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  Messages 1-23 from 23 matching the search criteria.
How Melatonin Can Support a Healthy Sleep Cycle and More Darrell Miller 5/11/22
Vitamin D Linked to Heart Health: Study Shows Promise in Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Darrell Miller 4/26/22
Andrographis Darrell Miller 7/30/19
Eating more citrus fruits is an easy way to prevent dementia Darrell Miller 2/13/19
CBD Oil: Health Benefits and Risks Darrell Miller 2/12/19
Pregnenolone: A ‘Prohormone’ t=?UTF-8?Q?hat_May_Help_Relieve_Depression?= Darrell Miller 12/4/18
Delicious remedy: Licorice is a potential treatment forischemia-induced brain damage Darrell Miller 11/20/18
Scientists study the neuroprotective effects of fermented Curcuma longa L. (turmeric) Darrell Miller 7/4/18
The powerful neuroprotective properties of curcumin revealed in science study: Stunning 30 percent improvement in memory Darrell Miller 7/1/18
Lion’s Mane Mushroom: The Potential Brain-Boosting, Cancer-Fighting Powerhouse Darrell Miller 8/8/17
How Coconut Oil May Rescue The Brain From Alzheimer’s Disease Darrell Miller 6/4/17
Daily consumption of tea protects the elderly from cognitive decline Darrell Miller 3/20/17
5 Ways CBD Can Improve Health Darrell Miller 3/16/17
Lion's Mane Mushroom; The Ultimate Natural Memory Enhancer Darrell Miller 10/7/16
Rhodiola an ancient medicinal plant to help you cope with modern life Darrell Miller 9/8/15
Is Coconut Oil A Brain Food? Darrell Miller 1/26/14
How Does Taurine Help the Brain? Darrell Miller 5/13/11
What is Vinpocetine and How Does it Help with Memory? Darrell Miller 3/24/11
Take Control Of your Inflammation With Supplements Darrell Miller 5/27/10
Inosine Darrell Miller 12/19/08
Best Sugar Balance Svetol (green coffee extract) Darrell Miller 5/5/06
Benefits of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Darrell Miller 2/12/06
Curcumin - Turmeric Extract Darrell Miller 8/19/05




How Melatonin Can Support a Healthy Sleep Cycle and More
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Date: May 11, 2022 12:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Melatonin Can Support a Healthy Sleep Cycle and More

Did you know that melatonin is a powerful free radical scavenger? This means that it helps protect the body from damage caused by harmful molecules called radicals. Melatonin is also naturally produced in the pineal gland and is present in high amounts in the GI tract. We will discuss some of the ways that melatonin supports health and wellness.

Melatonin and the body

Melatonin is a hormone that is produced by the pineal gland in the brain. It is responsible for regulating the body's internal clock, or circadian rhythm. The production of melatonin increases at night, and decreases during the day. This hormone is also available in supplement form, and is often used to treat jet lag or insomnia. When taken as a supplement, melatonin works by resetting the body's internal clock, making it easier to fall asleep and stay asleep. Additionally, melatonin may also help to reduce anxiety and improve mood. As a result, this hormone plays an important role in regulating the body's sleep-wake cycle.

How does melatonin support a healthy sleep cycle?

Melatonin is a hormone that help regulate the sleep cycle. The production of melatonin is stimulated by darkness and inhibited by light. As a result, melatonin levels typically start to rise in the evening as the sun sets, and they remain high throughout the night. In the morning, light exposure causes melatonin levels to drop, helping to wake us up and start the day. Melatonin supplements can be used to help people who have difficulty sleeping and staying asleep. This hormone helps to reset the body's natural sleep cycle, making it easier to fall asleep and stay asleep. As a result, melatonin can be an effective way to support a healthy sleep cycle.

What are some of the other benefits of melatonin?

It can help to boost the immune system, protect against cancer, and reduce inflammation. Research suggests that melatonin may also have neuroprotective effects and could be beneficial for people with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease.

Tips for getting a good night's sleep

Most people need about seven to eight hours of sleep a day. However, many people find it difficult to get enough rest. There are a number of things you can do to improve your sleep habits. First, create a regular sleep schedule and stick to it as much as possible. Go to bed and wake up at the same time each day, even on weekends. Second, create a relaxing bedtime routine. This might include taking a warm shower, reading a book, or writing in a journal. Third, create a comfortable sleep environment by making sure your bedroom is dark, quiet, and cool. Fourth, avoid caffeine and alcohol before bed. Caffeine can make it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep, while alcohol can disrupt your sleep cycle. Finally, try not to use electronic devices in bed. The blue light emitted by screens can interfere with your body's natural sleep rhythm and take melatonin. By following these tips, you can improve your chances of getting a good night's sleep.

Scientific research

Research on melatonin began in the 1950s, and since then, numerous studies have been conducted on its potential health benefits. Some of the most promising research has found that melatonin may help to prevent cancer. In one study, melatonin supplements were found to reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence by half. Other research has shown that melatonin may help to protect against colon cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancer. Additionally, melatonin has been shown to boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs and radiation therapy.

While more research is needed to confirm the exact role of melatonin in cancer prevention, the available evidence suggests that it could play a significant role in protecting against this disease. Therefore, it may be worth considering supplementing with melatonin if you are at high risk for cancer or are undergoing treatment for this disease.

References:

  • How Melatonin Can Support a Healthy Sleep Cycle and More. (n.d.).
  • Tips for Getting a Good Night's Sleep. (n.d.).
  • The Role of Melatonin in Cancer Prevention. (n.d.).
  • Cancer Treatment Centers of America. (2017, September 28). Melatonin Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment Adjuvant | Cancer Treatment Centers of America.
  • National Sleep Foundation. (2015, July 29). Melatonin and Cancer Risk - National Sleep Foundation.
  • Mayo Clinic Staff.(2018, March 23). Melatonin: Is it effective?Retrieved from Mayo Clinic: Diseases & Conditions.."Melatonin."

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Vitamin D Linked to Heart Health: Study Shows Promise in Preventing Cardiovascular Disease
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Date: April 26, 2022 10:18 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vitamin D Linked to Heart Health: Study Shows Promise in Preventing Cardiovascular Disease

A recent study has shown that Vitamin D may play a role in preventing cardiovascular disease. The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Edinburgh, looked at data from over 10,000 adults. They found that those who had the highest levels of Vitamin D were less likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke. This is great news for those looking to improve their heart health!

What is Vitamin D and why is it important for heart health?

Vitamin D is an essential nutrient that plays various important roles in the body, including helping to maintain healthy bones and supporting immune function. In recent years, scientists have also begun to uncover the critical role that Vitamin D can play in promoting cardiovascular health. Vitamin D is involved in the regulation of several important cardiovascular processes, including blood pressure and lipid metabolism. Studies have shown that individuals with lower levels of Vitamin D are at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. Therefore, ensuring adequate vitamin D levels through diet, sun exposure, or supplementation may help to protect against heart conditions and improve overall cardiovascular health.

The study on Vitamin D and heart health

Researchers at the University of South Australia have recently conducted a study exploring the link between vitamin D and heart health. They found that individuals with higher levels of vitamin D in their blood were less likely to suffer from cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attacks, than those with lower levels. The results suggest that vitamin D plays an important role in protecting the heart and maintaining efficient cardiovascular function. This is important not only for preventing or mitigating the effects of heart disease, but also for overall health and well-being. Overall, the results of this study highlight the importance of ensuring adequate levels of vitamin D to safeguard our hearts and keep us healthy.

How to get more Vitamin D in your diet

While vitamin D-3 is essential for good health, many people struggle to get enough of this important nutrient through their diet alone. With so many factors affecting our ability to absorb nutrients from food, it can be difficult to maintain healthy levels of vitamin D through regular meals. However, research suggests that we may be able to get enough of this vital nutrient by taking supplements or getting outside on sunny days. For example, studies show that simply spending time in sunlight for a few minutes each day can go a long way toward maintaining adequate vitamin D levels in the body. Additionally, many foods are fortified with vitamin D-3, including dairy products and some types of bread and cereal. Ultimately, the best way to ensure adequate vitamin D-3 levels is through a combination of dietary sources and appropriate supplementation. So don't be afraid to take that extra step or buying a supplement – your health will thank you!

Bottom line: Vitamin D is a promising nutrient for heart health

Vitamin D-3 is a nutrient that is continually been getting attention for its potential benefits to heart health. This nutrient can be obtained through certain foods, such as oily fish and eggs, but many individuals also supplement with vitamin D-3 on a regular basis. Preliminary research suggests that this nutrient may help to lower cholesterol levels and reduce inflammation in the arteries, two important contributors to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, studies have shown that vitamin D-3 can help to strengthen the immune system, which further enhances overall heart health by keeping the body healthy and strong. Overall, when it comes to promoting heart health, vitamin D-3 seems like a promising nutrient that deserves further scientific study and exploration.

Assist Mineral absorption

Vitamin D is an important nutrient that helps the body absorb calcium and phosphorus. It also plays a role in maintaining strong bones and muscles. Unfortunately, foods are a relatively poor source of vitamin D. The best way to get this nutrient is through exposure to sunlight. However, too much sun exposure can lead to skin damage, so many people choose to take a supplement instead. Vitamin D supplements are available in both liquid and pill form. They are typically taken once a day, and they can help people maintain adequate levels of vitamin D without exposing themselves to the harmful effects of the sun.

Vitamin D-3 is involved in over 300 enzymatic processes in the body

As we already know, vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays an important role in bone health and calcium absorption. Vitamin D-3, the form of vitamin D found in supplements, is involved in over 300 enzymatic processes in the body. These processes include cell proliferation, immunomodulation, and regulation of gene expression. Vitamin D-3 has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. Supplementation with vitamin D-3 has been shown to improve bone density and reduce the risk of fractures, particularly in older adults. In addition, vitamin D-3 supplementation has been shown to improve muscular strength and reduce the risk of falls in older adults. While most people can get adequate amounts of vitamin D from exposure to sunlight, those who don't get enough sun exposure or have dark skin are at risk for vitamin D deficiency. Supplementation with vitamin D-3 is an effective way to ensure adequate intake of this important nutrient.

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Andrographis
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Date: July 30, 2019 02:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Andrographis

Dear Friends,

I believe there’s an essential herb that everyone should be aware of, though not to many realize the powerful benefits of this near miracle botanical. This one nutrient has the ability to strengthen the immune system while also enhancing cardiovascular health, liver and kidney function, joint mobility, and much more. Recent studies have shown this herb to be three times more effective than milk thistle for liver health. And while I know there’s no miracle supplement, that can prevent all disease, there are a growing number of studies to show that this herb can promote overall health and well-being in a tremendous way.

This herb, which I respect and hold in high regard, is andrographis. I believe it’s the next up-and-coming superstar in botanical medicine, and for good reason. I am not yet at liberty to give you the full details on a recent study, but I can tell you the results are impressive. The study involved treating three different groups of animals that had cancerous tumors. One group of animals was treated with curcumin, the second group was treated with french grape seed extract, and the third group was treated with andrographis. And while all three herbs were beneficial in this study, andrographis proved to be the most effective in reducing the cancerous tumors in the animals. I can’t wait to share the study details when it’s published.

It’s no wonder that andrographis has been used in natural medicine for years, due to its powerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, cancer-preventive, neuroprotective, and immune-stimulating properties. In fact, andrographis is the subject of over 800 studies in the National Institute of Health’s PubMed online database, with more to come!

You’ll learn how this amazing herb:

  • Strengthens immune defenses
  • Stops Viruses and resistant bacteria
  • Protects the liver
  • Prevents tumors and cell damage
  • Soothes digestive disorders
  • Prevents pain, inflammation, and arthritis symptoms
  • Supports energy and resilience
  • Protects heart and arteries

And the benefits don’t stop there. Please take the time to read more at TerryTalksNutrition.com

In Good health,

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Eating more citrus fruits is an easy way to prevent dementia
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Date: February 13, 2019 08:00 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating more citrus fruits is an easy way to prevent dementia





A documented study has shown that citrus fruits like lemons, limes, and oranges may have the ability to prevent dementia. The Japanese study says that eating these fruits was directly linked to improved brain health and memory formation. In fact, the subjects who ate citrus fruits daily were 23% less likely to develop dementia. This is likely due to the nobiletin content in citruses, which also helps to reduce cholesterol levels. There are no studies yet as to how the consumption of citrus fruits affects those who already have dementia, however.

Key Takeaways:

  • In a recent study conducted in Japan it was discovered that people who take citrus fruits like orange, lemons, and grapefruits, can reduce their risk of having dementia.
  • The researchers in the study found a direct link between taking citrus fruits and decreased chances of having dementia which reduced by about 23 percent.
  • Citrus fruits have a neuroprotective effect on those taking it which can be linked to a compound, nobiletin, a flavonoid found in the peel that boosts the brain.

"The study, which spanned for up to seven years, looked at data from over 13,000 older adults in Japan, which included their diet and brain health."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-02-06-eat-more-citrus-fruits-to-prevent-dementia.html

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CBD Oil: Health Benefits and Risks
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Date: February 12, 2019 01:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CBD Oil: Health Benefits and Risks





CBD is currently being touted as a new treatment for a range of health concerns. However, we do not yet fully understand its long term effects. CBD has been shown to effectively treat epilepsy and have some success as an anti-inflammatory medicine. CBD is not considered to be addictive according to the WHO. It also does not have the intoxicating effects that THC has. However, some people do experience side effects including sleepiness, fatigue, and diarrhea.

Key Takeaways:

  • Interest in CBD oil for treating a wide range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders is growing, but its therapeutic effects are ill understood.
  • Cannabidiol (CBD) is one ingredient among the 85 active cannabinoids found in Cannabis sativa. It can be taken via inhalation, orally, or as a spray to the cheek.
  • CBD has lots of useful health benefits for the body due to its ability to interact with lots of cannabinoid receptors in the body.

"CBD oil is thought to have potential benefits for the treatment and management of a wide variety of disorders due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, antipsychotic, analgesic, and muscle relaxing effects, among others."

Read more: https://www.news-medical.net/health/CBD-Oil-Health-Benefits-and-Risks.aspx

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Pregnenolone: A ‘Prohormone’ t=?UTF-8?Q?hat_May_Help_Relieve_Depression?=
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Date: December 04, 2018 12:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pregnenolone: A ‘Prohormone’ t=?UTF-8?Q?hat_May_Help_Relieve_Depression?=





Relieving depression is not something that comes easy for anyone. Mental health issues are real and there are millions of people around the world that are suffering from these issues. It makes it really hard to diagnose these issues as depression is something that is unique to each person. If you have experience a form of it, then you know what it is. Now, studies are showing that the taking of some pro hormones can help combat depression.

Key Takeaways:

  • Taking a pro hormone is something that has been reported to help people deal with internal demons.
  • Depression is a real mental disorder that can take a really large toll on someone.
  • If you are feeling overly depressed, or down, then go and get checked out to see if you should take medication.

"Maybe you are looking to boost your cognitive health and want to use natural sources to stay mentally sharp. Aside from brain foods that boost focus and memory, a steroid called pregnenolone is gaining attention for its potential neuroprotective effects."

Read more: https://draxe.com/pregnenolone/

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Delicious remedy: Licorice is a potential treatment forischemia-induced brain damage
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Date: November 20, 2018 09:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Delicious remedy: Licorice is a potential treatment forischemia-induced brain damage





Little do people know, there are actually some large medical use cases that are related to licorice. The candy is not the favorite of many people around the world but there are some that really do like to have it on a regular basis. With that being said, it is now being considered as a potential treatment for people who have some brain damage. While the likelihood for success remains to be seen, doctors say early signs are promising.

Key Takeaways:

  • Licorice has been used for all sorts of things since it was brought to Europe from the Middle East. From flavoring food, to sweetening flour and as coloring.
  • Licorice is also used as a potent medicine in China. In fact, it is quoted as such in Chinese pharmacopeia.
  • The purported report that licorice has neuroprotective properties caught the attention of some South Korean researchers who sought to verify if this was really so.

"These days, licorice is best known as a candy flavor, but at the root of that sweetness is an actual root that holds a bevy of medicinal benefits."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-11-11-licorice-potential-treatment-ischemia-induced-brain-damage.html

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Scientists study the neuroprotective effects of fermented Curcuma longa L. (turmeric)
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Date: July 04, 2018 05:54 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Scientists study the neuroprotective effects of fermented Curcuma longa L. (turmeric)





Scientists study the neuroprotective effects of fermented Curcuma longa L. (turmeric)

A recent Kristina University study suggests that fermented turmeric may help protect brain cells from being degraded by inflammation and oxidative stress. The same researchers found that fermented turmeric may also help protect against the impact of the amnesiac compound scopolamine. Researchers subjected scopolamine-treated mice to mazes and inflicted oxidative stress on rat brain cells to test whether fermented turmeric offered any protection. Preliminary results suggest that fermented turmeric could have value as an alternative or complementary treatment for neurodegenerative diseases symptoms.

Key Takeaways:

  • Recent research has shown that fermented turmeric may be beneficial to the brain.
  • Fermented turmeric has displayed properties that aid with memory conditions like Alzheimer's.
  • Turmeric may also protect cells more generally from inflammation and other stress.

"It could serve as an alternative or complementary therapy for age-induced neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-07-02-scientists-study-neuroprotective-effects-of-fermented-curcuma-longa-turmeric.html

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The powerful neuroprotective properties of curcumin revealed in science study: Stunning 30 percent improvement in memory
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Date: July 01, 2018 09:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The powerful neuroprotective properties of curcumin revealed in science study: Stunning 30 percent improvement in memory





The powerful neuroprotective properties of curcumin revealed in science study: Stunning 30 percent improvement in memory

The component found in turmeric that gives the spice its brightly colored appearance is also directly responsible for helping enhance and preserve our neurological development. When given in doses of 90 mg each day, turmeric was shown to help improve memory in those who were suffering from some level of memory loss. The cognitive improvement is due to turmeric being high in curcumin, which makes it a natural aid in alleviating many cognitive deficiencies that happen due to age.

Key Takeaways:

  • Often overshadowed by it's anti-inflammatory characteristics, Turmeric is also a potent neuroprotector.
  • Research has shown that the main ingredient, curcumin, can improve memory.
  • A recent study found that participants given curcumin daily had a 30% improvement in their memory tests and PET scans showed improved signaling in the brain.

"The participants were randomly assigned to a placebo group or a control that took 90 milligrams a day of curcumin twice a day over the course of year and a half. Researchers measured everyone’s curcumin levels in their blood at the trial’s inception and conclusion."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-06-28-the-powerful-neuroprotective-properties-of-curcumin-improved-memory.html

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Lion’s Mane Mushroom: The Potential Brain-Boosting, Cancer-Fighting Powerhouse
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Date: August 08, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Lion’s Mane Mushroom: The Potential Brain-Boosting, Cancer-Fighting Powerhouse





Mushrooms are known to be a health providing food. They are also not as commonly eaten in American dishes as they should be. Lion's Mane is a mushroom that Americans and others might what to add to their diet. It has garnered quite a bit of attention as an all-round powerhouse of health in several Asian based research studies. Korean studies indicate it fights cancer, Malaysian research indicates it might help with gastric issues and in Japan Lion's Mane has been shown to help as an anti inflammatory agent.

Key Takeaways:

  • Lions mane is a mushroom which is found naturally in North America, Europe and Asia, although it is actually cultivated only in Asia.
  • Lion's mane can improve brain health by stimulating growth of dendrites and axons which helps to combat brain degeneration diseases such as Alzheimer's.
  • Lions' mane mushroom is not commercially available in America except for in limited areas where grocery stores focus on selling Asian products. You can also grow your own lion's mane using a kit.

"One study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry lists the benefits by stating lion’s mane mushroom is antibiotic, anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, anti-fatigue, antihypertensive, anti-hyperlipodemic, anti-senescence [anti-aging], cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, and neuroprotective, and improves anxiety, cognitive function, and depression. (1)"

Read more: https://draxe.com/lions-mane-mushroom/

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How Coconut Oil May Rescue The Brain From Alzheimer’s Disease
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Date: June 04, 2017 04:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Coconut Oil May Rescue The Brain From Alzheimer’s Disease





One more reason to celebrate coconut oil! Coconut oil can be used for so many things -- from healing dry skin to easing constipation. However, coconut oil also shows promise to aid in easing Alzheimer's symptoms! In an exciting new study soon to be published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease titled, “Coconut Oil Attenuates the Effects of Amyloid-ß on Cortical Neurons In Vitro.”, researchers found that adding coconut oil can have positive effects on the brain soon after it's ingested, helping to heal the brain of what is known as "type 3 diabetes". Researchers believe coconut oil shows great promise in helping extend the brain functions of Alzheimer's patients and warrants more research.

Key Takeaways:

  • Neuron cells from rats were exposed to the peptides that are found to cause Alzheimer's Disease and coconut oil. Results show that coconut oil may act as a neuroprotective against Alzheimer's.
  • Research shows that the chemical compounds found in coconut oil may act as an energy source for neurons battling Alzheimer peptides.
  • Some argue that food as medicine should be a doctrine that is further explored. Because walnuts and coconuts contains fatty acids that feed the brain and resemble the brain as well.

"Could the poetry of our direct experience tell us something about the value this food has to our brain"

Read more: http://www.healthnutnews.com/how-coconut-oil-may-rescue-the-brain-from-alzheimers-disease/

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Daily consumption of tea protects the elderly from cognitive decline
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Date: March 20, 2017 03:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Daily consumption of tea protects the elderly from cognitive decline





The daily consumption of tea protects elderly people from cognitive decline. It reduces the decline by 50 percent and as much as 86 percent for people who have a genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease. New research has come to this conclusion. The saying is that a cup of tea a day can help keep dementia away.

Key Takeaways:

  • A cup of tea a day can keep dementia away, and this is especially so for those who are genetically predisposed to the debilitating disease.
  • The neuroprotective role on cognitive function is not limited to a particular type of tea -- so long as the tea is brewed from tea leaves, such as green, black or oolong tea.
  • The tea compounds exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential and other bioactive properties that may protect the brain from vascular damage and neurodegeneration.

""A cup of tea a day can keep dementia away...""



Reference:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170316093412.htm

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5 Ways CBD Can Improve Health
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Date: March 16, 2017 04:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Ways CBD Can Improve Health





CBD is still controversial, but no one can argue with the results that science is giving us concerning this hemp-derived substance. Don't go another day without learning the array of medical benefits offered to your health when you use CBD. You might be quite surprised to learn the abundance of ways that CBD can help you feel your best day in and day out, but you will certainly like the information that you learn and will want to use it to your benefit.

Key Takeaways:

  • Cannabidiol, which is found in marijuana, is thought to have many different health benefits.
  • Some benefits of CBD are its anti-tumor, anti-seizure, anti-anxiety , antioxident, and neuroprotective properties.
  • Evidence for the CBD benefits is anecdotal and based on preliminary trials.

"Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in marijuana, and science has given it close attention in recent years for its potential in treating a wide variety of medical conditions."

Read more: https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.civilized.life%2Farticles%2F5-ways-cbd-improves-health%2F&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmM2M2RhZjlmZTVmZDZjMmU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNGRx_GLyElbd6ovLhDu2tG1_8AtEA

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Lion's Mane Mushroom; The Ultimate Natural Memory Enhancer
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Date: October 07, 2016 03:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Lion's Mane Mushroom; The Ultimate Natural Memory Enhancer

Lion’s Mane Mushroom (Hericium erinaceus) also bearded tooth mushroom, bearded hedgehog mushroom, or satyr's beard is an edible and medicinal mushroom indigenous to Europe, Asia, and North America.

Lion’s Mane for neuroprotection, brain function, and enhanced memory

Nootropic effect is perhaps the biggest draw of Lion’s Mane mushroom. Scientifically, the mushroom has been proven to have neuroprotective abilities as well as boost cognitive function such as enhancing memory. It’s also associated with the manufacture of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) which is a natural antidepressant. All these gives it the ability to help in maintaining attention and focus. It's therefore, a natural supplement for general brain function.

Other health benefits

Digestion aid - Lion’s mane contains glucan polysaccharides which improve stomach mucosa functioning that enhances digestion as well as protect the skin against aging. In addition, it contains cythan that aide in the treatment of esophagus cancer and peptic ulcers.

Enhances Immune System – the mushroom is rich in antioxidants, polysaccharides, beta-glucan and beta-glucoxylan that strengthens the immune system, by exhibiting immune-modulating features that decrease arthritis.

Lowers High Cholesterol – research carried on an animal indicated that the mushroom reduced 45% bad cholesterol and added 31% good cholesterol making it a substantial ingredient in cholesterol-free diets.

Myelin sheaths Repairs- Lion’s mane does not show any toxicity when consumed. It also enhances myelin sheath growth. This explains why it’s used to treat multiple sclerosis and other conditions related to the central nervous system.

Lion's Main is a great supplement for older individuals looking to improve mental function.

 


Reference URLs

https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/health-benefits-of-lions-mane-mushroom/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hericium_erinaceus

//www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/mushroom-memory_b_1725583.html

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Rhodiola an ancient medicinal plant to help you cope with modern life
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Date: September 08, 2015 09:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Rhodiola an ancient medicinal plant to help you cope with modern life

The plant Rhodiola Rosea, most commonly known as Rose Root, and also by the names Golden Root, King's Crown, Lignum Rhodium,Racine Dorée or Rodia Riza, is recognized throughout the world for its many proprieties and has been used since antiquity to treat and prevent a number of conditions - it has even been featured in De Materia Medica written by the ancient physician Dioscorides.  This Scandinavian herb, is native to the arctic regions of Europe, Asia, and even Alaska.

Rhodiola

It is an adaptogen, a substance that can normalize bodily functions and augment resistance to physical, chemical and environmental stress. It is also neuroprotective, thus, promoting longevity. There has been evidences of its use as a medicinal plant, under many names, in both Greek and Chinese medicine, but there are also accounts of its use by other past populations like the Vikings.

Rhodiola has been used to promote vitality both physical and psychological, since it can reduce fatigue and exhaustion, and conversely increase stamina, strength and mental capacity.

Nowadays, it has been used to improve daily life: for increasing sexual performance and hearing, to treat depression and to counter, aging and certain heart disorders. It is also used by athletes to reduce recovery time after long workouts.  There are even some that use the rhodiola plant to prevent against common colds.

However, since there hasn't been long term studies on humans, there isn't of yet confirmation of some of the benefits of this medicinal plant. While there isn't reliable information pertaining to side effects, pregnant and lactating women should consult their physicians prior to taking rhodiola or avoid it for the duration of the pregnancy and breastfeeding.


References

//www.herbwisdom.com/herb-rhodiola.html

//examine.com/supplements/rhodiola-rosea/

//www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-883-rhodiola%20%28roseroot%29.aspx?activeingredientid=883&activeingredientname=rhodiola%20%28roseroot%29


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Is Coconut Oil A Brain Food?
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Date: January 26, 2014 09:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Coconut Oil A Brain Food?

It is amazing how coconut oil has been ascribed as a good brain food.

coconut treeSince Dr. Mary Newport associated coconut oil with the ability to cure Alzheimer’s disease, it has attracted the attention of researchers and other interested parties. However, her attractive explanation of how the oil helped her husband to improve her husband’s Alzheimer’s disease can be described from the observation of an Alzheimer patient’s brain.

Taking into consideration Axona that is usually used by Alzheimer’s patients, its active ingredients is the caprylic acid that is extracted from the oil. As a substitute, Dr. Newport used coconut food products such as oil and milk in her husband diet to achieve the same quantity of MCTs. This improved her husband’s condition a clear indication that coconut oil has some medicinal value. From a scientific point of view, it is approved that the disease is caused by insulin resistant cells thus causing the brain to unsuccessfully use glucose to fuel their activity. In its place, ketone bodies are used as a substitute fuel supply. Coconut oil is a good supply of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), for instance caprylic acid that is simply transformed into ketone bodies in the liver when ingested. Then they act as an alternative of glucose which provides fuel for the brain. Neuroprotective effect of the coconut oil is attributed to the ketone bodies formed as a byproduct of coconut oil metabolism. Therefore, leading to an energy metabolism. The ketone bodies will then supply the compromised brain structure with the much-needed alternative fuel source from the Ketone bodies.

However, it is of the essence to state that coconut oil is only known for improving the condition. For this reason, there has been an increased call for more research, particularly human clinical trials. Since there is no any cure yet, coconut oil is going to remain a good brain food of choice for others who are experiencing Alzheimer.

References:

  1. //www.greenmedinfo.com
  2. //www.naturalnew.com/030373_cocnut_oil_alzheimers_disease.html
  3. //www.naturalnews.com/028753_alzheimers_drugs_trials.html


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How Does Taurine Help the Brain?
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Date: May 13, 2011 01:09 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Does Taurine Help the Brain?

Taurine is an amino acid often added to energy drinks. There have been several theories on how taurine affects brain chemicals and improve cognitive function. For many years, it has been compared to caffeine due to its effects on the human brain that appear to enhance mood. Its exact mechanisms of action remain a mystery to the scientific community, but recent studies are believed to be closing in.

It has long been known that taurine crosses the blood brain barrier, allowing it to exert some effects on several neurotransmitters found in the central nervous system. It has been tied to the alleviation of many mental illnesses, such as epilepsy, post traumatic stress disorder, clinical depression, bipolar disorder, and anxiety, making it the subject of a number of studies in the past few years.

Rebalances Brain Chemicals

It has been postulated that taurine influences the activities of neurotransmitters in the brain, but only recently has brain scientists been able to actually track its activities in the brain. A team of researchers at Cornell University managed to find a site for the neurological activity of taurine, with initial results pointing to its relationship with gamma the neurotransmitter aminobutyric acid, or GABA. The researchers do not discount the possibility that taurine may even have a receptor of its own.

Whether taurine interacts with brain chemicals is no longer debatable as it creates homeostasis in the central nervous system. It acts on receptors that the researchers discovered to be the same receptors present in GABAergic mechanisms. That being said, scientists remain inconclusive as to how its interaction with GABA receptors provides energy-boosting benefits as it is marketed in the food and drug industries.

Prevents Neuron Damage

The scientific community is convinced that taurine has neuroprotective properties. High levels of taurine in the brain have been observed to protect brain tissues from cerebral ischemia. Taurine has been linked to many metabolic pathways that are known to promote neurological health, such as the activation of glycine receptors and the regulation of enzymes called cysteine-dependent aspartate-directed proteases.

In addition, taurine serves as antioxidants that protect nerve cells from cellular damage brought on by oxidative stress. The presence of taurine within cells reduces damage from calcium excesses and increases mitochondrial events. For decades, supplementation of taurine has benefited sufferers of brain ischemia, epileptic seizures, panic attacks, anxiety symptoms, and even alcohol withdrawal.

Enhances Cognitive Function

Taurine has already been associated with physiological functions the hypothalamus controls, such as sleep-wake cycle and responses to fatigue. In several laboratory studies, administrations of taurine by way of intraperitoneal injection have successfully induced social interaction in animal subjects. It is one of the amino acids that affect cognitive development, especially in children. While it is one of the most abundant amino acids in the brain, it is depleted as we age, making supplementation a good option.

Protect your brain with Taurine by taking it daily!

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What is Vinpocetine and How Does it Help with Memory?
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Date: March 24, 2011 02:18 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is Vinpocetine and How Does it Help with Memory?

Vinpocetine And Brain Health

Vinpocetine is a derivative of an organic compound found in the plant species Vinca minor, or common periwinkle. It is best known for its neuroprotective effects and used in Europe and Japan in treatment of age-related cognitive decline. More often than not, its activities inside the human body are described as vasodilator, which means it increases blood flow. It has also seen a growing presence in the North American market as a dietary supplement.

Vinpocetine is available as a prescription drug in certain European countries and Japan and has shown to be speed up prognosis of patients who suffered cerebrovascular accident, or CVA, which is commonly referred to as stroke. Most cases of cerebrovascular accident are brought on by ischemia, or very poor circulation of blood to certain parts of the brain. This is exactly what vinpocetine is beneficial for, and recommended dosages have so far yielded very encouraging results.

Improves Blood Circulation in the Brain

It has long been postulated that one of the mechanisms of action of vinpocetine is limiting the effects of Na+ channels that are sensitive to voltage. This creates a neuroprotective effect believed to contribute to mental clarity and sustained attention. Striatal nerve endings produce extracellular Ca+ ions that induce neuronal damage through a phenomenon called excitotocity. High levels of Ca+ ions are now alleged to be correlated with voltage-sensitive Na+ channels. Striatal nerve endings see a decline in Ca+ ions when Na+ channels are influenced by vinpocetine, and in the process lessen excitotoxicity.

Attenuates Ischemic Neuronal Damage

In addition to limiting neuronal damage induced by excitotoxicity, which in turn results from cerebral ischemia, vinpocetine plays an active role in the upkeep of brain cells after being subjected to ischemic damage. As a vasodilator, it not only counters the effects of ischemia but also significantly increases the brain’s access to bioactive molecules like oxygen and other nutrients exclusively distributed by the circulatory system.

It also inhibits the enzyme phosphodiesterase, which is specialized for the breakdown of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, or cAMP, and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, or cGMP. By so doing, vinpocetine contributes to glucose metabolism and energy production in the brain, and at the same time, improves the distribution of bioactive compounds in the central nervous system.

Displays Neuroprotective Activities

Vinpocetine and its precursor belong to a group of indole alkaloids known as tryptomines, which are present in the human brain and the rest of the central nervous system in minute quantities. These organic compounds make up several psychoactive drugs and in the human body act as neuromodulators and neurotransmitters in the form of melatonin and serotonin.

Vinpocetine in particular displays activities that are primarily anti-inflammatory in nature. Several studies point to its effects on the enzyme complex called IkB kinase, which regulates cellular responses to inflammation, by preventing the translocation of a protein complex called responsible for the process of inflammation within cells.

In a Nutshell, vinpocetine can help you think clearer and protect the brain from inflammation and free radical damage. Give vinpocetine a try today!

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Take Control Of your Inflammation With Supplements
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Date: May 27, 2010 12:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Take Control Of your Inflammation With Supplements

Chronic inflammation is often induced by uncontrolled oxidative stress (free radical damage). It is the principle mechanism by which degenerative disease takes hold. By reducing oxidative stress and changing the balance within the body to favor the production of anti-inflammatory chemical messengers, one can lower their levels of inflammation. This can be achieved through conscious changes to diet and lifestyle, which includes appropriate supplementation.

By consuming foods that are rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids, EPA, and DHA, derived from fish oil or flax seeds, one can greatly influence and reduce inflammation. When the body has appropriate balances of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fats, the production of anti-inflammatory prostaglandins is favored and inflammation is kept in check. Increasing the consumption of foods that are rich in omega-3s or supplementing with a high quality fish oil suppresses the formation of harmful prostaglandins and also promotes the synthesis of beneficial prostaglandins. Since the average North American diet contains 10 to 20 times the amount of omega-6 oils that we need, the most sensibly dietary approach is to reduce sources of omega-6 oils and supplement with a high dose of omega-3 oils in order to achieve the optimal 4:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3.

Supplementing with flaxseed oil is another effective way to optimize your omega-6 to omega-3 ratio. Anti-inflammatory EPA can be manufactured in the body by converting the alpha-linolenic acid that is often found in flaxseed oil. Supplementing with this oil, along with restricting omega-6 fatty acid intake, raises tissue EPA levels to those comparable to fish oil supplementation. It should even be noted that flaxseed oil contains more than twice the omega-3 fats as fish oil. Additionally, alpha-linolenic acid can be found in a variety of other plant source including pumpkin seeds, walnuts, and other nuts. However, flaxseed is by far the richest source of omega-3 oil, carrying 58% by weight.

Another nutrient that plays a crucial role in inflammation is gamma tocopherol. This nutrient acts through a mechanism that is unavailable to alpha tocopherol by reacting with RNO radicals to subdue inflammation. Gamma tocopherol also has the ability to reduce inflammation by inhibiting COX-2 , which is an enzyme that has a central role in the inflammatory process as it controls the synthesis of the inflammatory prostaglandin. The consuption of gamma tocopherol has been found to reduce several other inflammatory protagonists at the site of inflammation. Strong evidence has found that this form of vitamin E exhibits potent anti-inflammatory properties that are extremely important for human disease prevention and therapy.

Similar to essential fatty acids is resveratrol and green tea polyphenols each of which have the ability to inhibit the activation of NFkB and control a wide variety of inflammatory pathways. Green tea polyphenols are also believed to be neuroprotective, as they invoke a spectrum of cellular mechanisms such as the chelation of metals, scavenging of free radicals, and modulation of mitochondrial function in nerve tissues. Green tea polyphenols are now considered to be therapeutic agents that can alter brain processes and serve as neuroprotective agents in the progression of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

There are a wide variety of nutrients that are involved in fighting systemic inflammation. These nutrients and nutrient categories include EPA and DHA, linolenic acid, gamma tocopherol, alpha-lipoic acid, vitamin C, flavonoids, procyanidolic oligomers, and the phenolic compounds found in green tea, turmeric, and olive extracts. When changing your diet from saturated fats to unsaturated fats and adds more fruits and vegetables to their diet along with antioxidant vitamin supplements, one can successfully reduce inflammation naturally and live a healthier happier life.

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Inosine
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Date: December 19, 2008 12:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Inosine

Inosine is a specific type of glycosylamine that consists of a base bound to a deoxyribose or ribose sugar. This type of glycosylamine is referred to as a nucleoside, others being adenosine, thymidine and cytidine.

It is available naturally in brewer’s yeast and major organ offal such as liver and kidney. It’s function in animal biochemistry is in the production of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), often known as the molecule of energy, that is essential for the generation of energy by the mitochondria in our body cells. It’s biochemistry is described below.

Inosine is synthesized as inosine monophosphate by means of a complex series of biochemical reactions. The inosine monophosphate is a precursor for adenine, a nucleotide and purine base that reacts with ribose to form adenosine. This is another nucleoside that can be phosphorylated to produce adenosine monophosphate (AMP), the diphosphate (ADP), the triphosphate (ATP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP).

Each of these is involved in the metabolism of energy in the mitochondria. Glucose undergoes a number of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in the presence of oxygen that ultimately breaks it down to water and carbon dioxide, plus at least 36 molecules of ATP via glycolysis and then the Krebs cycle. The ATP reacts with water to release energy and form ADP. The ADP can then be phosphorylated to produce more ATP. The starting point of all of this is inosine, and it is little wonder this nucleoside is used by athletes to help boost their energy.

Not only that, however, but adenine is also the precursor of amino and nucleic acids responsible for the generation of RNA and DNA, and it is also responsible for the production of many coenzymes. These provide other opportunities for its use elsewhere in medicine, and it has also been found to possess other medical properties that will be discussed later.

It was in the 1970s that inosine was first used to boost athletic performance due to its part in the generation of the energy needed by every muscle in the body. Its use began in eastern countries, although evidence at the time did not support the theory. Nevertheless, this did not deter its advocates, and inosine continued to be used by athletes, a practice that has now spread world-wide.

It has been found to be a metabolic activator, in that it supports metabolism through the generation of energy. Inosine has been used by power lifters for heavy weight training to increase the capacity of the blood to carry oxygen, and strength athletes, particularly of the Eastern Bloc, used it from the mid 1970s onwards.

Inosine appears to increase the natural ability of the body to handle strenuous workouts, although there is no scientific proof of this. However, those that use it claim an increased ability to carry out intensive training workouts and an improvement in their competitive performance. The nucleotide can penetrate the cell walls and get to where it is needed to take part in the metabolism of energy through the production of ATP.

Now, however, inosine has an entirley different application in medicine. Studies have shown that it could support those suffering from MS (multiple sclerosis) and strokes through its pereceived neuroprotective properties. It appears to promote axonal rewiring, where undamaged neurons appear to grow new connections with damaged areas of the brain, and undamaged neurons seem to branch out to replace some of the damaged neurons.

Inosine is also an intermediate in the production of uric acid through purine and purine nucleoside degradation. Uric acid is a powerful antioxidant, particularly in respect of peroxynitrite, a nucleophile that causes the type of axonal degradation that is associated with multiple sclerosis. It thefore helps in two ways: through the production of uric acid, and in promoting axonal rewiring that can improve brain function in patients.

Another potential medical use for the substance is based upon the discovery that inosine and related compounds can act as powerful anti-inflammatories through their effect on inflammatory macrophage proteins. Certain conditions can cause the release of these macrohages, and where it is an undesirable side-effect, inosine can be administered to prevent it occuring.

Inosine appears to inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines without inhibiting anti-inflammatory cytokines. It appears to do so extracellularly, although the effect can be reversed by the blockading of adenosine receptors. However, it is a convenient way of avoiding this sometimes serious condition, which is a natural function of the immune system, without affecting any other part of that system’s essential work.

It is not an essential nutrient, since it is synthesized biochemically, but a supplement of inosine is certainly worth taking if you want to increase your ability to carry out athetic exercise requiring a high energy output and increased blood oxygen availability. It also helps to reduce recovery time, and proponents of its use claim that it enables you to exercise at a higher level for longer.

Although the medical evidence for this is scant, not a lot of work has been done in trying to establish it, and those that use inosine in this way swear that it is effective. The theory certainly indicates that it should be effective in helping to produce more energy, and also that it should be able to make more oxygen available, and some athletes have been taking it for decades with excellent results.

There are no known side effects of its use, although pregnant women and nursing mothers are recommended not to use it, as with many other health supplements the pathology of which have not been closely studuied. As with any supplement, you are highly recommended to consult your own doctor or physician when taking any supplement, particular if you have a current medical condition or are taking prescriptive medicines.

If you are predisposed to gout, and some people are, the uric acid it produces can render inosine unsuitable. Uric acid reacts with calcium to produce the sodium urate that is deposited on the cartilage and tendons of the joints, particularly the big toe. It is a very painful condition, so those that have suffered gout in the past should not take inosine as a supplement.

Otherwise, its effect on your athletic performance might be academic!

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Best Sugar Balance Svetol (green coffee extract)
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Date: May 05, 2006 06:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Best Sugar Balance Svetol (green coffee extract)

Ingredients

Best Sugar Balance featuring Svetol® Svetol® is an extract of green coffee obtained by the use of a traditional patented extraction process from the beans of the species Coffea canephora robusta Pierre. This species is particularly rich in the constituent known as chlorogenic acid. Svetol® green coffee extract contains less than 2% caffeine. The extract is standardized to contain between 45-50% chlorogenic acids.

In vitro (test tube) and in vivo research suggests that chlorogenic acids present in coffee may have the ability to regulate blood sugar concentrations after meals by acting on the intestinal absorption of glucose and improving the body's glucose tolerance. Clinical evidence also suggests that Svetol® green coffee extract may help to maintain a healthy blood sugar level when used as a part of the diet.*

Benefits

Maintains healthy blood sugar levels when used as a part of the diet*

CHLOROGENIC ACIDS

Chlorogenic acid is the major polyphenol compound found in Svetol® green coffee bean extract. In vitro and animal studies have been conducted to determine the potential actions of this polyphenol. Studies report that chlorogenic acid and related compounds have significant antioxidant potential and are responsible for the high reported antioxidant benefit of green coffee. Several studies suggest that consumption of coffee in the diet is one factor that is correlated to the maintenance of healthy neural function and healthy aging. Coffee has also been shown in vitro to suppress the production of various free radicals. The chlorogenic acid content of coffee has been determined to be a major factor in the free radical quenching properties of coffee. A study was conducted to assess the activity of coffee extracts against the production of hydroxyl radicals in an in vitro system. It was found that coffee extracts possessed significant suppressive activity against hydroxyl radicals. Of the compounds assumed to be responsible for this effect, the researchers concluded that the chlorogenic acids played a major role with some contributions from other compounds found in the extract. This compound may also strongly contribute to any potential neuroprotective effects seen with coffee consumption.1

Two further studies highlight a possible mechanism by which chlorogenic acid mediates its antioxidant activity. In one study, the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assay was used to measure and compare the iron-reducing capacity of chlorogenic acid and caffeine. It was shown that the chlorogenic acid content of the samples tested was highly correlated with iron-reducing activity in this assay. Moreover, lighter roasted coffee samples (closer in nature to green coffee) had the highest iron-reducing activity. Caffeine did not influence the iron-reducing activity of the coffee samples.2 Iron compounds are known to mediate the production of radicals and often serve as catalysts for their production in the body. A second study shows that chlorogenic acid can bind to and Chelate certain iron compounds, preventing them from catalyzing radical-producing reactions. In this way, chlorogenic acid acts as a powerful antioxidant.3

Chlorogenic acid and related compounds have a dual effect on the production and suppression of free radicals. In the case of the hydroxyl radical, studies outlined previously suggest that chlorogenic acid suppresses the production of the radical due to its ability to chelate iron compounds, while other studies suggest that chlorogenic acid has direct scavenging effects on the hydroxyl radical.4 Dietary intake of this potent polyphenol may confer multiple benefits to human health.

Several studies further suggest that chlorogenic acid in coffee can have a beneficial effect on blood sugar levels when consumed as a part of the diet. A recent study assessed the effects of coffee and tea consumption on glucose tolerance in middle-aged Japanese men. In this study, the relationship between daily intakes of green tea or coffee and glucose tolerance status was measured by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). More than 3,400 men participated in the study in which fasting glucose was measured before and 2 hours after administration of an oral glucose load. A self-administered questionnaire was used to establish daily levels of dietary coffee and green tea consumption over the past year. The results showed that those individuals who consumed the highest levels of coffee per day had lower fasting glucose levels (by 1.5%) and lower post-test glucose concentrations (4.3% lower) than those who did not consume coffee Chlorogenic acid and related compounds have a dual effect on the production and suppression of free radicals. In the case of the hydroxyl radical, studies outlined previously suggest that chlorogenic acid suppresses the production of the radical due to its ability to chelate iron compounds, while other studies suggest that chlorogenic acid has direct scavenging effects on the hydroxyl radical.4 Dietary intake of this potent polyphenol may confer multiple benefits to human health.

Several studies further suggest that chlorogenic acid in coffee can have a beneficial effect on blood sugar levels when consumed as a part of the diet. A recent study assessed the effects of coffee and tea consumption on glucose tolerance in middle-aged Japanese men. In this study, the relationship between daily intakes of green tea or coffee and glucose tolerance status was measured by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT).

More than 3,400 men participated in the study in which fasting glucose was measured before and 2 hours after administration of an oral glucose load. A self-administered questionnaire was used to establish daily levels of dietary coffee and green tea consumption over the past year.

The results showed that those individuals who consumed the highest levels of coffee per day had lower fasting glucose levels (by 1.5%) and lower post-test glucose concentrations (4.3% lower) than those who did not consume coffee on a daily basis. In this study, green tea consumption was not associated with any benefits on glucose concentrations.5

It is likely that the chlorogenic acid found in coffee plays a role in supporting healthy glucose metabolism, whereas the role of caffeine is not clear, with some reports suggesting an adverse effect on sugar metabolism.

A second study further confirms an effect of chlorogenic acid at inhibiting the absorption of glucose from the diet. This effect occurs in the small intestine. In this study, nine healthy fasted volunteers consumed 25 grams of glucose in 400 ml of water (the control group), caffeinated coffee, or decaffeinated coffee. Frequent blood samples were taken over the next 3 hours. It was found that glucose and insulin concentrations were higher 30 minutes after the consumption of caffeinated coffee than with either decaffeinated coffee or control (water).While caffeine has specific biological effects on raising glucose levels and impacting insulin profiles, chlorogenic acid was shown to have an antagonistic effect on glucose transport. Previous studies have also shown that chlorogenic acid significantly delays glucose uptake from the small intestine.6

RESEARCH ON SVETOL®

Svetol® is a unique extract of Coffea canephora robusta green coffee beans containing between 45 and 50% chlorogenic acids with less than 2% total caffeine concentration. As outlined above, many studies highlight the potential benefits of coffee compounds, including chlorogenic acid, for providing protection against free radicals and promoting healthy glucose metabolism. A number of other potential benefits have been discovered for these compounds. Svetol® has also been the subject of preliminary clinical studies that have shown exciting results.

In a pilot study, the effect of Svetol® on sugar concentrations after meals was evaluated in 15 individuals. In the same trial, the longer-term effects of Svetol® on weight management were also evaluated. Blood sugar concentrations were measured on two separate occasions. Patients were administered an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in which they consumed a standard amount of sugar and had their blood sugar levels measured 1 hour after sugar intake. The first measurement was made on day 1 prior to taking Svetol® and the second OGTT was performed on day 2, after beginning the Svetol® regimen in which one tablet (200 mg per tablet) was administered 3 times during the day. Patients were fasted for at least 8 hours prior to the testing. The results showed that Svetol® was able to reduce blood sugar concentrations in 60% of the subjects. The mean reduction of blood sugar concentration in these individuals was 50%. The treatment was continued following the same regimen for 6 weeks to assess the impact of Svetol® on weight. The average weight loss of the participants was 1.5 kg (3.3 lbs) over the treatment period. 7

Based on the studies mentioned above and other related research on the ingredients in Svetol®, scientists have proposed two mechanisms of action whereby Svetol® may influence the metabolism and processing of glucose. The first mechanism seems to be an inhibitory action on glucose absorption from the diet. Svetol® may affect the uptake of glucose in the small intestine by modulating factors needed for sugar absorption.

The second mechanism relates to possible effects of Svetol® in the liver's ability to produce glucose. Chlorogenic acids have been shown in vitro and in animal studies to modulate the effects of certain enzymes in the liver that catalyze the production of glucose. By having this dual effect on sugar absorption and sugar production, Svetol® is an effective product for maintaining healthy blood sugar levels when used as a part of the diet.*

SAFETY

Svetol® is a natural food extract from green coffee beans containing a standardized amount of chlorogenic acid. Studies have shown that chlorogenic acid (up to 500 mg/kg/day) given to pregnant rats from the 5th through 12th day of gestation caused no maternal or fetal mortality and no adverse effects on the nervous system. Chlorogenic acids have also been shown to be non-mutagenic in tests on bacteria such as the Ames test. The LD50 of chlorogenic acids has been determined to be higher than 2500 mg/kg body weight. Svetol® is also extremely low in caffeine, with less than 2% caffeine contained in the extract, and is not expected to have any of caffeine's stimulant effects. Svetol® is extremely safe with no adverse effects having been reported while taking Svetol® at the recommended dosage.7

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Scientific References

1) Daglia M, Racchi M, Papetti A, Lanni C, Govoni S,Gazzani G. In vitro and ex vivo antihydroxyl radical activity of green and roasted coffee. J Agric Food Chem.2004 Mar 24;52(6):1700-4.

2) Moreira DP, Monteiro MC, Ribeiro-Alves M, Donangelo CM, Trugo LC. Contribution of chlorogenic acids to the iron-reducing activity of coffee beverages. J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Mar 9;53(5):1399-402.

3) Kono Y, Kashine S,Yoneyama T, Sakamoto Y, Matsui Y, Shibata H. Iron chelation by chlorogenic acid as a natural antioxidant. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 1998 Jan;62(1):22-7.

4) Zang LY, Cosma G, Gardner H, Castranova V, Vallyathan V. Effect of chlorogenic acid on hydroxyl radical. Mol Cell Biochem. 2003 May;247(1-2):205-10.

5) Yamaji T, Mizoue T, Tabata S, Ogawa S, Yamaguchi K, Shimizu E, Mineshita M, Kono S. Coffee consumption and glucose tolerance status in middle-aged Japanese men.Diabetologia. 2004 Dec;47(12):2145-51. Epub 2004 Dec 15.

6) Johnston KL, Clifford MN, Morgan LM. Coffee acutely modifies gastrointestinal hormone secretion and glucose tolerance in humans: glycemic effects of chlorogenic acid and caffeine. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Oct;78(4):728-33.

7) Berkem.Text on Svetol®.Gardonne, France: November 2005. Best Sugar Balance Svetol Green Coffee Extract



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Benefits of Acetyl-L-Carnitine
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Date: February 12, 2006 01:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of Acetyl-L-Carnitine

Benefits

Supports cognitive function*

ALC has been studied for its effect on cognitive performance and emotional health in the elderly. In a single-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 481 elderly subjects exhibiting mild memory impairment improved their scores on a memory test after taking 1500 mg of ALC a day for 90 days.2 Hospitalized elderly people taking ALC have shown improvements in mental outlook.3 While ALC is not a treatment or cure for Alzheimer's disease, double-blind studies suggest it may help slow the rate at which early-stage Alzheimer's patients deteriorate.4 In particular, ALC seems to benefit short-term memory in these patients.5

Supports biosynthesis of acetylcholine, a key neurotransmitter for brain and nerve function* Brain function requires coordinated communication between brain cells. Brain and nerve cells ("neurons") communicate across tiny cell-to-cell gaps called "synapses." The passage of an electrical impulse from one neuron to the next requires a "neurotransmitter." When an electrical signal arrives at the synaptic junction, the neuron releases a neurotransmitter into the synapse. The neuron on the other side of the synapse contains receptors for the neurotransmitter; these receptors bind the neurotransmitter, triggering a series of chemical events that sends a new electrical signal down the membrane of the receiving neuron. Neurotransmitters work together like an orchestra to transmit information throughout the brain and nervous system. Acetylcholine is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the body, regulating activities of vital organs, blood vessels and communication between nerves and muscles. In the brain, acetylcholine helps facilitate memory and learning as well as influence emotions. ALC is structurally similar to acetylcholine, and brain neurons stimulated by acetylcholine are receptive to stimulation by ALC.6 It has been shown experimentally that ALC supplies acetyl groups for the biosynthesis of acetylcholine.7 ALC's hypothesized cholinomimetic (acts like acetylcholine) activity has led researchers to investigate its effects on mental function and emotional health.8

Helps supply the brain with energy by improving energetics in the mitochondrion*

The acetyl groups donated by ALC can be used to synthesize acetyl-CoA, the key substrate for energy metabolism in the mitochondrion. 9 Acetyl-CoA enters the Krebs cycle, the mitochondrial mechanism that generates cellular energy in the form of ATP. ALC easily crosses the blood-brain barrier, allowing it to play various roles in maintaining brain neuron (nerve cell) function. When given by oral administration, the concentration of ALC is increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid.10

Stabilizes intracellular membranes*

ALC was found to improve membrane phospholipid metabolism in early-stage Alzheimer's patients.11 Phospholipids are structural components of brain cell membranes that regulate neuron function. ALC donates acetyl groups that can be used to modify the functional activity of proteins in neuronal membranes.12 ALC thus plays a role in maintaining membrane function. ALC also increases membrane stability and structural integrity.13

Increases nerve growth factor production*

The body produces various specialized proteins called "growth factors" which are essential to growth and repair of tissue. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) protects neurons from death, prolonging survival of neurons in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is theorized that aging of the central nervous system is associated with a loss of NGF. ALC has shown the ability to reverse age-related decrease in the binding of NGF to its receptors in neuron membranes.14 Given to aged rats, ALC increases the level and utilization of NGF in the rats. ALC protects cholinergic neurons (nerve cells stimulated by acetylcholine) in rats from degeneration due to lack of NGF.15 These results, together with other data from animal studies, suggest that ALC positively influences NGF activity.16

Has a protective influence on brain neurons*

Several animal studies have revealed that ALC exerts a protective effect on neurons. In one experiment, brain cells from rats exposed to NMDA, a known neurotoxin, were protected by being simultaneously exposed to ALC.17 Rats injected with ALC were protected from mortality caused by the neurotoxin MPP+.18 ALC has been shown to raise levels of glutathione, a highly valuable antioxidant, in isolated mouse brain tissue.19 ALC prevents buildup of malondyhaldeyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation.20 ALC is also a chelator of iron, which can generate free radicals. It also reinforces antioxidant mechanisms in the brain.21 As a whole, data from test tube and animal studies, showing that ALC has a protective, restorative effect on brain neurons and neuronal energetic processes, suggest that ALC is an anti-aging nutrient for the brain. This hypothesis is supported by human studies demonstrating measurable benefits for brain function in elderly persons taking ALC by oral consumption.


Safety
Suggested Adult Use: 1 to 4 capsules daily.
ALC is considered safe and well-tolerated when consumed orally. ALC has been administered in doses as high as 3 grams per day for periods of two to six months, with no reports of serious side effects. Some patients have experienced occasional mild abdominal discomfort, nausea, skin rash, restlessness, vertigo and headache. The severity and incidence of these side effects are reported as minor.22

Scientific References
1. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
2. Salvioli, G. Neri , M. L-acetylcarnitine treatment of mental decline in the elderly. Drugs Exptl. Clin. Res. 1994; 20(4):169-76.
3. Tempesta, E, et al. L-acetylcarnitine in depressed elderly subjects. A cross-over study vs. placebo. Drugs Exptl. Clin. Res. 1987;8(7):417-23.
4. Spagnoli, A et al. Long-term acetyl-L-carnitine treatment in Alzheimer's disease. Neurology 1991;41:1726-32.
5. Rai, G et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of acetyl-L-carnitine in patients with Alzheimer's dementia. Curr. Med Res. Opin. 1990;11:638-47.
6. Falchetto, S, Kato, G, Provini, L. The action of carnitines on cortical neurons. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 1971; 49(1):1:7.
7. Dolezal, V., Tucek, S. Utilization of citrate, acetylcarnitine, acetate, pyruvate and glucose for the synthesis of acetylcholine in rat brain slices. J Neurochem 1981;36(4):1323.30.
8. Passeri, M, et al. Mental impairment in aging: selection of patients, methods of evaluation and therapeutic possibilities of acetyl-L-carnitine. Int. J. Clin. Pharm. Res. 1988;8(5):367-76.
9. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
10. Parnetti, L, et al. Pharmacokinetics of IV and oral acetyl-L-carnitine in multiple dose regimen in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type. Eur. J. Clin Pharmacol 1992;42:89-93.
11. Pettegrew, JW, et al. Clinical and neurochemical effects of acetyl-L-carnitine in Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiology of Aging 1995;16(1):1-4.
12. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
13. Arduni, A, et al. Effect of L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitine on the human erythrocyte membrane stability and deformability. Life Sci 1990;47(26):2395-2400.
14. Taglialatela, G, et al. Stimulation of nerve growth factor receptors in PC12 by acetyl-L-carnitine. Biochem Pharmacol 1992;44(3):577-85.
15. Taglialatela, G, et al. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment increases nerve growth factor levels and choline acetyltransferase activity in the central nervous system of aged rats. Exp Gerontol 1994;29(1):55-56.
16. Pettegrew, JW, Levine, J, McClure, RJ. Acetyl-L-carnitine physical-chemical, metabolic, and therapeutic properties: relevance for its mode of action in Alzheimer's disease and geriatric depression. Molecular Psychiatry 2000;5:616-32.
17. Forloni, G, Angeretti, N, Smiroldo, S. Neuroprotective activity of acetyl-L-carnitine: studies in vitro. J Neurosci Res 1994;37(1):92-6.
18. Steffen, V, et al. Effect of intraventricular injection of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium: protection by acetyl-L-carnitine. Hum Exp Toxicol 1995;14(11):865-71.
19. Fariello, RG, et al. Systemic acetyl-L-carnitine elevates nigral levels of glutathione and GABA. Life Sci 1988;43(3):289-92.
20. Calvani, M, et al. Action of acetyl-L-carnitine in neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease. Ann Ny Acad Sci 1992;663:483-86.
21. Calvani, M, Carta, A. Clues to the mechanism of action of acetyl-L-carnitine in the central nervous system. Dementia 1991;2:1-6.
22. Zdanowicz, M. Acetyl-L-carnitine's healing potential. Continuing Education Module. New Hope Institute of Retailing. October, 2001.


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Curcumin - Turmeric Extract
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Date: August 19, 2005 12:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Curcumin - Turmeric Extract

Curcumin

Turmeric- History and Traditional Usage

Native to Southeast Asia, Curcuma longa is a tall
tropical shrub with large oblong leaves and pale yellow flowers.
The genus “Curcuma” belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, which
includes ginger.1 The plant possesses a large root structure
with fleshy, bulbous underground parts called “rhizomes.” These
rhizomes, known as turmeric root, are harvested at maturity,
dried and cured for commercial use. Chemical analysis shows that
dried turmeric contains essential and volatile oils, with a
curcuminoid content of 2.5 to 5.0 %.2

In addition to its
popularity as a spice, turmeric is used as a dye for cloth and
coloring agent in foods and cosmetics, thanks to its rich yellow
color. Turmeric also serves as a preservative, probably owing to
the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of curcumin.
Extracts of Curcuma longa have demonstrated in vitro
antibacterial and anti-fungal effects.3

Turmeric is named in
ancient Ayurvedic and Chinese herbal texts as a traditional folk
remedy. Historically, turmeric was used externally for wounds,
and sprains, and internally for digestive complaints,
rheumatism, liver disorders, coughs and colds.4
Benefits

Protects cells and tissues by fighting free radicals.*

Supports joint function*

The numerous beneficial
effects attributed to turmeric stem in large measure from the
antioxidant properties of curcumin. Antioxidants neutralize free
radicals, which are highly unstable molecules that can damage
cellular structures through abnormal oxidative reactions.
Curcumin is a potent “scavenger” of the superoxide radical, a
free radical that initiates potentially harmful oxidative
processes such as lipid peroxidation.5 Through this activity,
curcumin has been shown to protect skin cells from the injurious
effect of nitroblue tetrazolium, a toxin that generates
superoxide radicals. Curcumin also increases survival of cells
exposed in vitro to the enzyme hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase,
which stimulates superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production.
Curcumin itself is not toxic to cells, even at high
concentrations. Pure curcumin was shown to be less protective
than a mixture of curcuminoids, indicating a possible synergism
among curcuminoids.6 Because free radicals are involved in aging
and exert harmful effects on skin, these results suggest
curcumin may help slow skin aging.

Curcumin demonstrates
several other in vitro effects linked to free radical
scavenging. Curcumin scavenges nitric oxide, a compound
associated with the body’s inflammatory response.7 Pure curcumin
and turmeric extracts protect red blood cells from lipid
peroxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide.8 Curcumin has been
shown to protect DNA from oxidative damage, inhibit binding of
toxic metabolites to DNA, and reduce DNA mutations in the Ames’
test.9 Although additional studies suggest an anticarcinogenic
effect of curcumin, through protection of DNA,10 one in vitro
study found that curcumin induced DNA damage in human gastric
mucosal cells.11 It is speculated that curcumin may act as a
pro-oxidant in the presence of transition metal ions such as
copper and iron. (This is true for other antioxidants, including
vitamin C.) Curcumin also demonstrates in vitro inhibition of
COX-I and COX-II enzymes, which are involved in the inflammatory
reaction.12 Together these results strongly suggest that
curcumin is a potent bioprotectant with a potentially wide range
of therapeutic applications.

Animal studies- In vivo protective effects

Through its free radical scavenging
properties, curcumin has shown bioprotective effects in animals.
In one study, rats were treated with isoproterenol, a chemical
that causes cardiac hypertrophy (enlargement of the heart) due
to abnormal collagen metabolism. Co-treatment with curcumin
reversed the degradation of collagen and cardiac hypertrophy
induced by isoproterenol.13 Curcumin protects mice from
detrimental effects of radiation, by stabilizing the glyoxalase
system, a biological system that regulates cell division.14
Curcumin protects livers of rats from the damaging effects of
carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a potent hepatoxin that injures the
liver via its free radical metabolite, CCl3.15,16 Curcumin
protected rats from alcohol-induced brain damage, in a study in
which oral administration of curcumin reversed lipid
peroxidation, reduced levels of free-radical metabolites and
increased levels of glutathione, a major physiologic
antioxidant.17 Curcuma longa extracts have shown
anti-inflammatory effects in rats.18

Human Trials

Curcumin exhibits free-radical scavenging ability when
administered to humans. In an open trial (uncontrolled), 18
healthy individuals ranging in age from 27 to 67 years consumed
a Curcuma longa extract, at a dose supplying 20 mg curcuminoids,
for 45 days. Before and after blood tests showed a statistically
significant decrease in lipid peroxides.19 Preliminary trials
have tested the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin, with
results that verify the traditional use of turmeric as an
anti-rheumatic herb. In a short-term double-blind, cross-over,
comparative study, 18 people received curcumin (1200 mg daily)
or phenylbutazone for two week periods. Both curcumin and
phenylbutazone produced measurable improvements in joint
flexibility and walking time. The subjects reported results only
with phenylbutazone, which may be explained by the short
duration of the trial.20 In a small placebo-controlled trial
comparing curcumin to phenylbutazone, 45 patients with
post-operative inflammation received curcumin, phenylbutazone or
placebo. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin and
phenylbutazone were comparable and superior to placebo.21
Curcumin has not been found to produce an analgesic (pain
relieving) effect.

Bioperine-Nature’s Absorption Enhancer
Boosts Curcumin Absorption*

Traditional Ayurvedic herbal
formulas often include black pepper and long pepper as
synergistic herbs. The active ingredient in both black pepper
and long pepper is the alkaloid, piperine. Experiments carried
out to evaluate the scientific basis for the use of peppers have
shown that piperine significantly enhances bioavailability when
consumed with other substances.22 Several double-blind clinical
studies have confirmed that Bioperine® increases absorption of
nutrients.23

Curcumin is poorly absorbed in the intestinal
tract, limiting its therapeutic effectiveness. Oral doses are
largely excreted in feces, and only trace amounts appear in the
blood. Concomitant administration of 20 mg of piperine with 2
grams of curcumin increases the bioavailability of curcumin by
2000%.24

Scientific References


1. Majeed, M., Badmaev,
V., Shivakumar, U., Rajendran, R. Curcuminoids. 1995.
Piscataway, NJ: NutriScience Publishers.
2. Srimal, R.C.
Turmeric: a brief review of its medicinal properties.
Fitoterapia 1997;68(6):483-93.
3. Ammon, H.P.T., Wahl, M.A.
Pharmacology of Curcuma longa. Planta Medica 1991;57:1-7.
4.
Snow, J.M. Herbal Monograph: Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae).
The Protocol Journal of Botanical Medicine, Autumn
1995:43-46.
5. Rao, N.S., Rao, M.N.A. Free radical scavenging
activity of curcuminoids. Arzneim.-Forsch./Drug Res.
1996;46(2):169-171.
6. Bonté. F. et al. Protective effect of
curcuminoids on epidermal skin cells under free oxygen radical
stress. Planta Medica 1997;63:265-66.
7. Rao, S., Rao, M.N.A.
Nitric oxide scavenging by curcuminoids. J Pharm. Pharmacol.
1997;49:105-7.
8. Lalitha, S., Selvam, R. Prevention of
H2Os-induced red blood cell lipid peroxidation by aqueous
extracted turmeric. Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr
1999;8(2):113-14.
9. Deshpande, S.S., Maru, G.B. Effects of
curcumin on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene derived DNA adducts
in vitro. Cancer Letters 1995;96:71-80.
10. Subramanian, M., et
al. Diminution of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage by curcumin
and related antioxidants. Mutation Research
1994;311:249-55.
11. Blasiak, J., Trzeciak, A., Kowalik, J.
Curcumin damages DNA in human gastric mucosa cells and
lymphocytes. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and
Oncology 1999;18(4):271-76.
12. Ramsewak, R.S., DeWitt, D.L.,
Nair, M.G. Cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory
activities of Curcumins I-III from Curcuma longa. Phytomedicine
2000;7(4):303-308.
13. Nirmala, C. Anand, S., Puvanakrishnan,
R. Curcumin treatment modulates collagen metabolism in
isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Molecular and
Cellular Biochemistry 1999;197:31-37.
14. Choudhary, D.,
Chandra, D. Kale, R.K. Modulation of radioresponse of glyoxalase
system by curcumin. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1999;64:1-7.
15. Park, E-J. et al. Protective effect of
curcumin in rat liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride. J
Pharm. Pharmacol. 2000;52:437-40.
16. Deshpande, U.R. et al.
Protective effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract on
carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in rats. Indian
Journal of Experimental Biology 1998;36:573-77.
17.
Rajakrishnan, V. et al. Neuroprotective role of curcumin from
Curcuma longa on ethanol-induced brain damage. Phytotherapy
Research 1999;13:571-74.
18. Arora, R.B. Basu, N., Kapoor, V.,
Jain, A.P. Anti-inflammatory studies on Curcuma longa
(Turmeric). Indian J Med Res 1971;59(8):1289-95.
19.
Ramirez-Bosca, A. et al. Antioxidant curcuma extracts decrease
the blood peroxide levels of human subjects. Age
1995;18:167-69.
20. Deodhar, S.D., Sethi, R. Srimal. R.C.
Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin
(diferoyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.
21.
Satoskar, R.R., Shah, S J. Shenoy, S.G. Evaluation of
anti-inflammatory property of curcumin (diferoyl methane) in
patients with postoperative inflammation. International Journal
of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy and Toxicolgy
1986;24(12):651-54.
22. Atal, C., Zutshi, U., Rao, P.
Scientific evidence on the role of Ayurvedic herbals on
bioavailability of drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1981;4:229-232.
23. Bioperine®–Nature's Bioavailability
Enhancing Thermonutrient. Executive Summary. 1996; Sabinsa
Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.
24. Shoba, G., et al. Influence
of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and
human volunteers. Planta Medica 1998;64(4):353-6.

© 2002
Doctor's Best, Inc. Revised 8/13/02

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.



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