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Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death VitaNet, LLC Staff 8/17/18
Olive oil for a healthy heart Darrell Miller 7/30/17
Eating olives made warts disappear Darrell Miller 4/9/17
Olive oil could slash your chance of bone fractures in half, study says Darrell Miller 2/1/17
"Fake" olive oil warnings don't tell the real story: In truth, popular olive oil products are "real" oils which are oxidized, rancid or cut with cheaper oils Darrell Miller 12/13/16
You Can Repair the Adrenal Glands with the Right Diet Darrell Miller 11/9/16
The Health Benefits OF Avocado Oil Darrell Miller 3/8/14
The Tremendous Health Benefits Of Omega- 3 Fatty Acids Darrell Miller 11/10/12
Six Foods that Boost Heart Health Darrell Miller 1/21/08
Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally Darrell Miller 3/28/07
Olive, With a Twist – The Leaves of the Olive Tree are as beneficial to our health as the Darrell Miller 10/7/06
Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral Darrell Miller 11/20/05
Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion Darrell Miller 6/21/05




Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death
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Date: August 17, 2018 09:53 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death





Eating fried food just twice per week increases your chance of early death

Nature News puts out an article on a possible link between routinely eating deep fried foods and premature deaths. One of the possible causes of an early death is acrylamide, which is present in some foods, one of which is deep fried potatoes. To cut down on risks, Nature News recommends cutting back on eating deep fried foods more than once a week(preferably even less often) and finding healthier substitutes. Substitutes could include vegetables or oven baked sweet potato fries.

Key Takeaways:

  • Fried food is full of a carcinogen known as acrylamide.
  • Black olives, cocoa, dark-crusted breads, and peanut butter are also high in acrylamide.
  • Kale chips, sweet potato fries, and crispy green beans are some healthier alternatives to French fries.

"To stay healthy and lower your risk of premature death, limit your intake of fried foods like French fries and potato chips."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-08-16-eating-fried-food-just-twice-per-week-increases-your-chance-of-early-death.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5710)


Olive oil for a healthy heart
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Date: July 30, 2017 04:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Olive oil for a healthy heart





The use of olives or olive oil in a diet has been proven to reduce the number of lipid peroxidation in the bloodstream. Olive oil can help blood vessels from clotting together. It is digested well by the stomach and has been proven to help ward off certain cancers. It also helps bone health and has been used by people with memory issues and has shown that it does help. The fatty acids are also great for the skin as they nourish it well.

Key Takeaways:

  • Lipid peroxidation in the bloodstream is a dangerous condition. Olive oil can actually prevent that condition for some patients.
  • Clumping of blood cells in arteries is to blame for many heart conditions. Olive oil can also prevent that clumping from happening.
  • The antioxidant properties of olive oil is also important. That may actually prevent the onset of certain forms of cancer.

"The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of olives provide protection against cancer since chronic oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are the key factors in the development of cancer."

Read more: https://news.statetimes.in/olive-oil-healthy-heart-2/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5062)


Eating olives made warts disappear
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Date: April 09, 2017 11:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating olives made warts disappear





The article, posted by the King Features Syndicate inc., discusses the affect that eating olives had on the author's wart problem. The author then discusses the effects of other types of foods and substances and their impact on health issues such as krill oil and cinnamon. Details for health studies in different countries are given at the end of the article to help support the author's opinions on the subject as well as giving explicit details on the types of ingredients used in the studies.

Key Takeaways:

  • Jars of olives mysteriously helped get rid of two cases of warts
  • Krill oil is a great supplement for omega-3s, without the fish burps!
  • Cinammon can lower your cholesterol and total blood sugar, as shown in a controlled study

"It turned out to be a 12-ounce jar of stuffed olives that I consumed after work"

Read more: http://www.vindy.com/news/2017/apr/07/eating-olives-made-warts-disappear/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4385)


Olive oil could slash your chance of bone fractures in half, study says
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Date: February 01, 2017 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Olive oil could slash your chance of bone fractures in half, study says





Extra virgin olive oil could have better benefits besides making your meals taste better. A recent study found that people who regularly consume EVOO have a decreased risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture. When regular olive oil was analyzed, it was not found to have the same benefits. The reason behind this difference is believed to be due to the greater amount of processing. The olives that are pressed into EVOO contains the highest amounts of antioxidants and bio-active compounds.

Key Takeaways:

  • The phenolic compounds found in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) have a potential benefit on bone health, lowering the risk of fractures by 51%, if consumed regularly, say Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) researchers from Madrid.
  • However common olive oil – where 80% of the make-up is refined oil – consumption is not associated with a lower risk of fractures in the study.
  • Mintel say the health benefits of EVOO could be the reason why so many of us are willing to pay higher prices for it, as 39% of consumers prefer EVOO compared to 22% who prefer common olive oil.

"Eating more extra virgin olive oil could cut your risk of osteoporosis related fractures, says a new study."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.foodnavigator.com/Science/Olive-oil-could-slash-your-chance-of-bone-fractures-in-half-study-says&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFGn1bJZfyyO8T-crzwvhW1BHMrUg

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3866)


"Fake" olive oil warnings don't tell the real story: In truth, popular olive oil products are "real" oils which are oxidized, rancid or cut with cheaper oils
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Date: December 13, 2016 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: "Fake" olive oil warnings don't tell the real story: In truth, popular olive oil products are "real" oils which are oxidized, rancid or cut with cheaper oils





Like cooking with olive oil? You won't believe the real story behind these 8 popular brands! A food scientist explains new data from UC Davis that shows the heavy processing olive oil goes through between tree and table. Learn the secrets behind one of America's most popular cooking oils. And find out where you can get real, delicious olive oil, thanks to Natural News!

Key Takeaways:

  • As a food scientist, I can tell you this report is authoritative. It reveals the numerous methodologies used for assessing the authenticity of popular olive oil brands.
  • Still, as a laboratory scientist, I would strongly prefer scientific data derived from instrument analysis of olive oil samples.
  • Finally, for those who don’t know, olives grow on trees. The fact that so few people know that is yet more astonishing evidence of how disconnected people are from reality.

"As a forensic food scientist and lab science director, I wanted to get to the bottom of this “fake olive oil” news, so I went right to the source:The “Evaluation of Extra-Virgin Olive Oil Sold in California” report from the UC Davis Olive Center."



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/2016-12-07-fake-olive-oil-warnings-real-story-oxidized-food-science-health-ranger.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3636)


You Can Repair the Adrenal Glands with the Right Diet
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Date: November 09, 2016 01:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: You Can Repair the Adrenal Glands with the Right Diet

Bored with trips to the doctor or naturopath and the costs involved as you attempt to restore the functionality of your adrenal glands? If yes, then embrace an adrenal-supportive diet plan. Apart from reducing the costs you incur to treat adrenal fatigue; you will enjoy several other benefits that come with eating right. Basically you will have to take nutritious whole foods, eat at the right time, and avoid foods that you have intolerances to. Apart from the above, you will have to reduce stressing your mind and body, eliminate toxins and embrace positive thinking at all times. The details below will give you a proper guide towards your recovery.


The Adrenal Fatigue Diet

Since the problem is already here, you have to start by removing toxins and hard-to-digest foods from your diet (embrace a Paleo or Primal diet). This means you have to eliminate legumes, grains, vegetable oils, caffeine, microwaved and processed foods, and refined sugar.

After that, take foods that help replenish the energy of your adrenal glands. They include avocado, olives, Cruciferous vegetables, coconut, Fatty fish, turkey and chicken, seeds (like flax, chia and pumpkin), seaweed and kelp, Himalayan or Celtic sea salt, nuts (like almonds and walnuts), and food fats. These foods have low sugar levels, they are nutrient-dense, and contain healthy fiber and fat.


Taking the Required Adrenal Fatigue Recovery Supplements

Remember that if these supplements are taken in their whole-food form, the symptoms of your adrenal insufficiency could greatly be improved. The supplements to take include Holy basil, Vitamin B5, fish oil (DHA/EPA), Ashwagandha, Magnesium, Vitamin C, Zinc, Vitamin D3 and Vitamin B12. Where your adrenal fatigue is severe, get an experienced doctor to prescribe the correct levels of Pregnenolone, DHEA, Progesterone, B6, Licorice Extract, and L-tyrosine

Once you follow the above and embrace good lifestyle changes to promote your recovery you will now have a solution to the full recovery of your adrenal glands. Good lifestyle in this case, means you sleep regularly or about 8-10 hours a night, exercise, rest whenever you feel tired, reduce relational and work stress, laugh and have time to relax. Also, always ensure that you are eating regularly. You can now live a happy and fulfilling life with your adrenal glands working perfectly.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3411)


The Health Benefits OF Avocado Oil
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Date: March 08, 2014 09:02 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Health Benefits OF Avocado Oil

avocado fruitBenefits of avocado

Avocado oil has a high attention of healthier fats and supplement E, that is a fabulous epidermis lotion. Icy pressed virgin avocado oil, taken consistently, may help decrease levels of cholesterol and ensure against coronary illness.

Clearspring regular Avocado oil is icy pressed from oil-rich green olives and is broadly distinguished for its wellness profits notwithstanding a support to excellence.

Foul avcado oil is recognized to be a standout amongst the most restorative vegetable oils one can consume. It is a multi-reason oil that could be utilized for culinary purposes suitable for dressings and sauces and singing, because of its high smoke purpose of over 490 degrees. Natural avocado oil is additionally a top notch "transporter" oil for different qualities; avocado bearer oil is perfect for implantation with different herbs. Notwithstanding its suitability as an edible, foul avcado oil is additionally top notch for utilization as a corrective and the repair of harmed skin.avocado bearer oil is fine for making diverse seasoned oils. Despite the fact that fine for people and different primates, natural avocado oil holds a fattening corrosive known as persin, which might be profoundly poisonous to local creatures, especially pooches, felines and stallions.

This offers no issues to your general health or that of your skin, and holds a monounsaturated oil utilized within fragrance based treatment. There is nothing else in avocado oil with the exception of the 30% of oil that the foods grown from the ground holds. You can drink it without it doing you hurt. An engineered proportionate to avocado oil might fill the mark with included chemicals: one or more to enhance skin ingestion, some to protect the oil from oxidation (despite the fact that it holds its own particular cancer prevention agents), emulsifiers and surfactants to help it spread better (an oil?).

Avocado content

Actually avocado oil holds its own particular emulsifier, lecithin, and additionally the cancer prevention agents Vitamin An and Vitamin E that likewise help to administer a young looking skin. These cell reinforcement vitamins annihilate the free radicals that execute your skin cells and make you look more advanced in years. Avocado oil can help you to continue looking more youthful as you develop sequentially more senior. It likewise holds vitamin D that is so paramount in large portions of the natural methodologies inside your skin - it is not called the 'daylight vitamin' to no end.

Cell reinforcements secure you from the impacts of the less than great UV radiation held in solid daylight, the free-radical producing pesticides, activity and modern outflows and tobacco smoke. Without some type of cell reinforcement medicine your skin would quickly wrinkled and develop old as its unit films are burst and annihilated. Vitamins An and E execute off the free radicals that cause this.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3052)


The Tremendous Health Benefits Of Omega- 3 Fatty Acids
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Date: November 10, 2012 11:53 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Tremendous Health Benefits Of Omega- 3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 vs Omega-6

Several sources of information and clinical studies have revealed that the ratio between these two essential fatty acids in our diet have over a period of time played a significant role in making humans prone to certain diseases that the early humans were not afflicted with.

The raging debate in finding the right ratio arises also from the fact that modern foods preferences lean heavily toward the consumption of omega-6 rich foods . This fatty acid has been linked to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, inflammatory diseases, immunodeficiency, artherosclerosis, hypertension, blood pressure, arthritis, diabetes and obesity. In the last ten thousand years our genetic structure has remained the same, but with the onset of the Agricultural Revolution radical changes in food habits have created a lopsided diet. The western diet is heavily oversubscribing to the use of the polyunsaturated fatty acids or PUFA, and going low on Essential Fatty Acids or EFA. Living in the industrial societies that we do and in a kind of nutritional environment that we live in, we need to make informed choices about the food we consume is important considering how high- risk western societies are to many kinds of ailments.

Both omega-3 and omega -6 fatty acids are essential for us, but have to be obtained from food as the human body does not have the ability to produce it. Clinical evidence has shown that the Mediterranean diet is more focused on fresh fruits, vegetables, fats from olives, fish, nuts, garlic and whole grains. It has the requisite amounts of healthy fats to combat numerous diseases like coronary condition, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, high cholesterol, schizophrenia, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, bipolar disorder and colon cancer. Astounding also is the finding that our body possesses a certain enzyme that can be linked in its structure and function to these essential fatty acids. These are called prostaglandins.

Prostaglandins

Prostaglandins are the end products of a chain reaction that begins with the release of unsaturated fatty acids from the cell membrane. It was first isolated from human semen and has found great use as an enzyme based treatment for menstrual problems, childbirth and many other medical conditions. Its ability to increase blood flow has resulted in its use for inducing abortion in troubled pregnancies. However, its over secretion in the body is related to numerous inflammatory conditions and has been found to increase in the body due to the overbearing presence of 0mega-6 fatty acids.These facts can not be taken lightly for a civilization reeling under the onslaught of devastating ailments. Its time to take heed .

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2708)


Six Foods that Boost Heart Health
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Date: January 21, 2008 01:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Six Foods that Boost Heart Health

The majorities of baby boomers are looking for a way to loose weight and lower their cholesterol. Both of these are two important factors in heart disease, which still remains the number one killer in the United States. The good news is that you can dodge heart disease through your food choices. Below are six foods that can help boost your heart health.

Many studies have proven the variety of health benefits given by fish, ranging from joint inflammation in arthritis sufferers to brain development in babies. The omega-3 fatty acids found in fish support circulation and improve blood vessel function. Researchers have also determined that omega-3s can prevent heart-attack deaths as they stop the electrical disturbance that causes death and half of all heart attacks are due to these arrhythmias. Each week, you should eat one to two 3-ounce servings of fatty fish such as an Alaskan salmon, anchovies, herring or mackerel. By baking or poaching these fish at low heart you can help to preserve the omega-3s. For vegetarians, omega-3 rich flaxseeds can be added to oatmeal, smoothies, or salads. For those who don’t care for fish there are omega-3 oil supplements available as well.

Have you ever wondered why oatmeal is so good for you? In your body, this gluey beta-glucan, which is soluble fiber, binds to bile acids found in the intestines and stomach and excretes them as waste. In order to make more bile acids, the liver needs cholesterol and takes it from the blood. This results in lower blood cholesterol levels. You need 3 grams of soluble fiber each day to reduce your cholesterol by five percent. A cup and a half of cooked oatmeal is a good size serving that can be jazzed up in flavor with frozen berries, non-fat plain yogurt, almonds and much more.

High-glycemic foods like potatoes, white bread, and white rice should be avoided because you get a harmful burst of glucose and insulin that’s harmful immediately after eating them. These bursts tire out the pancreas in the long run and increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Research also shows that having high-glycemic foods at one meal will make you even hungrier and eat more at the next, which is why these foods are associated with weight gain. People with excess fat are much more likely to develop heart disease and stroke even if there are no other risk factors. Because of this, focusing on true grains such as brown rice, quinoa, and barley and choosing them over refined grains as much as possible.

Nuts are important for their unsaturated fats and their ability to help lower cholesterol. Walnuts actually contain omega-3 fatty acids, while almonds boost calcium, helping the heart muscle to contract, and Brazil nuts have selenium, which is a heart-protective antioxidant. About one ounce each day of nuts is good for you, but they do have a lot of calories so make sure to go easy on them. If you have a nut allergy, topping you salad with olives is a good alternative, as they contain unsaturated fats.

Beans also contain soluble fiber like oatmeal which helps to reduce cholesterol and keep arteries clear. By choosing the protein from beans instead of meat, you can cut back on saturated fats which raise cholesterol. Eating beans four to five times a week is recommended, as they can be added to a lot of meals. If you don’t tolerate beans well, try adding kombu, a sea vegetable, to them to help break down the components that cause gas. Your body also does adapt to beans over time, so try building up your bean servings slowly. Food enzymes can help reduce gas as well so don’t forget to take your enzymes.

Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and other berries all have strong antioxidant properties that can help fight heart disease and are also low in calories and high in fiber. Eating two cups of fruit each day for general health is recommended, but you should eat as many berries as you can tolerate. Free radicals can break down cholesterol that is flowing in your blood and make them sticky so to deposit on the arterial walls of your blood vessels. Fight this with antioxidant rich foods to reduce cholesterol build up.

Eating healthy is one step in boosting heart health and overall cardiovascular health. Exercise is also important in keeping your body strong and vibrant so one can live a healthier longer life.

--
Let Vitanet® improve your heart health!

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Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally
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Date: March 28, 2007 10:29 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally

Regulating Blood Pressure Naturally

 

High blood pressure (also known as hypertension) affects about 65 million Americans, or about 1 in 3 adults. There are many potential causes of hypertension, but not necessarily any symptoms. In fact, 30% of the people who have high blood pressure don’t even realize it.

In other words, just because you don’t have symptoms doesn’t mean you don’t have high blood pressure. That’s why it’s called “The Silent Killer.” And, make no mistake about it: high blood pressure is dangerous. It is the number one modifiable cause of stroke. Just lowering blood pressure reduces the chance of stroke by 35 to 40 percent. Other conditions, including heart attack and heart failure can be reduced from 25 to 50 percent, respectively.

In this issue of Ask the Doctor, we’re going to talk about high blood pressure and an exciting natural treatment for lowering blood pressure safely and effectively.

Of course, changing blood pressure numbers depends, in a large part, on the choices we make every day – how much we exercise, the foods we eat, and our lifestyle overall. But, for those times we need extra help, there is a new, scientifically-studied supplement to help us along our path to better health and lower blood pressure.

 

Blood pressure guidelines from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Category

Systolic (mm/Hg)

Diastolic (mm/Hg)

Result

Normal

Less than 120

And Less than 80

Excellent!

Prehypertension

120-139

Or 80-89

Make changes in eating and drinking habits, get more exercise and lose any extra pounds.

Hypertension

140 or higher

Or 90 or higher

You have high blood pressure. Talk to your healthcare professional on how to control it.

 

Q. What exactly is blood pressure?

A. Blood pressure is divided into two parts, systolic and diastolic. Systolic is the pressure of the heart beating. Diastolic is the pressure of the heart and vessels filling. When blood pressure numbers are written out, like “120/80,” 120 is the systolic pressure and 80 is the diastolic pressure. The unit of measurement for blood pressure is millimeters of mercury, written as “mm/Hg.”

 

Q. What is considered high blood pressure?

A. A person’s blood pressure can naturally vary throughout the day – even between heartbeats.

However, if the numbers are consistently high (over 120 systolic and 80 diastolic), after multiple visits to your healthcare practitioner, you may have either pre-hypertension or high blood pressure.

Young arteries and arteries that are kept young through healthy diet and exercise are typically more elastic and unclogged. Blood flows through them easily and without much effort. However, as we age, our arteries become more prone to plaque buildup (due to diets high in saturated fat and sedentary lifestyles) and don’t “flex” as well under pressure. The result is faster blood flow, all the time. Over the long term, it damages heart tissue, arteries, kidney and other major organs.

To get a better idea of high blood pressure, compare your arteries to a garden hose. When unblocked, a garden hose allows water to flow through it quickly and easily – without any real rush or stress. However, if you block the end of the hose with your thumb, closing it off even a little, water rushes out much more quickly.

For many years, high diastolic pressure was considered even more of a threat than high systolic pressure. That thinking has changed somewhat but high diastolic numbers could still mean organ damage in your body – especially for individuals under 50.

 

Q. What courses high blood pressure?

A. The reasons for hypertension aren’t always clear. However, there are lifestyle factors that contribute to high blood pressure that you can change:

 

Body type: Weight isn’t always a reliable indicator of whether or not you’ll have high blood pressure – but the type of weight is. Lean body mass – muscle – doesn’t increase blood pressure levels the way that fat can. However, fat body mass, especially fat around your middle, can contribute to high blood pressure.

 

Sedentary lifestyle: Too often, many of us sit down all day at work, and then sit down all night at home. Over time, this inactivity usually leads to weight gain, making the heart work harder to pump blood through the body. In a way, it almost seems contradictory, but inactivity usually leads to higher heart rates.

 

Sodium intake: Sometimes it’s hard to believe how much salt there is in processed foods. However, salt intake in itself is not necessarily bad. For people with a history of congestive heart failure, ischemia, and high blood pressure, sodium is definitely out. For those individuals, it leads to more water retention, which increases blood pressure. (Salt’s effect on water retention is one reason that so many sports drinks have fairly high sodium content – the sodium in the drink prevents your body from sweating out too much water.) But, for healthy individuals, moderate salt intake, especially a mixed mineral salt like sea salt or Celtic salt (good salt should never be white) is fine.

 

Low potassium intake: Unlike sodium, potassium is a mineral which most Americans get too little of. Potassium helps regulate the amount of sodium in our cells, expelling excess amounts through the kidneys. Low levels of this mineral can allow too much sodium to build up in the body.

 

Heavy alcohol intake: Having three or more alcoholic drinks a day (two or more for women) nearly doubles an individual’s chance of developing high blood pressure. Over time, heavy drinking puts a lot of stress on the organs, including the heart, liver, pancreas and brain.

 

Unhealthy eating: Eating a lot of processed or fatty foods contributes to high blood pressure. Adapting a diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grain products, fish, nuts and magnesium and potassium (like the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, known as the “DASH” diet) can bring it back down.

 

Smoking: If you smoke, stop. Smoking damages the heart and arteries – period. Nicotine constricts blood vessels, increases heart rate, and raises blood pressure. This in turn, increases hormone production and adrenaline levels, further stressing the body.

 

As if that weren’t bad enough, the carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke replaces the oxygen in the blood, making the heart work even harder to make up the difference. Since the effect of a single cigarette can last for an hour, smoking throughout the day leads to continuously revved-up blood pressure.

 

Some of these factors might sound like a lot to overcome. The important thing to remember is that all of these behaviors are changeable. If you have high blood pressure, modifying any of these can significantly lower blood pressure as part of an overall plan.

 

Q. What are the blood pressure numbers I should see?

A. Experts consider healthy blood pressure numbers to be 115/75 mm/Hg. The reason? They found that the risk of cardiovascular disease doubles at each increment of 20/10 mmHg over 115/75 mm/Hg. Even small jumps in blood pressure numbers increase the risk of stroke and heart attack.

 

Q. Okay, so other than diet, exercise and lifestyle changes are there other natural ways or supplements I can use to lower my blood pressure?

A. Yes, in fact, you hear about some of them in the news all the time – fish oil, CoQ10, and garlic. As effective as these symptoms are, they typically lower systolic pressure much more than diastolic pressure.

However, there is a blend of scientifically and clinically studied natural ingredients that lower high blood pressure separately, and work even better when they’re combined. This combination blend contains: dandelion leaf extract, lycopene, stevia extract, olive leaf extract and hawthorn extract.

Every one of these ingredients has been studied and recommended for years. But now, a scientific study on a supplement that combines them in one synergistic formula shows encouraging results for lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Let’s take a look at each:

Stevia leaf extract

Supports healthy blood pressure levels according to clinical studies.

Hawthorn extract

Supports the heart and balance sodium and fluid levels.

Olive leaf extract

Scientifically shown to support healthy blood pressure.

Dandelion leaf

Helps reduce fluid retention

Lycopene

Clinically shown to support arteries, circulation and heart health.

 

Stevia:

Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) originated in South America, and is often used as a sweetener. Glycosides in stevia, particularly stevoside, give the plan its sweet flavor 0 anywhere from 100 to 200 times sweeter than sugar.

The leaf of stevia is considered the medicinal part of the plant. Research shows that extracts of the leaf relax arteries and help prevent the buildup of calcium on artery walls – keeping them healthy and reducing blood pressure.

In a long-term, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study, stevia reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure. On average, participants’ blood pressure reduced from baseline 150 mm/Hg to 140 mm/Hg systolic and 95 mm/Hg to 89 mm/Hg diastolic.

And, in another double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study, stevia lowered blood pressure quite significantly – by an average of 14 millimeters of mercury in both systolic and diastolic readings. Those are impressive numbers!

Despite its role as a sweetener, stevia may have a side benefit to for those with hypertension – blood sugar regulation. Scientific studies show that extracts of stevia regulated blood sugar and reduced blood pressure.

A clinical study showed that stevia extract actually improved glucose tolerance by decreasing plasma glucose levels during the test and after overnight fasting in all participants. Regulating blood sugar is very important for those with high blood pressure. When blood sugar levels are high, blood vessels are inflamed. Many people with diabetes have high blood pressure as well. In a paired, cross-over clinical study, stevioside (one of the compounds in stevia) reduced glucose levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Further scientific studies show that stevia works to control blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin secretion by the pancreatic beta cells. It shows great potential in treating type 2 diabetes. Further scientific studies show that stevia works to control blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin secretion by the pancreatic beta cells. Its shows great potential in treating type 2 diabetes as well as hypertension.

 

Hawthorn extract:

Hawthorn (Crataegus spp. Oxycantha) has been used since ancient ties as a medicinal herb – even being mentioned by the Greek herbalist Dioscorides, in the first century AD. Traditionally, it has generally been used for support of the heart. Modern research points to bioflavonoid-like complexes in hawthorn leaf and flower that seem to be most responsible for its benefits on cardiac health, like blood vessel elasticity.

The bioflavonoids found in hawthorn include oligomeric procyanidins, vitexin, quercetin, and hyperoside. They have numerous benefits on the cardiovascular system. Hawthorn can improve coronary artery blood flow and the contractions of the heart muscle. Scientific studies show that the procyanidins in hawthorn are responsible for its ability to make the aorta and other blood vessels more flexible and relaxed, so that blood pumps more slowly and with less effort – sparing the cardiovascular system such a hard workout.

The procyanidins in hawthorn also have antioxidant properties – protecting against free radical cellular damage.

And, hawthorn may also inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme. Angiotensin-converting enzyme is responsible for retaining sodium and water, and may have roots in our evolutionary development. It influences blood vessel contraction and dilation, sodium and water balance and heart cell development – just about everything that has to do with blood pressure. This may have developed as a way of dealing with periods of drought and stress. By narrowing the blood vessels, the body could guarantee an adequate supply of blood and focus on repairing tissue.

Unfortunately, that can lead to real problems these days. Since many of us live in an industrialized society, and frequently have pretty sedentary lifestyles, conserving sodium just makes the conditions for high blood pressure that much worse.

Like the other ingredients in this combination, hawthorn showed benefits on other body systems, too. In clinical and scientific studies, it not only lowered blood pressure, but also showed anti-anxiety properties and regulated blood sugar.

 

Olive leaf extract:

Olive leaf (Olea europaea) comes up again and again in scientific and clinical studies as having beneficial effects on hypertension. One of olive leaf’s most beneficial compounds is oleuropein – the same compound that makes olive oil so helpful in reducing blood pressure. Here again, we have to look at the traditional Mediterranean diet, which features voluminous use of olives and olive oil. Not surprisingly, blood pressure is generally much lower in Greek and Italian populations.

But it’s not just the diet – scientific studies showed that oleuropein lowered blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels and prevented buildup of plaque in arteries. Plus, whether in olive leaf extract or in olive oil, oleuropein works as an antioxidant, too.

 

Dandelion leaf extract:

Dandelion (Taraxacum offinale) leaves provide a healthy supply of vitamins, much like spinach. In fact, although it has become the bane of North American gardeners and lawn owners, dandelion greens are a component of many gourmet salads.

Medicinally, dandelion has been used for centuries, dating back to ancient Greece. Leaves intended for medicinal use are harvested before flowering, to ensure the most nutrients.

They are a very rich source of vitamin A, and contain vitamin D, vitamin C, carious B vitamins, iron, silicon, magnesium, zinc and manganese, too. Dandelion leaves produce a diuretic effect in the body, similar to a prescription drug. Since one of dandelion leaf’s traditional uses was the treatment of water retention, it’s really not too surprising. Dandelion leaf is also rich in potassium – one of the vital minerals many Americans lack in their diet. So, even though it may act as a diuretic, it replaces more potassium than the body expels.

The diuretic effect of dandelion can relieve hypertension by drawing excess water and sodium from the body and releasing it through the kidneys as urine. Getting rid of extra water and sodium allows the blood vessels to relax – lowering blood pressure.

 

Lycopene:

If a nutrient can be called exciting, lycopene is it. Lycopene is found mostly in tomatoes and processed tomato products, like pasta and pizza sauce. Related to beta-carotene lycopene shows great antioxidant abilities among its many talents. In fact, it shows even greater free-radical scavenging properties than beta-carotene, its more famous cousin. Healthy intakes of lycopene can guard against a variety of chronic conditions, including lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol, lowering homocysteine levels and reducing blood platelet stickiness that can lead to clogged arteries. It’s even being studied for its protective effect against prostate cancer.

And, for proof, you don’t have to look too far to see the amazing effect lycopene intake can have on health. The Mediterranean diet provides an excellent example. Its high intakes of vegetables, (tomatoes, of course, playing a central role) fish, and whole grains improve cholesterol levels and lower blood pressure. The research on lycopene as a stand-alone nutrient has been compelling. A randomized clinical trial found that not having enough lycopene was associated with early thickening of the arteries.

So, it makes sense that other clinical trials, showed that higher intakes of lycopene frequently meant less thickening of arteries, and a reduced risk of heart attack. In one study, the risk of heart attack was 60% lower in individuals with the highest levels of lycopene. In a multicenter study, similar results were found – men with the highest levels of lycopene had a 48% lower risk of heart attack.

 

Q. What can I expect taking this herbal combination?

A. You should notice both systolic and diastolic numbers lowering in about two weeks. The scientific study showed that for pre-hypertensive and stage I, (early hypertensive individuals) this combination for ingredients lowers both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

When you’re taking herbs to support your blood pressure, it’s important to keep it monitored so you have an accurate reading (and record) of your numbers. If you need to, you can pick up a home blood pressure monitoring device. These can retail for anywhere from $30 all the way up to $200, but buying one in the $30 to $50 range is a good idea and money well spent. Consider taking the machine to your local doctor’s office or fire department to have it tested for accuracy against a professional blood pressure monitor. See the chart below for tips on getting an accurate reading from a home monitor.

 

Tips for Accurate Blood Pressure Monitoring:

-Relax for about 5 to 10 minutes before measurement.

-If you have just come inside from cold outdoors allow yourself to warm up.

-Remove tight-fitting clothing and jewelry.

-Unless your physician recommends otherwise, use left arm to measure pressure.

-Sit, don’t stand.

-Remain still and do not talk while using the monitor.

 

Q. Are there any side effects?

A. There were no side effects noted in the study. However, because of the mild diuretic effect of dandelion leaf extract, you may notice an increase in trips to the bathroom. It’s always important to make sure you don’t get dehydrated, so you may want to drink more water during the day.

 

Conclusion:

High blood pressure doesn’t happen overnight. As we get older, the likelihood of developing hypertension increases. And, stressful, fast-forward lifestyles, bad diets and no exercise conspire to raise our blood pressure.

 

In my own practice I have helped patients move toward a healthier lifestyle, including diet, exercise, and blood-pressure reducing supplements. They live better, more vibrant lives as a result, and their blood pressure normalizes. It really can happen – you can bring your blood pressure back to normal, and this combination of scientifically and clinically validated ingredients can help.



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Olive, With a Twist – The Leaves of the Olive Tree are as beneficial to our health as the
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Date: October 07, 2006 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Olive, With a Twist – The Leaves of the Olive Tree are as beneficial to our health as the

Olive, With a Twist – The Leaves of the Olive Tree are as beneficial to our health as the famous oil.

Okay class, its time for a beneficial botanicals pop quiz. Raise your hands—how many people here know that olive oil is good for you? The whole room not surprising. Now, how many know that olive leaf is also good for you? There are not quite so many hands up this time. Let the lesson begin.

The olive tree occupies a prominent place in ancient history and no wonder: olives and the oil hey contain were (and are) dietary staples in the Mediterranean world. (The Greeks were so enamored of the olive tree that they ascribed its creation to the goddess Athena.) But the leaf of this venerable tree has also made historical appearances, generally as a folk remedy for bringing down fevers. The mechanism behind that action didn’t come to light until scientists were able to isolate a substance called oleuropein, responsible for both the bitter taste of uncured olives and the tree’s hardy nature and resistance to bugs and bacteria.

Germ Buster

In the laboratory oleuropein extract has been as tough on many of the bacteria and viruses that plague human beings as it is on the olive tree’s natural enemies, a finding which helps explain why olive leaf has traditionally worked as well in fighting fevers (a sign of infection). Various types of rhinovirus (common cold), influenza and herpes virus have been numbered among oleuropein’s victims, along with the bacterial bad guys Escherichia coli (a strain of which can cause food poisoning) and staphylococcus aureus (the prime suspect in many hospital acquired infections).

Viruses are especially difficult to vanquish—antibiotics, as anyone suffering from the flu can tell you, don’t touch these tiny marauders. Olive leaf’s power lies in its ability to thwart viruses from replicating; now replication means no new viruses, which means no spread of infection. Olive extract can also incite immune system cells into gobbling up harmful micro-organisms.

Better Blood

In addition to thwarting microbes, olive leaf promotes better circulatory health. The white-coat crowd has discovered that oleuropein extract relaxes constricted arteries, which results in reduced blood pressure. And olive not only reduces blood sugar (glucose) levels but also serves as an antioxidant, a substance that can mop up harmful molecules known as free radicals. Given that oxidation plays a key role in the development of diabetic complications, both actions make olive leaf an intriguing option for people with diabetes. What’s more, oxidation also affects LDL cholesterol, turning it into the bad stuff that clogs arteries; olive leaf appears to interfere with this insidious process. This triple action-the ability to reduce blood pressure, glucose and LDL oxidation—may give olive leaf an important role in fighting metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health woes that helps fuel the worlds epidemic of cardiovascular disease.

The latest news from the olive grove: what boosts your blood may also benefit your bones. French researchers, intrigued by the low occurrence of osteoporosis among people who consume olive-heavy Mediterranean diets, found that female rats who received oleuropein showed less inflammation-induced bone loss than those fed standard rat chow (Clinical Nutrition 2006 online).

Surprised to learn that the olive trees leaf is just as valuable as its fruits? It’s true-and olive leaf deserves to go straight to the head of the class. --Lisa James.



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Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral
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Date: November 20, 2005 07:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride is an “essential” mineral for humans. It is abundant in ionic trace mineral preparations. It is a major mineral nutrient that occurs primarily in body fluids. Chloride is a prominent negatively charged ion of the blood, where it represents 70% of the body’s total negative ion content. On average, an adult human body contains approximately 115 grams of chloride, making up about 0.15% of total body weight.1 The suggested amount of chloride intake ranges from 750 to 900 milligrams per day, based on the fact that total obligatory loss of chloride in the average person is close to 530 milligrams per day. As the principle negatively charged ion in the body, chloride serves as one of the main electrolytes of the body. Chloride, in addition to potassium and sodium, assist in the conduction of electrical impulses when dissolved in bodily water. Potassium and sodium become positive ions as they lose an electron when dissolved and chloride becomes a negative ion as it gains an electron when dissolved. A positive ion is always accompanied by a negative ion, hence the close relationship between sodium, potassium and chloride. The electrolytes are distributed throughout all body fluids including the blood, lymph, and the fluid inside and outside cells.2 The negative charge of chloride balances against the positive charges of sodium and potassium ions in order to maintain serum osmolarity.

Pivotal Roles of Chloride in the Body

In addition to its functions as an electrolyte, chloride combines with hydrogen in the stomach to make hydrochloric acid, a powerful digestive enzyme that is responsible for the break down of proteins, absorption of other metallic minerals, and activation of intrinsic factor, which in turn absorbs vitamin B12. Chloride is specially transported into the gastric lumen, in exchange for another negatively charged electrolyte (bicarbonate), in order to maintain electrical neutrality across the stomach membrane. After utilization in hydrochloric acid, some chloride is reabsorbed by the intestine, back into the blood stream where it is required for maintenance of extracellular fluid volume. Chloride is both actively and passively absorbed by the body, depending on the current metabolic demands. A constant exchange of chloride and bicarbonate, between red blood cells and the plasma helps to govern the pH balance and transport of carbon dioxide, a waste product of respiration, from the body. With sodium and potassium, chloride works in the nervous system to aid in the transport of electrical impulses throughout the body, as movement of negatively charged chloride into the cell propagates the nervous electrical potential.

Deficiency of Chloride

Deficiency of chloride is rare. However, when it does occur, it results in a life threatening condition known as alkalosis, in which the blood becomes overly alkaline. A tedious balance between alkalinity and acidity is in constant flux, and must be vigilantly maintained throughout the entire body. Alkalosis may occur as a result of excessive loss of sodium, such as heavy sweating during endurance exercise, and in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms include muscle weakness, loss of appetite, irritability, dehydration, and profound lethargy. Hypochloremia may result from water overload, wasting conditions, and extensive bodily burns with sequestration of extracellular fluids. In a situation in which infants were inadvertently fed chloride-deficient formula, many experienced failure to thrive, anorexia, and weakness in their first year of life.3

Excess Intake?

Excessive intakes of dietary chloride only occur with the ingestion of large amounts of salt and potassium chloride. The toxic effects of such diets, such as fluid retention and high blood pressure, are attributed to the high sodium and potassium levels.4 Chloride toxicity has not been observed in humans except in the special case of impaired sodium chloride metabolism, e.g. in congestive heart failure.5 Healthy individuals can tolerate the intake of large quantities of chloride provided that there is a concomitant intake of fresh water. Other situations in which increased blood levels of chloride are seen include diseases of improper waste elimination that occur in kidney diseases. Excess chloride is normally excreted in the urine, sweat, and bowels. In fact, excess urinary excretion of chloride occurs in high salt diets. Excessive intakes of chloride can occur in a person with compromised health in addition to an unhealthy diet. However, those that follow a healthy diet and lead an active lifestyle may need to consider supplementing their diet with this important mineral.

Chloride vs. Chlorine

The mineral supplement chloride is very different from the gas chlorine. While elemental chlorine is a dangerous gas that does not exist in the free elemental state in nature because of its reactivity, although it is widely distributed in combination with other elements. Chloride is related to chlorine however, as one of the most common chlorine compounds is common salt, NaCl. Chloride is a by-product of the reaction between chlorine and an electrolyte, such as potassium, magnesium, or sodium, which are essential for human metabolism. Chloride salts are essential for sustaining human metabolism and have none of the effects of isolated chlorine gas.

Sources of Chloride

Chloride occurs naturally in foods at levels normally less than 0.36 milligrams per gram of food. The average intake of chloride during a salt-free diet is approximately 100 milligrams per day. Unfortunately, chloride is found commonly combined with undesirable dietary sources. The most common of these negative sources is table salt. Table salt is made from a combination of sodium and chloride ions. Other unhealthful sources include yeast extracts, processed lunchmeats, and cheeses. Healthier sources of chloride include kelp (seaweed), ionic trace minerals, olives, rye, tomatoes, lettuce, and celery, although not in large enough amounts to supply the needs of an active adult.6 In its original form, however, chloride is leached from various rocks into soil and water by years of weathering processes. The chloride ion is highly mobile and is transported to closed basins, such as the Great Salt Lake, or oceans.7

Summary

Chloride is a highly important, vital mineral required for both human and animal life. Without chloride, the human body would be unable to maintain fluids in blood vessels, conduct nerve transmissions, move muscles, or maintain proper kidney function. As a major electrolyte mineral of the body, chloride performs many roles, and is rapidly excreted from the body. Active adults that eat a healthy diet devoid of salt and illnesses in which vomiting and/or diarrhea are profuse warrant the supplementation of additional chloride. Replacement of chloride is essential on a daily basis to maintain regular metabolic function. Chloride is safely utilized by the body, without negative health effects. Of the negative health effects that have been associated with diets high in chloride, these are mainly attributable to the accompanying sodium and potassium, two other electrolyte minerals to which chloride is often attached

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Wesson LG. Physiology of the human kidney. New York, NY, Grune and Stratton, 1969: 591

2 Weast RC, ed. CRC handbook of chemistry and physics, 67th ed. Boca Raton, FL, CRC Press, 1986.

3 Kaleita TA. Neurologic/behavioral syndrome associated with ingestion of chloride-deficient infant formula. Pediatrics 1986 Oct;78(4):714-5

4 Beard TC. A salt-hypertension hypothesis. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 1990;16 Suppl 7:S35-8

5 Seelig M. Cardiovascular consequences of magnesium deficiency and loss: pathogenesis, prevalence and manifestations--magnesium and chloride loss in refractory potassium repletion. Am J Cardiol 1989 Apr 18;63(14):4G-21G

6 Altschul AM, Grommet JK. Food choices for lowering sodium intake. Hypertension 1982 Sep-Oct;4(5 Pt 2):III116-20

7 Gelb SB, Anderson MP. Sources of chloride and sulfate in ground water beneath an urbanized area in Southeastern Wisconsin (Report WIS01 NTIS). Chemical abstracts, 1981, 96(2):11366g.



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Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion
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Date: June 21, 2005 05:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion

Fats and Oils: Clearing the Confusion

By Fred Pescatore, M.D.

Aside from tax forms, it's hard to find anything more confusing to consumers than fats and oils. Fat-free diehards still don't know that fat is essential for the brain, hormones, cellular membranes: life itself. The clueless still use shortening, margarine and damaged grocery store vegetable oils. But what worries me more is that supposedly educated consumers aren't even getting it right. Should we be surprised since their doctors probably don't know the truth?

Mistakes made by your customers. They:

  • * Don't know monounsaturated fats are the key to health.
  • * Think olive oil is the healthiest choice.
  • * Buy junk olive oil without knowing it.
  • * Make olive oil toxic with misuse.
  • * Use grapeseed oil for its smoke point without regard to its pro-inflammatory fatty acids.
  • * Think all polyunsaturated fats are created equal.
  • * Believe flax oil is just the same as fish oil.
  • * Think healthy oil must be heavy and flavorless or strongly flavored.
  • * Don't know that oil has zero carbs.
  • * Don't know that all oils have the same number of calories.

    Let's clear up these myths so consumers can get busy being confused about something else:

  • * A compelling number of studies clearly demonstrate that we should get about 80% of our fats as monounsaturated fats, a key to the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet. Monounsaturated fats (omega 9) have been shown to lower total cholesterol, increase HDL, improve blood sugar management and help prevent cancer.
  • * Properly prepared olive oil is a decent choice because it is relatively high (around 70%) in monounsaturated fats. However, macadamia nut oil is much higher (84%). Macadamia nut oil is also lower in saturated fat and significantly higher in vitamin E, already making it a healthier choice.
  • * Any time something becomes quite popular, pretenders ride the wave. It is beyond suspicious that more Italian olive oil is sold than is actually produced. Much of what consumers think is "Extra Virgin" olive oil is actually a blend of refined olive (health benefits dramatically reduced) and even other oils (hmm, allergies anyone?). I review this in greater detail in The Hamptons Diet, my latest book, due out in May. For increasingly obvious reasons, the specific oil I recommend in it is MacNut™ Oil. It is the genuine article and the only product processed in the plant in Australia so there is no chance of contamination with another nut. This is a premium oil with processing quite superior to that from other countries.
  • * Overheating oil causes the formation of toxic free radicals and trans fats. Many don't realize that olive oil's smoke point is only 300-325:; so grilling, stir-fry and even baking become problematic. MacNut™ Oil is blessed with a 410: smoke point and great shelf stability.

  • * Grapeseed oil is 74% polyunsaturated omega 6. If that doesn't concern you, please read the next section.
  • * Recall that omega 3 and omega 6 fats, both polyunsaturated, have relatively opposite effects. Among the many virtues of omega 3, is that it is anti-inflammatory. The majority of omega 6 is pro-inflammatory. Yes, omega 6 is the source of beneficial GLA. However, GLA is just a very tiny variant the body should make if all circumstances are right. Our Paleolithic ancestors ate a diet that balanced the 3's and 6's ideally at 1:1. Now, because of vegetable oil use, junk food and animal feeding practices, Americans consume a 20:1 imbalance of pro-inflammatory omega 6. My recent book, The Allergy and Asthma Cure, tells more about the many health conditions worsened by inflammation. Now you can see that grapeseed oil is literally adding fuel to the fire. In MacNutTM Oil, the 3's and 6's are 1:1, as nature intended.
  • * Flax oil is great stuff if you buy it fresh, keep it cold and use it promptly. However, the EPA and DHA we prize so much in fish oil is not present in flax oil. To convert omega 3 to EPA and DHA, first be genetically adept and then avoid illness, age, stress, alcohol, aspirin, bad fats or sugar and deficiencies of the B's, C, Zinc and Magnesium. The same factors affect conversion of omega 6 into GLA.
  • * Some consumers have become accustomed to flavorless oils. Others grin and bear food that all tastes like olives. (Good olive oil tastes like olives.) Yet another reason I head the Scientific Advisory Panel for MacNutTM Oil is that it delicious cold or hot. It enhances recipes with a buttery richness but doesn't mask other ingredients.
  • * How can we tell consumers and not sound sassy that all oils are all zero carbs. They are oils, okay? There are only 3 classes of macronutrients: proteins, fats and carbs.
  • * Likewise, oil is oil when it comes to calories. Even 10-W-40 has 9 calories per gram. Protein and sugar are about half that. What is important is the type of fat in the oil and monounsaturated is the best.

    I hope this helps you educate consumers about the proper use of fats. Unfortunately, that still leaves a long list of other things they've been misled about.



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