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  Messages 1-48 from 48 matching the search criteria.
Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation, helping prevent depression Darrell Miller 3/23/19
What Is Vitamin A Good For? It Turns Out a Lot of Things Darrell Miller 2/21/19
Vitamins for Brain Function VitaNet, LLC Staff 9/12/18
Omega-3s for Heart Health Darrell Miller 12/17/17
I Did Not Think That Folic Acid, Something They Only Prescribe To Pregnant Women, Was So Beneficial Darrell Miller 10/17/17
Pregnant women are not getting enough omega-3 Darrell Miller 9/30/17
Home REMEDIES for PILES that Actually works? | Health tips 2017 Darrell Miller 7/6/17
End Discomfort & Pain from Gout Symptoms Darrell Miller 5/25/17
Diet Responsible For 45 Percent of All Deaths From Heart Disease and Diabetes Darrell Miller 3/26/17
12 Health Benefits of Salmon for the Heart, Brain, and Much More Darrell Miller 3/19/17
Eat This One Food To Get Rid Of Brain Fog Darrell Miller 3/18/17
ARE YOU GETTING THE RIGHT OMEGA-3-TO-OMEGA-6 RATIO? Darrell Miller 3/16/17
Poor diet tied to nearly half of U.S. deaths from heart disease, stroke, diabetes Darrell Miller 3/9/17
Omega-3s Help Joints by Reducing Inflammation Darrell Miller 2/12/17
Top 5 Selenium Foods to Fight Selenium Deficiency Darrell Miller 2/7/17
Top Foods That Prevent Osteoporosis Risk Darrell Miller 1/20/17
The awesome potential of omega-3s from seafood in reducing inflammation in the human body Darrell Miller 11/9/16
How Important Is It To Take A Trace Mineral Supplement And Why? Darrell Miller 9/7/14
The benefit of Amino Acid L-Tyrosin for our brains Darrell Miller 1/21/14
Can our health benefit from supplmenting choline? Darrell Miller 11/18/12
DHA Food Sources? Darrell Miller 10/31/12
Your Diet May Be What's Causing Your Acne Darrell Miller 9/19/11
What is the Amino Acid Taurine and How Does It Boost My Health Darrell Miller 4/26/11
How Does Cherry Fruit Extract Help with Gout? Darrell Miller 3/7/11
Anise Seed Is Anti-Fungal Herb And Much More! Darrell Miller 2/23/11
How can I Tell if I am Magnesium Deficient? Darrell Miller 2/9/11
A Good Vitamin Plan Is Essential To a Health Child To Help Fight ADHD Darrell Miller 12/21/10
Fight Acne Naturally Darrell Miller 5/6/09
L-Arginine An Amino Acid Essential Or Not You Be The Judge? Darrell Miller 1/6/09
L-Alanine Non Essential Amino Acid Darrell Miller 1/5/09
B Vitamins Darrell Miller 6/19/08
Antioxidants For The Body Darrell Miller 6/10/08
Ester-E Darrell Miller 6/7/08
Natural Supplements Like Fish Oils And Phosphatidylserine Can Boost Memory Darrell Miller 1/14/08
Wasabi Rhizome Cleanse - Supports Phase II Liver Detoxification - Wasabi Health Benefits Darrell Miller 8/1/06
Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen Darrell Miller 7/27/05
Nature's Cancer fighters ... Darrell Miller 7/7/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
America's Most Wanted Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Keeping Your Edge - The state of your outer body reflects the inner you. Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin Darrell Miller 6/6/05
Prosta Response - Supports Prostate Function and Healthy Urine Flow Darrell Miller 6/4/05
OptiZinc - The king of Zinc ... Darrell Miller 6/4/05
Male Response - Re-align your body systems ... Darrell Miller 6/3/05
Attentive Child - Enhances Mental Concentration ... Darrell Miller 5/31/05
Prosta Response - 45ct, 90ct, and 180ct -- Darrell Miller 5/20/05
Re: Boost Male Libido with Source Naturals Products Darrell Miller 5/20/05




Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation, helping prevent depression
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Date: March 23, 2019 10:57 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation, helping prevent depression





We've always known how benefical Omega-3 fatty acids are. They're found in seafood and many other food items but many people supplement with a vitamin. There is now more reason to make sure you're getting the right amounts of Omega-3 fatty acids. new research suggests that this nutrient can considerably reduce the risk of developing depression since it is a known inflammation reducer. A 43% reduction in depression signs and symptoms is noted in patients.

Key Takeaways:

  • Many people think of antidepressants when they have a depression, but the scary side effects of antidepressants put a lot of people off.
  • But one of the best routes to take to treat depression, which has been discovered by researchers, is eating more fish.
  • A recent study that found that there is a correlation between depression and low levels of omega-3 in the body is significant because many people suffer from depression.

"You might have heard that omega-3 fatty acids are good at reducing inflammation, but did you know that they can also help with depression?"

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-23-omega-3-fatty-acids-reduce-inflammation-prevent-depression.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6091)


What Is Vitamin A Good For? It Turns Out a Lot of Things
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Date: February 21, 2019 07:57 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Vitamin A Good For? It Turns Out a Lot of Things





Vitamin A has numerous health benefits, and is a nutrient that most people already get a sufficient amount of. Vitamin A is found in meats, eggs, seafood, fruits and vegetables. Vitamin A helps your eyesight. However, too much Vitamin A can actually cause blurred vision. Vitamin A is also known for helping your skin via retinoids. It also helps your immune system. Some studies have linked Vitamin A with a lower risk of cancer, although the science is not conclusive.

Key Takeaways:

  • Many persons in the developed world need not worry about their intake of vitamin A because they already get enough from their diet.
  • The World Health Organization doesn’t recommend supplementation for anyone living in countries like America because people already eat the things that contain it like eggs and meat.
  • Vitamin A deficiency results in eyesight issues and this is very well demonstrated in developing countries where supplementation is being proposed.

"But even if you don't have to worry about getting enough vitamin A in your diet, it's still important to know what it does in the body — here's what we know about it."

Read more: https://www.womansday.com/health-fitness/nutrition/g25895881/what-is-vitamin-a-good-for/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6047)


Vitamins for Brain Function
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Date: September 12, 2018 09:52 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vitamins for Brain Function





Vitamins for Brain Function

Your brain needs good nutrition to be at its best. Vitamin B6 and folate play important roles in neurological and psychological health. The Omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA also have vital roles to play, and can be found in seafood, flaxseed and fish and krill oil supplements. B Complex vitamins are constantly used up by the nervous system and must be regularly replenished. Stress and alcohol consumption both increase the depletion rate of B vitamins. Iron and various different minerals also play their own vital roles.

Key Takeaways:

  • While a good quality and nutritional health is linked to health benefits like weight management, healthier digestion and disease prevention, it also leads to long-term cognitive health.
  • Nutritional supplements like vitamins can help to fill any nutritional gap in the diet.
  • Inflammation in the body and gut health have a relevant relationship and it is found that increased inflammation contributes to many diseases.

"The human brain needs the correct nutrition through all stages of life, just like any other part of the body."

Read more: https://www.news-medical.net/whitepaper/20180907/Vitamins-for-Brain-Function.aspx

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5760)


Omega-3s for Heart Health
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Date: December 17, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Omega-3s for Heart Health





It has been studied and proven that increasing your consumption of Omega-3's can greatly reduce your chance of Heart Attacks and or heart disease as well as Stroke. Many people do not eat enough of Omega-3's which cause a nutrition gap in the population. One of the easiest ways to increase you Omega-3 intake is to eat more fish and seafood. You can also find Omega-3's present in some plant based nutrition as well. Some examples are Brussels Sprouts, Walnuts and Chia Seeds.

Key Takeaways:

  • If people want to increase their consumption of Omega-3's they can simply eat more fish and seafood
  • For people that prefer vegan or vegetable diets Brussels Sprout, Chia Seeds and Walnuts have good amounts of Omega-3
  • Increasing Omega-3 in your diet can reduce the chances of heart attacks and strokes

"The benefits of such omega-3 fatty acid supplementation over periods of up to five years (often in the range of 900 to 3,000 mg of EPA/DHA daily) against myocardial infarction and cardiac death appear to be particularly evident in those with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD)."

Read more: https://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/articles/2017/12/omega-3s-for-heart-health.aspx

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5440)


I Did Not Think That Folic Acid, Something They Only Prescribe To Pregnant Women, Was So Beneficial
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Date: October 17, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: I Did Not Think That Folic Acid, Something They Only Prescribe To Pregnant Women, Was So Beneficial





It has been a common practice that folic acid is highly recommended by the doctors to pregnant women. However, the application of folic acid should not be limited to the pregnant women, and everyone could benefit from taking folic acid. One could obtain folic acid from legumes, grain, fruits, whole grain, vegetables with dark or green leaves, meat of poultry and pork, liver, etc. The Vitamin B9 could help generate red blood cell, DNA, tissue growth, new cells, body break down, reduce suffering from heart disease, etc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn71qsb1CxM&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamin B9 helps keep cells healthy and aids in the process that cells regenerate and maintain themselves in the body.
  • Legumes, grains, citrus fruits, meats, seafood, dark and leafy veggies are good sources to get Vitamin B9 from.
  • Vitamin B9 is essential to keep your red blood cells healthy and aids in your DNA production.

"Vitamin B9 plays a role in the synthesis of blood cells such as platelets, leukocytes, and erythrocytes."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5346)


Pregnant women are not getting enough omega-3
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Date: September 30, 2017 01:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pregnant women are not getting enough omega-3





Omega-3 fatty acids are important for everyone. Pregnant women need them but aren't getting enough. This may be due to the fact that women are told to avoid certain fish during pregnancy but that is a common source of these important fatty acids. They are found in other foods, though, so it is still possible to get enough of them. If you are pregnant and don't know what to eat you can ask a doctor or dietician. You need to be healthy so the baby inside you can also be healthy.

Key Takeaways:

  • omega 3 is beneficial to pregnant women; but pregnant women have a deficiency of omega 3
  • women should be getting more omega 3 if they are pregnant
  • fish and seafood have omega 3, try to eat those to get the most omega 3

"The first ever study on the intakes of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnant women in New Zealand, has found only 30 per cent are getting the recommended daily amount."

Read more: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-09-pregnant-women-omega-.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5295)


Home REMEDIES for PILES that Actually works? | Health tips 2017
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Date: July 06, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Home REMEDIES for PILES that Actually works? | Health tips 2017





Your body can throw you for a loop at any time. You wake up with a sore throat the day you're set to make a major presentation, a seafood-salad sandwich leaves you with grumbling indigestion, or you overdo it at the gym and arrive home with a stiff neck. Wouldn't it be great to have a live-in doctor/therapist/trainer to tend to your everyday aches and pains? Here's the next best thing: all-natural, expert-recommended ways to treat ailments quickly, safely, and effectively at home. So clear some space in your bathroom cabinet, refrigerator, and kitchen cupboard for these surprisingly effective (and inexpensive) remedies.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpm2uL9P-V0&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • Applying apple cider vinegar (with a cotton ball) to the inflamed area will help shrink swollen blood vessels and provide relief to those suffering from both internal and external hemorrhoids.
  • Juice from a freshly squeezed lemon can either be applied externally (with a cotton ball) or ingested by mixing with milk and drinking. Should be repeated 3 times each day for best results.
  • The easiest remedy for treating hemorrhoids is simply to increase your daily intake of water to 8 to 10 glasses.

"As many as 75% of people in the United States will be affected by hemorrhoids also known as piles."

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4934)


End Discomfort & Pain from Gout Symptoms
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Date: May 25, 2017 09:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: End Discomfort & Pain from Gout Symptoms





Not only is gout extremely painful, but many people don't realize that it affects all joints and not just those in the feet. Conventional treatment can be costly not only in a monetary fashion but also your time, but there's hope that a variety of natural treatments may provide a better alternative. For instance, cherries, celery seed, coffee, vitamin C and tumeric can help combat this painful condition. By considering these solutions and changes to your diet, there's hope yet of minimizing this for anyone afflicted by it.

Key Takeaways:

  • Avoiding purine rich foods can help minimize the risk of gout attacks.
  • Gout is characterized by severe pain in the big toe or other body parts where any contact is unbearable.
  • Risk Factors include ,but are not limited to, a diet high in beef, seafood, and alcohol; obesity; high blood pressure; and dehydration.

"Researchers have found that two days of cherry intake can reduce recurrent gout attacks by 35 percent."

Read more: https://draxe.com/gout-symptoms/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4689)


Diet Responsible For 45 Percent of All Deaths From Heart Disease and Diabetes
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Date: March 26, 2017 01:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Diet Responsible For 45 Percent of All Deaths From Heart Disease and Diabetes





Heart disease and diabetes are two deadly conditions that you do not want to experience, yet the likelihood that you will are great, especially if you are not maintaining the best lifestyle. One of the worst things that you can do to impede on your health is consuming the wrong foods. In particular one diet is responsible for nearly half of all deaths from these two conditions. Do you want to know more about the diet and its contributions to these conditions?

Key Takeaways:

  • Our poor diet is not only unhealthy but can also kill us.
  • Sodium, processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, and red meats lead to diabetes and cardiometabolic diseases, and eventually death.
  • In order to stay healthy, add more nut, fruits, vegetables, seafood omega-3 fats, and whole grains to your diet.

"Data published in the March 7 issue of JAMA indicated that the highest number of cardiometabolic deaths were associated with too much sodium and processed meat, and not enough nuts and seeds, seafood omega-3 fats, vegetable, and fruit, compared with optimal consumption levels."

Read more: http://www.healthnutnews.com/diet-responsible-45-percent-deaths-heart-disease-diabetes/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4297)


12 Health Benefits of Salmon for the Heart, Brain, and Much More
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Date: March 19, 2017 02:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 12 Health Benefits of Salmon for the Heart, Brain, and Much More





If you want a delicious, healthy meal that the whole family will enjoy, it is time to serve Salmon on the menu as often as you possibly can. Once you learn the 12 exciting health benefits offered when you eat Salmon on a regular basis, you will wonder why you've not been eating this delicious seafood already. Salmon provides whole body benefits that are second to none, and it is a good that you will love!

Key Takeaways:

  • In the case of salmon it is misleading to assume that oily means "bad,"as omega 3 fatty acids in salmon are excellent for the brain and heart.
  • Selenium, omega 3, protein, B complex vitamins and potassium are some of the essential nutrients found in salmon.
  • Wound healing, cartilage repair, eye and skin health and cancer fighting are all areas, wherein the nutrition available in salmon can play a significant part.

"The great taste and excellent health benefits of salmon make it one of the most loved fish in the world."

Read more: http://www.foods4betterhealth.com/12-health-benefits-of-salmon-31980

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4224)


Eat This One Food To Get Rid Of Brain Fog
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Date: March 18, 2017 06:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eat This One Food To Get Rid Of Brain Fog





Omega-3 fatty acids play an important role in our health including anti-inflammation, reducing the risk of chronic diseases, maintaining brain function. ALA, DHA and EPA are 3 types of omega-3s that are most beneficial to our brain such as effects on depressive conditions, post-stroke, neuropathic pain, migraines, neurodegenerative disease and improving cognitive performance. ALA comes from plants. DHA and EPA are found in fatty, cold-water fish and shellfish. A balance of sources from plants and seafood will help you to find the right balance of these essential fatty acids, which is fundamental to prevent inflammation. Make sure to consult with your healthcare provider to find out the amount that is best for your unique condition.

Key Takeaways:

  • Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), a type of essential fat involved in several metabolic processes.
  • Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and may reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis.
  • But perhaps most impressive is the research that confirms the benefits of omega-3s on the brain.

"A well-balanced diet with natural sources of ALA, DHA, and EPA is fundamental to maintaining a healthy ratio that prevents inflammation and promotes long-term health."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.mindbodygreen.com/0-28855/eat-this-one-food-to-get-rid-of-brain-fog.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjFmZmViMTExOGM5Mzg5YTQ6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNH2zk6A0TTCdG9GwXiSEiyIU04Zvg

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4199)


ARE YOU GETTING THE RIGHT OMEGA-3-TO-OMEGA-6 RATIO?
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Date: March 16, 2017 08:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ARE YOU GETTING THE RIGHT OMEGA-3-TO-OMEGA-6 RATIO?





Just two unsaturated fats are basic to people, omega-3, and omega-6. The previous two are long-chain unsaturated fats, and the last is a short-chain unsaturated fat. So as to receive the rewards of omega-6 unsaturated fats, we require enough omega-3 to counterbalance the fiery way of the previous. While the correct proportion fluctuates among studies and research, anthropological confirmation uncovers that the advancement of the human eating regimen has constantly rotated around a balanced proportion, yet the flow Western eating regimen is a massively unbalanced 16:1, favoring omega-6 unsaturated fats. What's more, in spite of the fact that vegetables are not incredible wellsprings of either unsaturated fats, most dim verdant greens and different vegetables like cauliflower, specifically, do help with the proportion, as they by and large contain no omega-6s.

Key Takeaways:

  • Both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential to stay healthy and must be consumed in our diet.
  • An ideal diet would contain an equal amount of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.
  • Seafood, nuts, legumes, and green leafy vegetables all contain fatty acids in healthy ratios.

"Only two fatty acids are essential to humans, omega-3 and omega-6. They come with unparalleled health benefits, and they are essential in that we require them in order to stay healthy."

Read more: http://about.spud.com/blog-omega-3-to-omega-6-fatty-acids-ratio/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4171)


Poor diet tied to nearly half of U.S. deaths from heart disease, stroke, diabetes
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Date: March 09, 2017 05:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Poor diet tied to nearly half of U.S. deaths from heart disease, stroke, diabetes





Ensuring that diets include the right amount of certain foods may help the U.S. cut deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes by almost half, suggests a new study. About 45 percent of deaths from those causes in 2012 could be blamed on people eating too much or too little of 10 types of foods, researchers found.

Key Takeaways:

  • Ensuring that diets include the right amount of certain foods may help the U.S. cut deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes by almost half, suggests a new study.
  • About 45 percent of deaths from those causes in 2012 could be blamed on people eating too much or too little of 10 types of foods, researchers found.
  • Micha and colleagues identified 10 dietary components tied to heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes: sodium, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds, unprocessed red meats, processed meats, polyunsaturated fats like soybean or corn oils, seafood omega-3 fats and sugar-sweetened beverages.

"The good news is that we now understand more about which foods would help prevent Americans from dying prematurely from cardiometabolic diseases."



Reference:

//www.reuters.com/article/us-health-diets-metabolic-casualties-idUSKBN16E2WR?feedType=RSS&feedName=healthNews

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4088)


Omega-3s Help Joints by Reducing Inflammation
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Date: February 12, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Omega-3s Help Joints by Reducing Inflammation





It turns out that Omega 3's help your joints by reducing inflammation. It is keeping your joints active ans healthy that poses a problem for many people. 25 percent of the world population has joint problems. Joint health has become a much more popular topic in recent years. The joint health market is one of the top selling supplement sectors.

Key Takeaways:

  • Keeping joints active and healthy can pose a challenge for many people
  • The joint health market represents today one of the top-selling supplement sectors
  • One way to promote omega-3 use for people who are not regularly consuming fatty fish and seafood would be with supplements, specifically softgels.

"One way to promote omega-3 use for people who are not regularly consuming fatty fish and seafood would be with supplements, specifically softgels."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/articles/2017/02/omega-3s-help-joints-by-reducing-inflammation.aspx&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFY72bLsWBgzTEX_-j3JX_oDZyEJQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3926)


Top 5 Selenium Foods to Fight Selenium Deficiency
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Date: February 07, 2017 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Top 5 Selenium Foods to Fight Selenium Deficiency





You may have never heard of the mineral Selenium, but did you know it does wonders for our body? Selenium can be used for making electronic devices and some glass products but a small amount of this mineral can help keep our bodies healthy. Some people may have deficiency to the mineral which can cause many problems. You can find out more about selenium and how is works for us in this article

Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamins and minerals are very essential for a healthy body. One such mineral that benefits the human body is selenium. Although this mineral is mostly used in electronics and glass making, a small amount of it is required by the human body as well. Selenium deficiency can lead to many possible health hazards.
  • Studies have revealed that selenium consists of antioxidant properties that improve the health of the cells in the human body. It prevents cell damage, provides defense against various infections, and contributes to the proper functioning of the thyroid gland by regulating the thyroid hormone—thyroxine (T4).
  • The common source of selenium is the soil; therefore, the amount of selenium received through plant-based produce depends on the amount of selenium present in the soil. If the soil is found to be without selenium or in traces, farmers can add selenium fertilizers to the soil to meet the required quantity. Food sources of selenium are red meat, fish, seafood, and Brazil nuts.

"It is important to include selenium in an appropriate amount in the diet."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.foods4betterhealth.com/top-5-selenium-foods-to-fight-selenium-deficiency-29115&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmY4MTYyZmQ1NTMyNTY3NGQ6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNE0JwrJ28ETE4SwIAxCiB8rh4cmfA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3904)


Top Foods That Prevent Osteoporosis Risk
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Date: January 20, 2017 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Top Foods That Prevent Osteoporosis Risk





Getting more calcium, vitamin D, and other nutrients into your diet can help decrease your risk of developing osteoporosis. The best source of these nutrients is the food you eat. seafood, yogurt, beans, almonds, milk, bananas, and even cabbage all contain important nutrients that can help protect you against bone loss.

Key Takeaways:

  • Osteoporosis is the loss of bone tissue or density and tends to get worse as people age
  • A good diet high in calcium is the best way to avoid or reverse osteoporosis
  • A few good foods for avoiding osteoporosis are fish, yogurt, milk, eggs, cabbage, bananas, beans and almonds.

"The bones tend to become more porous as people age, but some people are at a risk of bone porosity at an earlier age and this leads to osteoporosis."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.boldsky.com/health/nutrition/2017/top-foods-that-prevent-osteoporosis-risk-109823.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNG0jw4VzbX6YMsQHbMNRHg5h9DwQw

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3807)


The awesome potential of omega-3s from seafood in reducing inflammation in the human body
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Date: November 09, 2016 01:09 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The awesome potential of omega-3s from seafood in reducing inflammation in the human body





More and more medical research is showing the profound impact that nutrition plays in our health and in disease prevention. The standard modern diet unfortunately contributes to many illnesses and diseases. Inflammation is a key factor in most health issues. Cold water seafood that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids can play a major role in reducing inflammation and maintaining good health.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Problem: Chronic Inflammation is a symptom of virtually every disease. Inflammation plays a major role in the development of the well known chronic problems of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, eye disease, mood disorders, fibromyalgia and the list goes on and on.
  • About 50 percent of all Americans suffer from some form of inflammatory disease.
  • In addition, 64 percent of all Americans are now considered obese, which contributes to more inflammation, as fat cells create inflammatory messengers such as interleukin-6 and the better known C-reactive protein.

"Chronic Inflammation is a symptom of virtually every disease. Inflammation plays a major role in the development of the well known chronic problems of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, eye disease, mood disorders, fibromyalgia and the list goes on and on."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.caribbeannewsnow.com/topstory-The-awesome-potential-of-omega-3s-from-seafood-in-reducing-inflammation-in-the-human-body-32387.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZmMDFkMTU2YWMzMmQ5OTU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNHKshBI-MvD4VOsz_SfgHC58xEHnQ

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3414)


How Important Is It To Take A Trace Mineral Supplement And Why?
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Date: September 07, 2014 05:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Important Is It To Take A Trace Mineral Supplement And Why?

trace mineralsWhat is Trace Minerals

Trace minerals are the essential minerals for proper functioning of our bodies. Trace minerals are zinc, calcium, copper, fluoride, iodine, iron, selenium, etc., the best way to get these minerals is through a diet rich in nutrients. The modern busy lifestyle prevents us from obtaining these minerals, also modern diets, have led to a deficiency in some of the most essential minerals. That is why a proper trace mineral supplementation is necessary for optimal health.

Most important trace minerals are:

      Zinc is a mineral found in meat, poultry, beans, nuts, seafood. The recommended daily intake for adult males is 11 mg and 8 mg for female. Zinc deficiency leads to slow recovery of injuries, diarrhea in children, stunted growth; it may disrupt the thyroid functioning, low levels of testosterone. Zinc is necessary for the immune system, it cures the common cold faster, and it is used for Attention deficit disorder, Down syndrome, colitis and many other illnesses.

      Copper is a mineral mostly found in meat, and many foods we already intake. The recommended daily intake of copper is only 2 mg. The National center for biotechnology information warns about recent studies who found copper deficiency. Copper deficiency leads to Menkes' syndrome, anemia, and neutropenia.

      Iodine - 3. 40% of the world population is at risk of iodine deficiency. The use of iodine is at risk of extinction because of using iodine in salt. Many people do not have the proper nutrition to obtain the daily need of iodine. Iodine deficiency leads to hyperthyroidism, enlargement of the thyroid gland, miscarriages in pregnancy, preterm delivery of babies, and to permanent mental damage in babies. Iodine is found in meat, dairy products, soy, eggs, milk, and ice cream.

      Manganese is a mineral responsible for blood clotting, sex hormones, and it forms the connective tissue. Manganese is found in the bones, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal, and pituitary glands. According to the University of Maryland, 37% of the Americans are at risk of manganese deficiency, and do not take the daily recommended intake of manganese. Manganese deficiency changes the fat metabolism; it causes bone deformities, skin rash, increases calcium in blood, and causes many other symptoms, which lead to serious medical problems. Manganese is found in nuts, seeds, whole grains.

      Chromium is found in meat, whole grain, some fruits, but these foods provide a very small amount of chromium in the body. The recommended daily intake of chromium is 50-200 mg a day and food provides 2 mg per serving. The elder are at a higher risk of chromium deficiency. Research has found that chromium deficiency leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and increased chromium intake has fixed diabetes symptoms in patients.

Who is at risk of trace mineral deficiency?

Vegetarians are at a higher risk of mineral deficiency as most of the sources of these minerals are coming from meat. Vegetarians should consider taking trace mineral supplementation. We need a very small amount of minerals for proper functioning of our bodies, still we have a mineral deficiency which leads to many illnesses, improper functioning in the body. The mineral deficiency has led to lower life span in humans. Our ancestors lived longer because they ate home cooked food, rich in the most important nutrients. Daily trace mineral supplementation is essential for returning our health and immune system on the right track. That is why we all need proper trace mineral supplementation to compensate for the low levels of minerals.

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The benefit of Amino Acid L-Tyrosin for our brains
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Date: January 21, 2014 09:47 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The benefit of Amino Acid L-Tyrosin for our brains

L-Tyrosine

L-Tyrosine is a nonessential amino acid because it can be made from phenylalanine, the another amino acid by our body. But from some researchers the body cannot make tyrosine from phenylalanine if stressed. In otherhand, L-Tyrosine is definitely present in many kinds of foods, such as milk, meats, eggs, nuts, cheese, bananas, beans and some seafood like fish.

Benefits of L-Tyrosine

By using this food stuff can increased the amount of L-Tyrosine in our body. And Also L-Tyrosine can we get from some suplement. L-Tyrosine has benefits for our brains. L-Tyrosine need for creating the neurotransmitters such as dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine. It can called stress hormone. This compounds that transmit chemical signals in our brains. The neurotransmitters that was produced by L-Tyrosine have effect significant for your mood, memory, concentration, focus and alertness. The neurotransmitter dopamine can affects the incentive mechanism in our brain which indicates it involved in feeling of happiness. Dopamine is also helps we keep motivated and handle problem that can make streesed. But too much stress can make our dopamine level decreased. It can make our brain less active and weak. The neurotransmitter epinephrine ability to increases our energy, heart rate and breathing. It because epinephrine produces oxygen with rich blood that travels to our brain. Moreover the neurotransmitter epinephrine can boosting our memory, enhance cognitive performance, polishing our senses and reducing pain level of sensitivity. And the third compound of neurotransmitters is norepinephrine. It can helps increase our concentrate and to develop new memories. Norepinephrine is also travels through our blood and can stimulate our brains. The effect of our body does not produce enough neurotransmitters, we will become depressed, fatigued, confused and also develop memory loss. So if you want to enhance your memories and don’t let your body has less L-tyrosine to products stressed hormone that you need. Food supplements have shown good results in improving the amount L-tyrosine in our body.

Reference:

  1. //www.bodybuilding.com/fun/md1.htm

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Can our health benefit from supplmenting choline?
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Date: November 18, 2012 11:01 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can our health benefit from supplmenting choline?

Discovery

Choline, discovered in 1864 by the German chemist, Adolph Strecker, is an essential nutrient, usually grouped under the vitamin B family. While the human body does synthesize small amounts of choline, dietary consumption is a must in order to maintain a healthy body. Deficiency of choline can lead to a number of serious health issues including neurological problems, insomnia, accumulation of fat in the liver, damage to the kidneys and also cardiovascular disease. There are a range of important functions that choline performs in the body.

Some of the key health benefits of choline are:

Maintenance of brain health: The neurotransmitter or the messenger molecule, acetylcholine, that transmits signals from the brain to the muscles and various organs in the body such as the liver, heart, lungs etc, is synthesized using choline. Thus, it plays a very important role in memory and muscle control. Research also suggests that choline has a calming effect on the brain and helps reduce panic and anxiety attacks.

Maintenance of cell membranes: The integrity and flexibility of cell membranes depends on the presence of satisfactory amounts of choline thus making it a prerequisite for appropriate cell metabolism.

Maintenance of Liver health: Choline is responsible for preventing the accumulation of cholesterol and fat deposits in the liver hence preventing hepatosteatosis, a condition more commonly known as fatty liver.

Anti inflammatory benefits: Studies have revealed that inflammatory markers such as Interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, Homocysteine, etc., which are associated with various illnesses such as Diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, Cardiovascular disease, Osteoporosis and also various cancers, show reduced levels if adequate amounts of choline are consumed in the diet. 

Food Sources

Apart from those stated above there are many more health benefits of choline and hence it is very important to consume foods that are rich in this nutrient. In addition to seafood and meat, foods that have high choline content include, Dairy and poultry products like Skim milk and Egg yolk, peanut butter; Vegetables such as Cauliflower, broccoli, tomatoes, Asparagus, Green beans and Fruits like Bananas and Oranges. Soybeans, due to their high lecithin content, are also a fantastic source of choline. Seeds like flax seed, sesame seeds and grains like corn, barley and oats are also rich in choline content.

Maintenance of adequate levels of choline is imperative in order to maintain optimal health. It is therefore very important to have periodic health checkups so that any deficiencies are identified and addressed as soon as possible.

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DHA Food Sources?
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Date: October 31, 2012 11:58 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: DHA Food Sources?

DHA

DHA, or Docosahexaenoic acid, plays an important role in the structure of the retina, cerebral cortex, sperm, and testicles. When levels of this substance decline, it has negative effects on cognitive function. Low levels are also suspect in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

The best ways to get this omega-3 fatty acid are from natural sources. Babies can get their needs taken care of through breast milk and enriched formula. Adults need to find food sources for their needs.

Food Sources Of DHA

Cold-water varieties of fish are often excellent sources. These include salmon, bluefin tuna, albacore tuna, swordfish, anchovies, herring, sardines, caviar, and fish roe. Other types of seafood are also good sources for DHA, including crab, shrimp, lobster, clams, mussel, octopus, and scallops. Eggs and some organ meats are other sources for this essential fatty acid. For most vegetarians, eating seafood is not an option. An alternative vegetarian source is algae and seaweed. Supplements are another way to get DHA when fish, seafood, seaweed, and algae are not an option.

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Your Diet May Be What's Causing Your Acne
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Date: September 19, 2011 06:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Your Diet May Be What's Causing Your Acne

Although dieticians and physicians maintain that diet does not cause acne, this is not strictly true. Even dermatologists argue the point, but while it is generally agreed that eating fatty foods or excessive quantities of chocolate will not in itself lead to acne, there are certain valid arguments that diet has a role to play. Recent research has shed new light on dietary factors that can help to promote acne symptoms, if not being the sole cause of them.

Before discussing that, it is important to understand why acne gives rise to the symptoms that it does: lesions in the form of whiteheads and blackheads, pustules and cysts. While not necessary to discuss the biochemical details, the part that your diet has to play will not be understood without considering the effect of hormones on acne.

The reason that teenagers in particular appear to be more prone to acne is that an increased production of hormones has an effect on the condition that causes the symptoms of acne. Fundamentally, acne is characterized by the infection and inflammation of a mass of oil and dead skin cells within the pores of the skin, particularly on the face, neck, chest buttocks and back. If we discuss each of these elements first, and how they are created, then the relationship between diet and acne will become clear.

At a certain time in their lives, people experience a spurt of growth and develop sexually. This is initiated by the secretion of hormones, particularly of male sex hormones collectively known as androgens, and by various hormonal 'Growth Factors'. This stage of human development is known as puberty, although there is also an increase in androgen secretion by the adrenal glands just before menstruation and during pregnancy and menopause. Androgens such as testosterone are reserved not only for the male of the species!

An effect of androgens is to increase the rate of secretion of sebum from the sebaceous glands in the skin. The reason for this is unknown, though it has been hypothesized that its purpose is to waterproof the additional hair that is grown on the body at this time. Another suggested reason is as an olfactory warning to others to deter from sexual activity, in teenagers until their sexual development is complete, and in pre-menstrual, pregnant and menopausal women for obvious reasons. There is no substantial proof for any of these hypotheses, though the latter appears to make more sense than the former.

Irrespective of this, androgens also interfere with desquamation, and the dead skin cells within the pores tend to fall off irregularly and in clumps. This mix of dead skin cells and excess sebum clogs up the pores of the sebaceous follicles. Once this plug becomes infected with bacteria, the immune system is activated, inflammation occurs, and leukocyte action leads to pus formation. That is what is known as acne.

In order to determine how diet and acne are connected, it would be necessary to determine what components of our diet can either stimulate sebum production, or stimulate androgen secretion. If no such link could be found, then it would be fair to descry any connection between acne and the food you eat. However, there is a connection, and it is a positive one.

In addition to their main function, insulin and a hormone known as IGF-1 (Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 that helps promote growth in children) promote the secretion of testosterone, a male hormone or androgen. Knowing, as we now do, that androgens promote the secretion of sebum, then anything that increases the levels of insulin or IGF-1 within the body will also lead to sebum production and hence to acne. What that infers is that any foodstuffs that increase the insulin levels in the blood can also lead to acne.

This inference is supported in many ways. For example, it has been found that while drinking milk promotes a greater risk of acne, eating yoghurt does not. Why is this? It is known that milk can increase insulin levels because of its high sugar content. The effect of bacterial activity to produce yoghurt reduces the amount of sugars in the milk it is made from because the bacteria live on the lactose. The same argument applies to cheese, which promotes lower insulin levels than milk, if not as low as yoghurt.

This being the case, then a diet low in sugars and carbohydrates should reduce the incidence of acne generally. Recent research has indicated that a diet high in refined carbohydrates and sugar increases both IGF-1 and insulin levels in the blood. This then creates a surge in male hormones which in turn leads to excessive sebum secretion and intermittent shedding of skin cells and so on to the growth of bacteria and acne. It is a logical progression, supported both by theory and by observation.

So how should a person with a propensity for acne change their diet? Switch to fruits, vegetables and grains. Non-fatty meats are also acceptable, and .lots of fish and other seafood. Studies have concluded that diets rich in seafood lead to very low acne rates. The Japanese and coastal Chinese suffer very little acne in comparison with those taking a Western diet, particularly an American diet.

One of the reasons for this is that omega-3 fatty acids help to reduce both inflammation and sebum production. The same is true of green tea that contains antioxidants that reduce the blood levels of dihydotetosterone and hence of sebum secretion by the sebaceous glands. We could go on, and list supplement after supplement that contain antioxidants and other substances that can reduce the production of sebum and hence of the symptoms of acne.

Vegetable oils, on the other hand, with their high omega-6 fatty acid content, can drive up sebum production and the activity of the immune system and the inflammatory response. There are few doubts left that, while acne is not specifically caused by what you eat, diet can contribute to it and that acne and its severity can be eased by eating a diet low in carbohydrates and other sugar-promoting foods.

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What is the Amino Acid Taurine and How Does It Boost My Health
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Date: April 26, 2011 02:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What is the Amino Acid Taurine and How Does It Boost My Health

Taurine is a nutrient that improves cellular processes by regulating mineral salts in the human body. Many people consider it as an amino acid as it is derived from seafood and meats. It is not an amino acid in the strictest sense, but a naturally occurring sulfonic acid. It is pivotal to removing the water in the bile. Bile acids are produced in the liver in the presence of taurine and stored in the gallbladder.

Enhances Physical Capacity

Many energy drinks describe taurine as an active ingredient. Several groups of researchers believe it affects athletic performance, drawing on its biological roles. For one, taurine is necessary for the upkeep of skeletal muscles, and in athletes appears to lengthen duration of physical exertion. Also, it is implicated in chemical reactions in the nervous system, boosting mental clarity.

Counteracts Hypertension

There is evidence that taurine has an effect on blood flow. In the circulatory system, taurine is important to regulating the level of water and minerals. It is widely accepted that it modulates the movement of elements and their metabolites in the blood, such as calcium, potassium, and sodium. In fact, taurine has been observed to significantly decrease high blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

Promotes Liver Health

Taurine is especially good for the health. Numerous studies have noted the effects of high levels of taurine on liver cells. It has been proven effective in removing any adiposity in the organ. Clinical trials have published results that emphasize its benefits to people with liver diseases, such as hepatitis and cirrhosis. It has also been observed that high intake of taurine counters hangover.

Lowers Serum Lipid Levels

In the liver, taurine plays an important role in inhibiting the releases of apolipoproteins, a class of proteins that bind with lipids to form lipoproteins. Apolipoprotein B makes up very-low-density lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins, or what we refer to as bad cholesterol. This is the reason why taurine has been suggested to help people afflicted with cardiovascular diseases.

Normalizes Blood Sugar

It has been postulated that taurine protects the beta cells of the pancreas, the organ responsible for the manufacture of the insulin. Patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus have been reported to experience an improvement in insulin levels. Taurine is also helpful for type 2 diabetes as it also appears to enhance glucose sensitivity of cells, thereby decreasing glucose levels in the blood.

Scavenges Free Radicals

Taurine is an antioxidant known for its wide-ranging benefits. It is almost always associated with oxidative stress brought on by physical exertion as it protects the skeletal muscles from the damaging effects of free radicals. More importantly, it protects the liver, the pancreas, and the circulatory system from the toxic by-products of metabolism, notably during oxidation of chemical compounds.

Given the health benefits of Taurine, everybody should be taking some daily!

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How Does Cherry Fruit Extract Help with Gout?
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Date: March 07, 2011 04:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How Does Cherry Fruit Extract Help with Gout?

Cherry fruit extracts contain the micronutrients and phytochemicals found in cherries. They are available as supplements widely touted to display antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Cherries, the fruits, are in fact very high in anthocyanins, which have a long association with the prevention of inflammation, even including the type that results in most known cardiovascular diseases. Also, research on anthocyanins in connection with its chemopreventative potential has yielded the most reliable public data. Individuals suffering from gout will definitely benefit from cherry fruit extracts as supported by an abundance of reports and anecdotal evidence concerning its efficacy.

Stabilizes Metabolism of Purine Nucleotides

The development of gout is greatly attributable to an anomaly in the metabolism processes involving purine nucleotides. A class of organic compounds classified as purines is necessary for life and present in many chemical reactions. They are a major component of ATP, the primary energy of cells, and several nucleotide bases of DNA and RNA are purines. The problem lies in its final metabolic product, uric acid, which at high levels condense into urate crystals that are deposited in tendons and ligaments, as is the case with gout and tophus. Cherry fruit extracts bring about twofold effects. First, they stabilize purine metabolites, notably uric acid, and, second, they facilitate the effective excretion of uric acid. If you consume a lot of foods high in purines such as animal products, especially beef, pork, and seafood, taking cherry fruit extracts will make sure that the uric acid they produce gets out of your system.

Affects Releases of Inflammatory Mediators

While high levels of uric acid is the causation of gout attacks, the painful inflammation that ensues is triggered by an entirely different group of endogenous compounds in the employ of the immune system. Eicosanoids have long been identified to precipitate pain not only during gout attacks, but in all inflammatory responses of the human body. These compounds are released locally by the cells around the joints containing urate deposits in an attempt to fight off the degenerative effects of uric acid on the surrounding tissues. They deal with the joints the same way they get rid of pathogens during infections, bringing on the redness, swelling, and pain characteristic of gout. A group of bioflavonoids called anthocyanins that are known to interfere with the releases of eicosanoids are abundant in cherries, and intake of cherry fruit extracts deliver these flavonoids into the region of pain.

Normalizes Acidic Digestive Environments

Cherries belong to the group of foods that are alkaline forming. With gout thriving in an acidic setting, it is just prudent to carefully reassess your diet and cut down on foods high in purines. Not surprisingly, your doctor may tell you to minimize consumptions of meat products especially if you suffer from recurrent gout attacks. Cherry fruit extracts rebalances the pH level of your gastrointestinal tract, and supplementation will keep your body in an alkaline state in the long run, protecting you not only against gout but also against the aging process.

If you suffer from gout or other uric acid buildup disease, give cherry fruit extract a try today!

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Anise Seed Is Anti-Fungal Herb And Much More!
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Date: February 23, 2011 01:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Anise Seed Is Anti-Fungal Herb And Much More!

Anise Seed And Your Health

Anise seed, or simply aniseed, refers to the seed pods of the herbaceous plant native to the Mediterranean and Southwest Asia. It is famed for its moderate flavor, which is similar to fennel, licorice, and tarragon. The plant species, Pimpinella anisum, has been part of many cuisines on both the West and the East, incorporated in aromatic, sweet-tasting dishes. There is a wide array of uses for anise in the food industry, especially in recent years because of its health benefits. For centuries, it has been utilized to treat digestive problems, and the recent discovery of its high phytochemical levels has been reported to show antibacterial and antifungal properties.

Historical Use

The first undisputed mention of anise seed was in Naturalis Historia by Pliny the Elder, which recorded its widespread use as a breath freshener, a therapeutic remedy for insomnia, and a cure for insomnia. Some translations of biblical accounts also recorded the use of the seeds in ancient Israel and surrounding areas. By the time of Roman antiquity, it had become a popular spice added to seafood dishes, valued for of its sweet fragrance. In the Indian subcontinent and nearby regions, anise has up to now been used as a digestive, taken after meals to avoid indigestion, especially after feasts.

The English herbalist John Gerard noted in his encyclopedia Generall Historie of Plantes the carminative effects of anise seed, which means it decreases pressure in the lower esophagus, thereby removing related digestive ailments such as excessive flatulence. It has become quite commonplace in Europe, not only due to its presence in traditional medicine, but also its increasing visibility in the food and beverage industry. It is used in soups and stews, in confectionery, adding a very strong sweet flavor. Anethole, an organic compound extracted from aniseed is added to liquor to produce a cloudy appearance.

Phytochemical Content or Anise Seed

Anise seed is known to contain many different phytochemicals that are polyphenolic and phytoestrogenic. It has high levels of phenylpropenes, a class of polyphenols that are present in essential oils, the reason why aniseed is one of the most common ingredients used in aromatherapy. These organic compounds have shown to lower the body temperature, act on the nervous system to relieve pain, and have a positive effect on epileptic seizures. In addition, it creates strong phytoestrogen-like activities in the human body, relieving cramps during menstrual period.

Anethole is widely believed to be responsible for the antimicrobial activities of anise seed, acting against bacteria, yeast, and other types of fungi. It is a bacteriostatic antibiotic and a bactericide, which means it inhibits the growth of bacteria by interfering with bacterial cellular metabolism responsible for their replication and, at the same time, actively kill them. This explains why anise seed is effective as a breath freshener in the old days, and removes digestive ailments related to bacteria. Interestingly, aniseed is also anthelmintic; it expels parasitic worms from the body.

That being said, keep in mind that the benefits of anise seed are largely therapeutic.

Anise Seed is one of those herbs you want to keep in the medicine cabinet for quick use when needed.

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How can I Tell if I am Magnesium Deficient?
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Date: February 09, 2011 01:25 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How can I Tell if I am Magnesium Deficient?

Magnesium The Essential Mineral

Magnesium is a dietary mineral that has established nutritional values in most countries. The presence of magnesium inside the human body involves many different chemical reactions, assisting more than 300 enzymes in their functional roles. That’s why we need to meet the daily recommended allowances for this dietary element, which has been calculated by the scientific community to supply the body with amounts adequate to support body functions.

An Essential Mineral

Not all enzymes are capable of producing the effects that they are programmed for on their own, and enzymes identified to rely on the presence of magnesium can be traced in almost all metabolic pathways. Molecules that comprise the structural units of RNA and DNA are extensively used as a source of energy of all cells, such as adenosine triphosphate or ATP. When enzymes utilize ATP for energy, they require another molecule that secures their binding to ATP, which is magnesium. In addition, ATP being the main source of energy that powers the functional roles of cells more often than not necessitates that it be bound to a magnesium ion to be fully activated.

Absorption Problems

Magnesium is ubiquitous in nature, and green leafy vegetables are ideal sources of this dietary element as well as nuts, wheat, seafood, and meat. In spite of that, it has been reported that in the US alone more than 60 per cent of the population does not meet the recommended daily intake for magnesium. The availability of magnesium in our diet does not ensure absorption of this essential mineral, and a significant fraction is in fact excreted along with other waste products in the urine or feces. Interestingly, diet high in protein or fat actually interferes with the absorption of magnesium.Solaray - Magnesium Asporotate 180 ct

Magnesium Deficiency

A general feeling of malaise must not be taken lightly, for it is key indicator of magnesium deficiency. Magnesium is indispensable at the cellular level, and insufficient amounts of this element will certainly affect the way you feel, bringing about the perception of fatigue. If you feel weak all the time for no known reason, then it is recommendable to visit your doctor and find out if you have an alarming case of magnesium deficiency.

Keep in mind that high concentrations of protein and fat in the foods that you eat contribute to malabsorption of magnesium, and subsequently malnutrition. Certain medical conditions are known to deplete your reserves of elemental magnesium present in your body, notably diabetes mellitus. Drugs and medications also washes away the magnesium found in your diet and your body especially osmotic diuretics, cisplatin, ciclosporin, amphetamines, and possibly proton pump inhibitors.

Continued exposure to stress and excessive intake of alcohol both result in the unhealthy drop of magnesium levels in the blood. While there are environmental settings that we may not be able to alter, we can certainly control what we ingest. Supplementation is the only surefire remedy for magnesium deficiency, but the best way to combat whatever symptoms you are experiencing is to seek medical advice.

It is Essential You Get Your Magnesium Daily!

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A Good Vitamin Plan Is Essential To a Health Child To Help Fight ADHD
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Date: December 21, 2010 06:19 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: A Good Vitamin Plan Is Essential To a Health Child To Help Fight ADHD

Have you known any child who is having difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and hyperactivity or over-activity? This child is probably experiencing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD. ADHD is a common childhood disorders and can continue through adolescence and adulthood. Researchers are not sure what causes ADHD, although many studies suggest that genes play a large role.

Like many other health conditions, ADHD probably is a result of a combination of factors. There has been no cure for ADHD yet palliative management is promising in reducing symptoms of ADHD and improving the child’s well being and optimal functioning. These include medications, psychotherapy, training and education or a combination of these managements. In this article, we will be focusing on the natural vitamins that can help fight the exacerbation of ADHD symptoms which include:

1. Choline: Choline is a vital precursor to the production of neurotransmitters such as Dopamine and Acetylcholine. These nervous system chemicals are helpful in supporting concentration, alertness, and memory.

2. Zinc: Studies show that children in ADHD categories have lower levels of zinc and clincal studies reveal that those children who supplemented with extra zinc along with traditional ADHD medications have reported improvement of signs and symptoms most especially hyperactivity and impulsivity. Foods high in zinc include seafood, oysters, salmon, crabmeat, and, red meat like beef, lamb and pork, poultry such as turkey and chicken, dairy products, nuts, beans, fortified cereals, and whole grains.

3. Fish oil: Most Oily Fish contain omega-3 fatty acids With DHA. These chemicals can improve mental skills and enhance the child’s ability to organize activities. Possible cause for the low fish oil status of the ADHD children may be impaired conversion of the fatty acid precursors namely Linolenic Acid and alpha-linolenic acid to their longer and more highly unsaturated products, EPA and DHA, which are fish oil fats. Fish high in omega 3 fatty acids include salmon, albacore tuna, herring, mackerel, trout, sardines, flax seeds, walnuts, butternuts and soybeans.

4. Magnesium: Magnesium can have a calming effect. The best thing about magnesium is that it is abundantly found in many foods. Low dietary magnesium levels could lead to anxiety, irritability, and/or restlessness. This mineral can also play a role in sugar metabolism, which is important when wanting to stabilizing moods and concentration. Magnesium, a calming mineral, can be found in foods like nuts, black beans, peas, seeds and ready-to-eat whole grain cereals.

5. Vitamin B-6: Vitamin B-6 is needed for normal mental development and is important in the synthesis of brain chemicals including dopamine , serotonin, and norepinephrine. A B-6 deficiency has symptoms of inability to concentrate, irritability, and short-term memory loss. Regular consumption of vitamin B-6 could help reduce behavioral issues in a ADHD child. Good sources of B vitamins are milk, fish, eggs, yeast, green-leafy vegetables and cereals. Oranges are a great source of vitamin C and can improve our mood.

These are some of the natural vitamins that we find in our food. A good multiple vitamin supplements with iron can be safe and effective.

If you Suspect your child has ADHD, whats stopping you from getting him or her on a supplement plan today?

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Fight Acne Naturally
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Date: May 06, 2009 12:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fight Acne Naturally

Acne treatment therapies focus upon two aspects of acne: its prevention and management, and the removal of its more lasting effects.

Looking at the latter first, acne scars can be unsightly, and there are several methods currently used either to remove them or to hide them. Some of the more radical are surgical, while others involve modifications the surface of the skin by means of techniques akin to sandpapering, and also cosmetic techniques.

However, such therapies are needed only if the condition is permitted to have a significant effect on your skin. There are therapies that can be used to mitigate the condition if not remove it altogether. Before discussing these it will be necessary to consider what causes acne, because without that knowledge there can be no effective treatment.

Acne is cause by blockage of the sebaceous pores in the skin. That blockage is generally caused by a mixture of dead skin cells and skin oil, otherwise known as sebum. Why should this occur with acne sufferers and nobody else, when all of us have the ingredients of acne as normal components of our skin? The answer lies in our hormones.

The reason that acne is most prevalent in teenagers is that the generation of sebum is promoted by our hormones: specifically the male hormones known as androgens that both males and females begin to create in quantity during puberty. These cause the sebaceous pores to enlarge, and sebum to be produced in larger than normal quantities.

The hormones also tend to disrupt the usual desquamation rate, or shedding of dead skin cells. What happens is that the skin cells within the pores begin to shed in clumps, rather than singly, and when mixed with the excess skin oil form a plug that clogs up the pores. This plug of oils and skin cells then gets contaminated with bacteria that in time initiate the immune reaction, resulting in pus being formed through the action of macrophages on the bacteria.

The therapy needed to reduce the incidence of acne, then, can be either proactive or retroactive. Proactively, they can reduce the production of the sebum/skin cell plug. Gamma linolenic acid (GLA) as found in Omega-6 oil can block androgen receptors and so decrease the amount of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) produced. The less the amount of DHT, then the less will be the severity of your acne.

Evening primrose oil contains large quantities of GLA, and even applying this topically on your skin will dilute the sebum and reduce the likelihood of sebum and skin cells blocking your pores. This is an extreme simplification of what GLA does, but it does accurately represent the end result of its use. There are also medications you can take to reduce the rate of shedding of your skin cells, so that your pores have less chance of being blocked.

Retroactively, you can apply antibiotics to kill off the bacterial that act on the plug and that initiate the immune response responsible for the lesions. You can also give your skin a good wash with an effective skin cleanser, including a mild antibiotic to enhance the cleansing of the bacterial plug. However, there are alternative treatments, such as the proactive diet control, and the use of vitamins and appropriate herbs to control or even prevent the condition.

When you think of diet, don't think chocolate. Acne is not caused by eating too much chocolate, or even by fatty foods. We have already discussed the causes of acne, and if we can find any components in our diet that can create these conditions, then by eliminating them we should be able to avoid the condition. As a corollary, if we can identify any substances that could prevent androgens from creating excess sebum, or even control the androgens themselves, or that could help the skin cells to shed more evenly, then we could include these in our diet.

In fact such substances do exist. By going deep into the science, we will find that the secretion of testosterone is promoted by a hormone known as IGF-1 and also by insulin. IGF-1 stands for Insulin-like Growth Factor 1, and is important in the growth of children. It also promotes acne! Insulin does the same, and what that infers that anything in the diet that promotes the production of insulin will also promote acne.

What promotes insulin? Sugars and carbohydrates! Therefore, if you eat a diet low in sugars and carbs then you should have less production of sebum, and hence less acne. What this is leading to is that if you have a tendency to get acne; then switch your diet from carbohydrates and sugary foods to vegetables, grains and seafood. The Japanese get very little acne, which supports this theory.

You should also take foods rich in zinc, since a zinc deficiency has been found to lead to acne. Nobody knows why yet, but use the information and either take a zinc supplement or eat zinc rich foods such as shellfish. Strangely, it is a deficiency of zinc that causes an increase in testosterone, not the surplus of zinc provided by eating oysters! These have another effect.

There are also herbal treatments that can be effectively used for acne. Most are topical, and tea tree oil is one the more recent such treatments used to treat acne. Among the chemical constituents of tea tree oil is terpinen-4-ol, with powerful antimicrobial properties. Little wonder then that it is effective in preventing the bacterial infection of the sebaceous gland pores. The oil helps to dry out the skin, again creating conditions alien to bacteria.

You could use tea tree oil by itself, though many people simply mix it with the acne creams they are currently using. That makes them much more effective. Another option goes back to the zinc again, but rather than take it as a supplement, use it topically. Chamomile and lavender are useful in calming skin that has been inflamed both by over-zealous use of skin scrubs and also the immune system's inflammatory response to the infection of the pores.

There are many healthy options to the severe pharmaceutical treatments offered by your physician. These can be used in place of, but preferably as supplements to, the treatment recommended by your doctor. Each of the natural treatments has a sound scientific basis, and if you suffer from acne can be well worth trying.

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L-Arginine An Amino Acid Essential Or Not You Be The Judge?
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Date: January 06, 2009 04:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: L-Arginine An Amino Acid Essential Or Not You Be The Judge?

L-Arginine is an amino acid that is one of 20 needed by the body for its existence. To some, it is not what is known as an essential amino acid, since it can be biosynthesized by the body, but arginine is termed a conditionally essential amino acid in that we must include some in our diet because our biochemistry does not produce all that our body needs, particularly during the growing years.

Amino acids are the building blocks of life, and are the units from which proteins and ultimately our DNA are built. In fact DNA contains the blueprints for every protein used by our bodies, including all the enzymes without which our biochemistry could not occur. When a supply of a particular protein is needed, the DNA template provides the sequence of amino acids needed to produce it.

Of the 20 amino acids we need, only 10 can be produced by our body: the other 10 must be included in our diet and are termed 'essential' because they are an essential part of our diet, just as vitamins and minerals are. Without an adequate supply of essential components, we cannot survive, and if the essential amino acids are depleted in our diet then the body will break down muscle tissue to release them.

Although L-arginine is termed a 'conditionally' essential amino acid, it is included by many among the 10 regarded as being essential. Hence, depending upon who you read, it can be either essential or non-essential. That is because, as inferred earlier, arginine is needed for growth and development, and there is insufficient in the diet to meet these needs. Therefore, while it is essential in cases where growth is still taking place, it is not in those where normal growth is complete.

Proteins are essential for all animal life, forming not only the enzymes, or biochemical catalysts, but also muscles and DNA among other bodily tissues. Protein is also a necessary part of our diet, and it is from protein, animal or vegetable, that we get the amino acids in our diet. L-arginine is one of these, being available from all meats and seafood’s, and vegetables rich in protein such as soy, seeds, nuts and grains.

So what does arginine do for us, quite a lot in fact, many of its functions being related to our health? Arginine plays an important role in the healing of wounds, especially bone, assisting the immune function, decreasing blood pressure and speeding up the repair time of tissue. However, it possesses other properties such as increasing muscle mass, helping to increase male fertility and improving the circulation.

It also helps to remove ammonia from the body, and is a precursor for the biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO2). It is in the way that L-arginine works with the nitrogen stores of the body that we will focus on here, prior to touching on its other properties.

L-Arginine transports, stores and excretes nitrogen, and used biochemically to manufacture nitric oxide. This oxide of nitrogen plays a very important role in your body, and is produced in every cell of your body. Nitric oxide helps in the dilation of your blood vessels, allowing a reduction in blood pressure, better circulation and helping to prevent a mans man-hood dysfunction, all of which are due to its relaxing effect on smooth muscle contraction and the promotion of the increased blood flow necessary for men and their functions. It is also important to your immune system and nervous system.

It works in a similar way to the effect of nitroglycerine on the heart: this is converted in the body to nitric oxide which relaxes the blood vessels and so reduces the amount of work needed by the heart. The way in which L-arginine forms nitric oxide is by the action of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase.

The amino acid is also an important component of the Citric Acid or Kreb's cycle, where it reacts with ammonia which is a toxic by-product in the generation of energy in the mitochondria. Ammonia is converted to urea by L-arginine and excreted from the body. This is another way in which L-arginine is involved in the storage and use of nitrogen-containing compounds in your biochemistry.

It was mentioned earlier that arginine is an essential amino acid for children. Studies have indicated that it supports the release of the human growth hormone from the pituitary gland although the amount released through supplementation of the amino acid varies widely between individuals. The growth hormone maintains the production of proteins and muscle tissue in the body cells. This reduces as we age, and arginine becomes non-essential, the smaller amounts needed in our biochemistry being manufactured by the body.

The anabolic effect of the supplement is believed to increase the effectiveness of exercise intended to increase muscle bulk and reduce the percentage of body fat, and many take L-arginine as a supplement while undergoing such anabolic fitness and exercise programs. It is normally best to start with low supplement levels and work up due the potential side effects (diarrhea and nausea).

Arginine is an important component in the body's healing mechanisms for both tissue and bone, and studies have confirmed accelerated healing of wounds and fractures with arginine supplementation. Although the mechanism by which this occurs is not yet understood, there is evidence that it may be connected with the nitric oxide pathway and increased blood flow, and also with its effect on the immune system in reducing inflammation at the healing site.

Diabetics, however, should be careful with substances that promote the release of growth hormone, and children with incomplete bone growth should also use such agents only under medical supervision. With diabetics, their condition could be either exacerbated or improved, and those with herpes and some psychotic conditions should also be careful.

Nitrogenous compounds are essential to life, and L-arginine plays a significant role in the storage, use and secretion of them. Without it life would not be possible, although it is its visible uses, such as the effect of nitrous oxide on blood flow and of proteins on muscle metabolism, for which it is best known to those that use it, either as a supplement or as a remedy. Pure supplement form is available at your local or internet health food store.

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L-Alanine Non Essential Amino Acid
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Date: January 05, 2009 04:31 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: L-Alanine Non Essential Amino Acid

L-Alanine is one of 20 amino acids that are used by the body to manufacture the proteins essential for life. Each protein possesses specific biological properties that are imparted by the sequence of amino acids it contains. Proteins control the chemistry that takes place within the cells of our body, and comprise all of the enzymes that catalyze the body's biochemistry.

Amino acids are also the building blocks of DNA that determines the genetic make-up of individuals, and that also provides recipes or templates for the production of proteins from amino acid sequences. There is a different DNA template for every protein required by the body that determines which of the 20 amino acids are needed, and in what order they are to be combined with one another to manufacture the desired protein.

10 of these 20 amino acids can be synthesized by your body's biochemistry, the other 10 being essential parts of your diet. If you fail to include just of these 10, then your body will break down its proteins until it has obtained a sufficient supply of that amino acids for its needs. That involves muscle and other tissue degradation, and is one of the symptoms of malnutrition. Amino acids are not stored, and a daily supply is essential to avoid these symptoms.

L-Alanine is one of the ten that the body can manufacture, and used by the body to help build protein and also to enable the body to make use of glucose to generate energy. It does so as part of what is known as the glucose-alanine cycle. During anaerobic exercise, such as in weightlifting and sustained running, muscles produce lactate and also alanine.

The alanine is passed on to the liver where it is converted to energy via its conversion to glucose. This is not a particularly efficient means of creating energy because a byproduct of the process is urea, the removal of which in turn requires energy. However, it serves its purpose as an energy source once the liver is depleted of glycogen. In fact that is the major use to which alanine appears to be put by the body: the conversion of glucose to energy.

The way the glucose-alanine cycle works is that a process known as transamination produces glutamate from the amino groups of amino acids that are degraded during exercise. Glutamate is then converted to pyruvate by means of the enzyme alanine aminotransferase, with the production of alanine and alpha-ketoglutarate. This is a reversible reaction, and after the alanine has been carried by the bloodstream to the liver, the reaction reverses with the regeneration of pyruvate that undergoes gluconeogenesis (generation of glucose).

The result of this is glucose that returns to the muscle tissue to provide more energy. The glutamate is broken down to the ammonium ion in the mitochondria, which in turn enters the urea cycle with the production of urea.

In a nutshell, then, the glucose-alanine cycle removes glutamate and pyruvate from muscle tissue to the liver where glucose is generated from the pyruvate and returned to the muscle. Since gluconeogenesis involves the expenditure of energy, and this occurs in the liver rather than in the muscle, all the energy in the muscle can be used for muscle contraction.

L-Alanine possesses other properties, among them the ability to help maintain the health of the prostate. A study of benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate) indicated that treatment with L-alanine, glutamic acid and glycine over a period of three months reduced the symptoms. However, make sure that you consult your physician before using alanine in this way. This is not because there are any known adverse side effects, because there are not, but because it I always wise to so with any supplement taken with a view to treating any medical condition.

A less obvious application derives from the fact that it forms a stable free radical when deaminated. Deamination can be initiated by radiation, and so the concentration of this free radical can be measured to ensure that the correct dose of radiation is being given in dosimetric radiotherapy. It is not always easy to control the dose accurately, and this property of alanine allows it to monitored and to ensure that it is neither too low to have the desired effect, nor dangerously high.

Although it is a non-essential amino acid, and can be produced by the body, a dietary supply or supplement is advantageous if extra energy is required. Good dietary sources of L-alanine include meats, seafood, eggs, nuts, beans, seeds, brewer's yeast, corn and legumes among others. Supplements are also available, and useful for body-builders, weightlifters and others involved in anaerobic exercise. Due to the glucose-alanine cycle, it can possibly provide energy when lactate build-up would otherwise lead to muscle cramps.

Those for whom a supplement could be useful are athletes and others who are trying to build muscle and stamina, or reduce their body fat and also the obese and overweight for the same reason. There is also evidence that a combination of the amino acids alanine, glycine and arginine can help to reduce arterial plaque from oxidized low density lipoproteins, and can also help to reduce high blood pressure.

Deficiencies are rare, although groups that do not eat meat should be careful to eat foods with a good alanine content. There are no known side effects of a deficiency since the body will generate what is needed for normal purposes, and while the supplement appears to have no side effects, it is advisable that pregnant and lactating women should first seek medical advice. The same applies if you suffer from hypertension or diabetes. High doses of alanine might also affect those with kidney or liver disease.

Although the benefits of supplementation of L-alanine might not be immediately obvious, the results and the science indicate that it is effective in making better use of blood glucose in that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) created in the muscle tissue is allowed to be expended on muscle contraction while the glucose-alanine cycle provides the energy needed for gluconeogenesis.

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B Vitamins
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Date: June 19, 2008 12:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: B Vitamins

The B vitamins are integral to body growth and development. They play a great part in the activities of enzymes that regulate chemical reactions in our body. Different B vitamins exist in various animal and plant foods. Examples of some of these are cereals and whole grains, pork, seafood, eggs and liver. They are also in dairy products, dried beans, chicken, watermelon and grapefruit to name a few among the many sources. Supplements are another great way to ingest B vitamins.

These vitamins consist of a group of eight water-soluble nutrients:

* B1 – Thiamine * B2 – Riboflavin * B3 – Niacin * B5 – Pantothenic Acid * B6 – Pyridoxine * B7 – Biotin * B9 – Folic Acid, Folate * B12 – Cobalamin

When the body takes in these B vitamins, it uses them in different ways. The body uses B1 and B2 to affect enzymes (proteins) that have an influence on muscles and nerves. When B1, thiamin, enters the system, the body uses it to help convert glucose into energy. It uses B2 to help repair hair, skin and nails. Vitamin B3 helps maintain skin health and digestive functions. This vitamin also helps maintain the health of the body's nervous system. Vitamin B5 affects the body's normal growth and development overall.

The body uses B6 to break down protein and to maintain the health of the red blood cells. It also uses this kind of B vitamin to keep the nervous system and components of the immune system healthy. The B7 vitamin helps the body produce hormones. It also helps it break down carbohydrates and proteins. The B9 vitamin also helps the production of red blood cells. The body uses B9 in its cells so they can manufacture and maintain DNA. This DNA contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all living organisms known to man. The body uses vitamin B12 to help produce blood cells and uses it in nervous system functions.

Since the B vitamins are water-soluble, they do not remain stored in the body if too much of them are ingested. The exceptions are B12 and folate (B9), which the liver stores. The body eliminates most of any extra amounts of the rest of the B vitamins through the urine. However, it's wise to take only what your particular system requires when it comes to these vitamins.

Because the body uses the B vitamins to aid so many vital functions, certain things happen when the body does not get enough of them. Some people may experience numbness and tingling in their arms and legs if they're deficient in B vitamins. Muscle cramps can occur as well as tiredness. Anemia is a concern if a person does not get enough of these vitamins, as is depression. Loss of appetite and abdominal pain are symptoms of vitamin B deficiency as well. Therefore, it is important that one ingest the B vitamins on a regular basis.

Just eating foods that contain these B vitamins prepared in any manner is not enough. Because the body uses these vitamins to support important functions, it needs them in full measure. Extended cooking times and food processing can dilute the strength and concentration of these vitamins. Alcohol can diminish their useful effects too.

The right amounts of B vitamins on a regular basis are part of a comprehensive health strategy. The body uses the required amounts efficiently to promote overall health. Used in conjunction with the other vitamins and minerals we need, the B vitamins can make daily living that much more energetic.

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Antioxidants For The Body
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Date: June 10, 2008 11:27 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Antioxidants For The Body

Eating the fruits and vegetables that naturally contain antioxidants is the best way to get them into your system. Mixing them into a well-balanced and healthy diet is the best method of all. This way you reap the benefits of all of the antioxidants in a natural combination.

The benefit of dietary antioxidants is that they slow the chemical process of oxidation. This oxidation is what causes narrowing of the arteries and heart-related health problems due to cholesterol deposits. Eating a regular variety of herbs, vegetables and fruits that contain antioxidants is the best way to maintain good health. Some foods that contain antioxidants include:

* Tomatoes
* Garlic
* Onions
* Rosemary
* Grapes
* Pomegranates

Antioxidant supplements are available, lab testing have shown that they are just as effective as their natural counterparts. Natural foods contain ranges of antioxidants that work together synergistically. These combinations of antioxidants are much more effective.

More Benefits:

Antioxidants and other nutrients are needed by the body to protect against cell damage. They also may reduce the risks of certain forms of cancer.

It has been discovered that the mitochondria (cell power plants) are a major source of oxidant production. They are also a target for the damaging effects of the very oxidants that they produce. This is a major cause in the advancement of cellular aging, called apoptosis.

It is believed that in apoptosis, each cell has a fixed number of cell divisions that it is capable of. After the cell has used its allotted number of divisions, it ceases to function. Oxidative damage is also a contributing factor of DNA mutation, which causes further malfunction of the cells.

Most Common Antioxidants:

The following is a list of the most common antioxidants, what benefits they offer and where to find them:

*Beta-carotene keeps the skin healthy and promotes growth and development of bones. It also helps to prevent night blindness and fight infection. Beta-carotene is found in vegetables and fruits: carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, broccoli, peppers, tomatoes, spinach, sweet potatoes and pumpkin.

* Vitamin C destroys free radicals inside and outside cells. It helps in the healing of wounds, preventing bruising, formation of connective tissue, iron absorption and keeping gums healthy. Vitamin C is being studied for its beneficial effects in reducing cataracts, cancer and heart disease. Foods high in vitamin C include tomatoes, citrus fruits and juices, berries, mango, papaya, peppers, cabbage, spinach, broccoli and potatoes.

* Vitamin E acts as the essential fat protector in cell membranes and red blood cells. It reduces the risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases associated with age. Vitamin E is found in peanut butter, nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, margarine, whole grains, wheat germ, salad dressings and avocado.

* Selenium helps the body maintain healthy hair and nails. It also enhances immunity and, along with Vitamin E, prevents cell damage. Vitamin E reduces the risk of cancers, especially prostate, lung and colorectal. The best sources of Selenium include brazil nuts, garlic, meat, eggs, poultry, seeds, seafood and whole grains. The amount of selenium found in plants depends on the soil content in which they are grown.

Antioxidants benefit the body by providing a layer of protection for the tissues and cells. They are the front line of the body's protection against free radicals. Free radicals are unstable by-products of oxygen that cause premature aging and degenerative diseases. They also come from environmental sources, such as pollution, UV rays and other toxins. Foods rich in antioxidants help to clean free radicals from the body. They also help to prevent various age-related diseases, cancers and heart disease.

Maintaining a healthy, nutritionally balanced body that has the ability to fight disease and infection is a prime way to live a long, disease free and happy life. Regular ingestion of antioxidant rich foods or supplements is the best method to achieve this.

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Ester-E
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Date: June 07, 2008 09:40 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ester-E

Vitamin E is a known natural supplement and antioxidant that helps support the immune and cardiovascular systems. It is created by a natural process so that you can receive the purest form available. It is formed when natural d-alpha tocopherol is combined with a phosphate molecule. This combination protects the potency of Vitamin E until your body needs it the most.

Ester E is processed so that its natural benefits are preserved to give the body the most optimal benefit possible. This is why Ester E is the best form of Vitamin E available. Vitamin E is known to aid in the following actions:

* Preventing Alzheimer’s disease
* Reducing vision problems
* Preventing heart problems
* Protecting cell membranes
* Flushing LDL cholesterol

Vitamin E Food Sources:

* Nuts
* Oils
* Whole grains
* Spinach
* Asparagus
* Avocado
* Carrots
* Celery
* Apples
* Beef
* seafood

How Vitamin E Works:

Manufacturers suggest that Ester E be taken along with a meal that includes some form of fat. This is because when fat is combined with Vitamin E, it is more readily absorbed. Since the supplement is fat soluble, this aids in delivery to the cells of the body.

Vitamin E is an essential nutrient because the body cannot produce it on its own. If you are not ingesting the proper amounts of it in your daily diet, you need to take a supplement. It is important to remember that improper preparation, cooking and storage can result in the loss of Vitamin E from the food.

Vitamin E is actually a combination of antioxidants, tocopherols and tocotrienols. Unfortunately, only alpha-tocopherol is actively maintained in the body. Therefore a supplement is needed to be sure the body is getting enough of the other ingredients that make up the complete Vitamin E.

Why do we need Vitamin E?

Part of its job is to protect Vitamin A and essential fatty acids from oxidation. When oxidation occurs in the cells, it breaks down body tissues.

Vitamin E Benefits:

Vitamin E has been found to aid in the prevention of heart disease. The oxidation of LDL cholesterol causes blockages in the coronary arteries. This often leads to atherosclerosis and heart attack. Vitamin E helps to prevent or at least delay these effects by limiting this oxidation. This has reduced the mortality rate due to coronary disease.

In its complete form, Vitamin E may be effective in reducing the risk of breast cancer in women who are genetically predisposed. It is being tested for its effectiveness in not only reducing the incidence of breast cancer, but also in inhibiting breast cancer cell growth.

Vitamin E is thought to protect the body against many forms of cancer due to its ability to increase immune system function. As an antioxidant, Vitamin E protects the body against the damaging effects of free radicals. These are believed to contribute to cancer cell production and the development of other chronic diseases. Vitamin E may also block formation of nitrosamines. These are carcinogens that form in the stomach from nitrites consumed through diet.

Another possible benefit to optimal amounts of Vitamin E in the diet is the prevention of cataracts. The clarity of the lens of the eye contributes to the formation of cataracts, blindness and eye disease. Vitamin E is being found to aid in the prevention of eye problems in people of all ages.

Vitamin E Warnings:

Vitamin E can produce harmful side effects if it is combined with certain medications. Consult your doctor before taking any dietary supplement to be sure it is safe for your use.

When taken as a supplement in its complete form, Vitamin E is nutritive and helpful in maintaining good health. Be sure when purchasing Vitamin E supplements that you are using Ester E for optimal benefits.

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Natural Supplements Like Fish Oils And Phosphatidylserine Can Boost Memory
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Date: January 14, 2008 03:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Supplements Like Fish Oils And Phosphatidylserine Can Boost Memory

We often think of our brain as being different from other organs, but the brain undergoes changes over time, just like the heart. Up until recently, brain aging and everything that goes along with it was associated with neuron failure. Actually, brain neurons do not undergo massive die-off with age. Although some neurons are lost, the brain continues to grow new ones, though at a slower pace. Decreasing cognitive function is now believed to start as early as one's late thirties, which is the result of a lowered vascular function for oxygen and nutrient supply, increased oxidative stress, and decreased production of neurotransmitters. Other issues impact memory too such as normal aging, emotional trauma, alcoholism, depression, seizures, dementias, stroke, neurodegenerative illnesses, and obesity. All of these can lead to devastating changes in mood and memory. Additionally, it is widely known that the use of cholesterol-lowering drugs can severely impact skills that involve brain functions.


Researchers believe that losing one's memory is not a requirement of aging. The human brain is like skeletal muscle: the more you exercise the mind the more efficient it becomes. Additionally, providing the mind with the right nutrients and protective antioxidants is absolutely necessary. For many years, Gingko biloba was the most well known dietary supplement for increasing cognitive function. Although a lot of physiological functions have been suggested, the improved blood microcirculation is the most important benefit of gingko. Gingko contains a number of beneficial plant compounds called flavonoids which support enhanced blood flow to the brain. This increased circulation helps combat a lot of the age-related memory issues that occur.


Gingko extract positively enhances short-term memory, sociability, mood and thinking ability. The herb also offers antioxidant benefits that can protect brain cells from free radical damage. Other compounds that have proved them selves to have benefits include phosphatidylserine. This phospholipid plays a critical role in maintaining optimal mental performance. Acetyl L-carnitine supports the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is a key compound that is needed for brain and nerve function. Acetylcholine facilitates memory function and learning and also influences emotions. It also has been shown to be a highly valuable antioxidant and supports the health of brain cells. Studies have found curcumin to potently protect brain cells from damage. Curcumin is best known for its anti-inflammatory effects and its antioxidant ability. Further antioxidant protection can be found in a diet full of fruits and vegetables.


Few, if any, nutrients have been proven truly effect in fighting Alzheimer's disease. However, phosphatidylserine can help individuals with noticeable memory loss and it is 100 percent safe. Anyone with any degree of memory impairment should take this supplement for at least a few months to see what degree of improvement can be experienced. It has also been found that people with a regular intake of omega-3 fatty acids from seafood do not develop Alzheimer's disease to the same extent as those who do not eat fish. Supplementing with the DHA can help to reduce the risk of and/or improve memory loss.


It's never too late to start thinking about how you can support and maintain healthy cognitive function. Since free radical damage is a major factor in reduced cognitive ability, supporting the health of the neurons and enhancing our antioxidant capacity to fight the effects of free radical damage can have beneficial effects on people of any age. It is crucial for us to focus on nutritional factors that can support our thinking ability over the long-term as we age.



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Wasabi Rhizome Cleanse - Supports Phase II Liver Detoxification - Wasabi Health Benefits
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Date: August 01, 2006 10:41 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Wasabi Rhizome Cleanse - Supports Phase II Liver Detoxification - Wasabi Health Benefits

Most people know of it as a pale-green lump on the side of their plates in Japanese restaurants—a hot, spicy accompaniment to sushi or sashimi. The fiery yet sweet taste perfectly compliments the saltiness of soy sauce and the cool delicacy of raw fish. But wasabi is much more than a burst of culinary flavor, it has been used by traditional herbalists of Japan since the 10th century and is now being rediscovered by modern health practitioners for its stunning health benefits.

Wasabi has powerful detoxification properties, in particular, it supports the immune system and cleanses the liver. Wasabi contains precursors to phytochemicals called isothiocyanates that help remove toxic substances that are stored in the liver’s fatty tissues.

The rare wasabi plant is a natural, potent support to a healthy, cleansed liver that in turn affects the detoxification and cleansing of the entire body. Source Naturals is pleased to bring you this convenient, effective addition to your wellness program.

Wasabia Japonica - Rooted In Health

The wasabi plant (Wasabia japonica) grows naturally in the mountains of Japan in the gravel and sandbars of coldwater streams and rivers. Rare and difficult to grow, it takes three years for a wasabi root or rhizome to reach maturity. Because of its popularity, wasabi is now cultivated hydroponically and in cold, wet environments outside of Japan, such as in New Zealand and Oregon. Traditionally, the rhizome was freshly grated at the table with a sharkskin grater, popular with dishes such as seafood or udon noodles. Now wasabi is usually dried into powder form and made into the pale green paste familiar to most westerners. Often, however, restaurants do not serve real wasabi; since it is so rare and expensive, a dyed horseradish paste is served in most American restaurants.

What makes wasabi so special? It comes from a good family; the brassica vegetables in the cruciferae family include such health giants as broccoli, horseradish, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower and kale. All of these are well-known detoxifying plants, and wasabi appears to be the most amazing of them all, with detox capacities far beyond the others in the family because it is loaded with isothiocyanate precursors. This chemical not only gives wasabi its famous “fire,” it is likewise a fireball of detoxification properties.

Phase II Detox

The liver detoxifies the by-products of digestion and other harmful substances through a complex series of chemical reactions often referred to as Phase I and Phase II Detoxification. Phase I enzymes begin the process by taking the toxic molecule and changing it into a bioactive form. This process breaks down toxins. A second set of enzymes, Phase II, then neutralizes the toxin and makes it water soluble for elimination. Wasabi, with its long-chain isothiocyanate precursors, induces the Phase II enzymes. Simply stated, it is the sparkplug that starts Phase II enzymes on their work. This process, all done in the liver, supports the body’s ability to clean itself of impurities.

Part of a Complete Wellness Program

In the modern world, with so many pollutants, it is critical to your health and longevity that you cleanse these toxic compounds from your body. Wasabi, along with a whole food, high-fiber diet and reduction of alcohol consumption, supports the liver— the largest of the vital organs and the key to the digestion and elimination systems and most particularly, the body’s ability to cleanse itself. Source Naturals is pleased to bring you this exceptional product as part of your wellness program.

Research

Depree, JA (1999) Flavour and pharmaceutical properties of the volatile sulphur compounds of Wasabia japonica. Food Research International: 31(5):329-337.

Morimitsu Y, et al. (2002) A sulforaphane analogue that potently activates the Nrf2-dependent detoxification pathway. J Biol Chem: 277:3456-3463.

Munday, R (2002) Selective induction of phase II enzymes in the urinary bladder of rats by allyl isothiocyanate, a compound derived from Brassica vegetables.

Nutrition and Cancer: 44(1):52-59.

Watanabe, M (2003) Identification of 6-methylsulfinylhexyl isothiocyanate as an apoptosis-inducing component in wasabi. Phytochemistry: 62(5):733-739.

Rose, P (2000) 7-methylsulfinylheptyl and 8- methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates from watercress are potent inducers of phase II enzymes. Carcinogenesis: 21(11):1983-1988.

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Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen
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Date: July 27, 2005 03:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

You and your sweetie can turn up the heat by cooking together.

Since the beginning of time, the pleasures of the table have been intertwined with those of the boudoir. (Remember the scene in the film Tom Jomes in which Tom and his amorata-of-the-moment wolf down a meal while staring lustily into each other’s eyes?) But when most of your kitchen time is spent trying to get everyone fed and out of the house in time for the night’s soccer game/ PTA meeting/ballet lesson, it can be tough keeping the pilot light lit on your love.

That’s why one of the best ways to spice up your sex life is to prepare a sensuous meal together sans offspring (thank heavens for doting grandparents with spare rooms!). A little fourhanded cooking- preferably while sharing some suggestive banter- can create chemistry that allows your playful, non-parenting side s to emerge, enhancing intimacy and setting the stage for the seductive feast to follow.

Just as the frenzied pace of modern living can often foster a sense of separation, cooking together as a couple can promote a sense of union. “Eventually you get a feel for your partner’s rhythms and adjust yours accordingly,” says food TV personality Jacqui Malouf, author of Booty Food (Bloomsbury). “Before you know it you’re passing the coriander, peeling the potatoes and stirring the risotto at precisely the right moments.”

With time, you can learn what each of you does best: Who has a flair for combining spices in just the right proportions? Who can chop carrots into perfect little matchsticks without taking all night? Since nothing kills the mood more than arguing over who misplaced the baker’s chocolate or the pasta platter, buy your ingredients earlier in the day and have all the necessary utensils out and at the ready. (Safety note: while two in a tiny kitchen can be steamily cozy, do be careful with hot pots and sharp knives.)

Four hands can also be better than two, so why not make the most of it? Malouf suggests approaching your combined efforts with a sense of adventure: “Use more than three ingredients in a salad dressing! Be daring with your desserts! Try concocting something with squab or squid or quince or quail- the sky’s the limit.”

Intriguing Ingredients

One advantage of using exotic ingredients (or at least foods not normally found on your weekly shopping list) is that they can help you and your partner break through the limits of everyday experience by reawakening long-dormant senses. Go ahead- run your fingertips over the rough rind of a pomegranate before feeling the smooth, full seeds within. Inhale the sweet, perfumed scent of a dead-ripe apricot, and appreciate its downy skin. Admire the cool green beauty of a cut avocado, and share a spoonful with your sweetie.

Avocado, in fact, is one of the foods known for inflaming passion based on its suggestive shape, along with artichoke and asparagus- and that’s just the AS! (Chocoholics rejoice: Chocolate, full of the same feel-good chemical released by the brain when one falls in love, also makes the ecstasy encouraging grade, even when obtained in standard shapes.) “coincidentally, many foods long considered aphrodisiacs are low in fat (avocado and chocolate are delectably healthy exceptions) and are high in vitamins and minerals,” write Martha Hopkins and Randall Lockridge in Intercourses: An Aphrodisiac Cookbook (Terrace Publishing). “A diet heavy in these foods, then, yields a healthy blood healthy body with the energy, blood flow and nutrients needed for a peak sexual experience.” (The way these foods feed the imagination- the ultimate smorgasbord of pleasure- is a bountiful bonus.) Other foods, such as honey, have been treasured for supplying the energy needed to fan love’s flames far into the night; no wonder the sweet, sticky stuff shows up in a number of naughty-night concoctions.

Just as Venus, the Roman goddess of love, emerged fully formed from the sea, so do the foods that best encourage those under her spell. In addition to being chockfull of healthy protein, “seafood is elegant, clean and light enough to keep your sleek loving machine fully fueled but never weighed down,” says Jacqui Malouf. Oysters are famous- or infamous- for their amorous effects (Cassanova was fond of them) but aren’t for everyone; other romantic dining favorites include shrimp or scallops.

Time to Eat

Once you’ve worked your kitchen magic together, it’s time to move the action into the dining room. Again, a little preparation can keep the evening at a slow, sensuous boil. Use the best china you have, along with matching silverware, cloth napkins and nice glasses (sippy cups don’t count). The warm glow of candlelight can both set off your tantalizing table and set your hearts aflame, along with a rose or two in the most decorative vase you own. Music (from Mozart to Motown, depending on your taste) is another surefire mojo mover. But please guys- catch up with CNN or ESPN some other time.

When you do finally sit down to dinner don’t rush, even (especially) if fast-forward eating is the norm in your house. “Treat the food as if you are making love for the first time,” advises Kerry McCloskey in The Ultimate Sex Diet (True Courage Press). “Before putting any in your mouth, inhale its aroma to get your digestive juices flowing…Cut your food into small, bite-sized pieces, (which) will ensure that you enjoy each bite.” The idea is to enhance all of your senses, which will come in handy later on in the evening.

You can make your couple dining experience even more intimate by feeding each other; some foods. Like asparagus spears and shrimp, beg for finger-feeding. McCloskey recommends also trying chopsticks: “Because it will take longer to maneuver your food when using them, you will feel full sooner with less food.” That’s important since you don’t want to overeat- passing out right after dessert is not the way to impress your partner (they’ve seen you snoring away on the couch a hundred times before).

In the wee hours, happily exhausted, you can ponder this: No matter how hectic your lives get, you should always make time for each other. You already share a mortgage and kids. Cooking together is a great way to share sensuality, too.
-Lisa James

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Nature's Cancer fighters ...
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Date: July 07, 2005 12:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nature's Cancer fighters ...

Cancer has always been a word no one wants to hear from a doctor's lips. But as a fatal disease, cancer has gone from dread to worse, passing heart disease as the number-one killer of Americans under the age of 85 (a category that includes the overwhelming majority of us). While death rates for both illnesses has dropped over the past few years, the improvement has been much more pronounced for cardiovascular disorders.

According to the American Cancer Society, 476,009 people died of cancer in 2002 (the last year for which statistics are available). Behind every one of those numbers is a web of lives tangled by cancer's relentless onslaught: A child who misses a mother's comforting arms, a bride without a father to walk her down the aisle, a spouse coming home to a dark, cold house every night. And for those fortunate enough to survive a cancer encounter, there's always the dark worry of recurrence that surfaces with every ache or twinge.

Many people think of cancer as either a random calamity of a genetically driven inevitability, but it ain't necessarily so. Diet is coming up big as a major cancer-risk player: For example, eating a lot of red meat, especially highly processed meats such as bacon, has been linked to high colorectal cancer risk in an investigation published by the Journal of the American Medical Association. On the positive side, a number of nutrients have shown cancer-fighting power, such as the recently discovered link between the B vitamin folate and reduced risk of colon and other cancers (see page 57). Other useful nutrients appear on the chart that follows.

Of course, risk always varies from person to person, and there are some lifestyle issues, like not smoking, that are no-brainers when it comes to cancer deterrence. But isn't it nice to know that protection from such a terrible disease might be as close as the end of your fork?

Nature's Cancer fighters

Berries

  • Description: Black or blue, rasp or straw, these tiny fruits pack a huge health punch; notable phytonutrients include anthocyanadins, ellagic acid and quercetin, along with vitamins and fiber.
  • Function: Among the plant world's most powerful antioxidants; have shown the ability to inhibit cancer cell growth.
  • Citrus Bioflavonoids

  • Description: These substances, found in oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruits, include hesperidin and limonene.
  • Function: Have shown promising anti-cancer effects in early studies; grapefruit compounds may be praticularly helpful in fighting lung cancer among smokers and colon cancer.
  • Curcumin

  • Description: A reddish yellow compound found in the spice turmeric, a staple in indian cookery.
  • Function: Interfers with cancer cell proliferation and with tumor blood-supply developement. Cooking use thought to be responsible for lower childhood cancer rates in asia.
  • EPA

  • Description: An Omega-3 acid found in such fatty fish as salmon and sardines; complete name: eiscosapentaenoic acid.
  • Function: Increased intake linked to reduced rates of several types of cancer, including those of the breast, colon, lung and prostate. May help make standard chemotherapy more effective (Consult your physician first).

    Green Tea

  • Description: Leaves of the Camilla sinensis plant, which is extensively cultivated in China, India and Japan; One of the world's most popular beverages that's also available in extract form.
  • Function: Contains potent antioxidants; has been associated with lower cancer rates in large population studies. Extract may make it more difficult for cancer cells to invade healthy tissues.
  • Lycopene

  • Description: Best known for putting the red in tomatoes, this phytonutrient is also found in apricots, pink grapefruit and watermelon.
  • Function: Associated with reduced risk of, and slower growth rates in, prostate cancer; recent research also links lycopene to lower pancreatic cancer risk. Reduces DNA damage in white blood cells.
  • Mushroom Polysaccarides

  • Description: Complex sugar compounds found in a variety of mushrooms, include shiitake, maitake, and reishi.
  • Function: Different polysaccarides have shown different anti-cancer effects in laboratory studies: Some fight tumor formation, others induce apoptosis. In Japan, mushroom eaters have lower cancer death rates.
  • Selenium

  • Description: Trace mineral found in grains, meats, seafood and some nuts, most notably brazil nuts. If using supplements, follow package directions.
  • Function: Supports production of glutathione, a natural antioxidant. Has reduced prostate cancer risk in men with low blood selenium levels. May lower colon cancer risk.
  • Soy

  • Description: Soy foods include soy milk, tempeh, edamame (Vegetable green soybeans) and tofu; also available as soy protein extract.
  • Function: Populations that consume high amounts of soy foods have lower breast and prostate cancer rates.
  • Vitamin C

  • Description: Found in citrus fruit, cabbage and related vegetables (broccoli, brussels sprouts,cauliflower), Potatoes, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes and tomato juice.
  • Function: The body's primary water-based antioxidant; has neutralized toxic byproducts of normal fat metabolism in some studies. Recharges its partner, Vitamin E.
  • Vitamin D

  • Description: While vitamin D is found in egg yolks, butter and cod liver oil, the main source is sun-exposed skin.
  • Function: Regular sun exposure is linked with lower overall cancer death rates, while rates for breast, colon and prostate cancers are all higher in northern parts of the US.
  • Vitamin E, Natural

  • Description: Found in almonds, fruit, peanuts, vegetable oils, whole grains (including brown rice).
  • Function: The body's primary fat-based antioxidant; may retard prostate cancer developement.
  • Glossary

  • Apoptosis - process by which cell normally die and are replaced; becomes disabled in cancer cells.
  • Antioxidant - counters harmful molecules called free radicals that can damage DNA, which can lead to cancer.
  • Phyonutrient - Substances found in plant foods that promote good health in humans.
  • Proliferation - unregulated growth and reproduction that characterizes cancer cells.
  • Tumor
  • - Solid mass formed by some cancers; capable of developing its own blood-vessel network.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    REFERENCES
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 25, 2005 08:13 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: REFERENCES

    REFERENCES

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Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics; 1994. 4 Center for Science in the Public Interest and McDonald’s Nutrition and You—A guide to Healthy Eating at McDonald’s: McDonald’s Corp,1991. 5 Bray GA. Appetite Control in Adults. In: Fernstrom JD, Miller GD eds. Appetite and Body Weight Regulation. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1994:1-92. 6 Michnovicz JJ. How to Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer. New York: Warner Book Inc. 1994:54. 7 Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet. National Research Council Report, National Academy of Sciences, 15 Feb. 1996. 8 Van Tallie TB. Obesity: adverse effects on health and longevity. Am J Clin Nutr 1979:32: 2723-33. 9 Somer E, M.A. R.D. Nutrition for Women. New York: Henry Hold and Company, 1993:273. 10 Swaneck GE, Fishman J. Covalent binding of the endogenous estrogen 16A-hydroxyestrone to estradiol in human breast concer cells: characterization and intranuclear localization. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988:85;7831-5. 11 Colditz GA. 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Kikai Tokkyo Koho JP 04,288,017 [92,288,017] 13 Oct 1992. 92 Suzuki K, Okawa Y, Suzuki S, Suzuki M. Candidacidal effect of peritoneal exudate cells in mice administered with chitin or Chitosan: the role of serine protease in the mechanism of oxygen-independent candidacidal effect. Microbiol Immunol. 1987;31(4):375-9. 93 Sawada G, Akaha Y, Naito H, Fujita M. Synergistic food preservatives containing organic acids, Chitosan and citrus seed extracts. Jpn, Kokai Kokkyo Koho JP 04 27,373 [92 27,373] 30 Jan 1992. 94 Min H-K, Hatai K, Bai S. Some inhibitory effects of Chitosan on fishpathogenic oomycete, Saprolegnia parasitic. Gyobyo Kenkyu, 1994;29(2):73-4. 95 Nelson JL, Alexander JW, Gianotti L, Chalk CL, Pyles T. The influence of dietary fiber on microbial growth in vitro and bacterial translocation after burn injury in mice. Nutr 1994;10(1):32-6. 96 Ochiai Y, Kanazawa Y. Chitosan as virucide. Jpn Kokai Tokkyo Koho 79 41,326. 97 Hillyard IW, Doczi J, Kiernan. Antacid and antiulcer properties of the polysaccharide Chitosan in the rat. Proc Soc Expl Biol Med 1964; 115:1108-1112. 98 Shibasaki K, Sano H, MatsukuboT, Takaesu Y. pH response of human dental plaque to chewing gum supplemented with low molecular Chitosan. Bull- Tokyo-Dent-Coll, 1994:35(2): 61-6. 99 Kato H, Okuda H. Chitosan as antihypertensive. Jpn. Kikoi Tokyo Koho JP 06 56,674 [94 56,674] 100 Kato H, Taguchi T. Mechanism of the rise in blood pressure by sodium chloride and decrease effect of Chitosan on blood pressure. Baiosaiensu to Indasutori 1993;51(12):987-8. 101 Muzzarelli R, Biagini G, Pugnaoni A, Filippini O, Baldassarre V, Castaldini C, and Rizzoli C. Reconstruction of Periodontal Tissue with Chitosan. Biomaterials. 1989;10:598-603. 102 Sapelli P, Baldassarre V, Muzzarelli R, Emanuelli M. Chitosan in Dentistry. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 103 Borah G, Scott G, Wortham K. Bone induction by Chitosan in endochrondral bones of the extremities. In Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 104 Ito F. Role of Chitosan as a supplementary food for osteoporosis. Gekkan Fudo Kemikaru, 1995;11(2):39-44. 105 Nakamura S, Yoshioka T, hamada S, Kimura I. Chitosan for enhancement of bioavailability of calcium. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 07 194,316 [95 194,316] 01 Aug 1995. 106 Maekawa A, Wada M. Food Containing chitin or its derivatives for reduction of blood and urine uric acid. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 03 280,852 [91 280,852], 11 Dec 1991. 107 Weisberg M, Gubner R. Compositions for oral administration comprising Chitosan and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Antacid preparations for alleviating gastric hyperacidity. U.S. patent 3257275 108 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Mechanism for the inhibition of fat digestion by Chitosan and for the synergistic effect of ascorbate. Biosci Biotech Biochem1995;59(5):786-90. 109 McCausland CW. Fat Binding Properties of Chitosan as Compared to Other Dietary Fibers. Private communication. 24 Jan1995. 110 Deuchi K, Kanauchi O, Imasato Y, Kobayashi E. Biosci Biotech Biochem. 1994:58,1613-6. 111 Ebihara K, Schneeman BO. Interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, cholesterol and triglyceride with dietary fibers in the small intestine of rats. J Nutr 1989;119(8):1100-6. 112 Weil A, M.D. Natural Health Natural Medicine: Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1990:182. 113 Chen Y-H, Riby Y, Srivastava P, Bartholomew J, Denison M, Bjeldanes L. Regualtion of CYP1A1 by indolo[3,2-b]carbazole in murine hepatoma cells. J Biol Chem 1995;270(38):22548-55. 114 Intestinal Absorption of metal ions and chelates. Ashmead HD, Graff DJ, Ashmead HH. Charles C Thomas, Springfield, IL 1985. 115 Nutrient Interactions. Bodwell CE, Erdman JW Jr. Marcel Dekker New York 1988. 116 Heleniak EP, Aston B. Prostaglandins, Brown Fat and Weight Loss. Medical Hypotheses 1989;28:13-33. 117 Connor WE, DeFrancesco CA, Connor SL. N-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Effects on plasma lipoproteins and hypertriglyceridemic patients. Ann NY Acad Sci 1993;683:16-34. 118 Conte AA. A non-prescription alternative in weight reduction therapy. The Bariatrician Summer 1993:17-19. 119 McCarty MF. Inhibition of citrate lyase may aid aerobic endurance. Unpublished manuscript. 120 Bray GA. Weight homeostasis. Annual Rev Med 1991;42:205-216. 121 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of Ephedrin/Methylxanthine mixtures: Human studies. Intl J Obesity 986;10:467-481. 122 Arai K, Kinumaki T, Fujita, T. Bulletin Tokai Regional Fisheries Res Lab. 1968;No. 56. 123 Bough WA. Private communication. 124 Freidrich EJ, Gehan, EA, Rall DP, Schmidt LH, Skipper HE. Cancer Chemotherapy Reports 1966;50(4):219-244. 125 A Drovanti, AA Bignamini, AL Rovati. Therapeutic activity of oral glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis: A placebo-controlled double-blind investigation. Clinical Therapeutics 1980;3(4):260-272. 126 K Deuchi, O Kanauchi, M Shizukuishi, E Kobayashi. Continuous and massive intake of Chitosan affects mineral and fat-soluble vitamin status in rats fed on a high-fat diet. Biosci. Biotech. Biochemistry. 1995;59(7):1211-6. 127 . BesChitin W in Chitin Wound Healing (video), Unitika Corporation, April 1992.

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    America's Most Wanted
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    Date: June 14, 2005 05:23 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: America's Most Wanted

    America's Most Wanted

    by Brian Amherst Energy Times, January 6, 2000

    The United States eats well, a little too well, according to experts. Amply supplied with a large supply of high-calorie food, our diets might seem to be chock full of every conceivable nutrient. Well, to the question "Getting all the right vitamins, minerals and other nutrients?" the most appropriate answer seems to be "Not exactly." Eating a lot doesn't equal eating a lot of the most important vitamins and minerals. So, which vitamins and minerals are likely to show up in short supply in the typical American diet? Calcium certainly sits at the top of list. According to the most recent Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, which is conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), women and girls age 12 and up are not consuming adequate calcium from their diet. Research reveals that about 1200 mg. day suffices for those over age 50 and 1000 mg a day should be adequate if you're between the ages of 19 and 50. Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Since strong bones are formed during "the first three decades of life," says Laura Bachrach, MD, of Stanford University, ". . .osteoporosis is a pediatric disease." For long-range protection against that bone-weakening disease, kids should eat calcium-rich, low-fat dairy products and plenty of leafy greens (broccoli, cabbage, kale) as well as salmon (with bones), seafood and soy. But the calcium campaign does not end in early adulthood. Bone mass begins to deteriorate at about age 30. Menopausal hormonal changes can exacerbate bone brittleness. Medical conditions, including cancer, liver disease and intestinal disorders; prescription drugs; tobacco and alcohol indulgence; or a decline in activity, especially the weight-bearing kind, also jeopardize bone strength. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, about one in every two American women will break a bone after age 50 due to osteoporosis. That translates into about half a million fractured vertebrae and more than 300,000 shattered hips. Frequently, those breaks are life-threatening.

    Crucial Calcium

    The critical role of calcium in many body functions is perhaps the most extensively clinically documented among nutrients. Researchers in the Department of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, reviewed epidemiological and clinical studies conducted over the past two years on the relationship between dietary calcium and blood pressure (J Am Coll Nutr October 1999: 398S-405S). "Nearly 20 years of investigation in this area has culminated in remarkable and compelling agreement in the data," the researchers report, "confirming the need for and benefit of regular consumption of the recommended daily levels of dietary calcium." Investigators at the State University of New York, Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, presented results of their studies of calcium and vitamin C and gum disease at the June 26, 1998 meeting of the International Association for Dental Research. Two separate inquiries revealed that people who consumed too little calcium as young adults, and those with low levels of vitamin C in their diets, appear to have nearly twice the risk of developing periodontal disease later in life than folks with higher dietary levels of either nutrient.

    Calcium: Much Documented Researchers offer extensive evidence of calcium's benefits on many fronts: n Osteoporosis poses a threat to older men as well as women, according to Randi L. Wolf, PhD, research associate at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Dr. Wolf presented her award-winning study to an October 3, 1999 meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Dr. Wolf suggests that men increase their consumption of calcium, particularly after age 80, to avoid age-related declines in the amount of calcium absorbed. According to Dr. Wolf, "It appears that the hormonal form of vitamin D, which is the main regulator of intestinal calcium absorption, may have an important role. We are conducting more research to better understand the reasons for why calcium absorption declines with age in men." n Scientists at Tufts University in Boston did some earlier work on the calcium-vitamin D connection and reported it in the September 4, 1997 New England Journal of Medicine. Using the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) increased recommended daily intake of 1200 milligrams of calcium and 400 to 600 international units of vitamin D for people over 50, the Tufts researchers found that with supplementation of the nutrients, men and women 65 and older lost significantly less body bone and, in some cases, gained bone mineral density. n Two studies published in American Heart Association journals show that atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be linked by a common problem in the way the body uses calcium. The September 1997 Stroke revealed that, in a group of 30 postmenopausal women 67 to 85 years old, bone mineral density declined as atherosclerotic plaque increased. Researchers reporting in Circulation (September 15, 1997) advanced the theory that the osteoporosis-atherosclerosis connection may be related to a problem in handling calcium. n For people who had colon polyps removed, taking calcium supplements decreased the number of new polyps by 24% and cut the risk of recurrence by 19%, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Medicine. The study, published in the January 14, 1999 New England Journal of Medicine, was a first in crediting calcium with anti-cancer properties.

    The D Factor

    Without adequate vitamin D, your absorption of calcium slips and bone loss can accelerate, increasing the risk for fractures. Fifty percent of women with osteoporosis hospitalized for hip fractures at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston had a previously undetected vitamin D deficiency (Journal of the American Medical Association, April 28, 1999). University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers told participants at the April 14, 1997 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research that vitamin D "significantly inhibits highly metastatic, or widespread, prostate cancer in animals," suggesting its potential for treating men with similar conditions. Few foods that Americans eat, except dairy, contain much vitamin D, but we can usually synthesize sufficient amounts from as few as five minutes' exposure to the sun. But as skin ages, its ability to act as a vitamin D factory decreases. According to Michael F. Holick, the director of the Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical Center, upwards of 40% of the adult population over age 50 that he sees in his clinic are deficient in vitamin D. Recently, the National Academy of Sciences (the official body that decrees the required amounts of necessary nutrients) increased the daily recommendations of vitamin D to 600 IU for people over 71, 400 IU for those aged 51 to 70 and 200 IU for people under 50. The best dietary sources, apart from dependable supplements, are dairy and fatty fish like salmon. Four ounces of salmon provide about 300 IU.

    The Facts About Fats

    The American lust for low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets filled with sugary foods has exploded into nothing short of "obsession," according to experts at the General Research Center at Stanford University Medical Center (Am J Clin Nutr 70, 1999: 512S-5S). That mania oftens robs us of the crucial balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids typical of the Mediterranean diet that protect us from heart disease by controlling cholesterol and making blood less likely to form clots. These fatty acids cannot be made by the body but are critical for health: n Omega-3 fatty acid (linolenic acid) comes from fresh, deepwater fish (salmon, mackerel, sardines) and vegetable oils such as canola, flaxseed and walnut. n Omega-6 fatty acid (linoleic acid) found primarily in raw nuts, seeds and legumes and in saturated vegetable oils such as borage, grape seed, primrose, sesame and soybean. The American Heart Association recommends limiting total fat consumption to 30% of daily calories. Saturated fats like those in dairy and meat products as well as vegetable oil should comprise 10% of total calories; total unsaturated fat (fish oils, soybean, safflower nuts and nut oils) should be restricted to 20 to 22% of daily calories.

    Be Sure About B12

    Vitamin B12 presents a particular problem for the elderly because older digestive systems often don't secrete enough stomach acid to liberate this nutrient from food. (The elderly have no problem absorbing B12 from supplements, because it's not bound to food.) Vitamins generally moderate the aging process but, ironically, that process and the diseases that frequently accompany it affect vitamin metabolism (Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax 83, 1994: 262-6). And because of those changes, we need more of certain vitamins. This is the case for vitamins D, B6, riboflavin and B12. Crucial for health, B12 is necessary to prevent anemia, and, according to recent studies, needed (along with folate and B6) to help stave off heart disease. B12, with thiamine and niacin, boosts cognition (Adv Nutr Res 7, 1985: 71-100). Screening for vitamin B12 deficiency and thyroid disease is cheap and easy and can prevent conditions such as dementia, depression or irreversible tissue damage (Lakartidningen 94, 1997: 4329-32). In the January 5-12, 1999 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, the AHA urged doctors to screen levels of homocysteine (the amino acid byproduct of protein digestion that damages arteries, causes heart disease and, possibly, strokes) in patients at high risk for heart disease. They also recommended all Americans to up their daily levels of vitamins B6 and B12, as well as folic acid. Since fruits, vegetables or grains lack B12, vegetarians need B12 supplements. And they're a good idea for the rest of us, too.

    Folic Acid Benefits

    Folic acid made headlines in the early 1990s when the U.S. Public Health Service declared that "to reduce the frequency of neural tube defects [spina bifida, or open spine, and anencephaly, a lethal defect of the brain and skull] and their resulting disability, all women of childbearing age in the United States who are capable of becoming pregnant should consume .4 milligrams (400 micrograms) of folic acid per day." This recommendation followed voluminous research that showed taking folic acid was associated with a significantly reduced risk of birth defects. (The advisory is based on the fact that nearly half of all pregnancies are unplanned. If you think you are pregnant, consult your health practitioner for supplementary advice.)

    A Team Player

    Folic acid's efficacy intensifies when it works with other nutrients. Among many studies on the preventive powers of folic acid on birth defects, one published in The New England Journal of Medicine (327, Dec. 24, 1992: 1,832-1,835), disclosed an even greater decrease in neural tube defects when supplements of folic acid contained copper, manganese, zinc and vitamin C. As a warrior against homocysteine, folic acid joins the battalion of B12 and B6 in detoxifying this harmful protein. At the University of Washington's Northwest Prevention Effectiveness Center, researchers recently analyzed 38 published studies of the relationship between folic acid, homocysteine and cardiovascular disease and, according to associate professor Shirley A. Beresford, MD, folic acid and vitamin B12 and B6 deficiencies can lead to a buildup of homocysteine.

    Compelling Evidence

    Canadian researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (275, 1996: 1893-1896) that men and women with low folic acid have a 69% increase in the risk of fatal coronary heart disease. This 15-year study of more than 5,000 people stressed the need for dietary supplementation of folic acid. Folic acid also has been credited with the potential to protect against cancers of the lungs, colon and cervix. It appears to help reverse cervical dysplasia, the precursor cells to cervical cancer, especially for women taking oral contraceptives, which may cause a localized deficiency of folic acid in the cells of the cervix. According to Shari Lieberman, PhD, and Nancy Bruning, authors of The Real Vitamin & Mineral Book (Avery), folic acid derivatives work with neurotransmitters, the chemicals that permit signals to be sent from nerve fiber to nerve fiber. A lack of folic acid can cause some nervous-system disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia and dementia; it also may be related to some forms of mental retardation. Other supporting roles of folic acid, according to researchers: the formation of normal red blood cells, important for preventing the type of anemia characterized by oversized red blood cells; strengthening and improving white blood cell action against disease; limiting production of uric acid, the cause of gout.

    The Best Sources

    Many foods are rich in folic acid: beef, lamb, pork and chicken liver, spinach, kale and beet greens, asparagus, broccoli, whole wheat and brewer's yeast. But experts believe that only 25 to 50% of the folic acid in food is bioavailable. Processing also reduces an estimated 50 to 90% of its content. Folic acid supplementation overcomes these obstacles with little risk, as it has no known toxicity. Women taking folic acid who are current or former users of oral contraceptives may require additional zinc. And be sure to augment your folic acid supplement with its synergistic counterpart, vitamin B12.

    Focus on Fiber

    The American Heart Association came out squarely behind fiber in a June 16, 1997 issue of its journal Circulation: Double your daily intake to lower cholesterol and the risk of heart disease. The American diet is consistently low in fiber, notes Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD, author of the article. Twenty-five to 30 grams a day from foods (or supplements) are not only heart healthy but seem to aid weight control.

    Iron Problem

    Getting enough iron? An estimated 25% of adolescent girls in the United States are iron deficient, according to an October 12, 1996 issue of the British medical journal The Lancet, which reported that girls who took iron supplements performed significantly better on verbal tests than those who took a placebo. "Teenage girls should be regularly tested for iron deficiency because rapid growth and the onset of menstruation during puberty increase the body's need for iron," says Ann Bruner, MD, of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and a lead author of the study.USDA data reveal that women up to age 50 also tend to get much less than recommended levels of iron, a lack of which leads to anemia, a deficiency of red blood cells, hemoglobin or volume of blood. For kids, deficiency is more common from six months to four years and during the rapid growth spurts of adolescence when the body is growing so quickly that the body's iron stores may sink to dangerous levels. Vegetarian women run the greatest risk for deficiency, as meat is iron-rich; foods like beans, grains and vegetables also contain some iron. Supplements, of course, supply easily absorbable iron. And to absorb iron from vegetarian sources, take vitamin C with your meals. That boosts the amount of this mineral you will take in. Bear in mind, however, that certain folks-older men and post-menopausal women-generally have adequate dietary supplies of iron. Of greater concern, in fact, is excessive iron, and for these folks iron-free multivitamin and mineral supplements are available.

    Ante Up the Antioxidants

    Antioxidant nutrients help protect the body from oxygen-scavenging molecules called free radicals. The products of pollution, the body's own metabolic processes and other sources, free radicals are linked to heart disease, cancer and other chronic health problems. The most important antioxidants, which include vitamin C, E, beta carotene, and selenium, are often lacking in the American diet. Plus, optimal amounts of vitamin E cannot be consumed from food. You need supplements. The bottom line: even though we live in a land of plenty, you can still miss vital nutrients. So make sure to consume these vital substances.

    Sprouts: Nutritional

    Source of Missing Nutrients In the search for the nutrients missing from America's diet, one big help is the sprout. The sprout is truly one of nature's heavyweights: fresh, tiny and moist, its power punch of vitamins, minerals, protein, chlorophyll and disease-busting phytochemicals land it in a weight class far beyond that of its full-grown competitors. Size does NOT matter to this nutritional giant. A championship belt currently wraps around the miniscule broccoli sprout, catapulted into the ring by Paul Talalay, MD, professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Talalay discovered that the seedlings contain substantially more of the cancer-fighting substance sulforaphane than mature plants (Proc. Natnl. Acad. Sci. USA, 94, 10367-10372). Sprouts, the quintessential health food of the Sixties, provide a wonderfully varied and versatile way to get your daily greens. Raw or cooked, strong or mild, vegetable and grass sprouts and their algae cousins add low-calorie texture to recipes and a rich, diverse complement of nutrients and fiber.

    Ancient Asia to the Modern Lab

    Asians stir-fried sprouts as one of the earliest fast foods as long as 5,000 years ago. The ancient Chinese relied on sprouts for year-round vegetables in colder regions of their vast country. Today, researchers studying sprouts and adult plants have identified their important chemoprotective and other health-bolstering substances. In Paul Talalay's research project at Johns Hopkins, scientists found that three-day-old broccoli sprouts contain up to 50 times more sulforaphane than mature plants, which prompts the body to produce an enzyme that prevents cancer tumors from forming. Uniform levels of the compound saturate the shoots, unlike the chemically uneven adult plants. The Brassica family of broccoli and cabbage is richly endowed with phytochemicals that also help reduce estrogen levels associated with breast cancer. Other phytochemical compounds in the Brassica family are associated with the prevention of stomach and lung cancers. Most of the initial landmark work on phytochemicals' cancer-fighting powers has taken place since 1989 under the aegis of the National Cancer Institute's "Designer Food Program," which isolated, for example, the isoflavones in beans that seem to neutralize cancer-gene enzymes.

    Strong Suit: Soy and Spirulina

    The isoflavones and phytosterols in soy produce an estrogenic effect that appears to relieve menopausal symptoms and help prevent breast cancer. Soy foods expert Mark Messina, PhD, has done extensive work on the subject, some of which has been published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute 83, 1991: 541-6. Researchers also have synthesized a bone-strengthening form of soy isoflavones called ipriflavone, following impressive clinical trials in the treatment of osteoporosis (American Journal of Medicine, 95 [Suppl. 5A] (1993): 69S-74S). Spirulina and other micro-algae are fascinating organisms that inhabit a niche between the plant and animals kingdoms. Named for its tiny spirals, spirulina, a blue-green algae, grows in saline lakes but is cultured for maximum nutritional content. In her book Whole Foods Companion (Chelsea Green), Dianne Onstad notes that spirulina contains "the highest sources of protein, beta carotene and nucleic acids of any animal or plant food." Its nucleic acids, she says, benefit cellular regeneration; its fatty acids, especially GLA and omega-3 acids, make it one of the most complete foods. Sprouts, like any other produce, should be rinsed thoroughly before serving. People at high risk for bacterial illness-young children, the very elderly or folks with weakened immune systems-should limit their consumption of raw sprouts. But no matter how you eat them, you may find more spring in your step from these tiny, sprouting nutritional wonders.



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    Vitanet ®

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    Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly
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    Date: June 14, 2005 11:18 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

    Fats: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly by Thomas Sherman Energy Times, October 15, 2004

    We need fat to absorb vitamins, to keep our brains sharp, to survive. But not all fats are our friends. Find out which ones are the heroes and the villains in your diet.

    In a lot of cases health fads don't live up to their hype. But the case for consuming more good fats-the omega-3 fatty acids found primarily in fish, flax and hemp oils-is strong and growing stronger. As a nation we eat too little of these good fats, and our health would improve greatly if we relied a little less on the bad saturated fat in burgers, skipped the ugly trans fats in fries and indulged in more salmon and other seafoods.

    Fish and the Heart

    Need proof? A wealth of research supports fish oil's desirable effects, especially on heart health. While many people believe that heart disease is primarily a problem for men, women who have passed through menopause are just as susceptible to heart problems.

    " [Our] findings suggest that all women, and most likely men, would benefit from regular fish intake," says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston. "A tuna fish sandwich counts, as does almost any other type of fish that is baked, broiled, grilled, or poached." But she points out that fried fish, which is often cooked in hydrogenated oils, is not helpful.

    In research on more than 200 women, performed at the Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts, scientists found that the arterial blockages among women who dined on fish were less (and impeded blood flow less) than in women who hardly ever ate seafood. Fish was especially helpful for women who had diabetes, a disease that makes you more prone to heart and circulation problems (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 9/04).

    These effects are important: Heart disease is the number one cause of death for women, and older women who suffer from diabetes are particularly susceptible. The number of people with diabetes has been increasing of late, mainly due to the fact that Americans are overweight. Right now about 18 million people have diabetes and another 20 million are expected to suffer this condition in the next four decades.

    " This study shows that following the current guidelines of eating at least two servings of any type of fish per week slows down the progression of heart disease in women with coronary artery disease (CAD), especially those who were also diabetic," says Dr. Lichtenstein, coauthor of the study. "We further found that eating one or more servings per week of fish that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as tuna or other dark-fleshed fish, is equally effective."

    Dangerous disruptions in heartbeat, known as arrhythmias, may also be affected by fish oil. "[E]xperiments show that fatty acids from omega-3 fish oils are stored in the cell membranes of heart cells and can prevent sudden cardiac death or fatal arrhythmias," notes Alexander Leaf, MD, medical researcher and professor at Harvard University.

    Fat for Your Brain

    The right kind of fat is also crucial for the function of your nerves and brain tissue, which is 60% to 70% fat. Incorporating omega-3 fatty acids into those cells can help keep your brain firing on all synapses. It may lower your risk of Alzheimer's disease, an irreversible form of mental deterioration that kills 100,000 Americans a year. About a thousand people a day in the US are found to have Alzheimer's, and experts believe that over the next 40 years 14 million of us will be doomed to being enveloped by the mental fog this condition produces.

    Research indicates that our brains probably need omega-3 fats for protection against the kind of damage that causes our mental capacities to slip. Once Alzheimer's starts, deterioration accelerates because brain cells start losing these fats.

    In experiments performed at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA (Neuron 9/2/04), scientists looked at how a lack of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, one of the omega-3 fats found in fish), affected the cellular processes that lead to Alzheimer's. They found that the part of brain cells that receive signals from other brain cells, the receptors, are vulnerable to damage from chemical reactions that take place inside the cells. However, DHA offers antioxidant protection against this destruction.

    When brain cells were denied DHA, the cells' receptors suffered extra harm. But when fish oil was present, brain cells were protected. In addition, animals that received extra omega-3s were better able to learn and find their way through mazes.

    Greg Cole, PhD, senior researcher on this study and a professor of neurology at Geffen, says, "We saw that a diet rich in DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, dramatically reduces the impact of the Alzheimer's gene [which made the animals more susceptible to Alzheimer's]. Consuming more DHA is something the average person can easily control. Anyone can buy DHA in its purified form, fish-oil capsules, high-fat fish or DHA-supplemented eggs." Fishes rich in omega-3s include salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines and herring.

    Protecting Kids from Asthma

    A surprising benefit of omega-3s has been found in pregnant women and their newborns: Pregnant women with asthma who eat fish rich in omega-3s during their pregnancy lower their children's risk of asthma.

    Not just any fish will do. The study (American Thoracic Society International Conference 5/25/04) discovered that mothers who ate fish sticks during pregnancy doubled the asthma risk in their kids. " Fish sticks are deep-fried, and they contain omega-6 fatty acids, which encourage inflammation of the airways," says study co-author Frank Gilliland, MD, PhD, professor at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Oily fish [like salmon and trout] contain omega-3 fatty acids, which appear to be anti-inflammatory, and lead to the reduced potential for developing asthma and allergies."

    The USC investigation showed that when women with asthma ate oil-bearing fish during pregnancy, the risk of asthma for their children dropped more than 70%. The more fish that mom consumed, the less likely her baby was to develop asthma. Unfortunately, the study did not find the same benefit in women without asthma.

    " A family history of asthma is a very strong risk factor for a child developing asthma," Dr. Gilliland says. "It appears that oily fish interacts with the genes involved in the predisposition to develop asthma, and somehow reduces the risk."

    Although most of us try to avoid accumulating unsightly fat around our hips, the right kind of fat plays an integral part in the functioning of our bodies and may even keep us alive. Fats don't get much better than that.



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    Keeping Your Edge - The state of your outer body reflects the inner you.
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    Date: June 12, 2005 05:22 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Keeping Your Edge - The state of your outer body reflects the inner you.

    Keeping Your Edge by Carl Lowe Energy Times, December 2, 2003

    If you want to keep your mental edge, better keep your physical edge. As your body goes, so goes your brain: The state of your outer body reflects the inner you.

    A flabby body leads to flabby thinking. Weight gain and toneless muscles on the outside are evidence of an out-of-tune brain and thinking processes as soft around the edges as your stomach. But staying in shape physically can boost your mental powers.

    As you age, one of the biggest threats to keeping your thoughts sharp is Alzheimer's disease, a progressive brain deterioration (dementia) that destroys your memory and your ability to think.

    Today, about 4.5 million Americans suffer Alzheimer's disease. Over a lifetime, the average cost per person suffering this disease adds up to a staggering $175,000. Consequently, according to the Alzheimer's Association (www.alz.org), this disease drains approximately a billion dollars a year from the US economy.

    Thanks to an aging population and the growing girth of Americans, the rate of Alzheimer's threatens to explode into an epidemic over the next two decades.

    Experts now believe that if you are carrying around too much weight, those extra pounds puts you at a higher risk of losing your thinking abilities. And being seriously overweight greatly expands your chances of developing this debilitating type of dementia.

    An 18-year study of about 400 people in Sweden, all aged 70 at the beginning of the research, concluded that your chances of suffering dementia significantly increases with every extra pound (Archives for Internal Medicine 7/03).

    Cholesterol Conquers Minds

    In addition to the extra risk to your thinking capacity from body fat, having high levels of cholesterol in your blood also threatens your brain's ability to reason. Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found that:

    * Excess amounts of cholesterol can lead to accumulation of APP, a protein found normally in moderate amounts in both the brain and the heart.

    * Excess APP linked to cholesterol can, in turn, lead to the development of larger amounts of a substance called amyloid protein.

    * Pieces of amyloid protein can form plaque on the brain, destroying cells and leading to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

    "Past research has shown that high cholesterol levels appear to increase APP levels, which in turn leads to increased levels of beta amyloid protein and the risk of accumulation of amyloid beta peptide," says Vassilios Papadopoulos, PhD, professor of cell biology at Georgetown. "Our research showed that high cholesterol levels also increase the rate at which the amyloid beta peptides break off and form the tangles that kill brain cells." Added to that, the Georgetown scientists have demonstrated that high cholesterol seems to cause the body to boost its production of the protein, apolipoprotein E (APOE), a chemical that normally helps take cholesterol out of cells. But when APOE accumulates, this chemical leads to an excess of free cholesterol, which kills nerve cells.

    "Our study adds to the growing body of evidence implicating high cholesterol as a significant risk factor in Alzheimer's disease, and breaks new ground in showing the damage caused by excessive levels of cholesterol," says Dr. Papadopoulos.

    Since high blood pressure also increases your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (BMJ 6/14/01), devoting yourself to a heart-healthy lifestyle (eating plenty of fiber, cutting back on saturated fat in red meat and avoiding trans fats in cookies and cakes) can increase your chances of keeping your wits about you as you move through life.

    Brain Food

    As part of that heart-healthy lifestyle that keeps your brain functioning at top capacity, experts recommend regular helpings of omega-3 fatty acids, the type of fats found in fish, flax and hemp.

    In research that focused on people between the ages of 65 to 94, researchers have found that eating seafood at least once a week drops your risk of Alzheimer's by about 60% compared with folks who forego fish (Archives of Neurology 7/03).

    Along with fish, the scientists recommended munching more nuts, which are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    In the report on the relationship between eating and Alzheimer's, Robert Friedland, MD, of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, noted: "A high antioxidant/low saturated fat diet pattern with a greater amount of fish, chicken, fruits and vegetables and less red meat and dairy products is likely to lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease, as that for heart disease and stroke."

    Wake Up Your Brain

    If your thinking has been fuzzy lately, take a nap.

    Getting enough sleep right after you learn something new helps maintain your learning abilities, according to research at the University of Chicago. In a test of how sleep can help people remember words and language, these researchers taught students to recognize a unique vocabulary spoken by a machine. After the learning session, students were then tested on their new abilities.

    The scientists found that students trained in the morning tested poorly when tested later the same evening. But when students were trained right before bedtime and then tested the next morning, their test scores soared (Nature 9/9/03).

    "Sleep has at least two separate effects on learning," according to the researchers. "Sleep consolidates memories, protecting them against subsequent interference or decay. Sleep also appears to 'recover' or restore memories."

    The concept of this research originated in observations of birds.

    "We were surprised several years ago to discover that birds apparently 'dream of singing' and this might be important for song learning," says researcher Daniel Margoliash, professor of biology and anatomy at the University of Chicago.

    While you may not dream of singing like a bird, you may dream of having a sharper intellect. Luckily, the tools for sharpening your mental powers are easy to find and put to good use: Methods for keeping your brain in shape are basically the same techniques effective for keeping your body and heart in shape.

    Pleasant dreams!



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    Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin
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    Date: June 06, 2005 08:45 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin

    Skin Eternal

    Source Naturals is proud to introduce our new SKIN ETERNAL Cosmetic Line. Our advanced skin care products recharge and revitalize your skin. Each product features scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin. You can nourish your skin with Source Naturals’ richly emollient SKIN ETERNAL CREAM smoothed under your eyes or on your neck. Or use our light, aqueous SKIN ETERNAL SERUM. Both products gently addresses imbalances and infuse skin with visible radiance. For a luxuriant, moisturizing bath, simply add SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL under warm running water. Whatever your individual preference, Source Naturals has a SKIN ETERNAL product that will leave your skin looking refreshed and energized.

    Now available from Source Naturals®: a variety of elegant cosmetics to moisturize, smooth and tone your skin.

    Your skin is a reflection of your health and well-being. To attain skin that looks truly alive, energized and refreshed, we believe a holistic approach is necessary. This includes nourishing your body with fresh, organic foods, exercising every day to motivate your mind and spirit, and eliminating unhealthy lifestyle choices. As part of this holistic approach, the Skin Eternal™ cosmetic line feeds your skin cells with scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ CREAM

    Apply this rich and luxurious blend under and around your eyes or massage it with upward strokes onto your neck—your skin will immediately feel the difference! SKIN ETERNAL CREAM features nutrients, natural oils and plant extracts. Included are alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, jojoba oil, MSM, squalane, tocotrienols, and vitamin C-ester, as well as extracts of grape seed, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, sage, marigold, and grapefruit seed.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ SERUM

    SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is an aqueous moisturizing serum that contains a rich blend of nutrients and plant extracts. It is easily absorbed, and immediately makes skin feel softer and replenished. SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils, and contains nutrients and herbs unavailable in other topical preparations. These include aloe vera, alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, MSM, vitamins A, C-ester, D-3 and E, and chamomile. Source Naturals also offers SKIN ETERNAL DMAE SERUM.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ BATH OIL

    OUR NEW SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL adds to your skin’s hydrolipic film, lightly coating your skin with nutrients. It holds moisture inside and protects your skin. Its unique formula is rich in alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, essential fatty acids, vitamins C-ester and E, plus other nutrients and plant extracts. SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils. And it is hypoallergenic and contains no alpha hydroxy acids—so it can be used even on delicate, sensitive skin.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Skin: A Strategy for WellnessSM

    Eat a Healthy Diet Low-nutrient foods, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates, will not provide the vitamins and minerals your skin needs. Choose unprocessed organic foods, high in antioxidants such as beta carotene (carrots, apricots, and squash), vitamin C (oranges and peppers), vitamin E (cold-pressed oils, nuts and seeds), selenium (tuna, garlic, onions and broccoli) and zinc (whole grains, most seafood, and onions). Essential fatty acids, such as those in oily fish, flaxseed and olive oil, are important for skin repair. Eat high-fiber fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals, and brown rice. Restrict excess sodium intake.

    Take Supplements

    Key nutraceuticals can help radiate beauty from within, by supporting body systems involved with healthy, radiant skin. These nutraceuticals include alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, ascorbyl palmitate (vitamin C-ester), vitamin E and grapeseed extract. Source Naturals offers you SKIN ETERNAL™ tablets with these five ingredients, to protect against free radical damage and provide cofactors for healthy skin tissue. Source Naturals SKIN ETERNAL PLUS is a Bio-Aligned Formula™, which includes these key nutraceuticals plus 30 more! It is designed to support multiple body systems: antioxidant defense, connective tissue, cell membranes, cell renewal, blood and liver cleansing, muscle and nerve function, and stress response. It is also useful to supplement with essential fatty acids, such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, flaxseed and primrose oil.

    Drink Water

    Our bodies are made up of 50-70% water, so it’s important to drink at least 1.5 liters daily. Water flushes out wastes, and acts as an internal moisturizer, keeping skin hydrated and supple. Spring water is beneficial since it contains trace minerals vital to healthy skin.

    Protect Your Skin from the Sun

    Avoid direct sun from 10 am to 4 pm, when ultraviolet radiation is strongest. Use sunscreen even during winter and on cloudy days. Wear a broad-brimmed hat and sunglasses with full UV protection.

    Get Plenty of Sleep

    Research has shown that skin regenerates itself between 1-3 am; lack of sleep during those hours can cause skin to look dull or puffy. Taking a melatonin supplement can be helpful in supporting your body’s normal sleep cycle.

    Exercise Regularly

    Exercise increases circulation, which delivers nutrients necessary for a clear, glowing complexion. It also burns off fat, helps eliminate toxins, and is a great stress reliever. Exercise three to five times a week until you are perspiring freely and breathing deeply.

    Avoid Excessive Alcohol and Coffee

    Alcohol weakens the immune system and depletes nutrients. It causes dehydration, depriving skin of moisture, and overtaxes the liver, which helps keep impurities from reaching other organs. Alcohol consumption can lead to broken or distended capillaries, especially over the nose and cheeks. Caffeine-rich beverages like coffee promote dehydration, leaving skin flaky and dry. Substitute herbal or green tea for coffee.

    Stop Smoking

    Smoking slows healing and regeneration, causes carbon monoxide to increase in blood, and induces free radical formation. Nicotine constricts blood vessels and reduces blood flow to skin. The benzopyrene in cigarette smoke inhibits absorption of vitamin C, which is important for collagen synthesis.



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    Prosta Response - Supports Prostate Function and Healthy Urine Flow
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    Date: June 04, 2005 01:56 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Prosta Response - Supports Prostate Function and Healthy Urine Flow

    Bookstores are filled with it, news magazines are reporting on it. From the revelations of politicians to disturbing statistical reports, prostate health issues that formerly received little notice are now in the headlines. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located under the bladder and surrounding the urinary tract in men. Many factors affect prostate wellness, including aging and individual genetic history, but today’s chemicalized environment poses unprecedented challenges to the health of the prostate gland. Source Naturals is helping to meet this challenge with PROSTA-RESPONSE, a Bio-Aligned Formula™ designed to support multiple, interdependent body systems. It is the only prostate formula that addresses six body systems involved with healthy prostate function.

    More than Symptoms*, Systems PROSTA-RESPONSE is a unique formula that combines clinically tested potencies of saw palmetto extract and beta sitosterol with standardized Swedish flower pollen extract, quercetin, lyopene, soy and additional herbs and nutrients. PROSTA-RESPONSE goes beyond formulas that simply address nutritional symptoms and instead deals with underlying causes. PROSTARESPONSE supports healthy prostate function and urine flow by addressing the following body systems:

    1. Hormone regulation: Hormones have a direct role in prostate functioning and have been closely linked to prostate health. PROSTA-RESPONSE contains specific plant extracts and nutrients shown in research to inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and the subsequent binding to receptors within the prostate.

    2. Prostate cell regeneration: Swedish flower pollen extract, used extensively in Europe and Asia for more than 40 years, has demonstrated significant effects in maintaining proper prostate cell regeneration.

    3. Soothing mechanisms: Certain plant compounds, such as flavonoids from soy and sterols from pollen extract, inhibit the metabolism of arachidonic acid. This in turn influences prostaglandin synthesis, which may be associated with comfort levels.

    4. Bladder and urinary tract health: A healthy environment within the bladder and urinary tract is vital for prostate health and normal urine flow. PROSTARESPONSE contains botanicals that support the bladder and urinary tract health.

    5. Prostate health: Studies show that dietary factors influence the overall health of the prostate. The body naturally concentrates certain compounds in higher amounts in the prostate. These include zinc, vitamin E and soy isoflavones.

    6. Antioxidant defense: Antioxidants play an important role in maintaining prostate function and cell membrane integrity. Oxidative stress, or the action of free radicals, is confirmed as a significant factor that can trigger a host of destructive processes.

    Developing a Prostate-Friendly Lifestyle

    Supplementation is only one part of an individual’s Strategy for WellnessSM. That’s why Source Naturals® is committed to providing public education about the many aspects of a prostate-healthy lifestyle.

    Less Fat, More Fiber, Lots of Veggies

    Studies suggest a direct relationship between dietary fat and prostate health, with men whose diets consist of 30%-40% or more fat at highest risk. Saturated fats, especially from animal sources, are most problematic. Some research has attributed this relationship to the effect animal fats have on excess levels of circulating sex hormones. Prostate health is also associated with high fiber intake. This may be because dietary fiber binds testosterone, estradiol and other sex steroids and helps eliminate excess hormones, Five to nine servings of high-fiber fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains (35 g) are recommended daily for prostate health. Tomato-based foods are rich in the carotenoid, lycopene, which is a potent antioxidant, helping to protect our cells and fatty tissues from free radical damage. A long-term study at Harvard School of Medicine found beneficial effects from 10 servings of tomato products weekly, while recent clinical research points to an intake of 15 mg of lycopene twice per day. Also helpful are green and yellow-orange vegetables, which contain compounds that are converted to vitamin A; citrus fruits that contain vitamin C; nuts and seeds that contain vitamin E; zinc-containing seafood, legumes and eggs; and selenium-rich whole grains, seafood and organ meats. Studies show a correlation between prostate health and diets that contain large amounts of soy. Soybeans contain prostate-healthy phytoestrogens, including the isoflavone, genistein. Some experts suggest eating seven servings of soy protein per week (providing 10 g of soy protein and 20 mg of isoflavones daily) for general good health, and three times that amount for more targeted protection.

    Drink Healthy

    Dehydration stresses the prostate gland. It is important to consume plenty of water—about eight glasses per day. Plain water is best, but you can also drink highly diluted fruit juice, herbal tea or lightly flavored sparkling water. Green tea is beneficial for prostate health, due to certain antioxidant compounds called polyphenols. You can reduce the frequency of nighttime trips to the bathroom by eliminating fluids a few hours before you go to sleep. You may find it more comfortable to spread out your intake, taking small sips of fluids over the course of the day.

    Exercise

    Good circulation is important for prostate health. Regular walking is excellent in this regard. “Kegel” exercises— a series of contractions of the muscles around the prostate—are helpful for improving circulation and tonicity of the genital area.

    Supplementation

    Supplementation tailored to prostate wellness would focus on the vitamins and minerals described above—in addition to nourishing our body systems, many are also antioxidants, helping to counter the free radical damage that is rampant in our chemicalized environment. The program would also include specific herbs found to support prostate function, especially saw palmetto, pygeum, and pumpkin seeds.

    First Bio-Aligned Formula for the Prostate Gland!

    PROSTA-RESPONSE is the first prostate support formula designed to work holistically, by addressing the multiple systems that affect prostate higher amounts in the prostate. health. Try Source Naturals PROSTA-RESPONSE, available in bottles of 45 and 90 tablets.

    PROSTA-RESPONSE™: A Bio-Aligned Formula™ Multi-System Support for the Prostate Gland

    Hormonal Regulation: Nettle, Pygeum, Red Clover, Saw Palmetto, Soy, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Zinc, Vitamin D-3

    Prostate Cellular Regeneration: Lycopene, Nettle, Quercetin, Red Clover, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Vitamin D-3

    Soothing Mechanisms: Prostaglandin Synthesis Beta Sitosterol, Pygeum, Quercetin, Red Clover Saw Palmetto, Soy, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract

    Bladder & Urinary Tract Health: Alanine, Glutamic Acid, Glycine, Goldenseal, Gravel Root, Marshmallow Root, Pumpkin Seed, Pygeum, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Uva Ursi

    Prostate Health: Red Clover, Soy, Zinc, Vitamin E

    Antioxidant Defense: Ginkgo Biloba, Grape Seed, Green Tea, Lycopene, Pygeum, Quercetin, Red Clover, Soy, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Selenium, Zinc, Vitamin E

    References
    Buck, A.C. 1996. Phytotherapy for the prostate. Brit J Urol 78:325-336. Morton, M.S. et al. Lignans and isoflavonoids in plasma and prostatic fluid in men: samples from Portugal, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom. Prostate 32:122-128. Morton, M.S. et al. 1996. The preventative role of diet in prostatic…Brit J Urol 77:481-493. Wilt, T.J. et al. 1998. Saw palmetto extracts…a systematic review. JAMA 280:1604-1609 Yasumoto, M.D. et al. Jan-Feb 1995. Clinical evaluation of long-term treatment using …pollen extract…Clin Ther 17(1):82-87.

  • *The term symptom as used in this literature refers to the effects of nutrient imbalances and shortages, and is not related to the diagnosis, treatment, cure, or prevention of any disease.



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    OptiZinc - The king of Zinc ...
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    Date: June 04, 2005 10:43 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: OptiZinc - The king of Zinc ...

    Source Naturals brings you yet another breakthrough in mineral nutrition: OptiZinc! Opti Zinc is Zinc Monomethionine — Zinc combined with the essential amino acid Methionine. It is FDA approved as safe for human nutrition, and is so unique, it’s patented.

    Opti Zinc — THE MOST POTENT FORM OF ZINC AVAILABLE Extensive scientific research shows that Opti Zinc is the most bioavailable and bioactive form of Zinc tested.1 Aside from demonstrating superior absorption and utilization by the body for Zinc’s many functions, Opti zinc is also more efficient than other forms of Zinc in getting needed Vitamin A out of storage in the liver, thus making it available for use.2 Perhaps most outstanding is the synergy offered by this combination of Zinc and Methionine: while both of these nutrients are well-known for their freeradical- neutralizing properties, the antioxidant activity of Opti Zinc far surpasses that of either Zinc or Methionine alone. ZINC — ESSENTIAL

    FOR YOUR HEALTH

    Zinc is one of the most important minerals your body uses. Among its many functions, Zinc is: ? critical for the health of the thymus gland, which is necessary for the natural defenses, as demonstrated in recent research by Nicola Fabris, Ph.D., director of the Gerontology Research Department of the Italian National Research Center on Aging in Ancona, Italy;3

  • ? important for skin health and wound-healing;
  • ? essential for carbohydrate metabolism; and
  • ? necessary for over 100 different enzyme systems, which are vital for proper vision, growth, skeletal integrity, tissue repair, sexual maturity, and reproductive capacity, as well as many other important functions. These enzyme systems also include critical antioxidant systems, such as catalase and SOD. Antioxidant systems are important for neutralizing free radicals, which could otherwise damage the body’s cells. A sign of Zinc’s importance is that just over three ounces of colostrum (the first human breast milk to be generated following childbirth) provides 70 to 900 mg of Zinc!

    DO YOU GET ENOUGH ZINC IN YOUR DIET?

    As vital as Zinc is, it can be hard to get enough of, even when following a healthy diet. Surveys show that the daily intake of Zinc in the average American diet ranges from 8 to 11 mg, yet the U.S. RDA is 15 mg. The few excellent sources include seafoods (such as oysters, herring, and clams), whole oatmeal, wheat germ, wheat bran, and milk.4 If some of these are not a regular part of your diet, you may be one of many people who are Zinc deficient, and you may want to use a dietary supplement.

    SOURCE NATURALS™ — Opti Zinc THE SUPPLEMENT OF CHOICE One Source Naturals’ Opti Zinc tablet provides 30 mg of Zinc (from 150 mg Opti Zinc Zinc Monomethionine), which is 200% of the U.S. RDA for Zinc. 300 mcg of the essential mineral Copper is also included, to offset the displacement of Copper that can occur when high levels of Zinc are consumed. The form of Copper used is also state-of-the-art: it is Copper Sebacate, a natural compound that is Copper:SOD-mimetic, meaning that even on its own, it can act as an antioxidant. Its inclusion with Zinc Monomethionine makes Source Naturals’ OptiZinc a powerful antioxidant combination that is truly on the cutting edge of nutrition science.

    OPTI ZINC® brand of Zinc Monomethionine complex is a trademark of InterHealth Company; U.S. Patents Nos. 3,941,818, 4,021,569, & 4,764,633. Source Naturals’ OPTI ZINC® is all-Vegetarian and hypoallergenic: contains no yeast, dairy, corn, soy or wheat. Contains no sugar, starch, salt, preservatives, or artificial color, flavor or fragrance.

    References:
    1. Spears, J. (1989). “Zinc Methionine for Ruminants: Relative Bioavailability of Zinc in Lambs…” Journal of Animal Science. 67(3):835-843.
    2. Pullman, et al. “WSU Research: Zinc Methionine Increases ß-Carotene, Vitamin A Levels.” Washington State University. Unpublished.
    3. McAuliffe, K. (1990). “Eat for Life.” Longevity. 12:18-19.
    4. Pfeiffer, C. Mental and Elemental Nutrients (pp. 241-242). ©1975 by Keats Publishing, Inc.: New Canaan, CT.



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    Male Response - Re-align your body systems ...
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    Date: June 03, 2005 12:00 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Male Response - Re-align your body systems ...

    Male Response

    Between 10 and 15 million American men experience challenges to libido and sexual performance, according to the National Institutes of Health. Fatigue, stress, inactivity and an unhealthy diet can result in decreased vigor and desire. In addition, the normal aging process may result in a slowing of response, according to the National Institute on Aging. MALE RESPONSE is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ that helps bring alignment to a range of interrelated body systems that can negatively impact male sexual function: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.

    Bio-Aligned Formula™

    MALE RESPONSE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula that supports the multiple, interconnected systems involved with male sexual function.

    Hormonal Function

    Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the male sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. MALE RESPONSE contains herbs and nutrients that may support hormonal function, including nettles, Panax ginseng, saw palmetto, tribulus, zinc, and vitamin B-5.

    Energy Generation

    Fatigue and poor energy can takes a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. MALE RESPONSE combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and/or invigorate the sexual response. These include ashwagandha, Panax ginseng, Siberian ginseng, zinc, and vitamins B-5 and B-6.

    Circulation

    Proper circulation of blood is vital for male sexual response. MALE RESPONSE contains several herbs known for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbe contains yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, which can stimulate selected portions of the nervous system and increase blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Additional ingredients that support healthy circulation include ginger, ginkgo, and vitamin E.

    Brain and Nervous System: Libido Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. MALE RESPONSE provides supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, including copper, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. In addition, it contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and/or rejuvenating properties. These include ashwagandha, avena sativa (oats), Panax ginseng, tribulus, and yohimbe.

    Prostate Gland

    A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support male reproductive health and are essential for the proper functioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production. Additional support is provided by nettle, saw palmetto, and tribulus.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Male Response: A Strategy for WellnessSM

  • • Eat well: Diet is perhaps the most significant single factor in generating virility. A diet rich in whole foods, with adequate protein from sources such as fish, chicken, turkey, lean beef, tofu or legumes, is crucial. The prostate gland contains high amounts of zinc, which is needed for sperm production and healthy testosterone levels. Foods high in zinc include seafood, meat, root vegetables, legumes, pumpkin seeds, nuts and whole grains. It is also important to follow a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, since elevated cholesterol levels and the resulting buildup of plaque in blood vessels, can affect male reponse by impairing blood flow.
  • • Stop using tobacco. Nicotine, tobacco’s active ingredient, constricts the small blood vessels, interfering with healthy circulation.
  • • Use alcohol in moderation and avoid illicit drugs. Alcohol is a nervous system depressant, which can interfere with sexual function. Steady drinking can inhibit male response by inhibiting blood flow.
  • • Get moving. Moderate, but not extreme, amounts of exercise help you relax, boost your energy levels, increase your physical awareness and ultimately stimulate your sexuality. Regular exercise has an impact on vasocongestion, raising blood supply to the organs, while walking, stretching, swimming and resistance exercise help raise testoterone levels.
  • • Contact a counselor. Counseling can help reduce the anxiety often associated with male performance. It can also address issues at work or home that may be contributing factors.

    Male Response is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ Multi-System Support for Sexual Vigor

    References
    Comas, M. et al. Bromatological study of maca. (Lepidium meyenii). Alimentaria 1997, 35(286): 85-90. Dini, A. et al. Chemical composition of Lepidium meyenii. Food Chemistry 1994, 49(4):347-9. Kapoor, L.D. Tribulus—indications and use. CRC Handbook of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton: FIAC/FASP; 1990. Physicians’ Desk Reference, 52 ed. Montvale, N.J.:Medical Economics Co.; 1998. Physician’s Desk Reference Medical Dictionary. Baltimore:Williams & Wilkins; 1995.



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    Attentive Child - Enhances Mental Concentration ...
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    Date: May 31, 2005 05:14 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Attentive Child - Enhances Mental Concentration ...

    Most children are creative, energetic and spontaneous, but sometimes they don’t focus on requested activities. Sometimes kids find it difficult to apply themselves to the task at hand. Your child’s brain also may work differently than most people’s brains— just like the 5% of the population that is left-handed. Most people think an ultra-active child means an active brain, but active children may actually need a boost in brain metabolism. Source Naturals ATTENTIVE CHILD is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ designed to address the multiple systems that affect children’s ability to focus: neurotransmitters and brain metabolism, nerve cell communication, antioxidant defense, and essential fatty acid metabolism.

  • Formerly FOCUS CHILD™
  • Comprehensive Brain Support

    Parents are looking for a safe and natural product to support their children’s ability to focus. Source Naturals studied the research and created an experiential formula, based on the latest breakthroughs in cerebral and nervous system biochemistry. Each ingredient in ATTENTIVE CHILD plays a role in brain and nervous system structure or functioning, or is involved in important biochemical pathways. DMAE, a substance normally found in the brain, boosts brain metabolism and has been shown to enhance concentration. L-Aspartate is an amino acid neurotransmitter that stimulates brain activity. Research has shown that some ultra-active children may have special dietary needs for magnesium, zinc and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). Magnesium is necessary for the transmission of nerve signals, and, along with zinc, for the processing of essential fatty acids into other vital biochemicals. DHA is an essential fatty acid that is very important for cerebral development and effective communication between nerve cells in the brain. Lecithin contains four phospholipids—fatty acid building-block molecules in nerve cell membranes. Phosphatidylserine, in particular, is vital in nerve cell communication and the electrical activity of the brain. Grape seed extract is a plant-derived antioxidant that protects the integrity of fatty acids in nerve cell membranes.

    ATTENTIVE DHA™ in Tiny Kid Caps™

    The ATTENTIVE CHILD formula can be supplemented with additional DHA. ATTENTIVE DHA Kid Caps are available in easy-to-swallow, small oval softgels, each containing 100 mg of DHA. For children who can’t swallow caps, simply pierce the gel and mix the oil with food. Sweeteners with Low Impact on Blood Sugar The delicious sweetand- tart taste in ATTENTIVE CHILD wafers comes from natural flavors, specially manufactured without sugar for Source Naturals. Unless specified, most flavors in other products contain maltodextrin, a sugar with a high glycemic index. The ATTENTIVE CHILD wafer itself is sweetened with crystalline fructose (natural fruit sugar) and xylitol (a naturally occurring sweetening agent found in many fruits and vegetables). These select natural sweeteners have a very low glycemic index—so ATTENTIVE CHILD will taste great to your child, but have little effect on blood sugar levels. We recommend carefully reviewing the labels of other products. They may contain honey, glucose, sucrose, maltodextrin, and maltose—all of which have moderate-tohigh glycemic indexes. In addition, maple sugar, molasses, malt syrup, rice syrup, and beet sugar contain varying amounts of high-glycemic-index sugars, which can set off blood sugar fluctuations that may affect concentration. Beware of children’s nutritional bars designed to enhance focus and concentration. Most have over 20 grams of sugar per bar. In contrast, each serving of ATTENTIVE CHILD contains only two grams of crystalline fructose, which has little effect on blood sugar.

    Glycemic Index of Various Sweeteners

    The glycemic index is a ranking of foods based on their immediate effect on blood glucose levels. It measures how much your blood glucose increases over a period of two or three hours after intake. The higher the glycemic index (GI), the greater the fluctuations in blood sugar. Sweetener Glycemic Index†
    Xylitol* 7.0
    Crystalline Fructose* 23.0
    Organic Agave Nectar†† 10.0
    High Fructose Corn Syrup 62.3
    Sucrose 65.0
    Honey 73.0
    Glucose 97.0
    Maltodextrin 105.0
    Maltose 105.0

    *sweeteners used in ATTENTIVE CHILD ™ †based on rate of 100 for glucose ††for information, see website www.wcommerce.com

    Lifestyle Strategies for Your Child

    You can help your child concentrate on schoolwork, chores and other challenges. Start with ATTENTIVE CHILD and ATTENTIVE DHA, and then incorporate a healthy lifestyle and nutrition routine.

    Physical Health

    Have your child’s overall health checked by a welltrained holistic health care professional, such as a naturopathic physician. It is particularly important to examine the functioning of your child’s thyroid gland (the master regulator of the body’s metabolism, which influences mood and energy level), and blood sugar metabolism (the brain depends on a steady supply of glucose to function properly, particularly when you are trying to concentrate).

    Nutritional Health: Feeding the Brain

    Help your child maintain a steady supply of energy and brain fuel by providing a balanced diet. Small, frequent meals are preferable since they dispense a steady level of glucose to the brain. Include foods high in the amino acid tyrosine, a precursor to neurotransmitters that support an alert state. It is found in protein foods, such as meat, poultry, beans, tofu, lentils and seafood. Also include complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables, which are metabolized slowly and yield a steady supply of glucose. The simple sugars found in candy, cookies, sodas and other processed foods can lead to a rapid rise in blood sugar levels, followed by an abrupt decline, and should be discouraged. It is important to include essential fatty acids, especially omega-3 fatty acids, which are abundant in the brain and essential for its development and normal functioning. Supplement with ATTENTIVE DHA, and encourage your child to eat cold-water fish, such as salmon. Avoid the hydrogenated fats found in processed foods and margarine, as well as chemicals and food additives. A nutrition program consisting of fresh, unprocessed natural foods is the healthiest choice for everyone.

    Lifestyle Health

    Some experts believe extended time watching TV and playing video games does not support optimal health or school performance. EEG studies have shown that these activities decrease brain activity rather than activating the brain. Encourage your child to spend time in outdoor physical recreation and in creative, challenging activities.

    Supplement with ATTENTIVE CHILD and ATTENTIVE DHA

    ATTENTIVE CHILD is available in bottles of 30 & 60 chewable wafers. ATTENTIVE DHA Kid Caps (algal-source Neuromins®) are available in 30- & 60-softgel bottles. References Amen, D. Windows into the....Mind. Fairfield, CA: MindWorks Press, 1997. Foster-Powell, K. & Miller, J.B. 1995, International tables of glycemic index. Am J Clin Nutr. 62:871S-93S. Natah, S.S. et al. 1997. Metabolic response to lactitol and xylitol in healthy men. Am J Clin Nutr. Apr; 65(4):947-50. Schmidt, Michael. Smart Fats. Berkeley: Frog, Ltd., 1997. Sears, William. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1998.



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    Prosta Response - 45ct, 90ct, and 180ct --
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 20, 2005 07:36 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Prosta Response - 45ct, 90ct, and 180ct --

    ookstores are filled with it, news magazines are reporting on it. From the revelations of politicians to disturbing statistical reports, prostate health issues that formerly received little notice are now in the headlines. The prostate is a walnut-sized gland located under the bladder and surrounding the urinary tract in men. Many factors affect prostate wellness, including aging and individual genetic history, but today’s chemicalized environment poses unprecedented challenges to the health of the prostate gland. Source Naturals is helping to meet this challenge with PRO STA RESPONSE, a Bio-Aligned Formula™ designed to support multiple, interdependent body systems. It is the only prostate formula that addresses six body systems involved with healthy prostate function.

    More than Symptoms*, Systems PRO STA-RE SPONSE is a unique formula that combines clinically tested potencies of saw palmetto extract and beta sitosterol with standardized Swedish flower pollen extract, quercetin, lyopene, soy and additional herbs and nutrients. PRO-STA- RESPONSE goes beyond formulas that simply address nutritional symptoms and instead deals with underlying causes. PROSTARESPONSE supports healthy prostate function and urine flow by addressing the following body systems: 1. Hormone regulation: Hormones have a direct role in prostate functioning and have been closely linked to prostate health. PRO STA RESP ONSE contains specific plant extracts and nutrients shown in research to inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and the subsequent binding to receptors within the prostate. 2. Prostate cell regeneration: Swedish flower pollen extract, used extensively in Europe and Asia for more than 40 years, has demonstrated significant effects in maintaining proper prostate cell regeneration. 3. Soothing mechanisms: Certain plant compounds, such as flavonoids from soy and sterols from pollen extract, inhibit the metabolism of arachidonic acid. This in turn influences prostaglandin synthesis, which may be associated with comfort levels. 4. Bladder and urinary tract health: A healthy environment within the bladder and urinary tract is vital for prostate health and normal urine flow. PROSTARESPONSE contains botanicals that support the bladder and urinary tract health. 5. Prostate health: Studies show that dietary factors influence the overall health of the prostate. The body naturally concentrates certain compounds in higher amounts in the prostate. These include zinc, vitamin E and soy isoflavones. 6. Antioxidant defense: Antioxidants play an important role in maintaining prostate function and cell membrane integrity. Oxidative stress, or the action of free radicals, is confirmed as a significant factor that can trigger a host of destructive processes. Developing a Prostate-Friendly Lifestyle Supplementation is only one part of an individual’s Strategy for WellnessSM. That’s why Source Naturals® is committed to providing public education about the many aspects of a prostate-healthy lifestyle. Less Fat, More Fiber, Lots of Veggies Studies suggest a direct relationship between dietary fat and prostate health, with men whose diets consist of 30%-40% or more fat at highest risk. Saturated fats, especially from animal sources, are most problematic. Some research has attributed this relationship to the effect animal fats have on excess levels of circulating sex hormones. Prostate health is also associated with high fiber intake. This may be because dietary fiber binds testosterone, estradiol and other sex steroids and helps eliminate excess hormones,

    Five to nine servings of high-fiber fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains (35 g) are recommended daily for prostate health. Tomato-based foods are rich in the carotenoid, lycopene, which is a potent antioxidant, helping to protect our cells and fatty tissues from free radical damage. A long-term study at Harvard School of Medicine found beneficial effects from 10 servings of tomato products weekly, while recent clinical research points to an intake of 15 mg of lycopene twice per day. Also helpful are green and yellow-orange vegetables, which contain compounds that are converted to vitamin A; citrus fruits that contain vitamin C; nuts and seeds that contain vitamin E; zinc-containing seafood, legumes and eggs; and selenium-rich whole grains, seafood and organ meats. Studies show a correlation between prostate health and diets that contain large amounts of soy. Soybeans contain prostate-healthy phytoestrogens, including the isoflavone, genistein. Some experts suggest eating seven servings of soy protein per week (providing 10 g of soy protein and 20 mg of isoflavones daily) for general good health, and three times that amount for more targeted protection. Drink Healthy Dehydration stresses the prostate gland. It is important to consume plenty of water—about eight glasses per day. Plain water is best, but you can also drink highly diluted fruit juice, herbal tea or lightly flavored sparkling water. Green tea is beneficial for prostate health, due to certain antioxidant compounds called polyphenols.

    You can reduce the frequency of nighttime trips to the bathroom by eliminating fluids a few hours before you go to sleep. You may find it more comfortable to spread out your intake, taking small sips of fluids over the course of the day. Exercise Good circulation is important for prostate health. Regular walking is excellent in this regard. “Kegel” exercises— a series of contractions of the muscles around the prostate—are helpful for improving circulation and tonicity of the genital area. Supplementation Supplementation tailored to prostate wellness would focus on the vitamins and minerals described above—in addition to nourishing our body systems, many are also antioxidants, helping to counter the free radical damage that is rampant in our chemicalized environment. The program would also include specific herbs found to support prostate function, especially saw palmetto, pygeum, and pumpkin seeds. First Bio-Aligned Formula for the Prostate Gland! PROSTA-RESPONSE is the first prostate support formula designed to work holistically, by addressing the multiple systems that affect prostate higher amounts in the prostate. health.

    Try Source Naturals PRO STA-RE SPONSE, available in bottles of 45 and 90 tablets.

    Hormonal Regulation Freeze Dried stinging Nettle, Pygeum, Red Clover, Saw Palmetto, Soy, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Zinc, Vitamin D-3 Prostate Cellular Regeneration Lycopene, Nettle, Quercetin, Red Clover, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Vitamin D-3 Soothing Mechanisms: Prostaglandin Synthesis Beta Sitosterol, Pygeum, Quercetin, Red Clover Saw Palmetto, Soy, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract Bladder & Urinary Tract Health Alanine, Glutamic Acid, Glycine, Goldenseal, Gravel Root, Marshmallow Root, Pumpkin Seed, Pygeum, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Uva Ursi Prostate Health Red Clover, Soy, Zinc, Vitamin E Antioxidant Defense Ginkgo Biloba, Grape Seed, Green Tea, Lycopene, Pygeum, Quercetin, Red Clover, Soy, Swedish Flower Pollen Extract, Selenium, Zinc, Vitamin E PROSTA-RESPONSE™: A Bio-Aligned Formula™ Multi-System Support for the Prostate Gland References Buck, A.C. 1996. Phytotherapy for the prostate. Brit J Urol 78:325-336. Morton, M.S. et al. Lignans and isoflavonoids in plasma and prostatic fluid in men: samples from Portugal, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom. Prostate 32:122-128. Morton, M.S. et al. 1996. The preventative role of diet in prostatic…Brit J Urol 77:481-493. Wilt, T.J. et al. 1998. Saw palmetto extracts…a systematic review. JAMA 280:1604-1609 Yasumoto, M.D. et al. Jan-Feb 1995. Clinical evaluation of long-term treatment using …pollen extract…Clin Ther 17(1):82-87. *The term symptom as used in this literature refers to the effects of nutrient imbalances and shortages, and is not related to the diagnosis, treatment, cure, or prevention of any disease.



  • Prosta Response 45ct

  • Prosta Response 90ct

  • Prosta Response 180ct



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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 20, 2005 05:33 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    Between 10 and 15 million American men experience challenges to libido and sexual performance, according to the National Institutes of Health. Fatigue, stress, inactivity and an unhealthy diet can result in decreased vigor and desire. In addition, the normal aging process may result in a slowing of response, according to the National Institute on Aging. MALE RESPONSE is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ that helps bring alignment to a range of interrelated body systems that can negatively impact male sexual function: hormonal function, energy generation, circulation, the brain and nervous system, and the prostate gland.

    Bio-Aligned Formula™ MALE RESPONSE is a comprehensive herbal-nutrient formula that supports the multiple, interconnected systems involved with male sexual function. Hormonal Function Hormones are chemicals released into the bloodstream that control numerous body functions. Testosterone is the most important of the male sex hormones. Produced by the testes, it is responsible for the development and maintenance of the male sex organs, contributes greatly to the level of sexual desire, and helps regulate energy and mood. MALE RESPONSE contains herbs and nutrients that may support hormonal function, including nettles, Panax ginseng, saw palmetto, tribulus, zinc, and vitamin B-5. Energy Generation Fatigue and poor energy can takes a toll on one’s desire or capacity for sexual intimacy. Male Response combines a variety of herbs and nutrients to help revitalize energy levels, nourish the adrenals, and/or invigorate the sexual response. These include ashwagandha, Panax ginseng, Siberian ginseng, zinc, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. Circulation Proper circulation of blood is vital for male sexual response. MALE RESPONSE contains several herbs known for their effect on blood flow. For example, yohimbe contains yohimbine, an alkaloid from the bark of a native African tree, which can stimulate selected portions of the nervous system and increase blood flow to enhance the sexual response. Additional ingredients that support healthy circulation include ginger, ginkgo, and vitamin E. Brain and Nervous System: Libido Stress and emotions often affect sexual desire and libido. MALE RESPONSE provides supportive nutrients for the healthy functioning of the nervous system, including copper, and vitamins B-5 and B-6. In addition, it contains herbs traditionally known for their aphrodisiac and/or rejuvenating properties. These include ashwagandha, avena sativa (oats), Panax ginseng, tribulus, and yohimbe.

    Prostate Gland A healthy reproductive system is an important part of a balanced approach to sexual function. Specific ingredients such as zinc support male reproductive health and are essential for the properfunctioning of the prostate gland. Vitamin E, an antioxidant, supports normal prostate tissue functioning and sperm production. Additional support is provided by nettle, saw palmetto, and tribulus. Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Male Response: A Strategy for WellnessSM • Eat well: Diet is perhaps the most significant single factor in generating virility. A diet rich in whole foods, with adequate protein from sources such as fish, chicken, turkey, lean beef, tofu or legumes, is crucial. The prostate gland contains high amounts of zinc, which is needed for sperm production and healthy testosterone levels. Foods high in zinc include seafood, meat, root vegetables, legumes, pumpkin seeds, nuts and whole grains. It is also important to follow a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, since elevated cholesterol levels and the resulting buildup of plaque in blood vessels, can affect male reponse by impairing blood flow. • Stop using tobacco. Nicotine, tobacco’s active ingredient, constricts the small blood vessels, interfering with healthy circulation. • Use alcohol in moderation and avoid illicit drugs. Alcohol is a nervous system depressant, which can interfere with sexual function. Steady drinking can inhibit male response by inhibiting blood flow. • Get moving. Moderate, but not extreme, amounts of exercise help you relax, boost your energy levels, increase your physical awareness and ultimately stimulate your sexuality. Regular exercise has an impact on vasocongestion, raising blood supply to the organs, while walking, stretching, swimming and resistance exercise help raise testoterone levels. • Contact a counselor. Counseling can help reduce the anxiety often associated with male performance. It can also address issues at work or home that may be contributing factors.

    References Comas, M. et al. Bromatological study of maca. (Lepidium meyenii). Alimentaria 1997, 35(286): 85-90. Dini, A. et al. Chemical composition of Lepidium meyenii. Food Chemistry 1994, 49(4):347-9. Kapoor, L.D. Tribulus—indications and use. CRC Handbook of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton: FIAC/FASP; 1990. Physicians’ Desk Reference, 52 ed. Montvale, N.J.:Medical Economics Co.; 1998. Physician’s Desk Reference Medical Dictionary. Baltimore:Williams & Wilkins; 1995.

  • Male Response 45 tab

  • Male REsponse 90ct



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