper Thyroid Function?

Thyroid, Your Health, And Metabolism

We are given absolute freedom unto what kind of diet we would like to engage ourselves in hence, at present we could see a lot of people engaging into different kinds of diets. The vegetarian diet is one of the many kinds of diets that are becoming really common today. The vegetarian lifestyle is a diet composed mainly of fresh and organic foods however, if you plan to employ the said diet, thorough planning is highly required. Despite the fact that there are already a lot of vegetarian foods that are sold commercially, vegetarians should be mindful and vigilant so that they could avoid vegetarian foods that are heavily processed that gives you the wrong impression that these foods offers you a balanced nutrition while in fact they are deficient with some vital vitamins and nutrients.

Perhaps, we are all aware of the importance of iodine as a nutrient for the body. Iodine plays a vital role in various biological functions such as growth, metabolism, and development. When a person is deficient with iodine, it can cause various ailments such as goiters, thyroid cancer, thyroid nodules, menstrual problems, and headaches. Among the groups that are very susceptible of developing iodine deficiency are pregnant women and children. Pregnant women who are unable to meet the recommended daily allowance of iodine will relevantly affect the intelligence of their baby.

Most vegetarians get iodine from the cheese, milk products, and fish they consume. If you would want to have the sense of assurance that you are getting enough iodine that you need every day, you have to eat foods that contain liberal amounts of iodine such as agar, turnips, kale, spinach, kelp, summer squash, asparagus, and mustard greens. Walnuts, brown rice, and wheat are also beneficial in providing you some protection against iodine deficiency. We could also not avoid the fact that some vegetarians are still unable to meet the recommended daily allowance of iodine because of some circumstances. To avoid such deficiency, intake of iodine supplements regularly and as prescribed is also very helpful.

At present, there are already many supplements that you can conveniently purchase to help you address iodine deficiency. However, when you are planning to take any supplement, it is wiser if you seek your physician’s advice first so that you will be properly and adequately guided on the right amount of the said mineral your body needs. Intake of supplements should be individualized because each and every one of us has different requirements of iodine because of the salient factors involved. So if you do not want to experience any health problems brought about by lack of knowledge.

All of us should be careful when it comes to taking good care of our health because any wrong move you could commit would have great implications to your over-all health state.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2525)


What Herbs Are Vein Strengtheners?
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 28, 2011 02:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Herbs Are Vein Strengtheners?

Blood vessels can be found all over the body. It is the passageway of blood so that cellular oxygenation as well as elimination of harmful substances from the cells would be successful. Blood vessels have three types, namely the arteries, the veins and the capillaries. Arteries contain the blood from the pulmonary system which is highly oxygenated while the veins consist of blood which is deoxygenated and abundant in cellular waste. Capillaries serve as a bridge between the two major blood vessels. Among these blood vessels, the veins are the only of its kind which has valves. These valves prevent backflow of blood since the direction of the blood in the vein is against gravity. Therefore, it is of no surprise that among the three types of blood vessels, veins are the most commonly damaged. In this article, we will be discussing of natural ways or herbs which are effective as vein strengtheners.

1. HORSE CHESTNUT. Traditionally, this herb has been used for the improvement of health the veins. In fact, Western medicine has considered this herb as the most effective herbal medicine for venous problems most especially Chronic Venous Insufficiency. It can improve venous return by improving the ability of the valves of veins to return blood to the heart from the lower extremities. This herb has also been found to decrease permeability of the capillary wall permeability thus lessening fluid outflow into tissues. The recommended dosage for this supplement is 500 mg each morning.

2. GOTU KOLA. Gotu kola is a popular herbal medicine of the Indian Ayurvedic medicine. It is also considered to be one of the oldest herbal medicines all over the world. This herb has been found to be effective in improving the tone, flexibility and integrity of the blood vessels. Therefore, this herb has been long used as a treatment for circulatory problems most especially varicose veins. 200 milligram extract of this herb is usually suggested three times daily.

3. RUTIN. This is not an herb itself but a chemical substance which can be found in several plants. Rutin is considered to be a flavonoid which can be extracted from citrus peels, cranberries, asparagus and buckwheat. Clinical studies of this chemical compound have revealed that it be an effective relief treatment of damaged and edematous veins. This chemical can also be used for improving the strength of the capillaries thus lowering the risk of damage.

These are only some of the herbs which are found to be effective as vein strengtheners. These herbs can be made into a poultice and applied to the skin so that positive effect can be obtained. Along with these herbs, it is also important that you should exercise regularly. Elevate your legs, if possible, especially when lying down at hours of sleep. This would greatly help in promoting venous return thus thwarting blood pooling at the lower extremities. It is also important that you should avoid long time standing or sitting. Health experts also suggest that people must avoid prolong crossing of legs and not to wear tight clothing and foot wears since this can possibly constrict veins..

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2466)


Can Herbs and Prunes Help with Constipation
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 30, 2011 02:41 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Herbs and Prunes Help with Constipation

Herbs and Prunes as a natural laxative

Herbs and Prunes must be the best digestive formula out there. It contains a select combination of herbs whose laxative properties are tried and tested for decades, namely: senna leaf, Chinese rhubarb root, Chinese asparagus, beet leaf, buckthorn bark, cabbage leaf, cascara sagrada bark, celery leaf, cranberry fruit, Culver’s root, parsley leaf, spinach leaf, and prune fruit. In addition to their long-standing association with alternative medicine, medical research has pointed to their active ingredients that are purgative in nature. These herbs not only relieve digestive problems such as constipation and indigestion but also cleanse the gastrointestinal tract, effectively disposing of toxins.

Induces Bowel Movement

There are several factors that may give rise to constipation, but in most cases it results from withholding bowel movement far longer than what is considered normal. In general, a healthy individual is expected to discharge fecal matter from the bowels at least once a day although it may vary from person to person. The rectum sends messages to the brain every time the final phase of digestion is about to take place, and not responding to these messages leads to reversing the direction of the feces, which are temporarily stored in the colon. However, the colon is not able to reduce the pressure the feces produce for long periods of time, leading to constipation. The unique formulation of Herbs and Prunes relaxes the intestinal walls and softens the stools, making it much easier to evacuate the bowels.

Alleviates Abdominal Pains

The phytochemicals that are considered the active ingredients of Herbs and Prunes include anthraquinones, such as senna glycosides, sorbitol, and isatin, such as dihydrophenylisatin, among others. These organic compounds are reputed for their laxative properties that soothe the muscles tissues within the intestinal walls and influence the releases of chemicals that sensitive the digestive tract to pain. Irregular bowel movement causes what we refer to as stomach pains, and more often than not the foods that we eat influences regularity. A balanced diet is named so because it promotes digestion as well as gives us the nutrients our body needs in right amounts. Herbs and Prunes works on the principle of supplying our body with all-natural, plant-based dietary fiber and phytochemicals that restores normal digestion.

Detoxifies the Digestive Tract

Herbs and Prunes comprises a significant fraction of both soluble and insoluble fiber that are guaranteed to wash away toxins when ingested with ample amounts of liquids. As diet significantly influences human health, it is not surprising that the digestive system may be rendered susceptible to unhealthy foods. The alimentary canal is our first line of defense against toxins that the foods we eat produce. Plant-based foods that contain fiber remove by-products of digestion that otherwise accumulate in the bowels. In conjunction with phytochemicals, fiber is known to reach parts of the alimentary canal that play host to harmful microorganisms, the reason why plant-derived medications are often the cure to many diseases of the digestive system.

Herbs and Prunes

It is always recommended to keep a herbs and prunes formula on hand when irregularity hits. Grab yourself a bottle today!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2263)


Horsetail
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 31, 2009 01:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horsetail

Horsetail has been used for healing in both Chinese and Asian cultures. During times of famine, the Romans ate horsetail shoots, while Native Americans used horsetail as a diuretic for kidney problems, cancer, and dropsy to increase blood circulation. The Hopi tribe in New Mexico mixed horsetail and cornmeal as a mush and in their bread. One of the oldest plants on the earth, horsetail is approximately two hundred million years old. It used to be a giant fernlike plant. However, there are now around twenty species of the original plant living today. These species are small in comparison to the original plant and are usually considered to be a nuisance. The species Equisetum arvense is a small perennial fern plant that is most common in North America.

The horsetail plant is a descendent of huge tree-like plants that thrived 400 million years ago during the Paleozoic era. The plant is a non-flowering weed that can be found throughout parts of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and North America. This plant returns each year with hollow stems and shoots that resemble asparagus. As the plant dries, silica crystals, which form in the stems and branches, give the plant the scratching effect that made it historically useful for polishing metal.

Horsetail is believed to aid the immune system and the nervous system because of its silica content. The nerves contain almost the same amount of silica as does the albumin in the blood. The pancreas is especially rich in silica. Silica is found combined with fluorine in the enamel of the teeth. Additionally, hair needs silica to grow, and it is needed as a protection for the skin and cell walls. This herb helps in treating urinary tract problems. It contains silicic acid, which is responsible for helping with circulation of the blood. This herb is also credited with helping coagulate the blood and decreasing blood flow. An externally-applied decoction has the ability to stop bleeding of wounds and help with healing. Horsetail can also be used as a mouthwash for mouth infections. Often found in calcium combinations, horsetail is helpful in building the skeletal system and improving bone structure. The silica that is found in horsetail also helps in healing bones, keeping the arteries clean, and facilitating the absorption of calcium in the body.

This herb is known for its antibiotic properties and its contribution to the overall healing process. Horsetail is also thought to help with bleeding, urinary and prostate disorders, bed-wetting, skin problems, and lung disease. Horsetail also possesses a weak diuretic effect, which is most notably due to the equisetonin and the flavone glycosides.

In short, the entire horsetail herb is used to provide alterative, antilithic, antineoplastic, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, galactogogue, lithotriptic, nephritic, nutritive, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are flavonoids, iodine, iron, manganese, PABA, pantothenic acid, silicon, sodium, and vitamin E. Primarily, this herb is extremely beneficial in treating arthritis, poor circulation, diabetes, glandular problems, weak hair, kidney stones, weak nails, nervousness, osteoporosis, parasites, rheumatism, and urinary problems.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with edema, eyestrain, gas, gout, heart problems, hemorrhage, incontinence, liver disorders, membrane irritations, neuralgia, palsy, skin disorders, tumors, and water retention. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horsetail, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2070)


What Is Fiber?
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 21, 2008 02:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Fiber?

Fiber often has been called roughage, as it technically is a food component that is undigested and processed through the gastrointestinal tract. Since it readily absorbs water, it helps to add to the bulk that is required in order to form a good bowel movement. Fiber is often described as a complex carbohydrate, which consists of the polysaccharide and lignin substance that often gives structure to the cell of a plant and is the portion of plant food that is not digested.

Fiber which is insoluble has the capability of passing through the intestines intact and unchanged. Unlike fats, carbohydrates, and proteins, fiber does not give the body nutrients or fuel for energy, and has no caloric value. Dietary fiber can only be found in plant components including vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Primarily, there are only two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble, with some foods containing both types.

Soluble fiber is eventually digested in the large intestine, causing it to have limited bulking power. Soluble fibers dissolve in water and have often been linked to helping prevent blood sugar highs and lows, helping to lower blood cholesterol, lowering the risk of heart disease, helping to control high blood pressure, and encouraging friendly bacteria growth. Soluble fiber can be found in pectin, lignin, gums, mucilages, and other sources such as psyllium, beans, apples, pears, and oat bran.

Soluble fiber doesn’t usually seem like fiber. It is digestible and, when broken down, it creates a gel as it absorbs water in the intestinal tract. It does not bulk the stool to the extent of insoluble fiber, but it does slow down the rate at which food is digested. Soluble fiber is found in vegetables, particularly onions, bulbs, leeks, and asparagus, and also fruits, including dried varieties.

Insoluble fiber remains undigested for the most part and promotes a faster stool transit time. Insoluble fiber can keep the bowel clean and operative and also help to bind dangerous toxins and hormones in order to promote better excretion. Insoluble fiber also fosters regularity in the body, contributes to better digestion, prevents constipation, and helps to lower the risk of bowel disease.

Insoluble fiber is primarily composed of cellulose and hemicelulose. Cellulose is a non-digestible form of fiber, found in outer portions of vegetables and fruits. Bran or seed covering of whole grains is another type of insoluble fiber. Hemicellulose fibers remain unchanged and absorb water as they travel the digestive tract. They increase stool bulk and transit time, preventing constipation and conditions like hemorrhoids. Stalks, stems, peels, and fruit and vegetable skins are all made up of insoluble fiber. However, the insoluble fiber content of fruits is actually found in its flesh and stringy membranes, rather than its peelings.

The average person needs a good variety of foods that contribute to at least 35 grams of dietary fiber in our diet daily. Most foods contain both types of fiber, but the ones that are most fiber rich are not usually the ones that we commonly eat. Whole grain cereal, raw fruits and vegetables, split peas, beans, lentils, millet, and barley are the best sources of fiber. Unfortunately, statistics have shown that most of us only get 9 grams of fiber each day, if we are lucky.

Finally, fiber has the ability to increase fecal bulk by retaining water, decrease stool transit time, keep blood sugar levels more stable, lower blood serum and liver cholesterol, help prevent weight gain by slowing the rate of digestion and absorption and controlling hunger, expediting the removal of dangerous toxins, binding with bile salts to help decrease the risk of gallbladder disease and certain types of cancer, and creating the presence of healthier intestinal bacteria.

--
Buy Fiber At Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1840)


Ester-E
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 07, 2008 09:40 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ester-E

Vitamin E is a known natural supplement and antioxidant that helps support the immune and cardiovascular systems. It is created by a natural process so that you can receive the purest form available. It is formed when natural d-alpha tocopherol is combined with a phosphate molecule. This combination protects the potency of Vitamin E until your body needs it the most.

Ester E is processed so that its natural benefits are preserved to give the body the most optimal benefit possible. This is why Ester E is the best form of Vitamin E available. Vitamin E is known to aid in the following actions:

* Preventing Alzheimer’s disease
* Reducing vision problems
* Preventing heart problems
* Protecting cell membranes
* Flushing LDL cholesterol

Vitamin E Food Sources:

* Nuts
* Oils
* Whole grains
* Spinach
* asparagus
* Avocado
* Carrots
* Celery
* Apples
* Beef
* Seafood

How Vitamin E Works:

Manufacturers suggest that Ester E be taken along with a meal that includes some form of fat. This is because when fat is combined with Vitamin E, it is more readily absorbed. Since the supplement is fat soluble, this aids in delivery to the cells of the body.

Vitamin E is an essential nutrient because the body cannot produce it on its own. If you are not ingesting the proper amounts of it in your daily diet, you need to take a supplement. It is important to remember that improper preparation, cooking and storage can result in the loss of Vitamin E from the food.

Vitamin E is actually a combination of antioxidants, tocopherols and tocotrienols. Unfortunately, only alpha-tocopherol is actively maintained in the body. Therefore a supplement is needed to be sure the body is getting enough of the other ingredients that make up the complete Vitamin E.

Why do we need Vitamin E?

Part of its job is to protect Vitamin A and essential fatty acids from oxidation. When oxidation occurs in the cells, it breaks down body tissues.

Vitamin E Benefits:

Vitamin E has been found to aid in the prevention of heart disease. The oxidation of LDL cholesterol causes blockages in the coronary arteries. This often leads to atherosclerosis and heart attack. Vitamin E helps to prevent or at least delay these effects by limiting this oxidation. This has reduced the mortality rate due to coronary disease.

In its complete form, Vitamin E may be effective in reducing the risk of breast cancer in women who are genetically predisposed. It is being tested for its effectiveness in not only reducing the incidence of breast cancer, but also in inhibiting breast cancer cell growth.

Vitamin E is thought to protect the body against many forms of cancer due to its ability to increase immune system function. As an antioxidant, Vitamin E protects the body against the damaging effects of free radicals. These are believed to contribute to cancer cell production and the development of other chronic diseases. Vitamin E may also block formation of nitrosamines. These are carcinogens that form in the stomach from nitrites consumed through diet.

Another possible benefit to optimal amounts of Vitamin E in the diet is the prevention of cataracts. The clarity of the lens of the eye contributes to the formation of cataracts, blindness and eye disease. Vitamin E is being found to aid in the prevention of eye problems in people of all ages.

Vitamin E Warnings:

Vitamin E can produce harmful side effects if it is combined with certain medications. Consult your doctor before taking any dietary supplement to be sure it is safe for your use.

When taken as a supplement in its complete form, Vitamin E is nutritive and helpful in maintaining good health. Be sure when purchasing Vitamin E supplements that you are using Ester E for optimal benefits.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1812)


Galactose
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 08, 2007 05:03 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Galactose

Dairy products
fenugreek
kelp
apple pectin
apples
apricot
banana
blackberries
cherries
cranberries
currants
dates
grapes
kiwi fruit
mango
orange
nectarine
peach
pear
pineapple
plums
prunes
raspberries
rhubarb
strawberries
passionfruit
echinacea
boswellia
chestnuts
broccoli
brussels sprouts
avocado
cabbage
carrot
cauliflower
celery
cucumber
potato
eggplant
tomatoes
leeks
asparagus
lettuce
green beans
mushrooms
beetroot
onions
parsnip
green peas
pumpkin
spinach

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1484)


Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 27, 2005 03:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

You and your sweetie can turn up the heat by cooking together.

Since the beginning of time, the pleasures of the table have been intertwined with those of the boudoir. (Remember the scene in the film Tom Jomes in which Tom and his amorata-of-the-moment wolf down a meal while staring lustily into each other’s eyes?) But when most of your kitchen time is spent trying to get everyone fed and out of the house in time for the night’s soccer game/ PTA meeting/ballet lesson, it can be tough keeping the pilot light lit on your love.

That’s why one of the best ways to spice up your sex life is to prepare a sensuous meal together sans offspring (thank heavens for doting grandparents with spare rooms!). A little fourhanded cooking- preferably while sharing some suggestive banter- can create chemistry that allows your playful, non-parenting side s to emerge, enhancing intimacy and setting the stage for the seductive feast to follow.

Just as the frenzied pace of modern living can often foster a sense of separation, cooking together as a couple can promote a sense of union. “Eventually you get a feel for your partner’s rhythms and adjust yours accordingly,” says food TV personality Jacqui Malouf, author of Booty Food (Bloomsbury). “Before you know it you’re passing the coriander, peeling the potatoes and stirring the risotto at precisely the right moments.”

With time, you can learn what each of you does best: Who has a flair for combining spices in just the right proportions? Who can chop carrots into perfect little matchsticks without taking all night? Since nothing kills the mood more than arguing over who misplaced the baker’s chocolate or the pasta platter, buy your ingredients earlier in the day and have all the necessary utensils out and at the ready. (Safety note: while two in a tiny kitchen can be steamily cozy, do be careful with hot pots and sharp knives.)

Four hands can also be better than two, so why not make the most of it? Malouf suggests approaching your combined efforts with a sense of adventure: “Use more than three ingredients in a salad dressing! Be daring with your desserts! Try concocting something with squab or squid or quince or quail- the sky’s the limit.”

Intriguing Ingredients

One advantage of using exotic ingredients (or at least foods not normally found on your weekly shopping list) is that they can help you and your partner break through the limits of everyday experience by reawakening long-dormant senses. Go ahead- run your fingertips over the rough rind of a pomegranate before feeling the smooth, full seeds within. Inhale the sweet, perfumed scent of a dead-ripe apricot, and appreciate its downy skin. Admire the cool green beauty of a cut avocado, and share a spoonful with your sweetie.

Avocado, in fact, is one of the foods known for inflaming passion based on its suggestive shape, along with artichoke and asparagus- and that’s just the AS! (Chocoholics rejoice: Chocolate, full of the same feel-good chemical released by the brain when one falls in love, also makes the ecstasy encouraging grade, even when obtained in standard shapes.) “coincidentally, many foods long considered aphrodisiacs are low in fat (avocado and chocolate are delectably healthy exceptions) and are high in vitamins and minerals,” write Martha Hopkins and Randall Lockridge in Intercourses: An Aphrodisiac Cookbook (Terrace Publishing). “A diet heavy in these foods, then, yields a healthy blood healthy body with the energy, blood flow and nutrients needed for a peak sexual experience.” (The way these foods feed the imagination- the ultimate smorgasbord of pleasure- is a bountiful bonus.) Other foods, such as honey, have been treasured for supplying the energy needed to fan love’s flames far into the night; no wonder the sweet, sticky stuff shows up in a number of naughty-night concoctions.

Just as Venus, the Roman goddess of love, emerged fully formed from the sea, so do the foods that best encourage those under her spell. In addition to being chockfull of healthy protein, “seafood is elegant, clean and light enough to keep your sleek loving machine fully fueled but never weighed down,” says Jacqui Malouf. Oysters are famous- or infamous- for their amorous effects (Cassanova was fond of them) but aren’t for everyone; other romantic dining favorites include shrimp or scallops.

Time to Eat

Once you’ve worked your kitchen magic together, it’s time to move the action into the dining room. Again, a little preparation can keep the evening at a slow, sensuous boil. Use the best china you have, along with matching silverware, cloth napkins and nice glasses (sippy cups don’t count). The warm glow of candlelight can both set off your tantalizing table and set your hearts aflame, along with a rose or two in the most decorative vase you own. Music (from Mozart to Motown, depending on your taste) is another surefire mojo mover. But please guys- catch up with CNN or ESPN some other time.

When you do finally sit down to dinner don’t rush, even (especially) if fast-forward eating is the norm in your house. “Treat the food as if you are making love for the first time,” advises Kerry McCloskey in The Ultimate Sex Diet (True Courage Press). “Before putting any in your mouth, inhale its aroma to get your digestive juices flowing…Cut your food into small, bite-sized pieces, (which) will ensure that you enjoy each bite.” The idea is to enhance all of your senses, which will come in handy later on in the evening.

You can make your couple dining experience even more intimate by feeding each other; some foods. Like asparagus spears and shrimp, beg for finger-feeding. McCloskey recommends also trying chopsticks: “Because it will take longer to maneuver your food when using them, you will feel full sooner with less food.” That’s important since you don’t want to overeat- passing out right after dessert is not the way to impress your partner (they’ve seen you snoring away on the couch a hundred times before).

In the wee hours, happily exhausted, you can ponder this: No matter how hectic your lives get, you should always make time for each other. You already share a mortgage and kids. Cooking together is a great way to share sensuality, too.
-Lisa James

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=710)


Natural Health for a Healthy Heart
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 13, 2005 09:17 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Health for a Healthy Heart

Natural Health for a Healthy Heart

Cardiovascular disease is on the rise. Heart disease, stroke, and related disorders kill more Americans than any other ailments combined. In 1990 approximately one million Americans died form cardiovascular disease. Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) is the leading cause of heart attacks and strokes. Fat and cholesterol accumulate around the heart and inner walls of the arteries. This causes blood flow to slow and blood pressure to rise. Blood clotting is also a problem when the arteries are clogged which, if a clot breaks loose, can cause strokes or heart attacks according to where they end up. Heart disease is usually advanced before a problem arises. Prevention should be the first goal.

Heart disease is much less common in “primitive” societies. This is due in part to the lifestyle and diet choices of Americans. Diet is viewed as the most important factor in heart related disorders. An increased intake of sugar, refined flour and simple carbohydrates may also be contributing factors. Other risk factors include a family history of heart disease, cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, type A personality, stress, diabetes, obesity, high blood cholesterol levels, physical inactivity and coronary artery disease. Changes must be made in diet and life-style in order to prevent heart disease.

DIET

Following a diet low in animal fat and refined sugars but high in fiber is highly recommended. Whole grains, almonds, fresh fruits and vegetables, a variety of legumes, skinless turkey, chicken and fish should be the main dietary elements. Brown rice, garlic, onions, olive oil, raw fruits and vegetables, sprouts, asparagus, apples, bananas, beans, buckwheat, seeds, whey powder, and yogurt are especially good for the heart. Avoid caffeine, alcohol, red meat, refined carbohydrates, and white flour. Limit intake of dairy products which contain high amounts of fat. Homogenized dairy products contain an enzyme called xanthine oxidase which is believed to cause artery damage and could lead to arteriosclerosis. Use olive oil and canola oil when using fat. Avoid palm oil, coconut oil, peanut oil and cottonseed oil.

SUPPLEMENTS

Choline, inositol and lecithin: These act as fat emulsifiers in the bloodstream and can help prevent plaque buildup.

Chromium: Chromium is known for recent studies linking it to a reduced risk of heart disease. It may help prevent plaque buildup in the arteries. Low levels of chromium are thought to be a risk factor for developing heart disease. It also may help increase the beneficial HDL cholesterol and aid in lowering the LDL cholesterol.

Coenzyme Q10: This can help oxygenate the heart muscle helping to prevent additional heart damage. Coenzyme Q10 can help the body break down fatty acids converting them to energy. This is often lacking in individuals with heart problems. Essential Fatty Acids: These can help prevent hardening of the arteries by preventing the blood cells from clumping together and forming clots. They also help with the assimilation of fat soluble vitamins.

Germanium: Germanium has been found to lower high blood pressure and improve circulation in the body. Calcium and Magnesium: Both of these minerals contribute to the muscular contraction and relaxation of the heart. They are essential for the proper function of the heart muscle and maintaining normal heart rhythm and blood pressure. Low levels of calcium have been linked to high blood pressure.

L-Carnitine: This is an amino acid that can help the heart by reducing fat levels in the blood. Vitamin C with bioflavonoids: Vitamin C helps prevent blood clots and strengthens the capillary and blood vessel walls. It may help prevent high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis, lower cholesterol, repair arterial walls, and contribute to reversing heart disease.

Vitamin E: Vitamin E is well known for its beneficial effect on the heart. Selenium: Low levels of selenium have been associated with heart disease.

HERBS

Hawthorn: This herb is great for cardiovascular health. Garlic: Garlic is one of the most studied herbs for cardiovascular health. Several recent studies link garlic to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease.

Cayenne: This is also known as capsicum and is beneficial on circulation and cleaning and nourishing the blood vessels.

Ginkgo: Ginkgo relaxes the blood vessels and improves the flow of blood even in constricted arteries. Rosemary Tea: This is a traditional heart tonic that helps to promote circulation and lower blood pressure. Chinese Mushroom (auricularia polytricha): This is a natural blood thinner.

EXERCISE:

It is important to include exercise in the daily routine. Aerobic exercise is known to help improve the heart1s pumping ability, reduce serum cholesterol levels, decrease the risk of heart disease, and reduce the risk of high blood pressure as well as many other ailments. Exercising an average of three to five days a week for thirty minutes will benefit the body. Actually any amount of exercise is beneficial for the body, so try and do something each day.

REDUCE STRESS:

Include relaxation techniques to reduce stress. Stress can increase the risk of heart disease. Stress releases adrenaline which causes the heart to work harder. If you feel resentment, fear or anger, find ways to deal with these in a positive way. Pursuit serenity and peace in life. Exercise, self hypnosis, biofeedback, meditation, yoga and prayer can all help develop inner peace.

--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=598)


Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus...
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 11, 2005 09:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fight Hay Fever - Help Your Sinus...

HANDLING SPRING(HAY)

The National Institute of Health’s branch of Allergy and Infectious Diseases re p o rt that 40 to 50 million Americans suffer from allergies in one form or another. Many experience food allergies that a re treated somewhat diff e rently from hay fever allergies. Hay fever comes from airborne allergens, generally from pollen or pollutants.

The symptoms of allergy occur when an immune system is overactive. The immune system often recognizes something as foreign and treats it as foreign by attacking it, when in fact it really isn’t a substance the body should be concern e d with. This over-activity of the immune system leads to the release of substances including histamine that cause the symptoms of hay fever.

The most common symptoms include a runny nose and itching eyes and scratchy throat. Sometimes, an allergy will precede a sinus infection by causing swelling in the nasal membranes preventing fluids f rom exiting the sinus passages. An infection then ensues. However, most people who feel pressure over their sinuses, never develop an infection and so can be adequately treated with the supplements mentioned here. Many people experience a tickle or a shallow cough that comes from the throat rather than the lungs. They may also experience a change in emotions, becoming quite irritable or moody.

These airborne allergies can often be g rouped by season. Those people sensitive to tree pollens usually have more severe allergies in the springtime. Those sensitive to grasses are often worse in mid-summer. Those allergic to weeds have their symptoms peak in the fall. There are some unfortunate people who have allergies all summer long who may be allergic to a few plants in each group. Those who have symptoms of allerg i e s all winter long probably are allergic to molds and mildew or household animals and dust mites. On occasion, it takes a real detective to determine from where the allergies come.

There are several methods used to diagnose a cause of an allergy. In a scratch test, drops of an allergen are put on small scratches on the arm or the back. Are action is considered positive if swelling or redness occur around the scratch. A blood sample can also be used to meas ure antibody response to certain allergens. It is often helpful to determine the allergen which cause the hayfever to reduce the symptoms. There are also practitioners who use kinesiology or electronic devices to determine the cause of allergies.

The most common treatment of allergies is with antihistamines. Their side effects include drowsiness and drying of the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth. Many of the newer prescription antihistamines don’t cause drying but often have serious drug interactions and the consumer must be very careful in combining the prescription antihistamines with antifungal drugs, and blood thinning as well as asthma medication. There are some natural products that can be taken to decrease allergy symptoms. They are often equally effective without the side effects of antihistamines.

QUERCETIN

One of the more popular is quercetin. Quercetin is a bioflavonoid found in red apples, red onions, brussels sprouts, kale, peas, bell peppers, pears and asparagus. It is also found in bee pollen and propolis, two plant materials found in the beehive. It is possible to consume a fair amount of quercetin through your diet. If you have allergies, however, diet is often not enough and you may need a supplement to get enough quercetin to ontrol your symptoms. It appears quercetin decreases allergic symptoms by stopping the release of histamine. If you start taking quercetin and other nutritional supplements I will mention below before an allergy attack, they are likely to be more effective. However, don’t let that discourage you from taking them even after the symptoms have started. A common dose is 300mg to 600mg per day.

BROMELAIN

Bromelain is a nutrient often extracted f rom pineapple. Found in many digestive formulas, it is an enzyme that helps absorption. If it is found in a combination formula, chances are, it is there to help with the absorption of the other nutrients such as quercetin. Bromelain also has an anti-inflammatory effect. When someone develops allergy symptoms, part of the reason is due to the inflammatory response to substances such as histamine that are released as the allergy takes hold. This causes inflammation in the tissues which then manifests with redness and swelling.

VITAMIN C

Vitamin C is useful in many conditions including hay fever. Higher doses are often required in the treatment of allergies: 2,000mg is beneficial and you can take up to 4,000mg or more during acute symptoms. It also stabilizes capillaries, reducing the swelling in the throat, nasal passages and around the eyes. If you are taking a multi-vitamin or a combination product that contains Vitamin C, I still recommend additional supplementation.

NETTLE (URTICA DIOICA)

Stinging nettle is probably a plant many a re familiar with, especially if it has come into contact with your skin, but it also has an historical use in the treatment of allergy. In fact, in double blind studies it was shown to decrease the symptoms of allergy, specifically runny nose.

EPHEDRA (MA HUANG)

The active component of the ephedra herb is ephedrine, an alkaloid. It is used in OTC asthma medication. As a natural herb, ephedra in small doses can be v e ry useful in decreasing the symptoms of colds, asthma, cough and in this case, hay fever. It is in many Chinese and American formulas that I use and I feel v e ry comfortable using 100mg to 200mg of ephedra that contain small doses of 2.5mg to 8mg of ephedra alkaloids per day. I feel comfortable using dosages of up to 15mg of ephedra alkaloids .

FEVERFEW

Feverfew is another herb with a variety of uses. You will find it in headache formulas, in fever reducing formulas, and many hay fever formulas. Like bromelain, it has an anti-inflammatory effect and reduces the swelling that occurs during a hay fever attack.

Homeopathic formulas can also be useful to reduce hay fever. There is no re ason why the herbs I’ve mentioned cannot be combined with homeopathic formulas. You may want to take them at separate times of the day.

So, if you suffer from hay fever, don’t give up. You can use these nutrients singly or in combination. You can take a formula that contains all of them and then add to that additional vitamin C for instance, or additional nettle. It may require trial and error to find the right amounts in combination that will work for you.



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=571)


America's Most Wanted
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 14, 2005 05:23 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: America's Most Wanted

America's Most Wanted

by Brian Amherst Energy Times, January 6, 2000

The United States eats well, a little too well, according to experts. Amply supplied with a large supply of high-calorie food, our diets might seem to be chock full of every conceivable nutrient. Well, to the question "Getting all the right vitamins, minerals and other nutrients?" the most appropriate answer seems to be "Not exactly." Eating a lot doesn't equal eating a lot of the most important vitamins and minerals. So, which vitamins and minerals are likely to show up in short supply in the typical American diet? Calcium certainly sits at the top of list. According to the most recent Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, which is conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), women and girls age 12 and up are not consuming adequate calcium from their diet. Research reveals that about 1200 mg. day suffices for those over age 50 and 1000 mg a day should be adequate if you're between the ages of 19 and 50. Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Stanford University, ". . .osteoporosis is a pediatric disease." For long-range protection against that bone-weakening disease, kids should eat calcium-rich, low-fat dairy products and plenty of leafy greens (broccoli, cabbage, kale) as well as salmon (with bones), seafood and soy. But the calcium campaign does not end in early adulthood. Bone mass begins to deteriorate at about age 30. Menopausal hormonal changes can exacerbate bone brittleness. Medical conditions, including cancer, liver disease and intestinal disorders; prescription drugs; tobacco and alcohol indulgence; or a decline in activity, especially the weight-bearing kind, also jeopardize bone strength. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, about one in every two American women will break a bone after age 50 due to osteoporosis. That translates into about half a million fractured vertebrae and more than 300,000 shattered hips. Frequently, those breaks are life-threatening.

Crucial Calcium

The critical role of calcium in many body functions is perhaps the most extensively clinically documented among nutrients. Researchers in the Department of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, reviewed epidemiological and clinical studies conducted over the past two years on the relationship between dietary calcium and blood pressure (J Am Coll Nutr October 1999: 398S-405S). "Nearly 20 years of investigation in this area has culminated in remarkable and compelling agreement in the data," the researchers report, "confirming the need for and benefit of regular consumption of the recommended daily levels of dietary calcium." Investigators at the State University of New York, Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, presented results of their studies of calcium and vitamin C and gum disease at the June 26, 1998 meeting of the International Association for Dental Research. Two separate inquiries revealed that people who consumed too little calcium as young adults, and those with low levels of vitamin C in their diets, appear to have nearly twice the risk of developing periodontal disease later in life than folks with higher dietary levels of either nutrient.

Calcium: Much Documented Researchers offer extensive evidence of calcium's benefits on many fronts: n Osteoporosis poses a threat to older men as well as women, according to Randi L. Wolf, PhD, research associate at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Dr. Wolf presented her award-winning study to an October 3, 1999 meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Dr. Wolf suggests that men increase their consumption of calcium, particularly after age 80, to avoid age-related declines in the amount of calcium absorbed. According to Dr. Wolf, "It appears that the hormonal form of vitamin D, which is the main regulator of intestinal calcium absorption, may have an important role. We are conducting more research to better understand the reasons for why calcium absorption declines with age in men." n Scientists at Tufts University in Boston did some earlier work on the calcium-vitamin D connection and reported it in the September 4, 1997 New England Journal of Medicine. Using the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) increased recommended daily intake of 1200 milligrams of calcium and 400 to 600 international units of vitamin D for people over 50, the Tufts researchers found that with supplementation of the nutrients, men and women 65 and older lost significantly less body bone and, in some cases, gained bone mineral density. n Two studies published in American Heart Association journals show that atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be linked by a common problem in the way the body uses calcium. The September 1997 Stroke revealed that, in a group of 30 postmenopausal women 67 to 85 years old, bone mineral density declined as atherosclerotic plaque increased. Researchers reporting in Circulation (September 15, 1997) advanced the theory that the osteoporosis-atherosclerosis connection may be related to a problem in handling calcium. n For people who had colon polyps removed, taking calcium supplements decreased the number of new polyps by 24% and cut the risk of recurrence by 19%, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Medicine. The study, published in the January 14, 1999 New England Journal of Medicine, was a first in crediting calcium with anti-cancer properties.

The D Factor

Without adequate vitamin D, your absorption of calcium slips and bone loss can accelerate, increasing the risk for fractures. Fifty percent of women with osteoporosis hospitalized for hip fractures at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston had a previously undetected vitamin D deficiency (Journal of the American Medical Association, April 28, 1999). University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers told participants at the April 14, 1997 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research that vitamin D "significantly inhibits highly metastatic, or widespread, prostate cancer in animals," suggesting its potential for treating men with similar conditions. Few foods that Americans eat, except dairy, contain much vitamin D, but we can usually synthesize sufficient amounts from as few as five minutes' exposure to the sun. But as skin ages, its ability to act as a vitamin D factory decreases. According to Michael F. Holick, the director of the Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical Center, upwards of 40% of the adult population over age 50 that he sees in his clinic are deficient in vitamin D. Recently, the National Academy of Sciences (the official body that decrees the required amounts of necessary nutrients) increased the daily recommendations of vitamin D to 600 IU for people over 71, 400 IU for those aged 51 to 70 and 200 IU for people under 50. The best dietary sources, apart from dependable supplements, are dairy and fatty fish like salmon. Four ounces of salmon provide about 300 IU.

The Facts About Fats

The American lust for low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets filled with sugary foods has exploded into nothing short of "obsession," according to experts at the General Research Center at Stanford University Medical Center (Am J Clin Nutr 70, 1999: 512S-5S). That mania oftens robs us of the crucial balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids typical of the Mediterranean diet that protect us from heart disease by controlling cholesterol and making blood less likely to form clots. These fatty acids cannot be made by the body but are critical for health: n Omega-3 fatty acid (linolenic acid) comes from fresh, deepwater fish (salmon, mackerel, sardines) and vegetable oils such as canola, flaxseed and walnut. n Omega-6 fatty acid (linoleic acid) found primarily in raw nuts, seeds and legumes and in saturated vegetable oils such as borage, grape seed, primrose, sesame and soybean. The American Heart Association recommends limiting total fat consumption to 30% of daily calories. Saturated fats like those in dairy and meat products as well as vegetable oil should comprise 10% of total calories; total unsaturated fat (fish oils, soybean, safflower nuts and nut oils) should be restricted to 20 to 22% of daily calories.

Be Sure About B12

Vitamin B12 presents a particular problem for the elderly because older digestive systems often don't secrete enough stomach acid to liberate this nutrient from food. (The elderly have no problem absorbing B12 from supplements, because it's not bound to food.) Vitamins generally moderate the aging process but, ironically, that process and the diseases that frequently accompany it affect vitamin metabolism (Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax 83, 1994: 262-6). And because of those changes, we need more of certain vitamins. This is the case for vitamins D, B6, riboflavin and B12. Crucial for health, B12 is necessary to prevent anemia, and, according to recent studies, needed (along with folate and B6) to help stave off heart disease. B12, with thiamine and niacin, boosts cognition (Adv Nutr Res 7, 1985: 71-100). Screening for vitamin B12 deficiency and thyroid disease is cheap and easy and can prevent conditions such as dementia, depression or irreversible tissue damage (Lakartidningen 94, 1997: 4329-32). In the January 5-12, 1999 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA urged doctors to screen levels of homocysteine (the amino acid byproduct of protein digestion that damages arteries, causes heart disease and, possibly, strokes) in patients at high risk for heart disease. They also recommended all Americans to up their daily levels of vitamins B6 and B12, as well as folic acid. Since fruits, vegetables or grains lack B12, vegetarians need B12 supplements. And they're a good idea for the rest of us, too.

Folic Acid Benefits

Folic acid made headlines in the early 1990s when the U.S. Public Health Service declared that "to reduce the frequency of neural tube defects [spina bifida, or open spine, and anencephaly, a lethal defect of the brain and skull] and their resulting disability, all women of childbearing age in the United States who are capable of becoming pregnant should consume .4 milligrams (400 micrograms) of folic acid per day." This recommendation followed voluminous research that showed taking folic acid was associated with a significantly reduced risk of birth defects. (The advisory is based on the fact that nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned. If you think you are pregnant, consult your health practitioner for supplementary advice.)

A Team Player

Folic acid's efficacy intensifies when it works with other nutrients. Among many studies on the preventive powers of folic acid on birth defects, one published in The New England Journal of Medicine (327, Dec. 24, 1992: 1,832-1,835), disclosed an even greater decrease in neural tube defects when supplements of folic acid contained copper, manganese, zinc and vitamin C. As a warrior against homocysteine, folic acid joins the battalion of B12 and B6 in detoxifying this harmful protein. At the University of Washington's Northwest Prevention Effectiveness Center, researchers recently analyzed 38 published studies of the relationship between folic acid, homocysteine and cardiovascular disease and, according to associate professor Shirley A. Beresford, MD, folic acid and vitamin B12 and B6 deficiencies can lead to a buildup of homocysteine.

Compelling Evidence

Canadian researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (275, 1996: 1893-1896) that men and women with low folic acid have a 69% increase in the risk of fatal coronary heart disease. This 15-year study of more than 5,000 people stressed the need for dietary supplementation of folic acid. Folic acid also has been credited with the potential to protect against cancers of the lungs, colon and cervix. It appears to help reverse cervical dysplasia, the precursor cells to cervical cancer, especially for women taking oral contraceptives, which may cause a localized deficiency of folic acid in the cells of the cervix. According to Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning, authors of The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery), folic acid derivatives work with neurotransmitters, the chemicals that permit signals to be sent from nerve fiber to nerve fiber. A lack of folic acid can cause some nervous-system disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia and dementia; it also may be related to some forms of mental retardation. Other supporting roles of folic acid, according to researchers: the formation of normal red blood cells, important for preventing the type of anemia characterized by oversized red blood cells; strengthening and improving white blood cell action against disease; limiting production of uric acid, the cause of gout.

The Best Sources

Many foods are rich in folic acid: beef, lamb, pork and chicken liver, spinach, kale and beet greens, asparagus, broccoli, whole wheat and brewer's yeast. But experts believe that only 25 to 50% of the folic acid in food is bioavailable. Processing also reduces an estimated 50 to 90% of its content. Folic acid supplementation overcomes these obstacles with little risk, as it has no known toxicity. Women taking folic acid who are current or former users of oral contraceptives may require additional zinc. And be sure to augment your folic acid supplement with its synergistic counterpart, vitamin B12.

Focus on Fiber

The American Heart Association came out squarely behind fiber in a June 16, 1997 issue of its journal Circulation: Double your daily intake to lower cholesterol and the risk of heart disease. The American diet is consistently low in fiber, notes Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD, author of the article. Twenty-five to 30 grams a day from foods (or supplements) are not only heart healthy but seem to aid weight control.

Iron Problem

Getting enough iron? An estimated 25% of adolescent girls in the United States are iron deficient, according to an October 12, 1996 issue of the British medical journal The Lancet, which reported that girls who took iron supplements performed significantly better on verbal tests than those who took a placebo. "Teenage girls should be regularly tested for iron deficiency because rapid growth and the onset of menstruation during puberty increase the body's need for iron," says Ann Bruner, MD, of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and a lead author of the study.USDA data reveal that women up to age 50 also tend to get much less than recommended levels of iron, a lack of which leads to anemia, a deficiency of red blood cells, hemoglobin or volume of blood. For kids, deficiency is more common from six months to four years and during the rapid growth spurts of adolescence when the body is growing so quickly that the body's iron stores may sink to dangerous levels. Vegetarian women run the greatest risk for deficiency, as meat is iron-rich; foods like beans, grains and vegetables also contain some iron. Supplements, of course, supply easily absorbable iron. And to absorb iron from vegetarian sources, take vitamin C with your meals. That boosts the amount of this mineral you will take in. Bear in mind, however, that certain folks-older men and post-menopausal women-generally have adequate dietary supplies of iron. Of greater concern, in fact, is excessive iron, and for these folks iron-free multivitamin and mineral supplements are available.

Ante Up the Antioxidants

Antioxidant nutrients help protect the body from oxygen-scavenging molecules called free radicals. The products of pollution, the body's own metabolic processes and other sources, free radicals are linked to heart disease, cancer and other chronic health problems. The most important antioxidants, which include vitamin C, E, beta carotene, and selenium, are often lacking in the American diet. Plus, optimal amounts of vitamin E cannot be consumed from food. You need supplements. The bottom line: even though we live in a land of plenty, you can still miss vital nutrients. So make sure to consume these vital substances.

Sprouts: Nutritional

Source of Missing Nutrients In the search for the nutrients missing from America's diet, one big help is the sprout. The sprout is truly one of nature's heavyweights: fresh, tiny and moist, its power punch of vitamins, minerals, protein, chlorophyll and disease-busting phytochemicals land it in a weight class far beyond that of its full-grown competitors. Size does NOT matter to this nutritional giant. A championship belt currently wraps around the miniscule broccoli sprout, catapulted into the ring by Paul Talalay, MD, professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Talalay discovered that the seedlings contain substantially more of the cancer-fighting substance sulforaphane than mature plants (Proc. Natnl. Acad. Sci. USA, 94, 10367-10372). Sprouts, the quintessential health food of the Sixties, provide a wonderfully varied and versatile way to get your daily greens. Raw or cooked, strong or mild, vegetable and grass sprouts and their algae cousins add low-calorie texture to recipes and a rich, diverse complement of nutrients and fiber.

Ancient Asia to the Modern Lab

Asians stir-fried sprouts as one of the earliest fast foods as long as 5,000 years ago. The ancient Chinese relied on sprouts for year-round vegetables in colder regions of their vast country. Today, researchers studying sprouts and adult plants have identified their important chemoprotective and other health-bolstering substances. In Paul Talalay's research project at Johns Hopkins, scientists found that three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain up to 50 times more sulforaphane than mature plants, which prompts the body to produce an enzyme that prevents cancer tumors from forming. Uniform levels of the compound saturate the shoots, unlike the chemically uneven adult plants. The Brassica family of broccoli and cabbage is richly endowed with phytochemicals that also help reduce estrogen levels associated with breast cancer. Other phytochemical compounds in the Brassica family are associated with the prevention of stomach and lung cancers. Most of the initial landmark work on phytochemicals' cancer-fighting powers has taken place since 1989 under the aegis of the National Cancer Institute's "Designer Food Program," which isolated, for example, the isoflavones in beans that seem to neutralize cancer-gene enzymes.

Strong Suit: Soy and Spirulina

The isoflavones and phytosterols in soy produce an estrogenic effect that appears to relieve menopausal symptoms and help prevent breast cancer. Soy foods expert Mark Messina, PhD, has done extensive work on the subject, some of which has been published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute 83, 1991: 541-6. Researchers also have synthesized a bone-strengthening form of soy isoflavones called ipriflavone, following impressive clinical trials in the treatment of osteoporosis (American Journal of Medicine, 95 [Suppl. 5A] (1993): 69S-74S). Spirulina and other micro-algae are fascinating organisms that inhabit a niche between the plant and animals kingdoms. Named for its tiny spirals, spirulina, a blue-green algae, grows in saline lakes but is cultured for maximum nutritional content. In her book Whole Foods Companion (Chelsea Green), Dianne Onstad notes that spirulina contains "the highest sources of protein, beta carotene and nucleic acids of any animal or plant food." Its nucleic acids, she says, benefit cellular regeneration; its fatty acids, especially GLA and omega-3 acids, make it one of the most complete foods. Sprouts, like any other produce, should be rinsed thoroughly before serving. People at high risk for bacterial illness-young children, the very elderly or folks with weakened immune systems-should limit their consumption of raw sprouts. But no matter how you eat them, you may find more spring in your step from these tiny, sprouting nutritional wonders.



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=352)



VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.