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Systematic review studies the potential of black seed in loweringblood pressure Darrell Miller 2/15/19
Scientists find GARLIC may treat lingering Lyme disease Darrell Miller 1/28/19
3 Ways to Boost Your Endocannabinoid System (Without Cannabis) Darrell Miller 12/6/18
Chlorella A powerful medicinal plant that can preventinflammation-related diseases Darrell Miller 12/5/18
5 Reasons why ashwagandha is an amazing healing herb Darrell Miller 11/23/18
Learn how moringa, just like hemp, is a miracle healing plant. Darrell Miller 11/17/18
Tribulus Terrestris Supplement Benefits for Libido, Blood Sugar &More VitaNet, LLC Staff 10/13/18
People really want their dogs to chill out with CBD and demand is sky high Darrell Miller 7/26/18
7 Signs That You Might Have Gallstones Darrell Miller 5/9/17
Coconut oil may be a good saturated fat alternative Darrell Miller 3/14/17
7 Awesome Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate Darrell Miller 2/26/17
Omega-3 intake may aid in recovery of concussions and brain injury Darrell Miller 12/13/16
All about trace minerals. Darrell Miller 3/18/14
Can Aloe Sooth The Skin When Damaged? Darrell Miller 3/13/14
How Does Tribulus Boost Testosterone? Darrell Miller 1/25/14
Does Green Coffee Bean Extract Help With Weight Loss? Darrell Miller 12/12/12
Can Butterbur Help Me with Migraines Darrell Miller 4/2/11
Is Pycnogenol a Good Antioxidant? Darrell Miller 4/1/11
St. John's Wort Darrell Miller 6/22/08
The Supreme Queen Of Fruits: Mangosteen Darrell Miller 1/18/08
10 Top Winter Cold & Flu Supplements Darrell Miller 1/14/08
Beyond Bran Fiber Darrell Miller 12/25/07
Setting the Record Straight on Vitamin E Darrell Miller 8/4/06
Perplexed about Protein? immunoglobulins to boost the immune system. Darrell Miller 4/29/06
Source Naturals - Continuous Quality Assurance Darrell Miller 8/20/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine) Versatile Life Support Nutrient .... Darrell Miller 6/21/05
Anti-Aging Nutrients Darrell Miller 6/18/05
Nutrients for Longevity Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Breast Cancer Darrell Miller 6/10/05
GlucosaMend™ Tissue/Joint Repair Complex Darrell Miller 6/2/05
Re: Its in the Blood Darrell Miller 5/9/05




Systematic review studies the potential of black seed in loweringblood pressure
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Date: February 15, 2019 10:25 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Systematic review studies the potential of black seed in loweringblood pressure





Blood pressure, that one health problem you always hear about but really don’t have that much knowledge on. In a new study, research published by the journal of hypertension shows that black seed may be a potential aid in helping lower that blood pressure. The article reviews the basics of the study and provides you with uses and common ways to find black seed. It additionally provides you with a few extra foods that can help lower your blood pressure overall.

Key Takeaways:

  • People wanting to take a more natural approach to blood pressure control should try nigella sativa, otherwise known as black seed.
  • According to a study in the Journal of Hypertension, black seed can lower diastolic and systolic blood pressure.
  • More research is needed to determine the optimal dose of black seed, as well as the treatment duration.

"Ten of these RCTs compared black seed with placebo and one compared black seed with standard treatment. They also looked at the associations between blood pressure reduction and the duration of treatment, dosage of black seed, and type of black seed."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-02-10-systematic-review-studies-the-potential-of-black-seed-in-lowering-blood-pressure.html

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Scientists find GARLIC may treat lingering Lyme disease
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Date: January 28, 2019 08:10 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Scientists find GARLIC may treat lingering Lyme disease





Garlic is one of those things that has a lot of health benefits. People underestimate diet and the massive effect that it can have on someone's body and piece of mind. These scientists are constantly doing studies that indicate that certain foods can be considered natural remedies. They are being proven to help people with certain diseases and the truth of the matter is that garlic is one of the main substances that is getting good reviews.

Key Takeaways:

  • Doctors from around the world are constantly looking at natural methods that can treat disease.
  • Some people are much more prone to diseases or sickness based on their lifestyle and diet.
  • It is really important for people to understand that the in take of certain foods can really help out your health.

"Known as persistent Lyme infection, it can last for months or even years, but now scientists from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found a natural solution that could finally put it to rest."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-12-08-scientists-find-garlic-treat-lingering-lyme-disease.html

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3 Ways to Boost Your Endocannabinoid System (Without Cannabis)
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Date: December 06, 2018 10:16 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 3 Ways to Boost Your Endocannabinoid System (Without Cannabis)





endocannabinoid system includes mood, memory, pain, and more within the body. It is mainly found in CBD oil made from marijuana. This system's purpose is to keep every thing in check with one another from the circulatory system to the nervous system. There are other ways to help with regulation of the body. Not only CBS oil but CBC has been known for it's pain relief and anti-inflammatory qualities. To help your own endocannabinoid system, feed it, don't ignore it, and then nurture it.

Key Takeaways:

  • Cannabis is something that many people feel has a stigma but it can be helpful for your body.
  • CBD oil is one of those things that is getting a lot of positive reviews for treating pain and anxiety.
  • There are a lot of forms of cannabis that are widely known by the general public.

"To reduce the impact of stress on the endocannabinoid system, experts suggest introducing healthy behaviors such as exercise, social interaction, massage, yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and even fasting, which Gersh notes can actually help increase natural endocannabinoids."

Read more: https://www.organicauthority.com/energetic-health/3-ways-to-boost-your-endocannabinoid-system

Leaf Therapeutics is a Trusted product from Solaray, never consume off brands stay with quality!

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Chlorella A powerful medicinal plant that can preventinflammation-related diseases
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Date: December 05, 2018 02:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Chlorella A powerful medicinal plant that can preventinflammation-related diseases





Medicine around the world is changing. Doctors and scientists are constantly looking at new ways in which they can develop something that can help people. If you are looking to prevent some inflammation diseases, there is a way to do it. However, you need to be smart and figure it out for yourself. These certain types of medicinal plants that are found in remote places in the world are working really well. Chlorella is one of those things that is getting great reviews.

Key Takeaways:

  • There are a lot natural remedies that people are finding to be effective in treating their diseases.
  • Plenty of plants around the world are being used as a form of medicine for many different diseases.
  • As time goes on, more and more doctors feel as if natural remedies will become far more common.

"Researchers in France have found that chlorella can reduce inflammation and prevent inflammation-related diseases. In their study, the researchers looked at the benefits of chlorella on visceral pain and associated inflammatory parameters related to cystitis, an inflammation of the bladder, in mice."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-12-03-chlorella-can-prevent-inflammation-related-diseases.html

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5 Reasons why ashwagandha is an amazing healing herb
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Date: November 23, 2018 08:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Reasons why ashwagandha is an amazing healing herb





A lot of natural healing herbs are getting a lot more media attention than before. It is hard to understand why but in all reality, it comes down to the individual. Some individuals really like the idea of natural remedies and they swear by them. This healing herb from India has received good reviews but doctors are not sure how effective it can be for the masses. However, if something works for you, then do not change from it.

Key Takeaways:

  • The best kind of healing herbs are the ones that are natural and have very low negative effects.
  • Doctors are starting to really look into some of these natural herbs for when it comes to medicine.
  • The field of medicine is something that is constantly changing and evolving as time goes on.

"This medicinal herb can provide the body with a lot of benefits. Some examples include lowering blood sugar levels, improving brain function, reducing inflammation, and even preventing anxiety and depression"

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-11-13-5-reasons-why-ashwagandha-is-an-amazing-healing-herb.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5854)


Learn how moringa, just like hemp, is a miracle healing plant.
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Date: November 17, 2018 10:25 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Learn how moringa, just like hemp, is a miracle healing plant.





Natural plants are getting more and more press due to the healing abilities that many have shown to have. Doctors truly do use some of these plants as they have received a lot of great feedback. This new plant from India, moringa, is just like latest healing plant that is being deemed a miracle. Though some may find these things to be a little bit of a stretch, the truth of the matter is that they work for people.

Key Takeaways:

  • Natural plants around the world are being found to have some great healing capacities.
  • When doctors are running out of ideas, or answers, they sometimes will resort to these natural remedies.
  • Moringa is something that kind of came out of no where but the reviews about it are great.

"Anna explains why moringa is rightfully known throughout the world as the “plant of decades,” or even the “plant of centuries,” because of its amazing healing benefits."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-11-12-learn-how-moringa-miracle-healing-plant.html

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Tribulus Terrestris Supplement Benefits for Libido, Blood Sugar &More
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Date: October 13, 2018 11:14 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Tribulus Terrestris Supplement Benefits for Libido, Blood Sugar &More





Tribulus Terrestris Supplement Benefits for Libido, Blood Sugar & More

There are many benefits that come from taking certain supplements. Some people like taking these things while others do not like the stigma that comes with it. Just the thought of taking a pill that can enhance them makes some people feel as if it is not worth it. There are others who simply do not believe that these things work for them or anyone. Now, this new supplement is supposed to help those with high blood sugar levels.

Key Takeaways:

  • There are many people who do not believe in the use of supplements of any kind in their.
  • Though not many may have heard of this particular supplement, it has gotten some rave reviews.
  • For someone who suffers from things like blood sugar issues and libido, let them do what they want.

"Often dismissed as nothing more than an invasive and pesky weed popping up in yards across the country, you may want to think twice before pulling out the weed killer on this powerful medicinal plant."

Read more: https://draxe.com/tribulus-terrestris-supplement-benefits-for-libido-blood-sugar-more/

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People really want their dogs to chill out with CBD and demand is sky high
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Date: July 26, 2018 01:53 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: People really want their dogs to chill out with CBD and demand is sky high





People really want their dogs to chill out with CBD and demand is sky high

CBD is being used by children and adults across the nation. Scientists have proven that it has an immaculate number of health benefits, even stopping seizures in children when nothing else worked. Now, pet owners are reaching for CBD to stop their dogs anxiety and hyperactivity at rates so high it is not easy to keep the product on the shelves. CBD is all-natural, has instant results and has proven itself worthy of use time and time again and pet owners are thrilled with the results

Key Takeaways:

  • Barkshop is an affiliate store of Barkbox known for selling fun, whimsical toys aimed at pet owners.
  • Barkshop has been expanding its repertoire, offering doggy-centered health options, like multi-vitamins and biscuits with CBD oil.
  • The CBD options have had mixed reviews, with some owners reporting their pets improved response to stress and others noting less, or no change.

"BarkShop became the first online retail retailer to sell CBD products to dogs in March."

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/07/23/barkshop-cbd-products-for-dogs/

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7 Signs That You Might Have Gallstones
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Date: May 09, 2017 06:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 7 Signs That You Might Have Gallstones





Helina Selemon writes about the troubles that can be created from gallstones, which are crystalized balls of bile and other elements in the body that form in the gallbladder. While many who have gallstones do not have symptoms, there are several people in the general population who have stones and experience acute symptoms, such as pain, nausea, and extreme discomfort. Unfortunately, pain relievers and over-the-counter medicines will not remedy these symptoms and surgery may be the only source of relief. Selemen reviews the symptoms that may indicate that you are suffering from gallstones.

Read more: 7 Signs That You Might Have Gallstones

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Coconut oil may be a good saturated fat alternative
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Date: March 14, 2017 11:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Coconut oil may be a good saturated fat alternative





By now most of us know that saturated fats aren't healthy. Many restaurants have cut them out. It's not always easy to do this, especially if you don't know what to use instead, so this gives you good info. You can use coconut oil in many ways to replace saturated fats.

Key Takeaways:

  • we really have no good data on coconut oil’s ability to reduce the risk of heart disease and strokes.
  • Lauric acid is absorbed differently than palmitic acid, which could suggest that coconut oil doesn’t cause the same degree of LDL elevation as animal fat.
  • I believe that you should look at coconut oil as a saturated fat.

"A study published in the journal Nutrition reviews in 2016 analyzed multiple studies and found no difference in the LDL cholesterol level between people who used coconut oil and people who used butter."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//goldenisles.news/opinion/advice_columns/coconut-oil-may-be-a-good-saturated-fat-alternative/article_c0dbe4d2-770a-5391-a2ef-66a63953fcb6.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjA0ZDU0MzY3MzQ5MTM0ZDA6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNH7CtrsQpqjpkJikqmUcrk4V7b-Fg

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7 Awesome Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate
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Date: February 26, 2017 10:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 7 Awesome Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate





This video reviews the health benefits of dark chocolate. Dark chocolate has the following health benefits: Lower Body Mass Index, boosts brain power,improves eyesight, reduces inflamation, it can protect your skin, it lowers blood pressure, raises good cholesterol. Overall, dark chocolate can provide many health benefits that can lead to a healthier well-being.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZlDx1ccWPM

Key Takeaways:

  • Dark chocolate can lower body mass index.
  • Dark chocolate boosts brain power.
  • Dark chocolate improves eyesight.

"Eating dark chocolate can give your brain a short-term boost by increasing your alertness."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4027)


Omega-3 intake may aid in recovery of concussions and brain injury
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Date: December 13, 2016 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Omega-3 intake may aid in recovery of concussions and brain injury





Treating brain injuries and concussions is difficult. However, in clinical experience, aggressively ingesting omega-3 can help a person suffering from these maladies on the road to recovery. It is also used to help with brain surgery recovery. Without the proper amount of omegas, recovery from a traumatic brain injury might not happen.

Key Takeaways:

  • The treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury is a clinical challenge. Clinical studies thus far have failed to identify an effective treatment strategy.
  • The article reviews preclinical research and cites three brain injury case studies that resulted from a mining accident, a motor vehicle accident, and a drowning accident
  • It is well recognized that n-3FAs are not a drug and not a cure and every situation is different.

"According to emerging science and clinical experience, aggressive intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) seems to be beneficial to TBI, concussion, and post-concussion syndrome patients. This research is presented in Concussions, Traumatic Brain Injury, and the Innovative Use of Omega-3s, a review article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, official publication of the American College of Nutrition."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://knowridge.com/2016/12/omega-3-intake-may-aid-in-recovery-of-concussions-and-brain-injury/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjFmZmViMTExOGM5Mzg5YTQ6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNF5veP8J-TFpxjz8VQTLqvDmais_w

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3632)


All about trace minerals.
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Date: March 18, 2014 10:26 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: All about trace minerals.

About minerals

foods rich in mineralWhile much accentuation is put on the trace minerals that are discovered to be crucial to the human form, to be specific, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, and zinc, there are additionally follow minerals which help the figure to perform its normal schedules. Follow minerals are required by the constitution, yet just in little measurements. Moment measures of follow components can mean the distinction between poor and fitting health. A number of them perform distinctive, critical capacities which are needed by the constitution. In this article, we'll examine a portion of the diverse follow minerals that are of service to people.

Iodine

Iodine is advantageous to the human figure because of the way that it serves to control advancement and usefulness in the thyroid organ. This is a capacity of most extreme criticalness, as the thyroid organ is answerable for to such an extent. The generation of vitality inside the human figure, fortified digestion system, discourse capability, and solid hair, skin, and teeth are all because of a legitimately working thyroid organ.

Copper

Copper is an alternate essential follow mineral. It has been discovered to be vital for legitimate assimilation of iron in the human form. It additionally works with the cell reinforcement Vitamin C to help structure elastin, which is a substance utilized within the muscles of the constitution. Fitting bone development, and also the best possible building of red platelets are likewise made conceivable because of copper.

Manganese

Manganese, in itself, is capable cell reinforcement. Notwithstanding performing the capacities of a cancer prevention agent, manganese is answerable for fitting breakdown of amino acids and vitality generation. Vitamin B-1 and Vitamin E are likewise influenced by manganese, as it helps the form to metabolize them legitimately. Also, sex hormone creation is controlled by manganese.

Chromium

While of service for all people, diabetics specifically profit from the best possible measurements of chromium. It helps insulin in the constitution to metabolize sugar, keeping glucose at a sensible level. Chromium is additionally answerable for serving to clean garbage out of our conduits, lessening cholesterol and triglycerides.

Potassium

Potassium works in pair with sodium in regulation of the physique's waste procedures. It animates the kidneys to help free the assemblage of harmful waste. Heart rhythms might additionally be stabilized by getting the correct dose of potassium. It is likewise known to encourage send more oxygen to the mind, which can bring about clearer considering.

Selenium

Selenium is an alternate follow mineral that has critical cancer prevention agent properties. Some therapeutic reviews have demonstrated that a fitting selenium admission may bring about a diminished shot of contracting bosom, lung, colon and prostate malignancy.

The trace minerals recorded above are simply a portion of the more applicable follow minerals. There are numerous distinctive follow minerals that your constitution requirements and it might take truly a long rundown to depict every one of them. To get all the minerals you need, make sure to consume your everyday necessities of products of the soil. This sustenance’s hold probably the most vitamin and mineral-rich mixes accessible, and are beneficial to consume, to boot!

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Can Aloe Sooth The Skin When Damaged?
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Date: March 13, 2014 04:25 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Aloe Sooth The Skin When Damaged?

What is aloe vera

aloe vera plantAloe Vera is one of the natural products that is used to treat various skin diseases as well as maintaining and preventing some of the skin conditions. Aloe is rich in enzymes, minerals, vitamins and amino acids that help to heal and sooth damaged skin.

Aloe is rich in antioxidants compounds such as vitamin A and calcium which have been proved to have a soothing effects. They help to eliminate free radicals in the body which are known to cause rashes and growths on the skin. Upon it use, you will feel calm and relaxed.

Benefits of aloe vera

Aloe gel is effective in healing damaged skin especially skin prone too acnes, rashes and blisters. It has anti-bacterial properties which permanently heals damages skin.

Aloe provides instant relief from itching, sunburn, rashes as well as blisters. Apart from healing damaged skin. Aloe will moisturise skin and give you a natural look. It is rich in fatty acids that increases sebum production which makes skin to remain hydrated.

Aloe is non-staining and is easily absorbed. It does not stick on your skin, nobody will know if you have applied aloe after 10 minutes.

It is also effective in removing skin tags and dark spot. Though there are methods to remove skin tags and dark spot, aloe is one of the safest way to remove. It does not cause irritation and permanently removes skin tags and black spots.

Aloe also increases oxygen supply to the skin. This is very important since it enhances growth of skin tissues and also tightens it. This is very important because it reduces saggy skins which are not pleasing.

Aloe extract will also reduce redness and swelling, reduce inflammation and speed up wound healing.

Thus, aloe is not only effective in soothing skin when damaged, it has multiple benefits to the user.

Source

  1. //www.invigorate360.com/reviews/aloe-vera-extract-your-home-remedy-to-heal-and-sooth-your-skin/.

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How Does Tribulus Boost Testosterone?
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Date: January 25, 2014 09:07 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Does Tribulus Boost Testosterone?

Effective Ways to Gain the Muscle Mass

tribulus plantIf you are a body builder, one of the things you might be interested in is how to make sure that you gain the muscle mass you need faster and more effectively. Of course, strictly keeping to your exercise regimen and also making sure that you have a proper diet are all necessary in order to achieve this. However, you can always take advantage of some other types of help to make the process even easier. One of these is through the use of supplements such as Tribulus to accelerate the process of muscle gain.

What is Tribulus

In a nutshell, tribulus is a herb that has the effect of increasing the amount of testosterone that one has in their body. It is normally taken in pill form, and has a large following in the body building community. It works by increasing the body’s testosterone synthetic activity, which means that you don’t have to depend on any exogenous hormone in order to gain the benefits you are interested in. It is a product that has received a lot of rave reviews in the past, and this means that you are likely to benefit from it a lot if you tried using it.

In addition to the fact that people who have tried it out have very good experiences with it, there are other benefits of trying out tribulus. One of these is the fact that it’s all natural. This means that unlike other kinds of supplements, you are unlikely to suffer from issues such as adverse reactions when you use tribulus. In addition to that, it’s also cheaper than most other alternative drugs as well. The only thing you need to do in order to benefit from all this is make sure that you buy your tribulus from sources you can trust. Remember, the fact that it’s so popular means that there are many fake versions of it out there.

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Does Green Coffee Bean Extract Help With Weight Loss?
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Date: December 12, 2012 10:56 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Does Green Coffee Bean Extract Help With Weight Loss?

Green coffee beans

Green coffee beans are the seeds of a coffee plant that have not been roasted and usually have a high content of chlorogenic acid, which play a critical role in metabolic reactions in the body. It helps to break down fats, promote carbohydrate absorption, control the levels of blood sugar and also act as an antioxidant. Coffee beans are usually soaked and then concentrated to be able to get the green coffee extract. Clinical studies have shown that daily intake of about 400 mg of the coffee bean extract before taking breakfast allow one to lose one pound every week without altering the diet. This is explained by the ability of chlorogenic acid to burn out fat. A certain research also showed that taking 700mg of these extracts once a day enables one to lose weight daily. These clinical studies have been backed up by reviews from people who have used the green coffee extract. Chlorogenic acid is a plant polyphenol with a variety of antimicrobial properties and ability to suppress the absorption of glucose leading to weight loss. Roasted coffee beans usually have a very low chlorogenic acid concentration which breaks down during roasting of the beans.

Antioxidant properties

Researches have shown that this acid is a tumor inhibitor by nature, and it does this by preventing carcinogenic agents from integrating with DNA and resulting in cancer. It has been proven to prevent cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and type II diabetes. Most supplements of green coffee have piperine and green tea, and other contents that focus on burning fats. When buying green coffee extract, establish all the contents and the effect. One should not drink much coffee.  There is no need for coffee, one will get all the nutrients including a small amount of caffeine as an energy boost, so extra coffee might just amp you up to much.

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Can Butterbur Help Me with Migraines
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Date: April 02, 2011 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Butterbur Help Me with Migraines

Butterbur and Headaches

Butterbur has helped countless of migraine sufferers for more than three decades. In Europe, it is available as a prescription drug, which neurologists have prescribed since 1972. It has been the subject of numerous studies and reviews in a span of 40 years that have come to a conclusion that it does alleviate symptoms of migraine and reduce frequency of attacks. It is one of the herbal remedies clinically tested in migraine centers in the US. To date there has been no recorded adverse effects and harmful drug interactions, and as such available in the US over the counter, no prescription required. It has been compared to beta blockers and anticonvulsants and in general believed to be better than both of these more common treatments.

Petasites hybridus, the common butterbur, is the herb where butterbur extracts are obtained from although other species that belong to the genus Petasites are also known to produce the same health benefits. Petasites comprises up to 20 plant species widely distributed across the globe, a number of which have been tied to folk medicine throughout the ages. Petasites hybridus is native to North America and thrive well in marshes and wetlands, where there is a significant amount of moisture in the soil.

American Indians have long used its rhizomatous roots to fight off headaches and inflammation-induced diseases, such as asthma attacks and hay fever. Indeed the discovery of the organic compounds petasin, isopetasin, and oxopetasin explained its long-standing association with the treatment of migraines and allergies. Today most butterbur preparations do not contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which were identified to cause liver damage. That being said, it is still best to seek professional advice and ask assistance in choosing products from a reputable laboratory.

Interferes with Releases of Pain Chemicals

The phytochemicals unique to Butterbur have been well investigated, and results point to their effects on inhibiting the productions of local pain chemicals, which are pro-inflammatory in nature. Leukotrienes are lipid mediators that supervise the productions of other intermediaries of inflammation. Prostaglandins are responsible for vasodilation of blood vessels and their consequent sensitization to pain. Butterbur has been observed to influence these two pain chemicals.

Plays the Role of a Natural Beta Blocker

Beta-adrenergic antagonists, or simply beta blockers, are a class of drugs that target endogenous catecholamines implicated in migraine attacks. Epinephrine and norepinephrine are catecholamines that act on beta-andrenergic receptors, leading to a reduced blood flow in the brain. This results in the spasmodic contractions of cerebral blood vessels characteristic of migraines. Butterbur works on the principle of blocking the effects of catecholamines and inducing normal blood flow to the brain.

Produces No Known Serious Side Effects

Most analgesics and beta blockers have been associated with several adverse effects, which more often than not include nausea, dizziness, and muscle weakness. Many have been reported to cause weight gain. None of these have been linked to regular use of butterbur, one of the reasons why it has enjoyed a surge in popularity in recent years.

If you suffer from Migraine headaches, give butterbur a try!

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Is Pycnogenol a Good Antioxidant?
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Date: April 01, 2011 03:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is Pycnogenol a Good Antioxidant?

Pycnogenol And Your Health

Pycnogenol is the latest innovation in the antioxidant supplement industry. It makes use of oligomeric proanthocyanidins, select bioflavonoids, and organic acids that have been well investigated in a span of more than 30 years. As a trademarked product, it has been cited in more than 230 published works and systematic reviews that came into the conclusion that it is safe and effective. In fact, it is now an ingredient in over 300 health products.

Pinus pinaster is an indigenous plant species of western Mediterranean from which the patented pycnogenol is extracted from. It is most populous in southwestern France, but it can also be found in large numbers in Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Morocco. Unlike new ingredients in some dietary supplements, pycnogenol is all-natural and completely derived from the Maritime Pine, which may well be known in the now-obsolete scientific name Pinus maritima.

Neutralizes Reactive Oxygen Species Fast

Antioxidants work on the principle of replenishing the antioxidant reserves of each cell especially at times when our body is most susceptible to physical fatigue. Radical chemistry has taught us that reactive oxygen species, or ROS, are natural by-products of oxygen metabolism. There is nothing we can do to inhibit their releases, but our body does have a mechanism to neutralize them. Free radicals are one of the best known ROS and they are particularly reactive, causing a damaging chain reaction called oxidative stress.

What makes pycnogenol different from other antioxidant supplements? It is the fastest-acting antioxidant out there with an absorption rate of only 20 minutes. In contrast with other known antioxidants, such as vitamin C and vitamin E, pycnogenol is believed to readily cross the blood-brain barrier, expanding its uses in the central nervous system. This is the reason why it has been suggested to be of value in treatment of known disorders of the nervous system. More importantly, it works up to a record-high 72 hours before it gets excreted by the body.

Fight Inflammation and Cardiovascular Disease With Pycnogenol

Displays Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activities

There have been numerous citations that pycnogenol is an effective inhibitor of inflammation intermediaries. It is postulated that it influences the productions and releases of eicosanoids that govern inflammatory responses. It has associated with the treatment of osteoarthritis, and preliminary results are encouraging. Also, it is believed that pycnogenol interferes with the effects of histamine via its receptors, and acts on mast cells responsible for mediator release. This is the reason why it is widely accepted as a viable treatment option for asthma, multiple sclerosis, allergic rhinitis, acute dermatitis, atopic eczema, and other skin conditions.

Contributes to Overall Circulatory Health

Pycnogenol is one of the antioxidants under scrutiny for its medicinal potential in the prevention of major diseases that afflict the circulatory and cardiovascular systems. For one, it has been observed to significantly lower systolic blood pressure, making it an effective therapy for hypertension. It has shown to alleviate chronic venous insufficiency and remove varicose veins. Moreover, regular supplementation of pycnogenol appears to improve performance in endurance athletes.

Pycnogenol is an excellent herb to add to anybodies diet. Give Pycnogenol a try today!

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St. John's Wort
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Date: June 22, 2008 08:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: St. John's Wort

St. John's Wort is a plant with yellow flowers that researchers continue to look at for its health and well-being benefits. A perennial herb, it is from Europe and found its way to America with settlers. It is commonplace in meadows and fields. The first recorded use of St. John's Wort was in ancient Greece. It also goes by the following names: hypericum, Klamath weed and goat weed.

For centuries, this plant has found use as a medicine for depression and anxiety. People often used it to treat mental conditions and nerve pain. Today, people use the herb to treat sleep disorders and anxiety as well as a treatment for mild to moderate depression. In Europe, St. John's Wort is available as a prescription medicine and finds wide use there.

In the United States, it is an herbal supplement and does not have classification by the government as a prescription medicine. However, there is great interest in the U.S. in this herb's capabilities as treatment for depression. Studies show St. John's Wort has a minimal effect on major depression. There is evidence though that it is a useful herb for treating milder depression. Some studies show it acts similar to synthetic antidepressants by affecting the neurotransmitters in the brain. There is also evidence that it produces fewer side effects than these synthetics.

In North America, St. John's Wort comes in capsule, tablet, liquid extract, oil-based skin lotions and tea form. The flower tops of the plant find use in tea formulations. The major active elements in the herb, considered by some researchers as antidepressants, are hyperforin and hypericin. Studies suggest that the hyperforin in the herb plays a part in helping people decrease alcohol consumption. In addition, hyperforin has beneficial antibacterial properties. The plant also contains essential oils and flavonoids. Native Americans have a history of use of St. John's Wort as an anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and astringent agent.

If you decide to try St. John's Wort, you must consult with a health care professional first, as this herb interacts with other medications. Evidence shows that it can affect anticoagulant drugs and contraceptive pills. It can also affect medication needed to treat high blood pressure.

One study of St. John's Wort showed it was beneficial to a group who consumed 300 mg. three times daily compared to a group who took a placebo only. This study occurred over a four-week period. Sixty-seven percent of the St. John's Wort group experienced improvement of their depression compared to 28 percent of the placebo group. This study included only those suffering from mild depression. What was important in this study was that there were no adverse side effects from the St. John's Wort as compared to synthetic antidepressants. This was significant because many patients often refuse standard antidepressants because of the harmful and bothersome side effects they produce.

There is no denying that St. John's Wort has a long tradition as a medicine to treat anxiety and depression. This is why studies continue into its effectiveness. Researchers do not want to ignore repeated testimonials about the herb's antidepressant capabilities; they seek to make sure these claims are legitimate by having facts to back them up.

Thirty-seven trials that met criteria for being credible received recognition concerning St. John's Wort. They received summarization in a study. (Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews 1998, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD000448. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000448.pub2.)

The conclusion reached upon analysis of the studies showed St. John's Wort could benefit those with milder types of depression. No conclusive evidence exists that more severe types receive anything more than minimum benefits from the St. John's Wort products that were part of the studies. The researchers stress that their analysis applies only to certain products they tested, not every St. Johns Wort formulation on the market. Many are of different pharmaceutical quality and of different strengths and purities.

Research will continue into this natural product that the earth provides us. At the very least, St. John's Wort does help some forms of depression. The jury is out on whether its benefits will extend to those who suffer harsher forms of the debilitating mental condition that affects millions.

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The Supreme Queen Of Fruits: Mangosteen
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Date: January 18, 2008 01:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Supreme Queen Of Fruits: Mangosteen

Although the word "mangosteen" may sound a little foreign when first heard, or even made-up, it is said to offer many health benefits. This fruit is high in antioxidants and has been used in many applications including beverages, lotions, teas, pills, powders, supplements, extracts, and more. It is commonly referred to as the “Queen of Fruits” in native areas. Even though mangosteen shares the name “mango” with another fruit, is not related at all and is, in fact, in a category of its own.

The mangosteen fruit is purplish-red on the exterior and rind, while the inside is white. Most people are familiar with the white part of the fruit, as it is used for nourishment. Although the place of origin of mangosteen is somewhat unknown, speculation usually focuses on Sunda Islands, Malaysia, Thailand, or Burma. The mangosteen plant can only be found growing commonly in a handful of places in the world, which includes certain places in the Philippines. Most of these places do not provide successful growth, making these plants extremely rare and hard to cultivate. The fleshy segments of the plant are eaten as a dessert, while the rind is extremely rich in pectin. The fruit’s pericup, which includes the rind and pulp, contains a huge supply of xanthones. These xanthones are a powerful family of antioxidants that help with minor muscle pain, immune system support, and intestinal health.

In previous years, mangosteen has been used for a variety of different applications. It can be ground into an ointment which can be used on eczema and other skin disorders. The rind has also been used as a remedy for diarrhea. Additionally, extracts of the bark of the tree have been shown to help with dysentery and urinary disorders. Most of its health benefits have been shown to be in the actual rind of the fruit instead of the fruits fleshy pulp.

Today, mangosteen is mostly used for its antioxidant support, while its ancient anecdotal benefits are supported by many scientific reviews found in alternative medicine products. Mangosteen based supplements are usually formulated so that they may provide better bioavialabity and absorption of the xanthones, which often deactivate free radicals before they are able to reek havoc on the body, keeping it out of harm’s way. Mangosteen can also be used in face creams or in conjunction with other fruit juices, such as noni and the lychee fruit, in order to produce maximum antioxidant power to boost health.

These mangosteen juices or supplements are special because they are concentrated or standardized with the beneficial nutrient xanthones from the plant. Additionally, the xanthones can also provide anti-inflammatory benefits. They can do this even without the negative side effects that are usually seen in conventional medications. As of right now, there are no known side effects that can occur while taking it in supplement form or eating Mangosteen fruit as it exists in nature. There are also no records of historical warnings that have occurred after years of traditional use. Even though all of mangosteen’s benefits have no yet been found, ongoing research is currently being conducted to find all of its health promoting properties.



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10 Top Winter Cold & Flu Supplements
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Date: January 14, 2008 10:01 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 10 Top Winter Cold & Flu Supplements

As the winter weather continues to keep people close together indoors, viruses causing influenza and the common cold are able to more easily multiply. However, there are ways to prevent these unwanted germs from invading your body. Here is a list of the top ten dietary supplements that help the immune system fight and repel cold and flu bugs.


AHCC (active hexose correlated compound) is made from mushrooms. This supplement was first developed in Japan in the late 1980s and has been used and studied for its effect on the immune system. Last year’s research showed that AHCC can boost the activity of natural killer cells, which destroy the cells that have become infected with a virus.

Andrographis has long been used in Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine to boost the immune system. Actually, andrographis was first used during the Indian flu epidemic of 1919, where it was credited with stalling the spread of the disease. According to research, andrographis works better than a placebo for reducing the symptoms of respiratory infections and it may even prevent the infection in the first place. These studies used a proprietary andrographis product which combines the herb with a Siberian ginseng.


Beta glucan is a fiber-like complex sugar that can be found in oats, barley, and the cell walls of mushrooms. It provides a boost to the immune system which enhancing resistance to viruses and bacteria. In fact, beta glucan has been shown to boost the activity of phagocytes, special immune system cells which engulf and destroy germs.


Echinacea has a long history of traditional use; with it actually being one of the most widely used herbs in Native American medicine. Instead of having a direct germ-killing effect, Echinacea stimulates the body’s own immune defenses. Many studies go back as far as 1970 have shown that Echinacea boosts the immune system so that it can protect against infections invaders. A new study has found that Echinacea can reduce the odds of developing a cold by 58 percent and shortens the length of a cold to 1.4 days.


Elderberry was considered in Roman times to be a flu remedy. Recently, elderberry extract has been researched for its role in treating influenza infections, especially when it is taken with in the first 24 hours of developing symptoms. One recent study proved that individuals who were taking elderberry recovered four days sooner from influenza than those taking a placebo. Additionally, the use of other medications was less for those who used elderberry.


Garlic improves resistance to disease by boosting immune function. Many studies have found that garlic stimulates immunity because it increases the number of white blood cells and other immune system team members. A recent study proved that a group of individuals taking garlic caught significantly fewer colds and recovered more quickly from the colds they did come down with than the other group which was taking a placebo.


Ginseng boosts immune function in all of its forms. A study of adults who were taking American ginseng daily during the winter months found that those people, compared to those taking a placebo, caught fewer colds and needed less sick days. Additionally, Siberian ginseng and Asian ginseng can also build defenses against winter germs.


Propolis is created by bees when resins from plants are mixed with wax. This propolis coats the inside of the beehive with an antiseptic layer and it can have similar benefits when taken by humans. Propolis stimulates the body’s immune system. It has been proven in studies that taking propolis extract can protect against colds and other upper respiratory infections. Children who take propolis daily for three winter months have been proven to catch fewer colds than those kids who are taking a placebo.


Many research reviews have found that Vitamin C does reduce the length of a cold episode and weaken the severity of an infection for the general population. For those individuals who are engaged in extreme exercise, vitamin C can also help prevent a cold.


Zinc lozenges, when they are taken within 24 hours of the first cold symptom, can keep cold viruses from taking ground in the respiratory tract. The use of a zinc lozenge every couple of hours also causes colds to resolve more quickly and symptoms to be less severe.


Our immune system is out first line of defense against the cold and flu, as well as the diseases we may come down with. Keeping our immune system in tip top shape is key to a happier and healthier life. The above herbs can help boost the immune system along with a dietary change and exercise plan one can reduce the length of or prevent sickness over a life time.



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Beyond Bran Fiber
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Date: December 25, 2007 08:35 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Beyond Bran Fiber

At one point in time, when you went to the health food store you usually only had choice of wheat bran, which is a good source of the insoluble fiber that helps your digestive system stay on track, or oat bran, which contains the soluble fiber that helps lower cholesterol. Although both of these bran’s are still popular, as they have good reason to be, remaining excellent sources of dietary fiber, these days store shelves are gathering more and more fiber supplements ranging from encapsulated forms to powders and specialized to deal with a variety of health concerns.

Insoluble fiber has the ability to draw water into the intestines, preventing constipation and keeping waste matter from decaying within the body. However, it is the many types of soluble fiber that science has recently started investigating for health benefits. Part of soluble fiber’s value is closely related to its mechanical action, as it forms a thick gel within the digestive track that moves slowly to stop sugar from entering the body too quickly, therefore, helping to keep glucose levels down and carrying some fat and sugar out of the body completely. Additionally, when soluble fibers gel up it helps to reduce blood level cholesterol by trapping bile preventing the bile from doing its action (breaking down fats in the digestive tract so the body can absorb it). Unlike insoluble fiber, soluble fiber undergoes fermentation inside the colon to produce fatty acids that do a little bit of everything, including: helping the body digest food, protecting against polyps, stimulating immunity, increasing mineral absorption, and helping to keep cholesterol and glucose levels in check.

Soluble fiber is getting large amounts of research reviews. One study concluded that people who ate the least fiber are 63% more likely to have high levels of CRP (C-reactive protein). CRP is an inflammation marker that is associated with cardiovascular risk. Another study proved that flax seed improved glucose control. Another fiber source, psyllium, has been shown to bring relief to people with Chron’s disease, an inflammatory intestinal disorder.

Flax seed and psyllium are two of the best known types of soluble fiber available, but there are other types that aren’t as well known. Others including arabinogalactan (AG) have been shown to have a special affinity for natural killer cells. Beta-glucans are another form of fiber that can help boost immunity. Lignans, which are found in flax, have been shown to cause lower breast-cancer rates. Fenugreek is a spice that is rich in galactomannan, a heart-healthy fiber. Some fiber formulations pair up different kinds of fiber with complementary herbs. An example of this is Garcinia cambogia and Gymnema sylvestre, which can be used for glucose control; or astragalus, Echinacea, olive leaf, and shiitake to assist the immune system. Some supplements even provide natural enzymes which help prevent bloating.

It is, of course, important to eat a healthy and well-balanced diet. However, thanks to supplementation that is designed specifically for certain health concerns, it has become much easier to find the additional fiber that is needed by your body, no matter what kind of fiber that is. A large selection of fiber bran supplements can be found at your local or internet health food store.



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Setting the Record Straight on Vitamin E
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Date: August 04, 2006 02:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Setting the Record Straight on Vitamin E

Vitamin E has become a staple nutrient in the lives of millions, and is considered by many to rank among the most vital antioxidant compounds ever developed as a dietary supplement for the health seeking public. Over the past eighty years the industry’s top scientists have made many discoveries on Vitamin E’s wide range of beneficial effects, via research conducted in some of the scientific community’s most advanced clinical settings.

As one of the Natural Product Industry’s leading suppliers of Vitamin E, Now Foods would like to share with you just a few of the measures we’ve taken to set the record straight on Vitamin E.

  • Now Vitamin E products are rooted in sound science, containing only 100% natural “d-“ forms. No synthetics (dl-) are used, and thorough testing is done to verify the absence of heavy metals, pesticides, microbes and other contaminants.
  • Each formula meets FCC and USP standards, making Now Foods Natural Vitamin E products both food grade, as well as pharmaceutical grade. This is the industry’s highest standard of purity and serves as one of the strongest pieces of evidence supporting the integrity of our Vitamin E products.
  • Now Foods Vitamin E is derived from vegetable oils, and safely processed in a manner that reduces the possibility of residual proteins and DNA. This virtually eliminates the potential for soy allergens or genetically modified genes. What remains, is a 100% natural-grade product, set in a safe oil base to positively enhance absorption.
  • Now Foods does not include additional soybean oils in our full-spectrum, 8-isomer Vitamin E formulas. Instead we rely on rice bran and olive oils. Our true-E bioComplex was scientifically formulated to deliver an optimally balanced isomer ratio of tocopherols and tocotrienols close to that found in nature in healthy ratios.
  • In just the past few years, our Natural Vitamin E formulas have been honored with multiple industry awards, including four consecutive 1st place Vity Awards for “Best Vitamin E.” their long history of success has made them a favorite among health conscious consumers, and a best seller among retailers.
  • Now Foods Nutrition Manager, Neil Levin, CCN, DANLA, has authored scientific papers reviewing the true science of Vitamin E, which are accessible on the website of peer reviews scientific journals, including the Annals of Internal Medicine, the British Medical Journal and CA: the Journal of American Cancer Society. As a well recognized expert in this field, Neil is the principal formulator of Now Foods Patented Tru-E BioComplex – the industry’s first identity preserved, non-GMO Vitamin E containing all eight natural isomers (distinct forms) as found in nature in healthy ratios.
  • Now Foods

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    Perplexed about Protein? immunoglobulins to boost the immune system.
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    Date: April 29, 2006 01:58 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Perplexed about Protein? immunoglobulins to boost the immune system.

    The Wellness Revolution

    Perplexed about Protein?

    As protein and whey powders have advanced in popularity, the confusion about them has grown. In particular, protein processing technology has advanced by leaps and bounds; consumers are being presented with protein claims and counter-claims that are highly contradictory.

    The confusion is part of a rapid growth. Little Miss Muffet’s quiet dish of curds and whey has expanded from a minor sideline aid for weight lifters, with sales increases around to percent a year, into an explosive $1 billion a year industry, with some companies announcing sales growth of 110 percent in just the last year.

    The increase in market is from whey’s expanding appeal. As new technology has made whey’s nutritive value beneficial to a wide range of consumers, more people are using whey, and whey is being added to more products. The problem is, those advanced nutritive qualities are not included in all whey products. The fantastic immune benefits, for example, apply to only the top tier of whey products.

    Protein Quality

    The standard of protein quality—the ability to provide indispensable amino acids—is judged on the basis of digestibility, nutrients, and amino acid composition. Whey has historically been acknowledged as on of the best sources of high quality protein.

    With the increasing popularity of whey, attention on new processing methods has raised the bar on quality, and new products have greatly expanded nutritional values. What may have been an acceptable high-quality whey protein a few years ago, no longer makes the grade. Tony Lucchesi, Natural Sales Trainer at Source Naturals says, “The different processing methods have changed the entire protein market.”

    He explains, “In separating casein from whey, (a process used to make cheese), most processing methods use heat, chemical modification, or pH adjustments. These all damage the native protein structure. The result is little or no biological activity in the whey product. All the low temperature drying and micro-filtration won’t help if the raw material is denatured before a protein is dried and brought to market.”

    Damaged Proteins

    Damaged protein may have been acceptable a few years ago, but it isn’t now. Lucchesi continues, “Animal experiments have shown that polypeptides—whole, non-denatured proteins—have greater nutritional value than protein isolates.”

    Protein isolates are what is left after the pasteurization process. The protein has traditionally been “Cross cooked” out of its normal balance. “What you have left are incomplete bits and pieces of whole protein,” he says. These protein bits have only partial nutrients.

    New Whey

    The latest introduction to the protein category are concentrates, which are intact, biologically-active whole proteins. The entire difference is in the processing; high heat, acids, and traditional methods of separating the caseins from the whey are no longer used. The new processing preserves the nutrients of the protein. This is the method that is the basis for a new Source Naturals whey product, True Whey.

    Lucchesi says, “TRUE WHEY is different in that it was designed to provide nutritional support for enhanced immune function. The entire process was designed for nutritive value. The preservation of these nutrients—lactoferrin, glutamine, immunoglobulins—give TRUE WHEY a huge benefit to athletes, children, and anyone interested in boosting their immune system.”

    Per serving, TRUE WHEY offers 8 grams of un-denatured protein that includes 900 mg immunoglobulins and 190mg of lactoferrin. Its vanilla flavoring has gotten very high reviews, and it has a two-year shelf life. It appears that the bar has truly been raised in the whey protein category!

    THE TRUE WHEY 16 oz. from SOURCE NATURALS

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    Source Naturals - Continuous Quality Assurance
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    Date: August 20, 2005 11:44 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Source Naturals - Continuous Quality Assurance

    “I oversee all the inspections, tests, and document reviews performed by our dedicated Quality Control staff to ensure that nothing compromises the healthfulness and high quality of our products.” Norm Nelson, Ph.D., Quality Control Director

    Continuous Quality Assurance

    Our Quality Control Department includes staff trained in microbiological assays, heavy metal screening, analytical chemistry and Eastern and Western herbalism. They utilize procedures that go beyond minimum industry requirements to ensure product excellence. All raw materials and finished goods must meet our inspectors’ rigorous quality specifications at every stage of manufacturing.

    Pure Raw Materials

    Bulk raw materials must be accompanied by Certificates of Analysis provided by the vendors. They are sampled and inspected according to a long list of specifications, including appearance, color, odor, flavor, texture, absence of extraneous material, and potency of active constituents. Vitamins, minerals and amino acids are screened and/or tested for impurities, while materials, such as herbs, that are biological in origin are tested for microbiological contamination.

    Bioavailable Manufactured Product Inspectors scrutinize finished tablets to see that they meet our standards for consistency in size, color, aroma or taste, are not broken, and contain no contaminants. Representative samples are taken to verify potency. Tablets and capsules are tested to ensure they are consistent in size and comply with USP standards for weight variation. Threshold utilizes USP disintegration standards* as its guidelines to ensure tablets will break up appropriately after ingestion, making the ingredients available for use by your body.

    *Under USP 25 standard conditions: Coated tablets: 50 minutes in water. Capsules: 45 minutes in buffered acetate or water.

    Rigorous Laboratory Procedures

    Methods used include: HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography), IR (Fourier Transform Infrared), UV/Vis Spectrophotometry, Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorbance Spectroscopy, TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography), Microbiology testing, and organoleptic inspection including visual, color, odor, clarity, pH, and taste.

    Raw materials must comply with vendor Certificates of Analysis as well as with our rigorous specifications.

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    REFERENCES
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 08:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: REFERENCES

    REFERENCES

    1 a. The Surgeon General’s “Nutrition and Health Report.” b. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES III)” c. The National Academy of Science’s. Diet and Health Report: Health Promotion and Disease Objectives (DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 91-50213, Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1990). e. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 2 Rolls BJ. Carbohydrates, fats, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr 1995; 61(4 Suppl):960S-967S. 3 McDowell MA, Briefel RR, Alaimo K, et al. Energy and macronutrient intakes of persons ages 2 months and over in the United States: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Phase 1:1988-91. Advance data from vital and health statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; No. 255. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics; 1994. 4 Center for Science in the Public Interest and McDonald’s Nutrition and You—A guide to Healthy Eating at McDonald’s: McDonald’s Corp,1991. 5 Bray GA. Appetite Control in Adults. In: Fernstrom JD, Miller GD eds. Appetite and Body Weight Regulation. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1994:1-92. 6 Michnovicz JJ. How to Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer. New York: Warner Book Inc. 1994:54. 7 Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet. National Research Council Report, National Academy of Sciences, 15 Feb. 1996. 8 Van Tallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979:32: 2723-33. 9 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:273. 10 Swaneck GE, Fishman J. Covalent binding of the endogenous estrogen 16A-hydroxyestrone to estradiol in human breast concer cells: characterization and intranuclear localization. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988:85;7831-5. 11 Colditz GA. Epidemiology of breast cancer. Findings from the nurses’ health study. Cancer1993;714:1480-9. 12 Hennen WJ. Breast Cancer Risk Reduction. The effects of supplementation with dietary indoles. Unpublished report 1992. 13 Deslypere BJ. Obesity and cancer. Metabolism 1995;44(93):24-7. 14 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:281. 15 Whittemore AS, Kolonel LN, John M. Prostate cancer in relation to diet, physical activity, and body size in blacks, whites, and Asians in the United States and Canada. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995;87(9):629-31. 16 Key T. Risk factors for prostate cancer. Cancer Survivor 1995;23:63- 77. 17 Kondo Y, Homma Y, Aso Y, Kakizoe T. Promotional effects of twogeneration exposure to a high-fat diet on prostate carcinogenisis in ACI/Seg mice. Cancer Res 1994;54(23):6129-32. 18 Wang Y, Corr JG, Taler HT, Tao Y, Fair WR, Heston WD. Decreased growth of established human prostate LNCaP tumors in nude mice fed a low-fat diet. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995;87(19):1456-62. 19 Nixon DW. Cancer prevention clinical trials. In-Vivo 1994;8(5):713-6. 20 Key T. Micronutrients and cancer aetiology: the epidmiological evidence. Proceed Nutr Soc 1994;53(3):605-14. 21 Gorbach SL, Goldin BR. The intestinal microflora and the colon cancer connection. reviews of Infectious Diseases 1990;12(Suppl 2):S252-61. 22 Shrapnel WS, Calvert GD, Nestel PJ, Truswell AS. Diet and coronary heart disease. The National Heart Foundation of Australia. Med J Australia. 1995;156(Suppl):S9-S16. 23 Ellis JL, Campos-Outcalt D. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in native Americans: a literature review. Am. J. Preventive Med 1994;10(5):295-307. 24 DiBianco R. The changing syndrome of heart failure: an annotated review as we approach the 21st century. J. Hypertension 1994; 12(4 Suppl):S73- S87. 25 Van Itallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979;32(suppl):2723-33. 26 Kestin M, Moss R, Clifton PM, Nestel PJ. Comparative effects of three cereal brans on plasma lipids, blood pressure and glucose metabolism in mildly hyper-cholesterolemic men. Am J Clin Nutr 1990;52(4):661-6. 27 Story JA. Dietary fiber and lipid metabolism. In: Spiller GA, Kay RM. eds. Medical Aspects of Dietary Fiber. Penun Medical; New York, 1980, p.138. 28 Stein PP, Black HR. The role of diet in the genesis and treatment of hypertension. Med. Clin. North America. 1993;77(4):831-47. 29 Olin JW. Antihypertensive treatment in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Cleve. Clin. J. Medicine. 1994;61(5):337-44. 30 Tinker LF. Diabetes Mellitus—a priority health care issue for women. J. Am. Dietetic Association. 1994;94(9):976-85. 31 Gaspard UJ, Gottal JM, van den Brule FA. Postmenopausal changes of lipid and glucose metabolism: a review of their main aspects. Maturitas. 1995;21(3):71-8. 32 Coordt MC, Ruhe RC, McDonald RB. Aging and insulin secretion. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biology and Medicine. 1995;209(3):213-22. 33 Felber JP. From Obesity to Diabetes. Pathophysiological Considerations. Int. Journal of Obesity 1992;16:937-952. 34 Gillum RF. The association of body fat distribution with hypertension, hypertensive heart disease, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors in men and women age 18-79. J Chronic Diseases 1987;40:421-8. 35 Haffner SM, Stern MP, Hazuda HP, et al. Role of obesity and fat distribution in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellits in Mexican Americans and non- Hispanic whites. Diabetes Care 1986;9:153-61. 36 Bonadonna RC, deFronzo RA. Glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and Metabolism. 1991;17(1 Pt. 2):12-35. 37 Shoemaker JK, Bonen A. Vascular actions of insulin in health and disease. Canadian J. of Applied Physiology. 1995;20(2):127-54. 38 Resnick LM. Ionic Basis of Hypertension, Insulin Resistaince, Vascular Disease, and Related Disorders. The Mechanism of ‘Syndrome X’. Am. J. Hypertension. 1993;6(suppl):123S-134S. 39 Trautwein EA. Dietetic influences on the formation and prevention of cholesterol gallstones. Z. Ernahrugswiss. 1994;33(1):2-15. 40 Cicuttini FM, Spector TD. Osteoarthritis in the aged. Epidemiological issues and optimal management. Drugs and Aging. 1995;6(5):409-20. 41 Melnyk MG, Wienstein E. Preventing obesity in black women by targeting adolescents: a literature review. J Am. Diet. Association. 1994;94(4):536-40. 42 Robinson BE, Gjerdingen Dk, Houge DR. Obesity: a move from traditional to more patient-oriented management. J. Am. Board of Family Practice. 1995;8(2):99-108. 43 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. Reversal of Obesity in the Genetically Obese fa/fa Zucker Rat with an Ehpedrine/Methylxanthines Thermogenic Mixture. J. Nutrition. 1987;117:383-9. 44 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of ephedrin/methylxanthine mixtures: animal studies. Am J Clinical Nutr. 1986;43:388-394. 45 Richelsen B. Health risks of obesity. Significance of the regional distri-bution of adipose tissue. Ugeskr. Laeger. 1991;153(13):908-13. 46 Lissner L, Heitmann BL. Dietary fat and obesity: Evidence from epidemiology. European J. Clinical Nutrition. 1995;49(2):79-90. 47 Lissner L, Heitmann BL. The dietary fat: Carbohydrate ratio in relation to body weight, Current Opinion in Lipidology. 1995;6(1):8-13. 48 Ravussin E. Energy metabolism in obesity. Studies in the Pima Indians. Diabetes Care. 1993;16(1):232-8. 49 O’Dea K. Westernisation, insulin resistance and diabetes in Australian aborigines. Med J. Australia. 1991;155(4):258-64. 50 Bailey C. Fit or Fat . Houghton Mifflen, Boston, 1991. 51 McCarty MF. Optimizing Exercise for Fat Loss. Unpublished report. 52 Weinsier RL, Schutz Y, Bracco D. Reexamination of the relationship of resting metabolic rate and fat-free mass and the the metabolically active components of fat-free mass in humans. Am. J. Clinical Nutrition. 1992;55(4):790-4. 53 Evans WJ. Exercise, nutrition and aging. J. Nutrition. 1992;122(3 suppl):796-801. 54 Schlicker SA, Borra ST, Regan C. The weight and fitness status of United States children. Nutrition reviews. 1994;52(1):11-7. 55 Raben A, Jensen ND, Marckmann P, Sandstrom B and Astrup A. Spontaeous weight loss during 11 weeks’ ad libitum intake of a low fat/high fiber diet in young, normal weight subjects. Stockholm Press. 1995;916-23. 56 Blundell JE, Cotton JR, Delargy H, Green S, Greenough A, King NA, Lawton, CL. The fat paradox: fat-induced satiety signals versus high fat overconsumption. Short Communication 1995:832-835. 57 Reinhold RB. Late results of gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13(4):307-8. 58 McCredie M, Coates M Grulich A. Cancer incidence in migrants to New South Wales (Australia) from the Middle East, 1972-1991. Cancer Causes Control 1994:5(5):414-21. 59 Schiff ER, Dietschy JM. Steatorrhea Associated with Disordered Bile Acid Metabolism. Am. J. Digestive Diseases. 1969;14(6) 60 Nauss JL , Thompson JL and Nagyvary J. The binding of micellar lipids to Chitosan. Lipids. 1983;18(10):714-19. 61 Braconnot H, Sue la natrue ces champignons. Ann Chim Phys 1811;79:265. 62 Odier A. Memoire sur la composition chemique des parties cornees des insectes. Mem Soc Hist Nat Paris 1823;1:29. 63 Johnson EL, Peniston QP. Utilization of shellfish waste for chitin and Chitosan production. Chp 19 In: Chemistry and Biochemistry of Marine Food Products. Martin RE, Flick GJ, Hebard CE and Ward DR (eds.) 1982. p.415-. AVI Publishing Co., Westport, CT. 64 Shahram H. Seafood waste: the potential for industrial use. Kem Kemi 1992;19(3),256-8. 65 Rouget C. Des substances amylacees dans le tissue des animux, specialement les Articules (Chitine). Compt Rend 1859;48:792. Commission on Natural Health Products. 1995 67 Peniston QP and Johnson EL. Method for Treating an Aqueous Medium with Chitosan and Derivatives of Chitin to Remove an Impurity. US Patent 3,533,940. Oct. 30:1970. 68 Poly-D-Glucosamine (Chitosan); Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance. Federal Register. 1995;60(75):19523-4. Rules and Regulations. Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Part 180. April, 19, 1995. 69 Arul J. “Use of Chitosan films to retard post-harvest spoilage of fruits and vegetables,” Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 70 Karlsen J, Skaugrud O. “Excipient properties of Chitosan,” Manufacturing Chemist. 1991;62:18-9. 71 Winterowd JG, Sandford PA. Chitin and Chitosan. In: Food Polysaccharides and their Applications. Ed: Stephen AM. Marcel Dekker 1995. 72 Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 73 Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 74 Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 75 Zikakis, JP. Chitin, Chitosan and Related Enzymes. Academic Press, Inc. 1984. 76 Abelin J and Lassus A. Fat binder as a weight reducer in patients with moderate obesity. ARS Medicina, Helsinki, Aug- October, 1994. 77 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Increasing effect of a Chitosan and ascorbic acid mixture on fecal dietary fat excretion. Biosci Biotech Biochem 1994;58(9):1617-20. 78 Maezaki Y, Tsuji K, Nakagawa Y, et al. Hypocholesterolemic effect of Chitosan in adult males. Biosci Biotchnol Biochem1993;57(9):1439-44. 79 Kobayashi T, Otsuka S, Yugari Y. Effect of Chitosan on serum and liver cholesterol levels in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutritional Rep. Int., 1979;19(3):327-34. 80 Sugano M, Fujikawa T, Hiratsuji Y, Hasegawa Y. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Chitosan in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutr Rep. Int. 1978;18(5):531-7. 81 Vahouny G, Satchanandam S, Cassidy M, Lightfoot F, Furda I. Comparative effects of Chitosan and cholestryramine on lymphatic absorption of lipids in the rat. Am J Clin Nutr, 1983;38(2):278-84 82 Suzuki S, Suzuki M, Katayama H. Chitin and Chitosan oligomers as hypolipemics and formulations containing them. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 63 41,422 [88,422] 22 Feb1988. 83 Ikeda I, Tomari Y, Sugano M. Interrelated effects of dietary fiber on lymphatic cholesterol and triglyceride absorption in rats. J Nutr 1989;119(10):1383- 7. 84 LeHoux JG and Grondin F. Some effects of Chitosan on liver function in the rat. Endocrinology. 1993;132(3):1078-84. 85 Fradet G, Brister S, Mulder D, Lough J, Averbach BL. “Evaluation of Chitosan as a New Hemostatic Agent: In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 86 Malette W, Quigley H, Gaines R, Johnson N, Rainer WG. Chitosan A New Hemostatic. Annals of Thorasic Surgery. 1983;36:55. 87 Malette W, Quigley H, Adickes ED. Chitosan effect in Vascular Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday, Eds: Chitin in Nature and Technology. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 88 Okamoto Y, Tomita T, Minami S, et al. Effects of Chitosan on experimental abscess with Staphylococcus aureus in dogs. J. Vet. Med., 1995;57(4):765-7. 89 Klokkevold PR, Lew DS, Ellis DG, Bertolami CN. Effect of Chitosan on lingual hemostasis in rabbits. Journal of Oral-Maxillofac-Surg, 1991;Aug. 49(8):858-63. 89 Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 90 Hiroshi S, Makoto K, Shoji A, Yoshikazu S. Antibacterial fiber blended with Chitosan. Sixth International Conference on Chitin and Chitosan. Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland. August 1994;16-19. 91 Shimai Y, Tsukuda K, Seino H. Antiacne preparations containing chitin, Chitosan or their partial degradation products. Jpn. Kikai Tokkyo Koho JP 04,288,017 [92,288,017] 13 Oct 1992. 92 Suzuki K, Okawa Y, Suzuki S, Suzuki M. Candidacidal effect of peritoneal exudate cells in mice administered with chitin or Chitosan: the role of serine protease in the mechanism of oxygen-independent candidacidal effect. Microbiol Immunol. 1987;31(4):375-9. 93 Sawada G, Akaha Y, Naito H, Fujita M. Synergistic food preservatives containing organic acids, Chitosan and citrus seed extracts. Jpn, Kokai Kokkyo Koho JP 04 27,373 [92 27,373] 30 Jan 1992. 94 Min H-K, Hatai K, Bai S. Some inhibitory effects of Chitosan on fishpathogenic oomycete, Saprolegnia parasitic. Gyobyo Kenkyu, 1994;29(2):73-4. 95 Nelson JL, Alexander JW, Gianotti L, Chalk CL, Pyles T. The influence of dietary fiber on microbial growth in vitro and bacterial translocation after burn injury in mice. Nutr 1994;10(1):32-6. 96 Ochiai Y, Kanazawa Y. Chitosan as virucide. Jpn Kokai Tokkyo Koho 79 41,326. 97 Hillyard IW, Doczi J, Kiernan. Antacid and antiulcer properties of the polysaccharide Chitosan in the rat. Proc Soc Expl Biol Med 1964; 115:1108-1112. 98 Shibasaki K, Sano H, MatsukuboT, Takaesu Y. pH response of human dental plaque to chewing gum supplemented with low molecular Chitosan. Bull- Tokyo-Dent-Coll, 1994:35(2): 61-6. 99 Kato H, Okuda H. Chitosan as antihypertensive. Jpn. Kikoi Tokyo Koho JP 06 56,674 [94 56,674] 100 Kato H, Taguchi T. Mechanism of the rise in blood pressure by sodium chloride and decrease effect of Chitosan on blood pressure. Baiosaiensu to Indasutori 1993;51(12):987-8. 101 Muzzarelli R, Biagini G, Pugnaoni A, Filippini O, Baldassarre V, Castaldini C, and Rizzoli C. Reconstruction of Periodontal Tissue with Chitosan. Biomaterials. 1989;10:598-603. 102 Sapelli P, Baldassarre V, Muzzarelli R, Emanuelli M. Chitosan in Dentistry. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 103 Borah G, Scott G, Wortham K. Bone induction by Chitosan in endochrondral bones of the extremities. In Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 104 Ito F. Role of Chitosan as a supplementary food for osteoporosis. Gekkan Fudo Kemikaru, 1995;11(2):39-44. 105 Nakamura S, Yoshioka T, hamada S, Kimura I. Chitosan for enhancement of bioavailability of calcium. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 07 194,316 [95 194,316] 01 Aug 1995. 106 Maekawa A, Wada M. Food Containing chitin or its derivatives for reduction of blood and urine uric acid. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 03 280,852 [91 280,852], 11 Dec 1991. 107 Weisberg M, Gubner R. Compositions for oral administration comprising Chitosan and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Antacid preparations for alleviating gastric hyperacidity. U.S. patent 3257275 108 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Mechanism for the inhibition of fat digestion by Chitosan and for the synergistic effect of ascorbate. Biosci Biotech Biochem1995;59(5):786-90. 109 McCausland CW. Fat Binding Properties of Chitosan as Compared to Other Dietary Fibers. Private communication. 24 Jan1995. 110 Deuchi K, Kanauchi O, Imasato Y, Kobayashi E. Biosci Biotech Biochem. 1994:58,1613-6. 111 Ebihara K, Schneeman BO. Interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, cholesterol and triglyceride with dietary fibers in the small intestine of rats. J Nutr 1989;119(8):1100-6. 112 Weil A, M.D. Natural Health Natural Medicine: Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1990:182. 113 Chen Y-H, Riby Y, Srivastava P, Bartholomew J, Denison M, Bjeldanes L. Regualtion of CYP1A1 by indolo[3,2-b]carbazole in murine hepatoma cells. J Biol Chem 1995;270(38):22548-55. 114 Intestinal Absorption of metal ions and chelates. Ashmead HD, Graff DJ, Ashmead HH. Charles C Thomas, Springfield, IL 1985. 115 Nutrient Interactions. Bodwell CE, Erdman JW Jr. Marcel Dekker New York 1988. 116 Heleniak EP, Aston B. Prostaglandins, Brown Fat and Weight Loss. Medical Hypotheses 1989;28:13-33. 117 Connor WE, DeFrancesco CA, Connor SL. N-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Effects on plasma lipoproteins and hypertriglyceridemic patients. Ann NY Acad Sci 1993;683:16-34. 118 Conte AA. A non-prescription alternative in weight reduction therapy. The Bariatrician Summer 1993:17-19. 119 McCarty MF. Inhibition of citrate lyase may aid aerobic endurance. Unpublished manuscript. 120 Bray GA. Weight homeostasis. Annual Rev Med 1991;42:205-216. 121 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of Ephedrin/Methylxanthine mixtures: Human studies. Intl J Obesity 986;10:467-481. 122 Arai K, Kinumaki T, Fujita, T. Bulletin Tokai Regional Fisheries Res Lab. 1968;No. 56. 123 Bough WA. Private communication. 124 Freidrich EJ, Gehan, EA, Rall DP, Schmidt LH, Skipper HE. Cancer Chemotherapy Reports 1966;50(4):219-244. 125 A Drovanti, AA Bignamini, AL Rovati. Therapeutic activity of oral glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis: A placebo-controlled double-blind investigation. Clinical Therapeutics 1980;3(4):260-272. 126 K Deuchi, O Kanauchi, M Shizukuishi, E Kobayashi. Continuous and massive intake of Chitosan affects mineral and fat-soluble vitamin status in rats fed on a high-fat diet. Biosci. Biotech. Biochemistry. 1995;59(7):1211-6. 127 . BesChitin W in Chitin Wound Healing (video), Unitika Corporation, April 1992.

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    GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine) Versatile Life Support Nutrient ....
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    Date: June 21, 2005 05:25 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine) Versatile Life Support Nutrient ....

    GPC (GlyceroPhosphoCholine): Versatile Life Support Nutrient

    Parris Kidd, Ph.D.

  • GPC - Marked Benefits to the Brain
  • GPC Supports Normal Brain Function
  • GPC Works Through Multiple Mechanisms
  • Dosing, Safety, Tolerability, Compatibility
  • GPC: Nutrient for All Ages
  • GPC or GlyceroPhosphoCholine (pronounced gli-sero-fos-fo-ko-lean) is a nutrient with many different roles in human health. It reaches extremely high concentrations within our cells, and its abundance in mother's milk suggests it is crucial to life processes. Clinically, GPC has been most intensively researched for its brain benefits. Biologically, it has great importance for the skeletal "voluntary" muscles, the autonomic nervous system, kidneys, liver, and reproductive organs. GPC goes beyond being a brain nutrient; it is a nutrient for vitality and long life.

    Marked Benefits to the Brain

    As a dietary supplement, GPC's brain benefits are unique. It boosts mental performance in healthy young people, as shown by three double-blind trials. In trials on middle aged subjects, GPC improved several physiologic measures of mental performance: reaction time, visual evoked potential, and EEG delta slow waves. In the elderly, GPC improves mental performance and provides noticeable revitalisation. In 11 human trials with 1,799 patients, memory, attention, and other cognitive measures improved. So did mood (including irritability and emotional lability), and patients often developed renewed interest in relatives and friends. GPC was well tolerated, and generated no bad drug interactions. A large trial on elderly subjects with memory challenges published in 2003 concluded GPC had significant benefits for these individuals.

    GPC Supports Normal Brain Function

    Circulatory deprivation or surgery can challenge healthy brain function. GPC can speed recovery and support improved quality of life. In four trials with GPC on 2,804 subjects who experienced difficulties under these circumstances, up to 95% showed good or excellent improvement. GPC consistently improved space-time orientation, degree of consciousness, language, motor capacity, and overall quality of life. The investigators concluded GPC offered marked benefits, with an excellent benefit-to-risk profile. Up to half of patients who survive bypass surgery experience problems with memory and other mental performance. A double-blind trial conducted with bypass survivors for six months determined that the GPC group had no remaining memory deterioration, while the placebo group failed to improve.

    GPC Works Through Multiple Mechanisms

    GPC supports human health through a variety of mechanisms:

    1. It helps keep choline and acetylcholine available to the tissues. Choline is an essential nutrient and GPC appears to be the body's main choline reservoir. GPC in mother's milk represents the baby's main source of dietary choline. Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important substance employed extensively throughout the body. ACh is a major brain transmitter; the motor nerves use ACh to drive the skeletal ("voluntary") muscles; the autonomic nervous system uses it to pace all the organs. ACh is also central to mental and physical endurance, and mind-body coordination.

    2. GPC is a major cell-level protectant, not as another antioxidant but in pivotal roles of osmotic pressure regulator and metabolic antitoxin. GPC for osmotic regulation can reach very high concentrations in the kidney, bladder, liver, brain, and other organs. As metabolic protectant, GPC shields proteins against urea buildup.

    3. GPC is a major reservoir for cell membrane omega-3 phospholipids. These substances are the major building blocks for cell membranes. Enzymes couple GPC with the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, to make the phospholipid PC-DHA. This makes membranes especially fluid, enabling membrane proteins to perform with better efficiency. GPC produces PC-DHA in the skeletal muscles, wherein fluidity is essential for contraction. Muscles that function abnormally can show GPC deficiency.

    4. GPC contributes to both male and female in reproduction. As spermatozoa mature, GPC is used to make PC-DHA that makes their membranes fluid to enable motility. With men, the lower their semen GPC the greater the likelihood of poor sperm motility and with it, infertility. Once semen is inserted into the female, an enzyme in uterine secretions breaks down the semen's GPC into substances that energize the sperm to achieve fertilization.

    Dosing, Safety, Tolerability, Compatibility

    Oral intake of GPC in the clinical trials was usually 1,200 milligrams (mg) per day, taken early in the day on an empty stomach. A reasonable dietary supplementation regimen is 1200 mg/day, taken in divided doses (AM and PM) between meals for 15-30 days, and thereafter 600 mg/day for maintenance. Symptomatic subjects can take 1200 mg/day until adequate improvement is achieved. Young, healthy subjects may experience benefit from daily intakes as low as 300 milligrams. GPC is very safe, being compatible with vitamins and nutrients and with pharmaceuticals. In clinical trial comparisons, GPC's benefits surpassed the nutrients acetylcarnitine and CDP-choline.

    GPC: Nutrient for All Ages

    GPC is unmatched for its support of active living and healthy aging. In some 23 clinical trials GPC improved mental performance in all functional categories. GPC can revitalize the aging brain, facilitating growth hormone (GH) release and boosting nerve growth factor actions. GPC's ample presence in human mother's milk suggests it could be conditionally essential. By supporting mental integrity, mind-body integration, the autonomic system, and the body's other organs, GPC enhances the active lifestyle. GPC is remarkable nutritional support for optimal health at any age.

    Parris M. Kidd, PhD is a cell biologist trained at the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco. Since entering the dietary supplement field in 1983, he has published many in-depth reviews of integrative medicine in the journal Alternative Medicine reviews, and is science columnist for totalhealth magazine. Dr. Kidd is internationally recognized for his accomplishments in dietary supplement product development, documentation and quality control.

    Disclaimer: the above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Anti-Aging Nutrients
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    Date: June 18, 2005 09:07 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Anti-Aging Nutrients

    Anti-Aging Nutrients by Edward C. Wallace, DC, ND Energy Times, February 3, 2000

    What's the big deal about trying to live longer? As you grow older (and the American population grows older alongside you) you may want to postpone the inevitable. Few wish to hasten "the journey from which no traveler returns." But as we approach that final bon voyage, chances are we desire clear sailing-aging without disability and with a peaceful, easy feeling.

    How Do We Age?

    Science has long puzzled about what causes the wrinkles, pains and deterioration of aging. In the search for causes, two basic theories have won over the most proponents: The first holds that cells are programmed with biological clocks that predetermine how many times they can reproduce before becoming non-functional. This theory has been largely formulated by the researcher Leonard Hayflick, MD.

    The second basic theory, introduced by Denham Harman, MD, PhD, in the mid 1950s, holds that cells eventually break down due to attack by caustic molecules called free radicals that cause oxidative stress.

    Programmed Cell Theory

    In the early '60s, Dr. Hayflick observed that human fibroblasts (cells from connective tissue) in the laboratory refused to divide more than about 50 times. Dr. Hayflick also found that even if he froze the fibroblasts after 20 divisions, they would remember that they only had 30 divisions left after thawing.

    Fifty cell divisions have been called the "Hayflick limit." Based on this research, scientists theorize that cells maintain a genetic clock that winds down as old age ensues. Many researchers believe the hypothalamus gland is the force behind our aging clocks, signaling the pituitary gland to release hormones that cause aging.

    Free Radical/Oxidative Stress Theory

    The other popular theory of aging pictures the human body as a cellular battlefield where attackers called free radicals damage our cells and tissues, making them age. In this scenario, a process called oxidation is the chief aging villain. On a microscopic level, oxidation generally entails molecules or atoms losing electrons. (Gaining electrons is called reduction.) The molecules or atoms that take these electrons are oxidizing agents.

    Free radicals are substances that can exist with missing electrons, making them readily able to donate or accept electrons and damage structures in cells. As such, they are highly reactive, binding with and destroying important cellular compounds. Most of the free radicals in your body are made during metabolic processes. More are added from the food you eat and environmental pollution. Most of these free radicals contain oxygen molecules. As each cell makes energy in little structures called mitochondria, free radicals result. These oxidant by-products can damage DNA, proteins and lipids (fats). Consequently, toxic by-products of lipid peroxidation may cause cancer, inhibit enzyme activity and produce mutations in genetic material that make you age faster.

    DNA Repair Theory

    Free radical damage to DNA can cause cells to mutate or die. Your body makes enzymes that can repair this damage and slow aging. But, over time, the amount of damage overwhelms the body's ability to fix things. As cells grow older, their ability to patch up DNA diminishes and the rate of damage proceeds faster than repair. The result: We age and eventually die.

    What Can We Do?

    The free radical theory of aging suggests that taking antioxidants (compounds known to prevent free radical damage) in our food or as supplements may slow aging.

    In the publication Age (18 [51] 1995: 62), it was reported that "aging appears to be caused by free radicals initiated by the mitochondria at an increasing rate with age. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide radicals formed by the mitochondria during normal metabolism are major risk factors for disease and death after about the age of 28 in developed countries. Antioxidants from the diet lower the production of free radicals without impairing essential reactions to maintain body function."

    Antioxidant Protection

    Common dietary antioxidants include: vitamins E and C, carotenes, sulphur containing amino acids, co-enzyme Q10 and flavonoids (a group of plant compounds or pigments responsible for the color in fruits and flowers). In addition, melatonin, DHEA and the amino acid compound glutathione may also prove of benefit.

    Glutathione along with the enzyme glutathione peroxidase are an essential part of free radical "quenching." (Quenching means changing free radicals into benign substances no longer capable of harm.) Deficiencies may suggest a decreased capacity to maintain detoxification and metabolic reactions in which glutathione plays a role, resulting in increased free radical stress and/or lipid peroxidation. Drinking too many alcoholic beverages can result in glutathione deficiency.

    In a study in which 39 healthy men and 130 healthy women between the ages of 20 and 94 were evaluated for glutathione levels, the older subjects had significantly decreased levels (especially in the 60 to 79-year-old group). The authors felt that physical health and longevity were closely related to glutathione levels (Jrnl Lab & Clin Sci 120(5), Nov. 1992: 720-725). Poor nutrition and/or deficiencies in essential micronutrients and many prescription medications may contribute significantly to detoxification capacity in an aged individual. All of these circumstances are common in the elderly.

    Eating a poor diet that contains too many processed foods without many fruits and vegetables can compromise your body's ability to detoxify pollutants, toxins and other harmful compounds. That can set off metabolic processes capable of fomenting large increases in free radical stress that can accelerate aging. Unfortunately, even in a country as prosperous as our own, nutrient deficiencies are frequent, especially in older citizens.

    Nutrition Deficiencies

    A study that looked at what elderly people consumed compared their reported intake with the 1989 Recommended Dietary Amount (RDA) and 1980 RDA: One of four people consumed only two-thirds of the RDA for calories and 60% consumed less than two-thirds of the RDA for vitamin D. As for other nutrients, 50% were found to have inadequate zinc levels (less than two-thirds of the RDA), 31% lacked calcium, 27% were short of vitamin B6, 25% didn't get enough magnesium, 7% missed out on folate and 6% ate less than two-thirds of the requirement for vitamin C (Nutrition reviews (II), September 1995: S9-S15).

    When researchers examine what everyone in the U.S. eats, they find that only 9% of Americans consume the recommended five servings of fruits and/or vegetables per day (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sept 1993).

    A diet high in fruits and vegetables is naturally high in antioxidant compounds and is believed to help you live longer. Unfortunately, if you buy your produce in the supermarket, those fruits and vegetables may also be rich in pesticide and herbicide residues (Consumer Reports, March 1999). Obviously, organic produce lacks these residues. But, in any case, research continues to indicate that a diet low in meats and animal fat and high in vegetables protects against antioxidant damage.

    Longevity Diets

    A six-year study of 182 people over age 70 in rural Greek villages found that those following their traditional diet of olive oil, whole grain breads, fresh fruits and vegetables and wine were less likely to die during the study than those who consumed more red meat and saturated fat. The most important foods in lowering the risk of early death included fruits, vegetables, legumes (peas and beans), nuts, dairy products and cereals (BMJ 311, 1995: 1457-1460).

    Another article in Epidemiology highlights the evidence that eating a vegetarian diet increases your chances of living longer. Included in this survey is a recent country-wide study of diet and health in China, showing that the traditional near vegetarian diet of 10% to 15% of calories coming from dietary fat reduced the chances of heart disease, diabetes and many types of cancers (Epidemiology 3[5], 1992: 389-391).

    Staying Alive

    Staying skinny and limiting what you eat may also increase longevity. Scientific studies have previously shown that being overweight can theoretically curtail your life, increasing the risk of heart disease, diabetes and other life-shortening conditions. Animal studies have also shown that restricting food can slow diseases associated with aging. Researchers believe that cutting calories helps your immune system stay younger by reducing the formation of substances that are called proinflammatory cytokines.

    Specifically reducing your intake of fatty foods may decrease your chance of coming down with autoimmune diseases. Researchers think omega-6 fatty acid vegetable oils (like corn oil) may increase free radical formation and decrease levels of antioxidant enzyme messenger RNA in addition to other effects (Nutrition reviews 53[4], 1995: S72-S79). Another study found that cutting calories lowers the levels of oxidative stress and damage, retards age-associated changes and extends maximum life span in mammals (Science 273, July 5, 1996: 59-63).

    In yet another study, it was shown that caloric restriction early in the life of lab animals increased their life span by a whopping 40% (Australian Family Physician 23[7], July 1994: 1297-1305). Today's modern higher-fat, low-fiber diet with substantial sugar consumption represents everything the longevity researchers say you shouldn't eat.

    Longevity and Exercise

    Exercise may slow aging. When researchers looked at the exercise habits of 17,000 men, average age of 46, they found that those who took part in vigorous activity lived longer.

    Exercise can improve both cardiac and metabolic functions within the body, while also decreasing heart disease risk. Even modest exercise has been shown to improve cholesterol and blood sugar levels (JAMA 273[15], April 19, 1995: 1179-1184). In a study of how exercise affects your chances of living longer, 9,773 men underwent preventive medicine examinations on two different occasions. When the researchers looked at who lived longest, they found the highest death rate was in men who were unfit during both physical exams.

    The Treadmill of Life

    The lowest death rate was in the men who worked out and were in good shape. The researchers concluded that for each minute increase in how long a man could keep treading on a treadmill (between the first and second exam) there was a corresponding 7.9% decrease in the risk of dying (JAMA 273 [14], April 12, 1995: 1093-1098).

    Since exercise can increase oxygen consumption up to 10 times, boosting the rate of production of free radicals, researchers believe that older individuals need more antioxidant nutrients to protect them. In a paper published in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (1997), researchers stated that if you regularly exercise in your golden years, you should take more antioxidant vitamins to compensate for this risk.

    Longevity Supplementation

    Melatonin is not often thought of as an antioxidant, but, instead, as a sleep aid. Melatonin, however, is an effective and efficient free radical scavenger and may help stave off the effects of aging. Melatonin protects against what are called hydroxyl free radicals. Research shows that older people's lack of melatonin may make them more susceptible to oxidative stress. In one study, researchers felt that new therapies aimed at stimulating melatonin synthesis may eventually lead to therapies for the prevention of diseases related to premature aging (Aging and Clinical Experimental Research 7[5], 1995: 338-339). Melatonin was shown to provide antioxidant protection in several ways.

    Toning Down Enzymes

    Melatonin can ease the effects of enzymes that generate free radicals, enhance the production of glutathione peroxidase (an antioxidant) and defuse the caustic action of free radicals that contain hydroxyls. In several studies, DHEA supplementation has been shown to potentially revive immune function in older adults (Exp. Opin. Invest. Drugs 4[2], 1995: 147-154).

    In a study of 138 persons older than 85 years compared to 64 persons 20 to 40 years of age, scientists found that the younger people had four times as much DHEA in their bodies.

    The researchers believe that our bodies make less and less DHEA as we get older. The authors of this study raise the possibility that declining DHEA may be partly to blame for our biological clocks running down (New York Academy of Sciences 1994: 543-552).

    Vitamins E & C

    A growing body of research also supports the benefits of taking vitamins E and C to hold off the effects of getting old. Researchers writing in Free Radicals and Aging (1992: 411-418) point out that as you get older your body is home to more and more free radical reactions that may lead to degenerative diseases like heart disease and arthritis. Research has found that in older people with exercise-induced oxidative stress, taking vitamin E every day may significantly fight off free radicals. (To investigate this effect, scientists measured waste products in urine that result from free radical reactions.) Their conclusion: Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin E may be beneficial.

    Chronological Age Vs.Biological Age

    Vitamin C also looks to scientists like a good anti-aging bet. Research in the Journal of Advancement in Medicine, (7[1], Spring 1994: 31-41) showed that folks consuming larger amounts of vitamin C were less likely to experience clinical problems at all ages. Those taking in less than 100 mg of vitamin C per day also suffered the most problems.

    In this research, individuals over 50 years of age who daily consumed the largest amount of vitamin C were as healthy or healthier than the 40 year olds who were taking the least amount of vitamin C.

    Similar Relationship

    A similar relationship appears to exist for vitamin E and serum cholesterol levels. In a study of 360 physicians and their spouses, researchers found that people in their 50s who consumed more vitamin E had lower cholesterol than those in their 30s who were taking less.

    And the longevity beat goes on: In a study evaluating environmental tobacco smoke and oxidative stress, researchers divided 103 people into three groups. Researchers blew smoke at 37 of these folks without protection while 30 of them got to breathe tobacco smoke but took antioxidant supplementation. Another 36 of them merely had to read magazines from doctors' offices. The results: After 60 days of supplementation the antioxidant folks had a 62% reduction in evidence of oxidative damage to their DNA. Cholesterol levels dropped and so did antioxidant enzyme activities. The researchers concluded that taking antioxidants provided a modicum of protection against environmental poisons.

    The range of antioxidant nutrients used in this study included: beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium as well as copper (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 7, November 1998: 981-988).

    Carotenoids

    When you mention carotene or carotenoids, most people think of the beta carotene that makes carrots orange. But more than 600 carotenoids are present in colorful vegetables and many of these misunderstood substances are more potent antioxidants than beta-carotene.

    Carotenoids have been shown to destroy oxygen free radicals in lipids (fats), help protect our cells from the sun's ultra violet radiation and enhance our natural immune response (J. Nutr 119[1], Jan. 1989: 112-115).

    Some evidence seems to show that how much carotenoids you (and other mammals) have in your cells may be the predominant factor in determining life span (Proc Natl Acad Sci 82 [4], 1985: 798-802). Therefore, a diet rich in carotenoids (leafy green vegetables, carrots, yams, sweet potatoes, squash, citrus fruits and tomatoes) along with supplementation seems to be just what the fountain of youth ordered.

    Flavonoids

    Flavonoids, a group of antioxidant plant pigments, seem to be able to protect specific organs. For instance, the flavonoids in milk thistle (Silybum marianum) have been used for ages for liver problems. Bilberry has been found protective for the eye and hawthorn for the heart and circulatory system.

    Numerous studies have shown the many beneficial effects of flavonoids with perhaps the best known being the ability of anthocyanidins in wine and grape seed extract to help protect your blood vessels and capillaries from oxidative damage (Phytotherapy 42, 1986: 11-14; Am J Clin Nutr 61, 1995: 549-54).

    Flavonoids are found in vegetables and such fruits as blackberries, blueberries, cherries and grapes. A diet rich in these foods helps ensure an adequate intake of these important nutrient compounds.

    Amino Acid Health

    Methionine and cysteine are sulphur containing amino acids (protein building blocks), both of which are essential in maintaining levels of glutathione, a substance that plays a major role in quelling free radicals. Studies have found that as we age, the level of these important amino acids in our bodies decreases. (NEJM 312 [1], 1985: 159-68). As it has been shown that adding cysteine to the diet of test animals can increase their life expectancy considerably, researchers believe these amino acids can help us live longer too.

    Attitude & Behavior

    Get more sleep! A recent study showed that men who habitually napped were less likely to have a heart attack. The men in this research who regularly napped for at least 30 minutes per day had about a 30% reduction in heart problems while those who napped for a full hour had a 50% reduction compared to non nappers. Naps of longer duration did not seem to increase the benefit. In the same research, investigators also found that spending time with a pet or merely contemplating nature could also improve cardiac health. Sensuality, optimism and altruism also appeared to have health benefits (Family Practice News, December 15, 1998: 14-15).

    In another study, this one in American Psychologist, researchers from the University of California found that people who are self-indulgent, pampered and achieve by running roughshod over the competition are less likely to outlive their healthy peers. Being egocentric, impulsive, undependable and tough-minded were predictors of poor physical health and a shorter life. So loosen up and be nice to your fellow humans! (U.C. Davis Magazine, Fall 1995: 14).

    Longevity at Last

    While no one has suggested that taking supplements, eating vegetables or exercising can, as of yet, extend the human life span past the generally recognized limit of about 120 years, researchers believe they can improve your odds of longer life. And by staying healthier, your old age will be more enjoyable, too.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=377)


    Nutrients for Longevity
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 10, 2005 09:59 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Nutrients for Longevity

    Nutrients for Longevity by Edward C. Wallace, ND, DC Energy Times, September 1, 1999

    What's the big deal about trying to live longer? As you grow older (and the American population grows older alongside you) you may want to postpone the inevitable. Few wish to hasten "the journey from which no traveler returns." But as we approach that final bon voyage, chances are we desire clear sailing-aging without disability and with a peaceful easy feeling.

    How Do We Age

    Science has long puzzled about what causes the wrinkles, pains and deterioration of aging. In the search for causes, two basic theories have won over the most proponents: The first holds that cells are programmed with biological clocks that predetermine how many times they can reproduce before becoming non-functional. This theory has been largely formulated by the researcher Leonard Hayflick, MD.

    The second basic theory, introduced by Denham Harman, MD, PhD, in the mid 1950s, holds that cells eventually break down due to attack by caustic molecules called free radicals that cause oxidative stress.

    Programmed Cell Theory

    In the early '60s, Dr. Hayflick observed that human fibroblasts (cells from connective tissue) in the laboratory refused to divide more than about 50 times. Dr. Hayflick also found that even if he froze the fibroblasts after 20 divisions, they would remember that they only had 30 divisions left after thawing.

    Fifty cell divisions have been called the "Hayflick limit." Based on this research, scientists theorize that cells maintain a genetic clock that winds down as old age ensues. Many researchers believe the hypothalamus gland is the force behind our aging clocks, signaling the pituitary gland to release hormones that cause aging.

    Free Radical/Oxidative Stress Theory

    The other popular theory of aging pictures the human body as a cellular battlefield where attackers called free radicals damage our cells and tissues, making them age. In this scenario, a process called oxidation is the chief aging villain.

    On a microscopic level, oxidation generally entails molecules or atoms losing electrons. (Gaining electrons is called reduction.) The molecules or atoms that take these electrons are oxidizing agents. Free radicals are substances that can exist with missing electrons, making them readily able to donate or accept electrons and damage structures in cells. As such, they are highly reactive, binding with and destroying important cellular compounds. Most of the free radicals in your body are made during metabolic processes. More are added from the food you eat and environmental pollution.

    Most of these free radicals contain oxygen molecules. As each cell makes energy in little structures called mitochondria, free radicals result. These oxidant by-products can damage DNA, proteins and lipids (fats). Consequently, toxic by-products of lipid peroxidation may cause cancer, inhibit enzyme activity and produce mutations in genetic material that make you age faster.

    DNA Repair Theory

    Free radical damage to DNA can cause cells to mutate or die. Your body makes enzymes that can repair this damage and slow aging. But, over time, the amount of damage overwhelms the body's ability to fix things. As cells grow older, their ability to patch up DNA diminishes and the rate of damage proceeds faster than repair. The result: We age and eventually die.

    What Can We Do

    The free radical theory of aging suggests that taking antioxidants (compounds known to prevent free radical damage) in our food or as supplements may slow aging.

    In the publication Age (18 [51] 1995: 62), it was reported that "aging appears to be caused by free radicals initiated by the mitochondria at an increasing rate with age. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide radicals formed by the mitochondria during normal metabolism are major risk factors for disease and death after about the age of 28 in developed countries. Antioxidants from the diet lower the production of free radicals without impairing essential reactions to maintain body function."

    Antioxidant Protection

    Common dietary antioxidants include: vitamins E and C, carotenes, sulphur containing amino acids, co-enzyme Q10 and flavonoids (a group of plant compounds or pigments responsible for the color in fruits and flowers). In addition, melatonin, DHEA and the amino acid compound glutathione may also prove of benefit.

    Glutathione along with the enzyme glutathione peroxidase are an essential part of free radical "quenching." (Quenching means changing free radicals into benign substances no longer capable of harm.)

    Deficiencies may suggest a decreased capacity to maintain detoxification and metabolic reactions in which glutathione plays a role, resulting in increased free radical stress and/or lipid peroxidation. Drinking too many alcoholic beverages can result in glutathione deficiency.

    In a study in which 39 healthy men and 130 healthy women between the ages of 20 and 94 were evaluated for glutathione levels, the older subjects had significantly decreased levels (especially in the 60 to 79-year-old group). The authors felt that physical health and longevity were closely related to glutathione levels (Jrnl Lab & Clin Sci 120(5), Nov. 1992: 720-725).

    Poor nutrition and/or deficiencies in essential micronutrients and many prescription medications may contribute significantly to detoxification capacity in an aged individual. All of these circumstances are common in the elderly.

    Eating a poor diet that contains too many processed foods without many fruits and vegetables can compromise your body's ability to detoxify pollutants, toxins and other harmful compounds. That can set off metabolic processes capable of fomenting large increases in free radical stress that can accelerate aging. Unfortunately, even in a country as prosperous as our own, nutrient deficiencies are frequent, especially in older citizens.

    Nutrition Deficiencies

    A study that looked at what elderly people consumed compared their reported intake with the 1989 Recommended Dietary Amount (RDA) and 1980 RDA: One of four people consumed only two-thirds of the RDA for calories and 60% consumed less than two-thirds of the RDA for vitamin D. As for other nutrients, 50% were found to have inadequate zinc levels (less than two-thirds of the RDA), 31% lacked calcium, 27% were short of vitamin B6, 25% didn't get enough magnesium, 7% missed out on folate and 6% ate less than two-thirds of the requirement for vitamin C (Nutrition reviews (II), September 1995: S9-S15).

    When researchers examine what everyone in the U.S. eats, they find that only 9% of Americans consume the recommended five servings of fruits and/or vegetables per day (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sept 1993).

    A diet high in fruits and vegetables is naturally high in antioxidant compounds and is believed to help you live longer. Unfortunately, if you buy your produce in the supermarket, those fruits and vegetables may also be rich in pesticide and herbicide residues (Consumer Reports, March 1999). Obviously, organic produce lacks these residues. But, in any case, research continues to indicate that a diet low in meats and animal fat and high in vegetables protects against antioxidant damage.

    Longevity Diets

    A six-year study of 182 people over age 70 in rural Greek villages found that those following their traditional diet of olive oil, whole grain breads, fresh fruits and vegetables and wine were less likely to die during the study than those who consumed more red meat and saturated fat. The most important foods in lowering the risk of early death included fruits, vegetables, legumes (peas and beans), nuts, dairy products and cereals (BMJ 311, 1995: 1457-1460)

    Another article in Epidemiology highlights the evidence that eating a vegetarian diet increases your chances of living longer. Included in this survey is a recent country-wide study of diet and health in China, showing that the traditional near vegetarian diet of 10% to 15% of calories coming from dietary fat reduced the chances of heart disease, diabetes and many types of cancers. (Epidemiology 3[5], 1992: 389-391).

    Staying Alive

    Staying skinny and limiting what you eat may also increase longevity. Scientific studies have previously shown that being overweight can theoretically curtail your life, increasing the risk of heart disease, diabetes and other life-shortening conditions. Animal studies have also shown that restricting food can slow diseases associated with aging. Researchers believe that cutting calories helps your immune system stay younger by reducing the formation of substances that are called proinflammatory cytokines.

    Specifically reducing your intake of fatty foods may decrease your chance of coming down with autoimmune diseases. Researchers think omega-6 fatty acid vegetable oils (like corn oil) may increase free radical formation and decrease levels of antioxidant enzyme messenger RNA in addition to other effects. (Nutrition reviews 53[4], 1995: S72-S79). Another study found that cutting calories lowers the levels of oxidative stress and damage, retards age-associated changes and extends maximum life span in mammals (Science 273, July 5, 1996: 59-63).

    In yet another study, it was shown that caloric restriction early in the life of lab animals increased their life span by a whopping 40% (Australian Family Physician 23[7], July 1994: 1297-1305). Today's modern higher-fat, low-fiber diet with substantial sugar consumption represents everything the longevity researchers say you shouldn't eat.

    Longevity and Exercise:

    Exercise may slow aging. When researchers looked at the exercise habits of 17,000 men, average age of 46, they found that those who took part in vigorous activity lived longer.

    Exercise can improve both cardiac and metabolic functions within the body, while also decreasing heart disease risk. Even modest exercise has been shown to improve cholesterol and blood sugar levels (JAMA 273[15], April 19, 1995: 1179-1184).

    In a study of how exercise affects your chances of living longer, 9,773 men underwent preventive medicine examinations on two different occasions. When the researchers looked at who lived longest, they found the highest death rate was in men who were unfit during both physical exams.

    The Treadmill of Life

    The lowest death rate was in the men who worked out and were in good shape. The researchers concluded that for each minute increase in how long a man could keep treading on a treadmill (between the first and second exam) there was a corresponding 7.9% decrease in the risk of dying. (JAMA 273 [14], April 12, 1995: 1093-1098).

    Since exercise can increase oxygen consumption up to 10 times, boosting the rate of production of free radicals, researchers believe that older individuals need more antioxidant nutrients to protect them. In a paper published in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (1997), researchers stated that if you regularly exercise in your golden years, you should take more antioxidant vitamins to compensate for this risk.

    Longevity Supplementation

    Melatonin is not often thought of as an antioxidant, but, instead, as a sleep aid. Melatonin, however, is an effective and efficient free radical scavenger and may help stave off the effects of aging.

    Melatonin protects against what are called hydroxyl free radicals. Research shows that older people's lack of melatonin may make them more susceptible to oxidative stress. In one study, researchers felt that new therapies aimed at stimulating melatonin synthesis may eventually lead to therapies for the prevention of diseases related to premature aging (Aging and Clinical Experimental Research 7[5], 1995: 338-339). Melatonin was shown to provide antioxidant protection in several ways.

    Toning Down Enzymes

    Melatonin can ease the effects of enzymes that generate free radicals, enhance the production of glutathione peroxidase (an antioxidant) and defuse the caustic action of free radicals that contain hydroxyls.

    In several studies, DHEA supplementation has been shown to potentially revive immune function in older adults (Exp. Opin. Invest. Drugs 4[2], 1995: 147-154).

    In a study of 138 persons older than 85 years compared to 64 persons 20 to 40 years of age, scientists found that the younger people had four times as much DHEA in their bodies.

    The researchers believe that our bodies make less and less DHEA as we get older. The authors of this study raise the possibility that declining DHEA may be partly to blame for our biological clocks running down (New York Academy of Sciences 1994: 543-552).

    Vitamins E & C

    A growing body of research also supports the benefits of taking vitamins E and C to hold off the effects of getting old. Researchers writing in Free Radicals and Aging (1992: 411-418) point out that as you get older your body is home to more and more free radical reactions that may lead to degenerative diseases like heart disease and arthritis. Research has found that in older people with exercise-induced oxidative stress, taking vitamin E every day may significantly fight off free radicals. (To investigate this effect, scientists measured waste products in urine that result from free radical reactions.) Their conclusion: Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin E may be beneficial.

    Chronological Age Vs. Biological Age

    Vitamin C also looks to scientists like a good anti-aging bet. Research in the Journal of Advancement in Medicine, (7[1], Spring 1994: 31-41) showed that folks consuming larger amounts of vitamin C were less likely to experience clinical problems at all ages. Those taking in less than 100 mg of vitamin C per day also suffered the most problems. In this research, individuals over 50 years of age who daily consumed the largest amount of vitamin C were as healthy or healthier than the 40 year olds who were taking the least amount of vitamin C.

    Similar Relationship

    A similar relationship appears to exist for vitamin E and serum cholesterol levels. In a study of 360 physicians and their spouses, researchers found that people in their 50s who consumed more vitamin E had lower cholesterol than those in their 30s who were taking less. And the longevity beat goes on: In a study evaluating environmental tobacco smoke and oxidative stress, researchers divided 103 people into three groups. Researchers blew smoke at 37 of these folks without protection while 30 of them got to breathe tobacco smoke but took antioxidant supplementation. Another 36 of them merely had to read magazines from doctors' offices. The results: After 60 days of supplementation the antioxidant folks had a 62% reduction in evidence of oxidative damage to their DNA. Cholesterol levels dropped and so did antioxidant enzyme activities. The researchers concluded that taking antioxidants provided a modicum of protection against environmental poisons.

    The range of antioxidant nutrients used in this study included: beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium as well as copper (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 7, November 1998: 981-988).

    Carotenoids

    When you mention carotene or carotenoids, most people think of the beta carotene that makes carrots orange. But more than 600 carotenoids are present in colorful vegetables and many of these misunderstood substances are more potent antioxidants than beta-carotene.

    Carotenoids have been shown to destroy oxygen free radicals in lipids (fats), help protect our cells from the sun's ultra violet radiation and enhance our natural immune response (J. Nutr 119(1), Jan. 1989: 112-115).

    Some evidence seems to show that how much carotenoids you (and other mammals) have in your cells may be the predominant factor in determining life span (Proc Natl Acad Sci 82 [4], 1985: 798-802). Therefore, a diet rich in carotenoids (leafy green vegetables, carrots, yams, sweet potatoes, squash, citrus fruits and tomatoes) along with supplementation seems to be just what the fountain of youth ordered.

    Flavonoids

    Flavonoids, a group of antioxidant plant pigments, seem to be able to protect specific organs.

    For instance, the flavonoids in milk thistle (Silybum marianum) have been used for ages for liver problems. Bilberry has been found protective for the eye and hawthorn for the heart and circulatory system.

    Numerous studies have shown the many beneficial effects of flavonoids with perhaps the best known being the ability of anthocyanidins in wine and grape seed extract to help protect your blood vessels and capillaries from oxidative damage (Phytotherapy 42, 1986: 11-14; Am J Clin Nutr 61, 1995: 549-54).

    Flavonoids are found in vegetables and such fruits as blackberries, blueberries, cherries and grapes. A diet rich in these foods helps ensure an adequate intake of these important nutrient compounds.

    Amino Acid Health

    Methionine and cysteine are sulphur containing amino acids (protein building blocks), both of which are essential in maintaining levels of glutathione, a substance that plays a major role in quelling free radicals. Studies have found that as we age, the level of these important amino acids in our bodies decreases. (NEJM 312 [1], 1985: 159-68).

    As it has been shown that adding cysteine to the diet of test animals can increase their life expectancy considerably, researchers believe these amino acids can help us live longer too.

    Attitude & Behavior

    Get more sleep! A recent study showed that men who habitually napped were less likely to have a heart attack. The men in this research who regularly napped for at least 30 minutes per day had about a 30% reduction in heart problems while those who napped for a full hour had a 50% reduction compared to non nappers. Naps of longer duration did not seem to increase the benefit.

    In the same research, investigators also found that spending time with a pet or merely contemplating nature could also improve cardiac health. Sensuality, optimism and altruism also appeared to have health benefits (Family Practice News, December 15, 1998: 14-15).

    In another study, this one in American Psychologist, researchers from the University of California found that people who are self-indulgent, pampered and achieve by running roughshod over the competition are less likely to outlive their healthy peers. Being egocentric, impulsive, undependable and tough-minded were predictors of poor physical health and a shorter life. So loosen up and be nice to your fellow humans! (U.C. Davis Magazine, Fall 1995: 14).

    Longevity at Last

    While no one has suggested that taking supplements, eating vegetables or exercising can, as of yet, extend the human life span past the generally recognized limit of about 120 years, researchers believe they can improve your odds of living longer. An added benefit: By staying healthier, your old age won't only be longer, it will be more enjoyable, too.

    And, who knows, if you hang around long enough, taking your nutrients and getting a comfortable amount of consistent exercise, while meditating and refusing to succumb to stress, that magic bullet that will keep you alive for centuries may be discovered. Some day a new antioxidant or other substance may finally prove to provide the elusive fountain of youth. Stay tuned.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=283)


    Breast Cancer
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 10, 2005 09:44 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Breast Cancer

    Breast Cancer by Joseph L. Mayo,MD Mary Ann Mayo, MA Energy Times, May 2, 1999

    What do you fear most? Bankruptcy? Floods? Heart disease? If you're like many women, breast cancer stands near the top of that dreaded list.

    But that fear doesn't permeate other cultures the way it does ours.

    A woman like Mariko Mori, for instance, 52 years old, Japanese, worries about intense pressures beginning to burden her toddler grandson. But worry about breast cancer? Hardly.

    In Indiana, Mary Lou Marks, 50, has similar family frets, mulling over her 28-year-old daughter's career choice.

    But on top of that, when Mary Lou tabulates her other worries, she recoils at the thought of breast cancer. She's heard about her lifetime risk: 1 in 8. Meanwhile, Mariko's is merely 1 in 40, according to Bob Arnot's Breast Cancer Prevention Diet (Little, Brown).

    American Problem
    Experts reporting in "Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer: A Primary Care Perspective" (Prim Care Update Ob/Gyns, vol. 5, no. 6, 1998, p. 269) say the risk of developing breast cancer for the average American woman during ages 40 to 59 is 3.9%; by 60 to 79 years of age that rises to 6.9%. A high-risk 40-year-old has a 20% chance of breast cancer in the next 20 years.

    New studies have found the effect of carrying the gene linked to breast cancer, which is responsible for only 5 to 10% of breast cancer incidence, is not as great as first suspected. Earlier estimates that the gene reflects an 80% chance of incurring breast cancer by age 70 has been recalculated to be only 37% (The Lancet, 1998;352:1337-1339).

    Complex Causesbr> Researchers agree: No one factor is solely responsible for breast cancer. Risk depends on many factors, including diet, weight, smoking, alcohol consumption, activity level and, of course, those genes.

    Regardless of their actual chance of getting breast cancer, women worry. Mary Lou faces no factors that would place her in particular jeopardy. But her anxieties about radical therapies and medical expenses paralyze her: She forgets to visit her health care provider and skips her annual mammogram appointments. Mary Lou's daughter, perhaps in reaction to her mother's gripping fears, campaigns ardently for cancer prevention, educating herself and mobilizing against the cumulative effects of known cancer risks. Smart young woman: A malignancy, after all, can take years to develop. A tumor must swell to one billion cells before it is detectable by a mammogram.

    Dietary Benefits
    Of all the tactics for reducing the risk of breast cancer, diet ranks high on the list.

    The soy-rich regimen of Japanese women like Mariko Mori, for example, helps to explain the low breast cancer rates in Asian countries (see box at center of the page).

    Tomatoes, because of their high quotient of the carotenoid lycopene, have been found to protect cells from the corrosive clutches of oxidants that have been linked with cancer in 57 out of 72 studies (The Santa Rosa Press Democrat, February 17, 1999, page A6, reporting on a Harvard Medical School study). For more on tomatoes see page 16.

    But there's no one magic anti-cancer food or diet. Eating to prevent breast cancer requires a balanced menu with fiber, healthy fats, phytoestrogens and antioxidants, all fresh and free of chemical additives.

    Modifying the balance and type of estrogen, the female sex hormone produced by the ovaries, offers an important breast cancer safeguard. Fat cells, adrenal glands and, before menopause, the ovaries, produce three "flavors" of estrogen, the strongest of which, estradiol, is believed to be carcinogenic when too plentiful or persistent in the body.

    Estrogen does its work by attaching to estrogen receptors. Receptors are particularly numerous in the epithelial cells that line milk sacs and ducts in the breasts.

    A receptor site is like a designated parking spot: Once estrogen is parked there it triggers one of its 400 functions in the body, from preparation of the uterus for pregnancy to intensifying nerve synapses in the brain.

    The food we eat can be a source of estrogen; plant estrogens, called phytoestrogens, are much weaker than the body's estrogens, but they fit the same receptors. Phytoestrogens exert a milder estrogenic effect than bodily estrogen and are capable of blocking the more potent, damaging versions.

    Finding Phytoestrogens
    Foods high in phytoestrogens include vegetables, soy, flaxseed and herbs such as black cohosh, chasteberry, red clover and turmeric. Soy is the darling of the day for good reason. Both soy and flaxseed can lengthen periods, reducing the body's overall exposure to estrogen.

    Soy also contains genistein, an "isoflavone" very similar in molecular form to estrogen but only 1/100,000 as potent. Because of its structure, genistein can attach to cells just as estrogen does; it also helps build carriers needed for binding estrogen and removing it from the body (Journal of Nutrition 125, no.3 [1995]:757S-770S). It acts as an antioxidant to counteract free radicals.

    Tumor Inhibition
    Studies have demonstrated that genistein inhibits angiogenesis (new tumor growth), slowing the progression of existing cancer.

    Soy is most protective for younger women. Postmenopausal women benefit from soy's ability to diminish hot flashes and for cardiovascular protection, especially in combination with vitamin E, fiber and carotene (Contemporary OB/GYN, September 1998, p57-58).

    Experts don't know that much about the cumulative effect of combining hormone replacement with soy, herbs and a diet high in phytoestrogens. Menopausal women who boost their estrogen this way should work with their health care providers and monitor their hormonal levels every six to 12 months with salivary testing.

    The Vegetable Cart
    Some vegetables are particularly protective against breast cancer because they change the way the body processes estrogen. Indol-3-carbinol, found in the co-called cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli and cabbage, diminishes the potency of estrogen. (Broccoli also contains isothiocyanates that trigger anti-carcinogenic enzymes.) These vegetables supply fiber, beta-carotene, vitamin C as well as other vitamins and minerals (Proc of the National Academy of Science USA, 89:2399-2403, 1992).

    Fiber from fruits, vegetables and whole grains reduces insulin levels and suppresses the appetite by making make us feel full, thus helping with weight control, so important to resisting cancer. Fiber also helps build estrogen carriers that keep unbound estrogen from being recirculated and reattached to the breast receptors.

    Cellulose, the fruit and vegetable fiber most binding with estrogen, also rounds up free radicals that damage DNA within cells.,p> Feeding the Immune System Despite heightened public awareness and efforts to stick to wholesome, healthful diets, experts increasingly link poor nutrition to depressed immune systems. Many Americans are at least marginally deficient in trace elements and vitamins despite their best attempts to eat well; that's why a good multivitamin/mineral is wise, even mandatory. Vitamins given to people undergoing cancer treatment stimulate greater response, fewer side effects, and increased survival (International Journal of Integrative Medicine, vol. 1, no. 1, January/February 1999).

    Nutrients tend to work synergistically on the immune system. They should be taken in balanced proportions, and in consultation with your health care provider.

    Immune Boosters
    In Research links low levels of calcium and vitamin D, an inhibitor of cell division and growth, to higher breast cancer rates.

    n Riboflavin (B2), pyridoxine (B6), pantothenic acid (B5), zinc and folate strengthen immunity. Selenium, in lab culture and animal studies, has helped kill tumors and protect normal tissues.

    n Beta-carotene and vitamins A, E and C are antioxidants. Vitamin C enhances vitamin E's effects, boosting immunity and protecting against cell damage. The antioxidant isoflavones in green tea, with soy, convey the anticancer effects of the Asian diet. Research shows actions that discourage tumors and gene mutations.

    The food you eat influences hormones. Excess sugar raises insulin, which acts as a growth factor for cancer and interferes with vitamin C's stimulation of white blood cells. It may contribute to obesity.

    Alcohol is converted to acetaldehyde, which causes cancer in laboratory animals. It affects gene regulation by decreasing the body's ability to use folic acid. It increases estrogen and the amount of free estradiol in the blood. The liver damage that accompanies high alcohol consumption frequently reduces its capacity to filter carcinogenic products, regulate hormones and break down estrogen. Studies of alcohol consumption have caused experts to estimate that drinking more than two alcoholic beverages a day increases breast cancer risk by 63% (OB-GYN News, November 1, 1998, p. 12).

    Fat Can be Phat
    Fat conveys nutritional benefits. Not all fats are bad: we can't survive for very long without certain fats. Fat can turn you into a "well-oiled" machine. But the wrong kind of fat (the fatty acids in red meats and fatty poultry) is believed to be a major culprit in breast cancer.

    Fat cells produce estrogen. Excess fat stores carcinogens and limits carriers that can move estrogen out of your system.

    Once estrogen has attached itself to a receptor, the health result depends on the type of fat in the breast. Saturated fat, transfatty acids and omega-6 fat from polyunsaturated vegetable oils such as safflower oil, peanut, soybean oil, corn oil and in margarine can increase the estrogen effect and trigger a powerful signal to the breast cell to replicate.

    Restraining Prostaglandins
    Blood rich in the essential fatty acids omega-3 and omega-9 lowers cancer risk by driving down levels of prostaglandins, which promote tumor growth. The blood and tumors of women with breast cancer usually contain high levels of prostaglandins.

    Breast tissue is protected by omega-3 fat chiefly from fish and flaxseed and by omega-9 from olive oil. Salmon once a week or water packed tuna three times a week are particularly beneficial. Fish oil supplements processed to reduce contaminates are available. Cod liver oil isn't recommended: its vitamin A and D levels are too high.

    Flaxseed is the richest known plant source of omega-3. Use a coffee grinder to benefit from the seed and oil for the full estrogen effect; sprinkle ground flaxseed over cereal or fold into baked goods. Drizzle flaxseed oil, found in the refrigerator section of your health food store, over salads or cereal. (Store the oil in the refrigerator.)

    Olive oil, especially in the context of the so-called Mediterranean diet of vegetables, omega-3-rich fish and fresh fruit (Menopause Management, January-February 1999, p. 16-19), lowers the risk of breast cancer (The Lancet, May 18, 1996;347:1351-1356).

    Selecting Organic Food
    Select organic foods for extra anticancer protection. Pesticides stimulate erratic cell action and often inhibit the estrogen carrier's ability to attach and remove estrogen from the body. Free floating estrogen then can attach to breast receptors and cause trouble.

    Buy or grow fresh, organic foods whenever you can. When grilling meat, fish or poultry, reduce the area where carcinogens may accumulate by trimming fat. Charred, well-done meat is known to be carcinogenic. When grilling, marinate meat first and reduce the cooking time on the grill by slightly precooking.

    Cancer prevention is an interlocking puzzle requiring the limitation of fat consumption, weight control, exercise, stress reduction and care for psychological and spiritual balance. Possessing more cancer fighting pieces makes you more likely to be able to complete the prevention picture.

    Joseph L. Mayo, MD, FACOG and Mary Ann Mayo, MA, are the authors of The Menopause manager: A Safe Path for a Natural Change, an individualized program for managing menopause. The book's advice, in easy-to-understand portions, isolates in-depth explanations with unbiased reviews of conventional and alternative choices. A unique perspective for mid-life women who want to know all their options.

    Also from the Mayos - The HOW Health Opportunities For Women quarterly newsletter to help women learn HOW to make informed health choices. Learn HOW to: - Choose nutritional supplements

  • - Integrate natural remedies with conventional medicine.
  • - Pick healthier foods.
  • - Reduce breast cancer, osteoporosis and heart disease risk.
  • - Slow aging's effects. Protect against environmental toxins.



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    GlucosaMend™ Tissue/Joint Repair Complex
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 02, 2005 11:19 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: GlucosaMend™ Tissue/Joint Repair Complex

    GlucosaMend

    More than 40 million Americans experience joint discomfort. But exciting new research proves you can do something about it. Our health and well-being is inextricably linked to lifestyle choices: the right combination of exercise, weight training and supplementation can strengthen muscles and joint tissues to minimize stress and degradation. Targeted nutrition to the multiple body systems related to joint and connective tissue can help maintain flexibility and joint comfort. GLUCOSAMEND supports the musculoskeletal system with structural building blocks and tissue production cofactors, as well as aiding the body’s mechanisms for soothing relief and antioxidant defense.

    Bio-Aligned Formula™ GLUCOSAMEND is uniquely effective because it is a Bio-Aligned Formula. Source Naturals evaluates the underlying causes of system imbalances. Then we design formulas that provide targeted nutrition to bring your interrelated body systems back into balance.

    Musculoskeletal System—Structural Building Blocks

    Certain building blocks of joints and connective tissue can help maintain joint integrity and comfort. Glucosamine is a major constituent of glycosaminoglycans, which in turn form proteoglycans, molecules that hold and bind the water that lubricates joints, disperses stress and nourishes joint tissue. The amino acids proline and lysine are structural components of collagen and elastin, which give strength to connective tissue. GLUCOSAMEND contains glucosamine sulfate, N-acetyl glucosamine, proline and lysine.

    Musculoskeletal System—Tissue Production Cofactors

    Some micronutrients are necessary as cofactors in the production of connective tissue. For example, vitamin C and copper help form hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine, main constituents of collagen. A unique property of grape seed extract is its ability to form a bond between broken collagen fibers, helping to repair them and restore flexibility and strength to connective tissues and joints. GLUCOSAMEND provides vitamin C, zinc, manganese, copper, and grape seed extract to address these cofactors.

    Soothing Relief Mechanisms

    Some herbs and nutrients have the capacity to support the body’s natural mechanisms for increasing comfort. Boswellia, for example, is an herb with soothing properties, while vitamin B-6 helps to stabilize collagen and elastin. Additional herbs and nutrients, acting in conjunction with antioxidant protectors, support tissue comfort and health. GLUCOSAMEND contains Boswellia serrata, quercetin, copper, and vitamin B-6.

    Antioxidant Defense

    The health and integrity of joints and tissues—specifically of cell membranes— is supported by botanicals and nutrients that support the body’s natural antioxidant response. When tissues become damaged, the body mounts a repair process that ultimately generates free radicals. These free radicals can also break down healthy cells and tissues in the process, hence the need for antioxidants to neutralize and break the cycle. GLUCOSAMEND provides grape seed extract, vitamin C, zinc, selenium, copper, quercetin to neutralize free radicals.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Joints: A Strategy for WellnessSM

    Healthy lifestyle habits should be part of your individual strategy for joint wellness. Source Naturals believes in a holistic approach to living. Not only can supplements bring balances to your individual body systems but certain lifestyle choices can also bio-align your health. Exercise Regularly: Regular physical activity helps lubricate cartilage, strengthens muscles around joints, and promotes weight control. An exercise program geared to joint health includes stretching, mild weight training, and low-impact aerobics. Watch Your Weight: Population-based studies, including the well-known Framingham study, have consistently shown a link between obesity and challenges to joint health. Excess weight causes pressure on joints, and can speed the rate at which cartilage wears down. Eat Healthy: To support healthy joints, increase your intake of omega-3 fatty acids from salmon, sardines, flax seeds or flax oil, avoid excess protein intake, and replace animal with plant proteins when possible. You should also eat lots of organically grown fruits and vegetables, limit saturated fat and eliminate hydrogenated oils. Rest and Relaxation: Regularly scheduled rest gives your body time to recover and rebuild, allowing you to make the most of your exercise program. It’s important to know when to slow down. Supplementation: Source Naturals offers a range of products that can supplement your strategy for joint wellness. These include the pineapple enzyme BROMELAIN; SAME, a natural compound formed from the amino acid methionine, which has been found to support joint comfort and mobility; and CHONDROITIN to promote water retention and elasticity in cartilage and inhibit enzymes that break down cartilage.

    Structural Building Blocks N-Acetyl Glucosamine, Glucosamine Sulfate, L-Lysine, L-Proline Tissue Production Cofactors Grape Seed, Copper, Manganese, Zinc, Vitamins A, B-6 and C, Niacinamide Soothing Relief Mechanisms Boswellia Serrata, Quercetin, Turmeric, Copper, Magnesium, Zinc, Vitamin C Antioxidant Defense Grape Seed, Quercetin, Manganese, Selenium, Zinc, Vitamins A, C and E

    References
    Bhavan’s, B. H. Selected Medicinal Plants of India (A Monograph of Identity, Safety, and Clinical Usage) Bombay: Chemexcil, 1992. Dore-Duffy, P., et al. (1990, Nov-Dec.). “Zinc profiles...” Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology 8.6: 541-46. Ellis, J. M. (1985, Winter). “Vitamin B6 deficiency and rheumatism.” Anabolism. Lakshmi, R., et al. (1991, Oct-Dec.). “Effect of riboflavin or pyridoxine deficiency on inflammatory response.” Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics 28.5-6: 481-84. Leibovitz, B., (1991). Nutrition Update 5.3: 5. Levine, M. (1986). “New concepts in the biology and biochemistry of ascorbic acid.” New England Journal of Medicine 314: 892-902. Pavelka, K, Gatterova, J., Olejarova, M, Machacek, S., Giacovelli, G., Rovati, L.C., (2002). “Glucosamine Sulfate Use and Delay of Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: A 3-Year, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study. Arch Intern Med, 2002 October 14; 162(18):2113-23. Roubenoff, R., et al. (1995, Jan.). “Abnormal vitamin B6 status...” Arthritis and Rheumatism 38.1: 105-9. Shampe, P., and R. Harvey. Lippincotts Illustrated reviews: Biochemistry. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1987. Tarp, U., et al. (1985). Scandanavian Journal of Rheumatology 14.2: 97-101. Volpi, N., (2002). “Oral bioavailability of chondroitin sulfate (Condrosulf) and its constituents in healthy male volunteers,” 2002 Oct; 10(10):768.



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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 09, 2005 06:10 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    It's in the Blood

    Natural alternatives abound for managing cholesterol levels, backed by a growing body of research ©VR By Paul Bubny

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) last July lowered the threshold for considering the use of statin drugs—a move which some say was motivated more by profits than scientific evidence. For example, the Center for Science in the Public Interest pointed out that eight of the nine authors behind the new recommendations had financial ties to statin manufacturers, which stand to reap billions of dollars more from a category that grossed $14 billion in the U.S. last year. And though the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in January decided against authorizing over-the-counter (OTC) sales of statin drugs, drug companies would still like to see this happen.

    “The medical establishment’s pushing of these drugs to becoming the number one category of prescribed drugs in the world has led them to keep lowering the total cholesterol number that triggers the drug recommendation,” said Neil E. Levin, C.C.N., D.A.N.L.A., nutrition educator, product formulator, and “Truth Advocate” for NOW Foods (Bloomingdale, IL), which produces a number of supplements for addressing cholesterol. “This is despite the lack of evidence that total cholesterol means much as regards cardiovascular risks.

    “Other tests are much more important in terms of predicting risks, including CRP (C-reactive protein), the balance of different cholesterol fractions, and homocysteine,” he continued. “Add adult-onset diabetes to the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD).”

    At the same time, the allegation that enormous sales potential lay behind the lower threshold for prescribing statin drugs illustrates how widespread the problem of hypercholesterolemia (elevated total cholesterol) is. More than 100 million Americans have elevated cholesterol (total cholesterol values of 200 mg/dl and higher), and of these, more than a third have high cholesterol (levels of 240 mg/dl and higher), according to the American Heart Association. Those numbers have unfavorable implications for the incidence of CVD, as high cholesterol is considered a risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke.

    While statin drugs haven’t garnered the same degree of negative publicity that COX-2 inhibitors have suffered lately, safety concerns have arisen nonetheless. For one thing, these drugs lower the liver’s production of coenzyme Q10 (coQ10) along with its production of cholesterol. “CoQ10 is related to energy production and immune functions, is an antioxidant, and [is] an important cardiovascular nutrient,” Levin said. “It is not good to lower one’s coQ10 levels by half!”

    Moreover, said Levin, statins increase the tendency of muscle tissues to break down. “Combined with inactivity or certain drugs, this can stimulate muscle wasting,” he said. “Muscle is where a good deal of calories are burned, so a loss of muscle could affect mobility and energy production, potentially adding to obesity problems. These muscle changes occurred in patients and persisted for years after treatment was discontinued, as shown by muscle biopsies, even if no obvious muscle problems were observed by the patients.”

    And the last word on the subject may not have been spoken. Predicted Dr. Frank King, Jr. president of King Bio Natural Medicine (Asheville, NC), “Once the appropriate studies are finished, these drugs, along with hypertensives, will hit the fan bigger than the COX-2 inhibitors.”

    Also looking toward the future, Levin said that of the 20 million Americans who will be “targeted” for statin drug prescriptions under the new NCEP guidelines, “Some of these will want to try natural methods first. Others will rebel at the side effects of the drugs and experiment with alternative products.”

    King and Levin both saw opportunity for natural products in the fallout from drug safety concerns, with King projecting that sales of his company’s cholesterol-related homeopathic remedies will double in 2005. “The reports of deaths from drugs will always overshadow the trumped-up studies and news reports blasting dietary supplements,” said Levin. “Vioxx knocked vitamin E off the media’s radar screens pretty rapidly, though we still see ignorant reporters citing that [Johns Hopkins] vitamin E analysis as if it were true. But the comparable safety of supplements means that open-minded people will want to at least try natural therapies before signing in to a lifetime of drug therapies. Meanwhile, the studies on natural products will continue to build our credibility.”

    Those studies keep coming in, with at least four major findings published in the past few months, plus a heart-health claim on walnuts authorized by FDA. They join a raft of earlier findings that link natural products—branded and otherwise—to healthy cholesterol levels.

    "Blur of Products"

    With so many natural alternatives to cholesterol drugs available, it can be hard to keep track. “As with any other category, the blur of products as they cascade over several shelves means that the retailer needs to have a good sense of what works and what they want to recommend to their customers,” Levin said. “Really, each person needs a protocol that would include antioxidants, fiber, vitamins, herbs, and oils. The pre-mixed cholesterol support formulas are a good starting place.”

    To help retailers get a sense of “what works,” here is an alphabetical discussion of several nutrients that have demonstrated benefits in serum cholesterol levels. They include the following:

    Barley may help lower cholesterol, according to a report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2004, vol.80, no.5: 1185-1193). Twenty-five adults with mild hypercholesterolemia consumed a controlled diet low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol for 19 weeks. They then added whole-grain products containing barley to their diets that contained low (0 g), medium (3 g), or high (6 g) amount of beta-glucan per day for five weeks. Total cholesterol was reduced by 4 percent 9 percent, and 10 percent, respectively. The diet with the highest amount of beta-glucan led to a decrease in LDL cholesterol of 17 percent.

    Chromium. There’s evidence, Levin said, that chromium in doses of 500 mg a day may decrease levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the so-called “bad” cholesterol) and total cholesterol while raising levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good” cholesterol). At the annual meeting of the American College of Nutrition last October, a poster presentation on the safety of Benicia, CA-based InterHealth Nutraceuticals’ ChromeMate niacin-bound chromium won first prize; among other things, the presentation cited chromium’s role in maintaining healthy blood lipid levels.

    Fatty Acids. The latest in a long line of studies demonstrating the benefits of fatty acids in heart health is a study published in The International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics in December 2004. It showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid, can restore normal blood vessel function in children with inherited high cholesterol. The study, which used Martek DHA produced from microalgae, concluded that restoration of normal blood vessel function has the “potential for preventing the progression of early coronary heart disease in high-risk children.”

    “The evidence continues to accumulate on the cardiovascular benefits of DHA for people of all ages,” said Henry “Pete” Linsert, Jr., chairman and CEO of Martek Biosciences, an ingredient supplier based in Columbia, MD. “This study clearly indicates that DHA played an important role in healthy blood vessel function in the children in this study.”

    On the Omega-Research.com Website maintained by fish oil manufacturer Nordic Naturals (Watsonville, CA) can be found summaries of several earlier studies linking omega-3 fatty acids to maintaining healthy blood lipid levels, as well as related benefits such as elasticity of the arteries. In a 2003 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, it was found that women receiving a mixture of 4 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and DHA along with 2 g of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) had lower levels of LDL cholesterol after 28 days compared to those who received either the EPA/DHA supplements without DHA, EPA/DHA with a smaller dose of GLA, or GLA alone.

    Flax is another source of omega-3s, and Arkopharma/Health From The Sun (Bedford, MA) offers FiProFLAX in a variety of forms. Marketing director Hugues P. Mas said the flax is “QAI [Quality Assurance International] certified organic and guaranteed GMO [genetically modified organism]-free.” On its Website, the company offers a cholesterol quiz geared to consumers, discussing the importance of omega-3s as well as other nutrients.

    Garlic. Adding to an already considerable body of research demonstrating that garlic can lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides while increasing HDL cholesterol, researchers at UCLA in 2003 reported that Kyolic aged garlic extract reduced or inhibited plaque formation in the arteries of 19 cardiac patients taking statin drugs.

    Lead researcher Matthew Budoff, Ph.D. commented at the time that the study “suggests that aged garlic extract may be a useful and beneficial dietary addition for the people who have high cardiovascular risk or who have undergone heart surgery.” Budoff has since presented several trade show seminars sponsored by Los Angeles-based Wakunaga of America, the makers of Kyolic.

    Guggul. In use for centuries as a component of Ayurvedic medicine, guggul—a gummy resin tapped from the Commiphora mukul tree, which is native to India—has been studied since the early 1960s for its hypolidemic (blood-lipid lowering) properties. Sabinsa Corp. (Piscataway, NJ), an ingredient supplier which produces a standardized extract under the brand name Gugulipid, says the studies on guggul indicate that its hypolipidemic activity can be attributed to more than one mechanism of action.

    Among the possible mechanisms are: inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, enhancing the rate of excretion of cholesterol, promoting rapid degradation of cholesterol, thyroid stimulation, alteration of biogenic amines, and “high affinity binding and anion exchange.”

    Homeopathy. “Homeopathy activates the body’s own control system to work properly,” said King. “This is the safest and most curative approach to take.

    “Forcing the body into biochemical change even naturally doesn’t actually have the curative action of homeopathy,” King continued. “Homeopathy can even correct the genetic predispositions to disease we may have inherited from as deep as a thousand years into our family chain.” King Bio makes Artery/Cholesterol/BP, a homeopathic formula intended to help tone heart muscles and blood vessels.

    Low glycemic index foods. In a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that high glycemic load is negatively correlated to serum levels of HDL cholesterol. Assessing the relationship between blood levels of lipids and diet in a test population of 32 healthy males and females ages 11 to 25, the researchers found that glycemic load accounted for 21.1 percent of the variation in HDL cholesterol. They concluded that glycemic load appears to be an important independent predictor of HDL cholesterol in youth and noted that dietary restrictions without attention to glycemic load could unfavorably influence blood lipids.

    Medicinal Mushrooms. Although its product SX-Fraction is intended primarily to address high blood sugar, Maitake Products, Inc. (MPI, Ridgefield Park, NJ) found in a clinical study that LDL cholesterol in diabetic patients declined modestly (from 142 mg/dl to 133 mg/dl) over a two-month period. Those taking SX-Fraction also lost about 7 lbs. in the same time period.

    “The more impressive lowering of cholesterol, however, comes from the dietary fiber that is found in all medicinal mushrooms,” said Ellen Shnidman, manager of scientific affairs at MPI. She cited animal studies which documented the cholesterol-lowering properties of four different mushrooms: maitake, shiitake, agaricus, and enokitake.

    For example, a study reported in the September 1996 issue of Alternative Therapies showed “a 44 percent reduction in total cholesterol in rats consuming maitake mushroom in their diet,” said Shnidman. “This cholesterol reduction is accompanied by weight loss, relative to rats eating a similar high-choelsterol diet without mushrooms. Apparently, cholesterol is excreted by the rats in sufficient quantity to aid in weight loss.”

    Oat bran. A 2004 consumer study conducted by the Natural Marketing Institute (NMI, Harleysville, PA) for Nurture, Inc. (Devon, PA), which produces the ingredient OatVantage, found that 63 percent of consumers managing their cholesterol levels prefer oat-based ingredients.

    Oat bran is the subject of a health claim authorized by FDA in 1999, and NMI research found that 69 percent of respondents preferred the FDA-permitted health claim, “Helps Lower Cholesterol,” over the model structure-function claim, “Helps Maintain Healthy Cholesterol Levels.” “This is significant for food, beverage, and dietary supplement manufacturers who want to increase sales by using a more consumer-desired claim on the product label,” said Griff Parker, Nurture CEO.

    Plant sterols. Also the subject of an FDA-approved claim for heart health, plant sterols (structurally similar to cholesterol in humans) can block the absorption of cholesterol, according to a number of studies. In an “Ask the Doctor” publication (available online at www.atdonline.org), Decker Weiss, N.M.D. noted that sterols enter the same receptor sites that cholesterol enters on its way to the bloodstream. “The cholesterol, being blocked from absorption, remains in our intestines where it is eventually excreted,” Weiss wrote. General Mills has just introduced Yoplait Healthy Heart, a yogurt high in plant sterols.

    Policosanol. A mixture of fatty alcohols derived from sugar cane or beeswax, policosanol has been favorably compared in clinical studies to several types of prescription drugs for managing cholesterol. On its own, policosanol was found in a 1999 study to reduce LDL cholesterol while raising levels of HDL cholesterol.

    Probiotics. “Several studies have indicated that consumption of certain cultured dairy products resulted in reduction of serum cholesterol, as well as triglycerides,” wrote Dr. S.K. Dash, president of probiotic manufacturer UAS Laboratories (Eden Prairie, MN), in his Consumer Guide to Probiotics. Among other studies, Dash cited two controlled clinical studies from the VA Medical Center at the University of Kentucky.

    “In the first study, fermented milk containing [Lactobacillus] acidophilus was accompanied by a 2.4 percent reduction of serum cholesterol concentration,” he wrote. “In the second study, a different L. acidophilus strain reduced serum cholesterol concentration by 3.2 percent. Since every 1 percent reduction in serum cholesterol concentration is associated with an estimated 2 to 3 percent reduction in risk for coronary heart disease [CHD], regular intake of fermented milk containing an appropriate strain of L. acidophilus has the potential of reducing risk for [CHD] by 6 to 10 percent.”

    Dash said his company’s DDS Probiotics contain DDS-1 L. acidophilus, “which has been researched and demonstrated to show cholesterol-lowering effect.”

    Psyllium. “Internal cleansing is very important” in maintaining healthy cholesterol levels, “especially if you do it with a lot of fiber,” said Sunil Kohli, vice president of Chino, CA-based Health Plus, Inc. The cholesterol-managing ability of fiber in general and psyllium in particular is “very well-established,” he said.

    However, Kohli said, “It will probably do you no good if it’s random. It should be done on a regular basis, and it should be supervised. Consulting the doctor or pharmacist is important.”

    Soy. The protein in soy “has evidence of lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, based on reviews of studies using over 20 g of soy protein per day,” said Levin. “Soy isoflavones are considered only partly responsible for this effect.”

    Sytrinol. A patented proprietary formula derived from natural citrus and palm fruit extracts and containing citrus polymethoxylated flavones and palm tocotrienols, Sytrinol has been shown in clinical trials to improve total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides by up to 30 percent, 27 percent, and 33 percent, respectively. Having just wrapped up Phase III of a long-term trial of Sytrinol, Chicago-based SourceOne Global Partners, which owns the exclusive worldwide license for intellectual property associated with the ingredient, is commencing a study that combines Sytrinol with plant sterols.

    Tocotrienols. On its Website discussing the science and benefits of tocotrienols (www.tocotrienol.org), ingredient supplier Carotech Inc. (Edison, NJ) identifies several benefits for blood lipid levels. Tocotrienols, according to the Website, have been shown to “inhibit cholesterol production in the liver, thereby lowering total blood cholesterol;” “[suppress] hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity [and result in] the lowering of LDL cholesterol levels;” and “inhibit cholesterogenesis by suppressing HMG-CoA reductase.”

    New Weapons

    There are also nutrients that are emerging as potential weapons in the fight against cholesterol. Levin cited rice bran oil, resveratrol, pantethine, l-carnitine, and niacin as showing promise.

    With all of this, Levin said, it’s important for retailers to remember that “they are not allowed to discuss diseases and remedies unless there is an approved FDA health claim allowed on the label, as with soy protein and plant sterols. What is allowed are structure-function claims such as ‘cholesterol support,’ ‘promoting normal, healthy circulation,’ ‘homocysteine regulators,’ etc.”

    Supplementation is only one tool for managing cholesterol levels, manufacturers pointed out. “Besides nutrition, lifestyle is a key to controlling cholesterol,” Levin said. “Eating a variety of antioxidant-rich foods will prevent the liver from churning out cholesterol as a ‘cheap’ antioxidant. The body uses oxidized cholesterol to patch leaky and damaged blood vessels, so the ability to build healthy collagen is a must, using nutrients like vitamin C, Pycnogenol, rutin, hyaluronic acid, and MSM.

    “Don’t forget exercise and stress reduction,” he added. “Stress results in high cortisol levels—usually accompanied by poor blood lipid levels—and a lack of good sleep to produce unhealthy people.” VR

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