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  Messages 1-14 from 14 matching the search criteria.
What Herbs Are Good For Boosting The Immune System? Darrell Miller 3/25/12
What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea? Darrell Miller 12/18/11
What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea? Darrell Miller 7/6/11
Elderberry Lozenges With Zinc 1.2mgs Darrell Miller 12/18/09
Echinacea Purpurea Root Darrell Miller 6/17/08
The Fizzy Comparison (Airborne Vs Wellness Fizz) Darrell Miller 2/26/07
Wellness Fizz - Fast-Acting Immune Defense Darrell Miller 2/26/07
Echinacea: why does it work in real life but not in trials? Darrell Miller 2/4/06
Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/7/05
Echinacea - Choosing The Ideal Immune Support Darrell Miller 6/30/05
Wellness Herbal Kids Liquid - Immune Support for Children–Ages 2 & Up Darrell Miller 6/29/05
References Darrell Miller 6/24/05
History Darrell Miller 6/24/05
Well Child - For a Healthy Winter Darrell Miller 6/21/05



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Solaray Echinacea purpurea Root
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Solaray Echinacea purpurea, angustifolia
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Solaray Echinacea purpurea, angustifolia
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Solaray Organic Echinacea Purpurea
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Solaray Organic Echinacea purpurea Herb
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What Herbs Are Good For Boosting The Immune System?
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Date: March 25, 2012 03:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Herbs Are Good For Boosting The Immune System?

Herbs for Immunity

The immunity system comprises a network of organs, cells and tissues that are responsible for your overall wellness. The status of your immunity system mainly depends on your feeding habits. The foods you eat supply you with vital nutrients and minerals that help protect you from diseases. The white blood cells in your body are also endowed with the role of defending your body against diseases. There are herbs that help increase the number of white blood cells, while others produce immunity cells thus boosting your immunity system. The following are the best herbs that are good for boosting the immune system:

Astragalus

Astragalus is a traditional Chinese herb that is locally known as Huang-Qi. The roots of this herb are used for a wide range of purposes, one of which is to boost the immune system. This is because of its ability to increase the number of T-cells and interferon.

Astragalus is also used to treat inflammatory conditions, liver problems, viral and bacterial infections, lack of appetite, short breath, stomach ulcers, flu, common cold, diabetes, stress, hypertension and body weakness. This herb also interferes with the growth of cancerous tumors, and has thus been used as a natural aid during chemotherapy treatments.

Echinacea

Echinacea is a group of herbs popular within the American market, which are also known as black susans, Indian head, American cone flower, or Kansas snake root. The popular species of Echinacea are E. pallid, E. purpurea and E. angustifolia.

These herbs have been used for ages as natural immune boosters because of their ability to increase the number of WBC as well as spleen cells in your body. They also increase the number of natural immune chemicals such as immuno globin, interferon and interleukin. When White Blood Cells increase, they give your body maximum protection against antigens that interfere with your overall wellness. The phenolic compounds found in the flowers, roots and leaves of Echinacea herbs are the ones that facilitate this immuno stimulating function.

They are also natural remedies for common colds, respiratory infections, skin complications and Urinary tract infections. These herbs can suppress your immunity if taken habitually. Therefore, it is recommended that you use the herb only when you suspect infection. It is also advisable for you to limit the intake of Echinacea to a week because overuse may generate unbearable symptoms.

Golden seal

This herb is also known as Ground Raspberry, Yellow Root, Orange Root, Wild Curcuma, Indian Dye, Indian Paint, Jaundice Root or Indian Plant. It is a medicinal herb that contains berberine, canadine and hydrastine alkanoids. Golden seal also contains vital vitamins and minerals that are needed for strong immunity system.

One of the benefits of Golden Seal is that it serves as an immuno stimulant, especially when blended with echinacea. It has also been used to treat various medical conditions such as inflammation, herpes and common cold. It also has tonic and antiseptic qualities. You can also use it externally to cure sores and itchy sensations.

So if you want an immune boost, give one of these herbs a try!

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What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea?
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Date: December 18, 2011 08:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And purpurea?

In the advent of natural medicine these days it is important for us to also know what we are dealing with. We may feel that it is better because it is all natural but still, just like prescription drugs, herbal medicine also has its attractiveness to those who want to take advantage of people’s needs and momentary lapses of judgement. It does not mean that it is all natural it is good for the body right away, we also need to find out if it is exactly what we need or what we expect it to be. These herbal medicines and supplements in the market today come from plants and they are derived from it by various types of processing. As an example, we can look at Echinacea Angustifolia And purpurea and what the differences are.

Echinacea

Both of them are species of this plant and we will only be able to understand more about those two if we are able to know their mother so to speak. It is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants and those two are part of the family and it has 7 other brothers and sisters so to speak because there are 9 species all in all including both the E Angustifolia and E. purpurea. In modern natural medicine it has been known to have a lot of health benefits and the main one being its ability to support the immune system and help activate white blood cells to improve bodily functions. Other studies have learned that it has the ability to influence the increased production of interferon which is an essential part of the body’s defensive response to any viral attacks that may cause infections.

Echinacea Angustifolia

This flowering plant is believed by some to be a miracle plant especially in the natural medicine world. It has shown to have amazing healing powers and this is what makes it a popular part of alternative medicine. Throughout US history it has been used by native Americans and frontiersmen as tonic and somewhat of a cure all treatment for various ailments and rightfully so because in modern science it has been proven to have amazing antiviral and antifungal properties which makes it an effective treatment against infections, certain diseases, common colds and flu. Other uses that it may have are being a treatment for inflammation, skin ulcers and upper respiratory infection which needs more studies to be done but early results seem promising.

Echinacea purpurea

This specie is not as popular as the other but it also can be effective. It basically is a perennial with long stems and long lasting lavender coloured flowers. It also has the power to help the immune system be stronger and is commonly made as a tea. Studies have shown that it has a mild natural antibiotic characteristic and its extracts has been known to have the ability to increase white blood cell count as well however it is helpful to note that it is better in smaller doses than in large ones.

Both forms posses the same properties primarily immune boosting properties; either one is good to use to help strengthen the body in times of cold and flu and disease.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2546)


What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?
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Date: July 06, 2011 10:32 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is the Difference between Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea?

Echinacea Health Benefits

Echinacea is a group of plant species that belongs to the same family as dandelion, sunflower, and daisy. These flowering shrubs are best known as ornamental plants in gardens. Also, they are widely recognized as medicinal herbs in alternative medicine. Modern herbalists have attributed a diverse variety of healing properties to this herb, drawing on its traditional uses among the Native Americans.

Echinacea angustifolia

Elk root, black samson echinacea, or narrow-leaved purple cornflower refers to Echinacea angustifolia. Its native range stretches from Manitoba in the north to Texas in the south. It is an herbaceous plant, as all species of echinacea are. It grows up to 28 inches in height, extending from a branched taproot. Its stems and leaves are hairy while other species are smooth. Its flowers resemble a cone in shape.

Echinacea angustifolia is so named in the vernacular due to the fact that elks knowingly consume the plant when sick or wounded. Elk root is an herb important to folk medicine practices of Plain Indians, such as the Cheyenne and Apache. It displays analgesic properties, and thus has been in use as a pain reliever for external wounds and internal inflammation, including allergies, rheumatism, and arthritis.

Research on elk root has been promising. It is one of the species of echinacea believed to enhance the immune system and improve immune responses. In particular, it is good for the respiratory system. It has been used in the treatment of the common cold, sore throat, and nasal congestion. In addition, it exhibits antimicrobial properties, which effectively wards off infections of the respiratory tract.

Echinacea purpurea

Eastern purple cornflower, or simply purple cornflower, refers to Echinacea purpurea. It enjoys a wide distribution in North America, though they thrive in large concentrations in the wild in regions close to the east coast. Unlike all other species of echinacea, it grows from a woody base with fibrous roots instead of a taproot. Its flowers are arranged in a cone, sitting atop a stem that grows up to 40 inches.

Echinacea purpurea is arguably the most extensively studied of all species of echinacea. Traditionally, it has been utilized by many different tribes in North America as a cure-all medicinal herb. Clinical trials have shown that juice extracts obtained from this plant species are useful for the short term treatment of cold infections, though contraindications in children and pregnant women were noted.

Echinacea purpurea displays chemopreventive potential. Laboratory studies have discovered that it contains alkamides, which bind to cannabinoid receptors and inhibit tumor growth and pain chemicals in the process. Also, it has been linked to immunotherapy largely owing to its properties that appear to increase the activity of immune cells. It shows promise as an adjunct treatment for cancer.

Either way, Echinacea can help boost the body so the body can fight back against disease. Make sure you have some in your medicine cabinet just in case you feel a cold coming on!

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Elderberry Lozenges With Zinc 1.2mgs
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Date: December 18, 2009 01:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Elderberry Lozenges With Zinc 1.2mgs

zinc and elderberry lozengesThe immune support benefits of Zinc and Elderberry, on their own or when united, are supported by scores of welldocumented research. Numerous studies have demonstrated the ability of these two natural compounds to help support the body’s ability to more effectively identify, target, and eliminate foreign particles, as part of the immune system’s innate defense mechanism. In lozenge form, they help coat the lining of the throat and esophageal surface — a region where airborne particles, many of which can be harmful, tend to thrive. The presence of zinc has been shown on countless occasions to support a healthy immune response.* Simple enough, right? It would be, if such a strong percentage of the population wasn’t so sensitive to zinc. On an empty stomach (and in some cases, even when food has been consumed), zinc can result in almost unbearable feelings of nausea.

This innovative new low-dose Zinc-Elderberry lozenge from NOW® provides enough zinc to provide effective immune system support, without the gut-wrenching nausea that leaves many would-be users apprehensive of even considering supplementation. Each tasty lozenge delivers a modest 1.2 mg of zinc, along with additional vitamin C, Elderberry extract, Echinacea purpurea root extract, and Slippery Elm extract. If there was ever a time to be extra mindful of one’s immune system maintenance,* this is definitely it. Stock up on this promising new immune supplement and save throughout December!

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Echinacea Purpurea Root
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Date: June 17, 2008 06:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea purpurea Root

There are nine known species of Echinacea native to the United States and southern Canada. The most commonly used and most potent of them is Echinacea purpurea.

Other common names for Echinacea are purple coneflower, American coneflower and coneflower. The plants contain large heads of flowers that bloom in early to late summer.

In North America, Native Americans used Echinacea more than any other herb for its healing properties. For Europeans and Americans, it was believed to aid in curing Anthrax and snakebites as well as contain antimicrobial properties.

Echinacea is well known for its abilities to boost the immune system and to help fight infections. It is also widely used to prevent infections, colds and the flu. In lesser known medicinal practices, it is used to treat wounds and such skin problems as acne and boils. Some studies have shown that Echinacea has been effective in treating upper respiratory infections.

The whole Echinacea plant is used for treating various indications. Fresh or dried, the plant and roots are used to make teas, extracts, juices or external salves, creams and ointments. As a general rule, the fresh-pressed juice of the Echinacea plant is most effective in treating colds in children. In adults, both the root and herb in combination are most effective.

When taken at the first signs of a cold, Echinacea has been found to reduce the length and severity of cold symptoms. Be aware that Echinacea is not a one-dose fix-it remedy. Begin taking recommended doses at the first signs of a cold. Subsequent doses should be taken regularly, according to the product label, until all symptoms have disappeared.

Unfortunately, many herbal preparations can vary in effectiveness due to a lack of systematic extraction and refining. It is best to research the manufacturers of herbal products to find out how they cultivate and store their herbs. Their methods will cause the chemical compositions to vary greatly. The different parts of the plant that are used vary widely in their chemical makeup as well. One part may be extremely useful as an antimicrobial, while another may stimulate stronger reactions from the immune system. Other factors that may affect the quality of the product you purchase are:

* Species * Plant part * Extraction method * Contamination * Adulteration

Side Effects and Warnings:

When taken orally (by mouth), Echinacea usually does not produce any side effects. In rare cases, some people have experienced allergic reactions and side effects that include:

* Rashes or dermatitis * Pruritus (itching) * An increase in asthma symptoms * Anaphylaxis (life threatening allergic reaction) * Hepatoxicity * Nausea * Dizziness * Dyspnea (difficulty breathing)

All of these symptoms tend to be mild and infrequent. If you suffer from asthma symptoms, you should probably avoid using echinacea. In most cases the most common side effects are gastrointestinal in nature, such as gas or mild cramping. People are much more likely to experience side effects if they are allergic to other plants in the daisy family. These plants include:

* Ragweed * Chrysanthemums * Marigolds * Daisies

Use of Echinacea in children younger than 12 years is not recommended due to lack of sufficient data to support safety. It is also not recommended for use in pregnant or nursing women.

Echinacea should not be used if you have progressive systematic or auto-immune disorders, connective tissue disorders or other diseases that may be related to these. It should not be taken if you are taking immune-suppressants and heap-toxic drugs. It may also interfere with anesthesia.

It is important to communicate with your health care providers. Be sure they are aware of any alternative herbs or other substances you are using and what their purpose is in your daily diet.

--
Vitanet ®, LLC

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The Fizzy Comparison (Airborne Vs Wellness Fizz)
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Date: February 26, 2007 03:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Fizzy Comparison (Airborne Vs Wellness Fizz)


The Fizzy Comparison

Airborne Ingredients

•Vitamin A (palmitate)5000 I.U.
•Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)1000 mg
•Potassium (bicarbonate)75 mg

•Magnesium (sulfate)40 mg
•Vitamin E (acetate)30 I.U.
•Zinc (sulfate)8 mg
•Riboflavin2.8 mg
•Manganese (gluconate)3 mg
•Selenium (amino acid chelate) 15 mcg

•Herbal Extract Blend350 mg

(Lonicera, Forsythia, Schizonepeta, Ginger, Chinese Vitex, IsatisRoot, Echinacea)

•Amino Acids 50 mg

(L-Glutamine, L-Lysine HCL)

Also Contains: Sorbitol, Mineral Oil, Sucraloseand Acesulfamepotassium (artificial sweetener)

Wellness Fizz Ingredients

Vitamin A (as beta carotene) 5000 I.U.

•Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)1000 mg
•Potassium (bicarbonate)99 mg
•Vitamin E (succinate)30 I.U.

•Zinc (gluconate)12 mg
•Selenium (sodium selenite) 40 mcg
European Elderberry Ext (5% Flavonoids)200 mg
•Yin Chiao Extract 10:1 Complex 170 mg

(Forsythia, Japanese honeysuckle, Platycodon, Chinese Mint, Lophatherum, Chinese Licorice, Schizonepeta, Soy bean, Burdock, Phragmites)

•Echinacea purpureart. Extract (1.5-1) 100 mg

•Boneset Ext (4:1)30 mg
•Horehound Ext (4:1) 30 mg
•IsatisRt. Ext (4:1) 20 mg
•Isatisleaf Ext (4:1) 20 mg
•Elecampane Rt. Extract (4:1) 20 mg

Also Contains:Stevialeaf, natural flavors, honey

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Wellness Fizz - Fast-Acting Immune Defense
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Date: February 26, 2007 02:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Wellness Fizz - Fast-Acting Immune Defense

New! Wellness Fizz™

Fast-Acting Immune Defense

  • Delicious, efficient seltzer drink that is quickly and easily absorbed into the bloodstream.
  • For speedy, convenient protection in new or enclosed environments.
  • Features Yin Chiao, a centuries-old Chinese herbal blend that supports immune function with powerful phytonutrients.
  • Yin Chiao combines honeysuckle and forsythia with additional Chinese botanicals to tonify and cleanse the lungs and circulatory system.
  • Beautifully designed counter display puts this brand new product at your customers’ fingertips!
  • Added ingredients include the renowned winter immune herb echinacea; elderberry, a source of immune-stimulating anthocyanidins; and one full gram per wafer of vitamin C.
1 wafer contains:

Vitamin A (as beta-carotene) 5,000 IU

Vitamin C (from ascorbic acid) 1 g

Zinc (as zinc gluconate) 12 mg

Vitamin E (as vitamin E succinate) 30 IU

Selenium (as sodium selenite) 40 mcg

European Elder Berry Extract (5% flavonoids) 200 mg

Yin Chiao Extract (10:1) Complex 170 mg

(Forsythia Fruit, Japanese Honeysuckle Flower, Platycodon Root, Chinese Mint Aerial Parts, Lophatherum Stem and Leaf, Chinese Licorice Root and Rhizome, Schizonepeta Aerial Parts, Soy Bean, Burdock Fruit, and Phragmites Rhizome)

Echinacea purpurea Root Extract (1.5:1) 100 mg

Elecampane Root Extract (4:1) 20 mg

Boneset Aerial Parts Extract (4:1) 30 mg

Horehound Aerial Parts Extract (4:1) 30 mg

Isatis Root Extract (4:1) 20 mg

Isatis Leaf Extract (4:1) 20 mg

Suggested Use: Dissolve 1 wafer in 8 ounces of hot or cold water every 3 to 4 hours at the first sign of imbalance or before exposure to crowded environments such as offices, restaurants and airplanes. Do not exceed 4 wafers daily.

Wellness Fizz Wellness Fizz Wellness Fizz Wellness Fizz Wellness Fizz

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Echinacea: why does it work in real life but not in trials?
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Date: February 04, 2006 09:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea: why does it work in real life but not in trials?

The Wellness Revolution

Why clinical trials must take into account real dosage amounts!

You took it, and it worked. You’re one of legions of people all over the world who have found the little purple coneflower called Echinacea to be wonderfully effective in fighting colds. Echinacea is among the most popular herbal supplements in North America, accounting for 10% of herbal sales in the U.S.

So why are some in the scientific community saying it doesn’t work?

How Controversy Over a Little Flower

It was a July 2005 study done at the University of Edmonton in Canada, published in the pages of the New England Journal of Medicine, that fueled the fire of controversy. On one side, there’s the community of people who take Echinacea to ward off colds and other respiratory tract infections (staying well or getting better quickly tends to make enthusiastic and loyal followers). On the other side is a spate of studies, culminating in the July 2005, giving the thumbs down to the flower’s healing powers.

The much-touted study was a placebo-controlled trial and was double-blinded (neither test group knew what they were taking). Healthy college students were given a dose of a rhinovirus infection, and were then sent to individual dorm rooms to take either an extract of Echinacea or a placebo. The results were disappointing to those of us expecting the scientific community’s “proof” to match ours—based on what our bodies and senses tell us. The study found no statistically significant difference between severity of symptoms or duration of the rhinovirus between the Echinacea and the control group. Why didn’t the study results match those of so many individuals?

What went wrong?

Noted herbalist and author Roy Upton states, [“The studies which found] positive results had dosages which were consistent with herbalist recommendations.”]

The University of Edmonton study didn’t.

Two oft-cited clinical trials in which positive results were found in the use of Echinacea for the common cold, both in vivo and in human volunteers, have been conducted by researchers Vinti Goel.

Tiny Doses, Minuscule Amounts of Active Herb

It is widely agreed among herbalists that the trial—also conducted by the team at the University of Alberta, Canada—published in the New England Journal of Medicine in July 2005 used radically smaller doses than those traditionally taken, doses so small they couldn’t possibly have worked. In the Turner trial, Echinacea extracts were given in doses of 1.5 ml tid, equivalent to 900mg daily, if the conductors of trial had consulted the real-life herbalist, say the natural health care community, they could have run a test that would have, well, tested something. The usual prescription dose for Echinacea taken by mouth ranges from 500 to 1,000 milligrams per day, and is taken three to five times a day, for seven days. This creates a range of 1500 to 5,000 mg per day. Most studies have shown Echinacea to have the greatest effectiveness when one starts taking it immediately upon feeling the early symptoms of coming down with a cold or virus.

Importantly, Echinacea has been proven in many tests, including those by Bauer and Wagner, Foster, and Hobbs, to have a supportive effect upon the immune system. That Echinacea stimulates macrophages and killer cells is proven.

Sources:

Turner RB et al. New England Journal of Medicine, 2005 jul 28;353(4):341-8.

Upton R et al. Echinacea purpurea root: standards of analysis, Quality control, and therapeutics, American herbal pharmacopoeia, 2004

Goel v et al. Efficacy of standardized Echinacea preparation (echinilin) for the treatment of common cold: a randomized, double-blind, placebo- controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Pharmaceutical Therapy 2004: Feb,29(1):75-83.



--
Buy Echinacea at Vitanet ®

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Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet
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Date: December 07, 2005 01:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet

Allibiotic CF Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 03/09/05

LIKELY USERS: People seeking support of the immune system and intestinal flora

KEY INGREDIENTS: Allicin (“AlliSure” patented, stabilized allicin from fresh garlic); Olive Leaf Extract (Olea Europaea with 18% minimum Oleuropein content); Elderberry extract, from fruit/berry, 60:1 concentrate (equivalent to 2,500 mg. of fresh berries of Sambucus nigra); Oil of Oregano (wild oregano from Origanum vulgare) ImmunEnhancer AG (trademarked Arabinogalactan from Larch Tree, Larix occidentalis)

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: AlliSure is the clinically tested, patented and stable form of allicin. Not allicin potential, but actual allicin. Allicin represents the immune supporting nutrients of raw garlic, and is chemically similar to penicillin, though with different physical properties. AlliSure shares garlic’s abilities to help maintain healthy cholesterol and blood pressure levels, and also has been shown to raise levels of a key T cell to enhance immune system function. Like raw garlic, AlliSure has antimicrobial properties linked to its ability to react with sulfur-containing metabolic enzymes. Allicin is also shown in studies to play a role in controlling blood sugar and abnormal cell growth.

Black Elderberries have strong antioxidant properties, containing flavonoids like anthocyanidins. They have been studied in relation to inhibition of viral replication and of minor inflammations.

Olive Leaf has been used as an antioxidant, cholesterol and blood viscosity regulator, and vasodilator. But its most important use has been as a way to help the body deal with undesirable organisms in the vital respiratory and intestinal areas.

Oil of Oregano (wild oregano, wild marjoram) contains carvacrol and thymol, which are responsible for much of its antimicrobial activities. It also has some anti-inflammatory effects.

Arabinogalactan from Larch tree bark (ImmunEnhancer AG) can help speed the immune system’s response to undesirable organisms and is often compared to Echinacea. It has also been shown to promote the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT INFORMATION: Patented and trademarked ingredients enhance quality controls and have clinical research. Rosemary Oil provides antioxidant protection for the capsule contents. Enteric coating protects the capsule from stomach acid to deliver its contents past the stomach. This helps to assure full potency and reduces the possibility of the oils repeating.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: One softgel twice daily, preferably with meals. Try one before using the full dose.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Probiotics, Antioxidants, D-Flame

CAUTIONS: Pregnant & lactating women, children and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. Discontinue use if any uncomfortable side effects occur. This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

ALLICIN:

Josling P. Preventing the common cold with a garlic supplement: a double-blind, placebo-controlled survey. Adv Ther. 2001 Jul-Aug;18(4):189-93. (AlliSure was used in this study.)

Abramovitz D, Gavri S, Harats D, Levkovitz H, Mirelman D, Miron T, Eilat-Adar S, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Eldar M, Vered Z. Allicin-induced decrease in formation of fatty streaks (atherosclerosis) in mice fed a cholesterol-rich diet. Coron Artery Dis. 1999 Oct;10(7):515-9. PMID: 10562920

Ankri S, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Mirelman D. Allicin from garlic strongly inhibits cysteine proteinases and cytopathic effects of Entamoeba histolytica. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1997 Oct;41(10):2286-8. PMID: 9333064

Cellini L, Di Campli E, Masulli M, Di Bartolomeo S, Allocati N. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori by garlic extract (Allium sativum). FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 1996 Apr;13(4):273-7. PMID: 8739190

Chowdhury AK, Ahsan M, Islam SN, Ahmed ZU. Efficacy of aqueous extract of garlic & allicin in experimental shigellosis in rabbits. Indian J Med Res. 1991 Jan;93:33-6.

Eilat S, Oestraicher Y, Rabinkov A, Ohad D, Mirelman D, Battler A, Eldar M, Vered Z. Alteration of lipid profile in hyperlipidemic rabbits by allicin, an active constituent of garlic. Coron Artery Dis. 1995 Dec;6(12):985-90. PMID: 8723021

Elkayam A, Mirelman D, Peleg E, Wilchek M, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Oron-Herman M, Rosenthal T. The effects of allicin on weight in fructose-induced hyperinsulinemic, hyperlipidemic, hypertensive rats. Am J Hypertens. 2003 Dec;16(12):1053-6. PMID: 14643581

Feldberg RS, Chang SC, Kotik AN, Nadler M, Neuwirth Z, Sundstrom DC, Thompson NH. In vitro mechanism of inhibition of bacterial cell growth by allicin. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1988 Dec;32(12):1763-8.

Focke M, Feld A, Lichtenthaler K. Allicin, a naturally occurring antibiotic from garlic, specifically inhibits acetyl-CoA synthetase. FEBS Lett. 1990 Feb 12;261(1):106-8.

Hirsch K, Danilenko M, Giat J, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Mirelman D, Levy J, Sharoni Y. Effect of purified allicin, the major ingredient of freshly crushed garlic, on cancer cell proliferation. Nutr Cancer. 2000;38(2):245-54. PMID: 11525603

Patya M, Zahalka MA, Vanichkin A, Rabinkov A, Miron T, Mirelman D, Wilchek M, Lander HM, Novogrodsky A. Allicin stimulates lymphocytes and elicits an antitumor effect: a possible role of p21ras. Int Immunol. 2004 Feb;16(2):275-81. PMID: 14734613

Rabinkov A, Miron T, Mirelman D, Wilchek M, Glozman S, Yavin E, Weiner L. S-Allylmercaptoglutathione: the reaction product of allicin with glutathione possesses SH-modifying and antioxidant properties. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2000 Dec 11;1499(1-2):144-153. PMID: 11118647

Rabinkov A, Miron T, Konstantinovski L, Wilchek M, Mirelman D, Weiner L. The mode of action of allicin: trapping of radicals and interaction with thiol containing proteins. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1998 Feb 2;1379(2):233-44. PMID: 9528659

Sela U, Ganor S, Hecht I, Brill A, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Mirelman D, Lider O, Hershkoviz R. Allicin inhibits SDF-1alpha-induced T cell interactions with fibronectin and endothelial cells by down-regulating cytoskeleton rearrangement, Pyk-2 phosphorylation and VLA-4 expression. Immunology. 2004 Apr;111(4):391-9. PMID: 15056375

Shadkchan Y, Shemesh E, Mirelman D, Miron T, Rabinkov A, Wilchek M, Osherov N. Efficacy of allicin, the reactive molecule of garlic, in inhibiting Aspergillus spp. in vitro, and in a murine model of disseminated aspergillosis. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2004 May;53(5):832-6. Epub 2004 Mar 24. PMID: 15044429

Tsai Y, Cole LL, Davis LE, Lockwood SJ, Simmons V, Wild GC. Antiviral properties of garlic: in vitro effects on influenza B, herpes simplex and coxsackie viruses. Planta Med. 1985 Oct;(5):460-1. PMID: 3001801

Uchida Y, Takahashi T, Sato N. [The characteristics of the antibacterial activity of garlic (author's transl)] Jpn J Antibiot. 1975 Aug;28(4):638-42. PMID: 1099271

Yasuo Yamada and Keizô Azuma. Evaluation of the In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Allicin. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1977 April; 11(4): 743–749.

ELDERBERRY:

Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1985, 423.

Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C, et al. (eds). PDR for Herbal Medicines. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics, 1998, 1116–7.

Mascolo N, Autore G, Capasso G, et al. Biological screening of Italian medicinal plants for anti-inflammatory activity. Phytother Res 1987;1:28–31.

Murkovic M, Abuja PM, Bergmann AR, et al. Effects of elderberry juice on fasting and postprandial serum lipids and low-density lipoprotein oxidation in healthy volunteers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Eur J Clin Nutr. Feb2004;58(2):244-9.

Newall CA, Anderson LA, Phillipson JD. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press, 1996, 104–5.

Yesilada E. Inhibitory Effects of Turkish Folk Remedies on Inflammatory Cytokines: Interleukin-1Alpha, Interleukin-1Beta and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha. J Ethnopharmacol. Sept1997;58(1):59-73. Youdim KA, Martin A, Joseph JA. Incorporation of the elderberry anthocyanins by endothelial cells increases protection against oxidative stress. Free Radical Biol Med 2000;29:51–60.

Zakay-Rones Z, Varsano N, Zlotnik M, et al. Inhibition of several strains of influenza virus in vitro and reduction of symptoms by an elderberry extract (Sambucus nigra L.) during an outbreak of influenza B Panama. J Alt Compl Med 1995;1:361–9.

OLIVE LEAF EXTRACT:

American Herbal Products Association. Use of Marker Compounds in Manufacturing and Labeling Botanically Derived Dietary Supplements. Silver Spring, MD: American Herbal Products Association; 2001.

Bennani-Kabchi N, et al. Effects of Olea europea var. oleaster leaves in hypercholesterolemic insulin-resistant sand rats. Therapie. Nov1999;54(6):717-23.

Bisignano G, et al. On the in-vitro antimicrobial activity of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol. J Pharm Pharmacol. Aug1999;51(8):971-4. Gonzalez M, et al. Hypoglycemic activity of olive leaf. Planta Medica. 1992;58:513-515. Visoli F, et al. Oleuropein protects low density lipoprotein from oxidation. Life Sciences. 1994;55:1965-71. PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd edition. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:557.

Petroni A, et al. Inhibition of platelet aggregation and eicosanoid production by phenolic components of olive oil.Thromb Res. Apr1995;78(2):151-60. Pieroni A, et al. In vitro anti-complementary activity of flavonoids from olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves. Pharmazie. Oct1996;51(10):765-8. Zarzuelo A, et al. Vasodilator effect of olive leaf. Planta Med. Oct1991;57(5):417-9. OREGANO OIL (OIL OF OREGANO, WILD OREGANO, WILD MARJORAM):

Dorman HJ, et al. Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils. J Appl Microbiol. Feb2000;88(2):308-16. Force M, et al. Inhibition of enteric parasites by emulsified oil of oregano in vivo. Phytother Res. May2000;14(3):213-4.

Hammer KA, Carson CF, Riley TV. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts. J Appl Microbiol 1999;86:985–90.

Kelm MA, Nair MG, Strasburg GM. Antioxidant and Cyclooxygenase Inhibitory Phenolic Compounds from Ocimum sanctum Linn. Phytomedicine. Mar2000;7(1):7-13. Lamaison JL, et al. Medicinal Lamiaceae with antioxidant properties, a potential source of rosmarinic acid. Pharm Acta Helv. 1991;66(7):185-8.

Ponce MM, Navarro AI, Martinez GMN, et al. In vitro effect against Giardia of 14 plant extracts. Rev Invest Clin 1994;46:343–7 [in Spanish].

Stiles JC, Sparks W, Ronzio RA. The inhibition of Candida albicans by oregano. J Applied Nutr 1995;47:96–102.

Tantaoui EA, Beraoud L. Inhibition of growth and aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus by essential oils of selected plant materials. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol 1994;13:67–72. ImmunEnhancer AG (Larch tree Arabinogalactan)

Corado J, et al. Impairment of Natural Killer (NK) Cytotoxic Activity in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection. Exp Immunol. 1997;109:451-457. Currier NL, Lejtenyi D, Miller SC. Effect over time of in-vivo administration of the polysaccharide arabinogalactan on immune and hemopoietic cell lineages in murine spleen and bone marrow. Phytomedicine. 2003 Mar;10(2-3):145-53. PMID: 12725568

Egert D, et al. Studies on Antigen Specificity of Immunoreactive Arabinogalactan Proteins Extracted from Baptisia tinctoria and Echinacea purpurea. Planta Med. 1992;58:163-165. Gonda R, et al. Arabinogalactan Core Structure and Immunological Activities of Ukonan C, An Acidic Polysaccharide from the Rhizome of Curcuma longa. Biol Pharm Bull. 1993;16:235-238. Hagmar B, et al. Arabinogalactan Blockade of Experimental Metastases to Liver by Murine Hepatoma. Invasion Metastasis. 1991;11:348-355. Kelly GS. Larch arabinogalactan: clinical relevance of a novel immune-enhancing polysaccharide. Altern Med Rev. 1999 Apr;4(2):96-103. Review. PMID: 10231609

Kim LS, Waters RF, Burkholder PM. Immunological activity of larch arabinogalactan and Echinacea: a preliminary, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Altern Med Rev. 2002 Apr;7(2):138-49. PMID: 11991793

Levine PH, et al. Dysfunction of Natural Killer Activity in a Family With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1998;88:96-104. Robinson RR, Feirtag J, Slavin JL. Effects of dietary arabinogalactan on gastrointestinal and blood parameters in healthy human subjects. J Am Coll Nutr. 2001 Aug;20(4):279-85. PMID: 11506055

Rolfe RD. The Role of Probiotic Cultures in the Control of Gastrointestinal Health. J Nutr. Feb2000;130(2S Suppl):396S-402S.

Salyers AA, Vercellotti JR, West SE, Wilkins TD. Fermentation of mucin and plant polysaccharides by strains of Bacteroides from the human colon. Appl Environ Microbiol. 1977 Feb;33(2):319-22. PMID: 848954

Uchida A. Therapy of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Nippon Rinsho. 1992;50:2679-2683.



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Echinacea - Choosing The Ideal Immune Support
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Date: June 30, 2005 09:27 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea - Choosing The Ideal Immune Support

Echinacea By Ellen J. Kamhi, Ph. D. with Dorie Greenblatt Echinacea, pronounced ek-i-NAY-see-a, is one herb that has become a “household” name in the 1990’s. Many refer to it as “Purple Cone Flower” because of its large purple daisy petals, which contain a hard and spiny center cone. These spines probably give the plant its name, since sea animals with spines are called “echinoderms”. Echinacea is indigenous to the U.S., and can be found both growing wild in many areas as well as in cultivated gardens. There are actually nine different species of the plant; two are most popular as remedies: Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea. Echinacea has a long history of use by Native Americans, who have utilized the herb for a wide variety of treatments ranging from stings, poisoning, toothaches and swollen glands to colds and sore throats. It has also been touted as an ideal natural remedy for snake bites. In particular, the benefit of Echinacea as a treatment for snake bites brought national attention to the herb in the last half of the 1800’s. Dr. H.F.C. Meyer of Pawnee City, Nebraska first tried to interest Eclectic Physicians (doctors who used natural medicines) to use Echinacea as an herbal remedy for snake bites by volunteering to be bitten by a rattlesnake to prove its effectiveness. Although his dramatic offer was rejected, his enthusiasm and concerted efforts led to renewed interest and investigative studies on Echinacea, resulting in the herb’s emergence as one of the most popular natural plant therapies by the turn of the century.

Extensive studies on Echinacea’s medicinal properties continue to mirror the earlier usages of the herb as experienced by indigenous people. In fact, Echinacea is part of the official materia medica listed in the German Commission E. Monographs, a universally recognized publication reputed to be the official information authority on herbal medicines. The Commission lists a number of medicinal applications for Echinacea as an ideal treatment for such conditions as colds, chronic infections of the respiratory tract and lower urinary tract ailments, as well as topically for chronic ulcerations and slow healing wounds.

Echinacea has been shown to be a potent immune system stimulant. Nature’s Answer® offers an outstanding Echinacea fluid herbal extract formula in a unique blend that contains both Echinacea angustifolia root and Echinacea purpurea whole plant. Fluid extracts that feature both whole plant and root parts in the formula insure that the highest levels of the whole herb’s active constituents are maintained. A further advantage to this kind of supplement lies in its delivery system– liquids are faster to absorb and easier to assimilate by the body than tablets or capsules. Nature’s Answer®’s Echinacea formulas are available in either alcohol-free or organic alcohol forms. In addition, the alcohol-free supplements are also offered in a tasty grape or tangy orange flavor.

Two popular blends featuring Echinacea with other supportive herbs are Immune Boost™ and Re-Zist™. Immune Boost™ combines Echinacea with Wild Indigo and Maitake Mushroom. Re-Zist™ contains Echinacea, Goldenseal, Wild Indigo, Cayenne and Myrrh for potent support.

Echinacea is also recognized for its ability to enhance the resistance of cells to viruses, especially when used after cells have been exposed to colds and flus. As a preventative, formulas such as Nature’s Answer®’s Echinacea/Goldenseal (alcohol-free, organic alcohol) are ideal. This is an excellent supplement for soothing sore throats and helping to shrink swollen glands. An added benefit to the formula is the presence to berberine, the active ingredient in Goldenseal, which provides further wellness enhancement.

Many studies have focused on Echinacea’s possible use for ailments such as psoriasis and early rheumatoid arthritis. The herb also acts as an overall anti-inflammatory tonic. Nature’s Answer®’s Blood Support™ (alcohol-free) combines Echinacea with Dandelion, Licorice and other herbs for an anti-inflammatory effect. Allertone™ (alcohol-free) blends Echinacea with Mullein Leaf to help support the respiratory and sinus areas.

Most herbal practitioners suggest using Echinacea for short-term periods. There has been evidence to suggest that the herb loses its effectiveness when used over longer periods of time. Also, in the case of autoimmune illnesses, some people believe Echinacea may OVER-stimulate the immune system, although there is no solid research to back this contention. Echinacea is probably most effective if used in frequent doses for 5-7 days at the early onset of symptoms. It may also serve as a preventative during periods after known exposure or during extra stress, taking it two to three times a day every other or every third day. The German Commission E lists no known drug interactions or side effects with Echinacea. It is indeed one of the safest and most effective herbs for natural immune support today.

Echinacea seems well suited to life in the 90’s with all the stresses upon our immune systems. Its importance and effectiveness as an immune stimulant is as true today as it was in 1927 when Dr. Liebstein stated:

“Nature has probably destined Echinacea to be used for remedial purposes only, as a sustainer of vitality, an organizer of the defensive powers of the system, to such an extent as to be justly crowned the greatest immunizing agent in the entire vegetable kingdom....” written in 1927 by Dr. A. M. Liebstein (Foster, 1991)

  • These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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    Wellness Herbal Kids Liquid - Immune Support for Children–Ages 2 & Up
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    Date: June 29, 2005 12:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Wellness Herbal Kids Liquid - Immune Support for Children–Ages 2 & Up

    For parents, nothing is more important than ensuring the wellbeing of our children. That’s why Source Naturals developed WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS.

    WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS is the only herbal liquid for children with the Wellness name behind it. This unique and powerful cold weather blend features the prime immune herbs, echinacea and goldenseal. Unlike typical formulas, WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS also contains the famed Yin Chiao Chinese herbal complex, plus uncommon winter botanicals from around the world. And WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS is alcohol-free, with a great kidapproved taste. Source NaturalsWELLNESS HERBAL KIDS: because nothing is too good for your child.

    Echinacea & Goldenseal: Botanical Immune Support

    Echinacea, one of the most popular herbs in the United States, has been used to support natural defenses for more than 5,000 years. A highly valued Native American botanical, it has been shown in modern research to support immune function, specifically the activity of macrophages. Echinacea’s beneficial activity is due to a number of constituents, including polysaccharides and echinacosides, a group of compounds found only in echinacea. WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS features a standardized extract of Echinacea purpurea and Echinacea angustifolia. Goldenseal, another Native American botanical, has been used for centuries to soothe sensitive mucous membranes, including those in the respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems. Its beneficial properties are attributed to its alkaloids, especially berberine.

    Yin Chiao: Classic Chinese Formula

    According to traditional Chinese herbalism, Yin Chiao is best taken at the first signs of internal imbalance. Yin Chiao features herbs like lonicera (honeysuckle), forsythia, peppermint, and licorice.

    Supporting Herbs

    WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS includes other traditional botanicals. Elderberry has been used for winter health for centuries. It is a rich source of nutrients, especially bioflavonoids and anthocyanins. The phytonutrients in elderberry positively influence cell function and protection, and support the immune system. Isatis contains glycosides that help support your body’s innate defenses; it is valued by herbalists as a complement to echinacea and goldsenseal. The formula also includes the traditional Native American botanicals boneset and horehound, warming ginger, the renowned adaptogen Eleutherococcus senticosus, and bayberry.

    The Wellness Family™:

    Comprehensive Winter Support WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS, an important member of Source Naturals’ Wellness Family of natural immune system products, is available in 2, 4 and 8 fl oz bottles. You can also try Source Naturals’ other fine Wellness products. Look for WELLNESS EARACHE™ homeopathic kids’ formula, WELLNESS COLD & FLU™, WELLNESS COUGH SYRUP, WELLNESS ZINC™ Lozenges and Throat Spray, WELLNESS ELDERBERRY™ and lots more—including, of course, original WELLNESS FORMULA®.

    WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS: Part of the Wellness Revolution

    There is a revolution underway in natural health consciousness, and health food stores are in the forefront. You can benefit right now—long before word spreads to the general public—with the innovative child nutrition of WELLNESS HERBAL KIDS.

    References:
    Bensky, Dan & Barolet, Randall, compilers/translators. Chinese Herbal Medicine: Formulas & Strategies. Seattle: Eastland Press; 1990; pp. 44-46. Pizzorno, Joseph E., N.D. & Murray, Michael T., N.D. A Textbook of Natural Medicine. Seattle: John Bastyr College Publications; 1987. V. 2: Echin 1-2, V. 2: Hydras 1-4.



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    References
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    Date: June 24, 2005 04:34 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: References

    References

    1Claire Kowalchik and William H. Hylton, Editors, Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia. (Emmaus, Pennsylvania: Rodale Press, 1987), 176. 2Louise Tenney, “Echinacea”, To day’s Herbs. ( Provo, Utah: Woodland Publishing, Vol. XIII, Number 1, 1993), 1. 3Family Guide to Na t u ral Medicine. ( Pleasantville, New Yo rk : Reader’s Digest, 1993), 303. 4Andrew Weil, MD, Natural Health, Natural Medicine. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1990) 236. 5Gary Gillum, Editor, “Echinacea” To day’s Herbs. ( Provo, Utah : Woodland Books, Vol. I Issue 11, July, 1981), 1. 6PenelopeOdy, The Complete Medicinal Herbal. ( New York : Dorling-Kindersley, 1993), 53. 7Michael Murray, ND and Joseph Pizzorno, ND, Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1991), 58. 8V.H. Wagner and A. Proksch., “Immunostimulatory Drugs of Fungi and Higher Plants”, Economic Medicinal Plant Research . (1985), 1, 113-53. 9Louise Tenney, The Encyclopedia of Natural Remedies. ( Pleasant Grove, Utah: Woodland Publishing, 1995), 50. 10Ibid. 1 1Daniel B. Mowre y, The Scientific Validation of Herbs. ( New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, 1986), 119. 12Murray, 59. 13Michael T. Murray, N.D.. The Healing Power of Herbs. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1995), 100. 14J. Mose, “Effect of Echinacin on Phagocytosis and Natural Killer Cells”, Med. Welt. (1983), 34, 1,463-7. 1 5M. Stimple, A. Proksch, H. Wagner, etal., “Macrophage Activation and Induction of Macrophage Cytotoxicity by Purified Polysaccharide Fractions From the Plant Echinacea purpurea”, Infection Immunity. (1984), 46, 845-9. 16Mowrey, 119. 17Ibid., 250 18Ibid., 119 19Ibid. 20Ody, 176 21Velma J. Keith and Monteen Gordon, The How To Herb Book. (Pleasant Grove, Utah: Mayfield Publishing, 1983), 29. 2 2Louise Tenney, To day’s Herbal Health. ( Pleasant Grove, Utah: Woodland Publishing, 1992), 60. 2 3Daniel B. Mow re y, Ph.D., Echinacea. ( New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, 1995), 31. 24Ibid., 33. 25Ibid., 41. 26C. Steinmuller, J. Roesler, E. Grottrup, G. Franke, H. Wagner and Matthes Lohmann, “Polysacharides Isolated From Plant Cell Cultures of Echinacea purpurea Enhance the Resistance of Immunosupproes Mice Against Systemic Infections with Candida Albicans and Listeria Monicytogens,” Int-J-Immunpharmacol. 1993, July: 15(5): 605-14. 27Ibid., 43. 2 8U. Mengs, C. Clare and J. Poiley, “Toxicity of Echinacea purpurea. Acute, Subacute and Genotoxicity Studies , Arzneimittelforschung. 1991, Oct. 41(10): 1076-81.

    ADDITIONAL REFERENCES

    Becker, V. H. Against snakebites and influenza: use and components of echinacea angustifolia and e. purpurea.. Deutsche Apotheker Zeitung, 122 (45), 1982, 2020-2323. Buesing, K.H. Inhibition of hyaluronidase by echinacin. Arzneimittel- Forschung. 2, 1952, 467-469. Foster, S. Echinacea, Nature’s Immune Enhancer. Healing Arts Press, Rochester, VT., 1991. Hobbs, C. The Echinacea Handbook. Eclectic Medical Publications, Portland, Oregon, 1989. Keller, H. Recovery of active agents from aqueous extracts of the species of echinacea. Chemie Gruenenthal G.M.B.H., GER. Oct . 11, 1956, 950, 674. Kuhn, O. Echinacea and Phagocytosis. Arzneimittel - Fo rxchung, 3, 1953, 194-200. Mc Gregor R.L. The taxonomy of the genus Echinacea (Compositae). Univ. Kansas Sci. Bull. 48, 1968, 113-142.



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    History
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    Date: June 24, 2005 01:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: History

    HISTORY

    Because 20th century medical practices have routinely over - prescribed antibiotics, the notion of a natural antibiotic with virtually no side-effects is intriguing to say the least. Echinacea is one of several herbs which possesses antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. In a time when new life-threatening microbes are evolving and pose the threat of modern-day plagues, herbs such as echinacea are particularly valuable. More and more health practitioners are focusing on fortifying the immune system to fight off potential infections rather than just treating infection after it has developed.

    Echinacea is enjoying a renaissance today. During the late 1980’s, echinacea re-emerged as a remarkable medicinal plant. In addition to its infection fighting properties, echinacea is known for its healing properties as well. As was the case with so many herbs, echinacea lost its prestige as a medicinal treatment with the advent of antibiotics. It has experienced a resurgence over the last two decades.

    Echinacea has several other much more romantic names including Purple Coneflower, Black Sampson and Red Sunflower. It has also become the common name for a number of echinacea species like E. angustifolia, E. purpurea, and E. pallida. The genus derives its name from the Greek word echinos which refers to sea urchin. This particular association evolved from the prickly spiny scales of the seed head section of the flower. Historically, echinacea has sometimes become confused with Parthenium integrifolium.

    The word echinacea is actually apart of the scientific latin term, echinacea angustifolia, which literally translated means a narrow - leafed sucker. The plant grows wild as a perennial exclusively in the midwestern plains states, but can be cultivated almost anywhere . Echinacea leaves are pale to dark green, coarse and pointy. Its florets are purple and its roots, black and long.

    Echinacea has a strong Native American link in the Central Plains. Native Americans are credited with discovering the usefulness of this botanical without knowing its specific chemical properties. It was routinely used by Na t i ve Americans to treat toothaches, snakebite, fevers and old stubborn wounds.

    Native Americans thought of echinacea as a versatile herb that not only helped to fight infection, but increased the appetite and s t rengthened the sexual organs as well. The juice of the plant was used to bathe burns and was sprinkled on hot coals during traditional “sweats” used for purification purposes. It is also believed that some Native Americans used echinacea juice to protect their hands, feet and mouths from the heat of hot coals and ceremonial fires.1 According to Melvin Gilmore, An American anthropologist who studied Native American medicine in the early part of this century, Echinacea was used as a remedy by Native Americans more than any other plant in the central plains area.

    In time, early white settlers learned of its healing powers and used the plant as a home remedy for colds, influenza, tumors, syphillis, hemorrhoids and wounds. Dr. John King, in his medical journal of 1887 mentioned that echinacea had value as a blood purifier and alterative. It was used in various blood tonics and gained the reputation of being good for almost every conceivable malady. It has been called the king of blood purifiers due to its ability to improve lymphatic filtration and drainage. In time, echinacea became popular with 19th century Eclectics, who were followers of a botanic system founded by Dr. Wooster Beech in the 1830’s. They used it as an anesthetic, deodorant, and stimulant.

    By 1898, echinacea had become one of the top natural treatments in America. During these years, echinacea was used to treat fevers, malignant carbuncles, ulcerations, pyorrhea, snake bites and dermatitis. In the early twentieth century, echinacea had gained a formidable reputation for treating a long list of infectious disease ranging from the commonplace to the exotic. The Lloyd Brothers Pharmaceutical House developed more sophisticated versions of the herb in order to meet escalating demands for echinacea.

    Ironically, it was medical doctors who considered echinacea more valuable than eclectic practitioners. Several articles on echinacea appeared from time to time in various publications. Its attributes we re re v i ewed and, at times, its curative abilities ranged from the sublime to the ridiculous. In 1909, the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association decided against recognizing echinacea as an official drug, claiming that it lacked scientific credibility. It was added to the National Formulary of the United States despite this type of negative reaction and remained on this list until 1950.

    Over the past 50 years, echinacea has earned a formidable reputation achieving worldwide fame for its antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial actions. Consumer interest in echinacea has greatly increased, particularly in relation to its role in treating candida, chronic fatigue syndrome, AIDS and malignancies. Practitioners of natural medicine in Eu rope and America have long valued its attributes. In recent, years, German research has confirmed its ability to augment the human immune system. Extensive research on echinacea has occurred over the last twenty years. Test results have s h own that the herb has an antibiotic, cortisone-like activity.

    Echinacea has the ability to boost cell membrane healing, protect collagen, and suppress tumor growth. Because of its immuno-enhancing activity, it has recently been used in AIDS therapy. Research has proven that echinacea may have p rofound value in stimulating immune function and may be particularly beneficial for colds and sore throats.3

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    Well Child - For a Healthy Winter
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    Date: June 21, 2005 05:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Well Child - For a Healthy Winter

    Well Child - For A Healthy Winter

    By Lesley Tierra, L.Ac.

    As summer turns to fall and then to winter, the nights turn cold and the days brisk. This is a challenging time physiologically as our bodies, especially those of children, try to adapt to the changing climate. Coming into the Fall and Winter seasons, many people continue to eat and dress as if it were still summer, causing the body to work even harder at maintaining homeostasis. This is a special consideration for children who have the added challenge of being exposed to numerous other children in school and day care centers. This requires parents to be prepared by making sure your herbal health care chests are well stocked. One product worthy of having on hand is Well Child by Planetary Formulas, an echinacea-elderberry herbal syrup, specifically designed for the needs of our youth during the winter season. Well Child was developed by Michael Tierra, L.Ac., O.M.D. in the East-West Traditional Chinese Medicine Clinic in Santa Cruz, CA. Michael has been a practicing herbalist and licensed health professional for more than 35 years. His more than three decades of experience are represented in all his formulas, which have stood the test of time in his practice with literally thousands of clients.

    Key Herbal Elements

    * Echinacea purpurea leaf and root: No other herb is as widely used for winter immune health as echinacea. Originally used by Native Americans of the Plains and introduced to Eclectic physicians in the 1800's, echinacea has become one of the most widely researched botanicals in modern times. While the clinical findings of many studies have been mixed, there is substantial pre-clinical evidence demonstrating its ability to stimulate various immune responses, such as increasing macrophage, phagocytic and natural killer cell activity. Most of the clinical trials that have utilized protocols and dosages similar to those used by professional herbalists have reported positive findings with regard to its immune-enhancing effects. Echinacea is also very safe. * Elderberry (Sambucus nigra): Whereas echinacea reigns supreme as North America's primary wintertime botanical supplement, the berries of elder have a similar reputation in Europe, where it is widely used in cordials. Most research on elderberries has been conducted in Israel, where it was found to contain potent immune-stimulating compounds as well as powerful antioxidant activity. It makes one of the most delicious proanthocyanidin-rich syrups, so it is an ideal wintertime supplement. In Western herbal terms it is classified as a warming diaphoretic, which makes it ideal in combination with echinacea as a first line defense against the cold winds of winter. * Honeysuckle flowers (Lonicera spp.): Honeysuckle flowers are among the most widely used botanicals in Chinese herbalism for wintertime health. They are a key ingredient in the legendary classic Chinese formula Yin Chiao, which is perhaps the most frequently prescribed of all Chinese herbal supplements. Honeysuckle flowers are rich in a host of unique flavonoids which likely contribute to their health-promoting effects. These key ingredients are combined with cinnamon twig, chamomile flowers, catnip, lemon balm, and licorice root in a great-tasting syrup base of purified water, vegetable glycerin, and honey, along with extra vitamin C.

    Clinical Experience

    At the East-West Clinic, we have experienced dramatic positive results when giving Well Child. Luckily, this combination of botanicals tastes good. In addition, Well Child is formulated in a tasty glycerin base with added honey. The result is a liquid that is easily taken by most children. Because of the honey, we do not recommend Well Child for children under two years of age, unless it is subjected to boiling water. We also recommend specific dietary changes, including the avoidance of cold and raw foods during the cold season, eating plenty of broths, avoiding dairy, and eliminating simple sugars from the diet while ensuring the intake of adequate fluids.

    References

    Chang HM, But PP. 1986. Pharmacology and Clinical Applications of Chinese Materia Medica. World Scientific. Singapore. Mumcuoglu M. 1995. Sambucus: Black elderberry extract. RSS Publishing, Inc. Skokie, IL. Upton R, Graff A (eds.). 2004 Echinacea purpurea root: Monograph of the American Herbal Pharmacopoeia. Scotts Valley, CA.

    Lesley Tierra L.Ac., Diplomate in Chinese Herbalism (NCCAOM) is a California state and nationally certified acupuncturist and herbalist. She has been practicing as a primary health care provider with her husband, Michael Tierra, in Santa Cruz, California for almost 20 years. Lesley combines acupuncture, herbs and food therapies in her work. She is the author of several books, including Herbs of Life, published by Crossing Press, and is co-author, with Michael, of Chinese Traditional Herbal Medicine. Lesley is also the director of the East-West School of Herbal Medicine, and has taught at schools throughout the United States and England since 1983.



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