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Adaptogens: Herbs That Can Help In Fighting Stress Darrell Miller 9/6/15
Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells Darrell Miller 12/20/05
Super Cortisol Support Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/8/05
Carnitine Creatinate Darrell Miller 12/8/05
Inflama Rest - Natural COX-2 Inhibitor for Joint Comfort Darrell Miller 6/2/05



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Adaptogens: Herbs That Can Help In Fighting Stress
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Date: September 06, 2015 09:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Adaptogens: Herbs That Can Help In Fighting Stress

It has been proven through various researches that cortisol hormone in your body can cause stress by effecting its physiological system like adrenal glands or thyroid, etc.  The anxiety and irritation caused by the elevation of cortisol can cause a number of health problems including diabetes, weight gain, depletion of energy level and risk of heart problems etc. Most researchers have found adaptogenic herbs as the best and effective natural source of fighting stress caused by the elevation of cortisol in the body. 

A group of plants that can be used for fighting stress caused by the increase of cortisol hormone in the body are known as Adaptogens. They can help in protecting and restoring the body by balancing its hormonal growth. Some of the popular herbs used for this purpose may include Ashwagandha, American Ginseng, Astragalus, Asian Ginseng, Eleuthero, Cordyceps, Maca, Holy Basil, Schisandra and Rhodiola.  


Here's a brief description about these herbs:

Ashwaganda: It is also known as Indian ginseng as Ayurvedic medicine science uses it since thousands of years not only for fighting stress but also for regulating your immune system by lowering the level of cortisol hormone.

Ashwagandha

American Ginseng: This adaptogenic herb is also known as Panax Ginseng as it belongs to the botanical family of Panax. Normally two types of Ginseng are used for relieving stress including American and Asian ginseng.

Asian Ginseng: Researches have proved it to be one of the most popular adaptogens that can help in improving your ability to handle stress along with your mental performance due to its antidepressant and antioxidant properties which can lower the levels of your blood sugar and blood pressure. Though American and Asian ginsengs belong to the same medicinal group, their healing properties are different from each other.

Astragalus: The root of this herb is used in various Chinese medicine to reduce the effect of stress along with boosting your immunity level. It can reduce the receptor binding ability of cortisol, a stress causing hormone.

Astragalus

Eleuthero: It reduces the symptoms of adrenal fatigue due to its Panax Ginseng like properties. It soothes the stimulated adrenal glands producing stress causing hormones cortisol and adrenaline.


Cordycep: It is a kind of fungus which has antioxidant properties to help you in fighting stress along with boosting your immune system.

Cordyceps

Maca: It is a root vegetable that is used to reduce the risk of various health problems like arthritis and diabetes etc. caused due to increased stress along with increasing your libido. Along with wide variety of nutrients, it also provides healthy fiber to your body.

Maca

Holy basil: Tulsi is another popular name of this adaptogenic herb. Along with boosting your immune system it also helps you in fighting stress and regulating blood pressure.

Schizandra: The berries of this adaptogenic herb are used for making various stress relieving medicines and general tonics in China.

Rhodiola: According to various health experts it helps in reducing physical fatigue along with stress related problems like mental stress etc. due to its antioxidant properties.


References

//www.natural-health-and-healing-4u.com/adaptogenic-herbs.html

//draxe.com/7-adaptogen-herbs-to-lower-cortisol

//bottomlinehealth.com/maca-the-super-food-that-helps-with-everything-from-fatigue-to-sex-drive


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Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells
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Date: December 20, 2005 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells

Your Cells Supercharge Your Cells

The differences between aging and growing old are poles apart. Sure, they may sound similar in nature. But when you think about it, the two are as different as night and day. Growing old is about retirement and travel and enjoying what you’ve worked an entire life for. Aging, on the other hand, summons images of wrinkled skin, brittle joints, cloudy minds and medicine cabinets full of prescriptions. It’s safe to assume that the majority of us want to look, live, and feel better as we grow old. Not the opposite. Many of us are on the right track - committed to a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and a well-balanced diet. And yes, these do serve as a solid foundation for good health during our golden years. It is our cells, however, that ultimately determine who grows old, and who just ages.

Still, slowing the proverbial hands of time is not all about health clubs and organic produce. If you want to grow old gracefully, you must nurture the ten trillion cells that defi ne you physically. Why? Because these cells are constantly under attack by free radicals - unstable molecules that either lack, or have an unpaired number of electrons. They scour the body in search of stable cells, and do whatever they can to rob them of their electrons, a process more formally known as oxidation. Considering that it’s environmentally impossible to completely avoid contact with the billions of airborne toxins that cause free radicals, the only other option is to safeguard your healthy cells. Making the commitment to a healthy lifestyle is the fi rst step in the process, and can be accomplished by eating healthier foods, exercising on a regular basis, and paying close attention to what you are exposed to environmentally.

The next step is to nourish and protect your cells. The best way to do this is to consume foods that are rich in antioxidants and other cell-friendly nutrients. Unfortunately, this task is often much easier said than done. Today’s average adult is busier than ever, making it far more diffi cult to consume fresh, unprocessed meals 100% of the time. This does not, however, imply that all hope is lost. Over the years, the nutritional sciences have made stunning advances that afford you the opportunity to live your life while still safeguarding the integrity of your most basic building blocks. Here are a few of the best.

Antioxidants

Antioxidants work at the cellular level to paralyze the free radicals that cause oxidation throughout the body. Some of today’s most popular nutrients and dietary supplements fall into this category. They include vitamins A, E, and C, Selenium, Zinc, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Lycopene, Lutein, CoQ10, in addition to a host of others. And though similar in function, each of these free radical fi ghters has a unique role within the body.

Take CoQ10 for example. It’s present in every cell of the body, and is especially important for cardiovascular support. Lutein has been used extensively to prevent oxidation in the macular regions of the eyes. Zinc is a powerful immune system booster that has become extremely popular during cold and fl u season. Alpha Lipoic Acid is both fat and water soluble, and is commonly referred to as the “universal” antioxidant based on its ability to quench free radicals anywhere in the body.

Immune Boosting Herbs

Herbs such as Astragalus, Olive Leaf, Rhodiola, Echinacea, Panax Ginseng and Ashwaganda have been used for centuries to help support healthy cells and strong, responsive immune systems. They’ve also been shown to exhibit natural synergistic effects when used together. Today, they remain one of the most popular ways to naturally promote all-around wellbeing. When it comes to supporting healthy cells, NOW is pleased to offer one of the best selections of antioxidants, herbs and immune support formulas. Be sure to look for these and other great products at fi ne health food retailers, nationwide.*

OPCs

OPCs (proanthocyanidins) are high-powered polyphenol antioxidants that belong to the fl avonoid family. Grape seed extract, pine bark extracts such as pycnogenol and enzogenol, bilberry, gingko biloba, resveratrol and others all fall into this category. Research continues to suggest that OPCs work in the same manner that traditional antioxidants do, however their ability to eradicate free radicals is much greater and more versatile. Equally appealing, OPCs can easily cross the blood barrier of the brain to help protect brain and neural tissues from the damage caused by oxidative stress.

Mushroom Extracts

Throughout history, many civilizations have relied on organic mushroom extracts to encourage wellness. What we know now is that mushrooms such as Shiitake, Maitake, Reishi and others are rich in 1,3 Beta-glucans - soluble fi ber compounds that help support both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition, the active compounds in some mushrooms have been shown to stimulate the production of microphages, T cells, and other natural killer cells. These biological warriors serve at the front line when it comes to responding to bacterial attacks. They are of immeasurable value to the immune system, though drastically lacking in today’s average diet. In just the past few years, more and more healthconscious individuals have learned fi rst-hand how benefi cial they can be in the preservation of healthy cells.



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Super Cortisol Support Fact Sheet
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Date: December 08, 2005 07:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Super Cortisol Support Fact Sheet

Super Cortisol Support Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 10/1/05

LIKELY USERS: People under a lot of stress; People who suffer from stress-related eating; People who may have metabolic syndrome (Syndrome X);

KEY INGREDIENTS: Relora®13, Rhodiola14-20, Reishi 21-24, Green Tea Extract25-32, Holy Basil, Ashwaganda, Banaba, Pantothenic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium, Lecithin, Chromium

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: NOW® Super Cortisol Support is an herbal and nutritional formula designed to support healthy adrenal function and maintain healthy cortisol levels. The adrenal glands help the body respond and adjust to stress generated from both internal and external forces. Under chronic stress, cortisol can be overproduced, resulting in weight gain and difficulty in managing healthy blood sugar levels. Super Cortisol Support combines adaptogenic herbs with Chromium, Corosolic Acid and Relora® to help the body manage the negative effects of stress such as abdominal obesity, overeating and low energy levels.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES:

Reishi, Rhodiola, Ashwaganda, and Holy Basil support healthy energy levels throughout the day1-6. Reishi, Rhodiola, Ashwaganda, and Holy Basil support healthy immunity1-9. Along with Chromium, and Corosolic Acid, these herbs also help to support healthy serum glucose levels1-12. Relora® has been included in this formula to alleviate symptoms associated with stress such as irritability and nervous tension13.

This formula is recommended by Hyla Cass, MD.

This is the first Cortisol formula to use Relora®, a natural proprietary blend of a patented (U.S. Patent No. US 6,582,735) extract of Magnolia officinalis and a patent-pending extract from Phellodendron amurense. Relora® was developed as an ingredient for dietary supplements and functional foods that could be used in stress management and for stress-related appetite control. This patented blend of plant extracts is the result of screening more than fifty plant fractions from traditional plant medicines used around the world. Relora® has excellent stress management properties without causing sedation. Overweight adults may have excessive abdominal fat due to stress-related overeating. Relora® appears to maintain healthy hormone levels in stressed individuals and act as an aid in controlling weight and stress-related eating.33

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: One capsule, two to three times a day.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Holy Basil, Green Tea, L-Theanine, Licorice Root, Vitamin C, Eleuthero Root, Pantothenic acid

CAUTIONS: None.

SPECIFIC: Some of these ingredients may support the body’s blood sugar controls, so people taking blood sugar medications should inform their physician before using Super Cortisol Support, and their glucose should be monitored when taking this formula so their medication strength can be modulated appropriately to avoid an overdose of medication. No side effects have been noted for this dosage of Relora®.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women, children and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. This document has not been reviewed by the FDA or by the company posting it. Information given here may vary from what is shown on the product label because this represents my own professional experience and understanding of the science underlying the formula and ingredients. When taking any new formula, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

1. Spasov AA, Wikman GK, Mandrikov VB, Mironova IA, Neumoin VV (2000) Phytomedicine 7(2):85-89.
2. Darbinyan V, Kteyan A, Panossian A, Gabrielian E, Wikman G, Wagner H (2000) Phytomedicine 7(5):365-371.
3. Bhattacharya SK, Battacharya A, Sairam K, Ghosal S (2000) Phytomedicine 7(6):463-469.
4. Sembulingam K, Sembulingam P, Namasivayam A (1997) Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 41(2):139-143.
5. Archana R, Namasivayam A (2000) J Ethnopharmacol 73:81-85.
6. Lin Z-B, Zhang H-N (2004) Acta Pharmacol Sin 25(11):1387-1395.
7. Monograph (2002) Alt Med Rev 7(5):421-423.
8. Agarwal R, Divanay S, Patki P, Patwardhan B (1999) J Ethnopharmacol 67:27-35.
9. Archana R, Namasivayam A (2000) J Ethnopharmacol 73:81-85.
10. Vincent JB (2000) J Nutr 130:715-718. 11. Judy WV, Hari SP, Stogsdill WW, Judy JS, Naguib YMA, Passwater R (2003) J Ethnopharmacol 81)1):115-117.
12. Lin Z-B, Zhang H-N (2004) Acta Pharmacol Sin 25(2):191-195.
13. Maruyama Y, Kuribara H, Morita M, Yuzurihara M, Weintraub ST (1998) J Nat Prod 61:135-138.
14. Brown RP, et al. American Botanical Council. Rhodiola rosea: a phytomedicinal overview. g/herbalgram/articleview.asp?a=2333.
15. Kelly GS. Rhodiola rosea: a possible plant adaptogen. Alt Med Rev 2001;3(6):293-302.
16. De Bock K, et al. Acute rhodiola rosea intake can improve endurance exercise performance. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2004;14:298-307.
17. Shevtsov VA, et al. A randomized trial of two different doses of a SHR-5 rhodiola rosea extract versus placebo and control of capacity for mental work. Phytomedicine 2003;2-3(10):95-105.
18. Shugarman AE. Men’s Fitness, 2002. As reported on: LookSmart FindArticles. Energy pills that work: can these five supplements help unleash the muscle building power within you? ttp://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1608/is_3_18/ai_83343009/
19. Earnest CP, et al. Effects of a commercial herbal-based formula on exercise performance in cyclists. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2004;36(3):504-9.
20. Wing SL, et al. Lack of effect of rhodiola or oxygenated water supplementation on hypoxemia and oxidative stress. Wilderness Env Med 2003;14(1):9-16.
21. Shu HY. Oriental Materia Medica: A Concise Guide. Palos Verdes, CA: Oriental Healing Arts Press, 1986, 640–1. 22. Kammatsuse K, Kajiware N, Hayashi K. Studies on Ganoderma lucidum: I. Efficacy against hypertension and side effects. Yakugaku Zasshi 1985;105:531–3.
23. Jin H, Zhang G, Cao X, et al. Treatment of hypertension by ling zhi combined with hypotensor and its effects on arterial, arteriolar and capillary pressure and microcirculation. In: Nimmi H, Xiu RJ, Sawada T, Zheng C. (eds). Microcirculatory Approach to Asian Traditional Medicine. New York: Elsevier Science, 1996, 131–8.
24. 9. Hobbs C. Medicinal Mushrooms. Santa Cruz, CA: Botanica Press, 1995, 96–107.
25. Kono S, Shinchi K, Ikeda N, et al. Green tea consumption and serum lipid profiles: A cross-sectional study in Northern Kyushu, Japan. Prev Med 1992;21:526–31.
26. Yamaguchi Y, Hayashi M, Yamazoe H, et al. Preventive effects of green tea extract on lipid abnormalities in serum, liver and aorta of mice fed an atherogenic diet. Nip Yak Zas 1991;97:329–37.
27. Sagesaka-Mitane Y, Milwa M, Okada S. Platelet aggregation inhibitors in hot water extract of green tea. Chem Pharm Bull 1990;38:790–3.
28. Stensvold I, Tverdal A, Solvoll K, et al. Tea consumption. Relationship to cholesterol, blood pressure, and coronary and total mortality. Prev Med 1992;21:546–53.
29. Tsubono Y, Tsugane S. Green tea intake in relation to serum lipid levels in middle-aged Japanese men and women. Ann Epidemiol 1997;7:280–4.
30. Serafini M, Ghiselli A, Ferro-Luzzi A. In vivo antioxidant effect of green tea in man. Eur J Clin Nutr 1996;50:28–32.
31. Benzie IF, Szeto YT, Strain JJ, Tomlinson B. Consumption of green tea causes rapid increase in plasma antioxidant power in humans. Nutr Cancer 1999;34:83–7.
32. Sasazuki S, Komdama H, Yoshimasu K, et al. Relation between green tea consumption and severity of coronary atherosclerosis among Japanese men and women. Ann Epidemiol 2000;10:401–8.
33. Sufka KJ, et al. Anxiolytic properties of botanical extracts in the chick social separation-stress procedure.Psychopharmacology. 2001 Jan 1;153(2):219-24. PMID: 11205

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Carnitine Creatinate
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Date: December 08, 2005 03:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Carnitine Creatinate

Carnitine Creatinate

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 6/30/05

LIKELY USERS: Athletes, Bodybuilders, Dieters, People who consume a lot of fat, People needing cardiovascular support (energy for the heart), People who need quick energy, especially for fast muscle response, People with muscle wasting problems (including the elderly), Weightlifters

KEY INGREDIENTS: L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate is a specialized form of Creatine bonded to L-Carnitine. Creatine is a compound natural to the human body that aids in the regeneration of ATP, the chemical energy used by muscle tissue. During exercise, large quantities of creatine are irreversibly consumed. Clinical studies have shown that oral supplementation with Creatine can increase the amount of Creatine available in muscles for ATP production. L-Carnitine is an amino acid that is necessary for the transfer of fatty acids into the fat-burning parts of the cell, facilitating energy production from fat. The combination of these two compounds can produce a synergistic effect, making NOW® Carnitine Creatinate an ideal energy supplement.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: Carnitine and Creatinate Monohydrate is a patented ingredient that has been the subject of research studies. It is supported by the scientific staff in the laboratories of both NOW Foods and the raw material supplier, both of which have a mutual interest in protecting the integrity and efficacy of this product. Protected by U.S. Patent No. 5,994,581 (L-Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate).

Look at the price: this is a better way to buy both supplements than purchasing them separately.

This formula is suitable for vegetarians and is offered in both tablet and powder forms.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: As a dietary supplement, every two tablets provide 1,000 mg. (one gram) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Or one teaspoon provides 1,150 mg.) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Take one or more servings per day with a carbohydrate source, such as fruit juice or sports drinks.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: CoQ10, carbohydrates, B-Complex vitamins, chromium, vanadium, Hawthorn leaf and flower extract, protein supplements. Adaptogenic herbs: ginsengs, Eleuthero, Rhodiola, Maca, Ashwaganda, licorice root

CAUTIONS: none.

PRODUCT SPECIFIC: This product is very sensitive to moisture. Please keep in the original packaging or in a moisture resistant container. Do not take more than 20 grams per day. Discontinue use if cramps of stomach upset occur, especially if taking large doses. Do not take if kidney disease is present. Do not use large doses of caffeine with creatine, as it may increase the possibility of muscle cramping.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. When taking any new supplement, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time to avoid any potential problems.

Packages may contain moisture or oxygen controlling packets or canisters that are not intended for consumption. In order to maintain maximum freshness, please do not remove these from your bottle (until the bottle is empty). Please recycle your container.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

Fang S-M (1998) Carnitine Creatinate. U.S. Patent 5,994,581.

L-CARNITINE:

Beers MH, Berkow R (eds). The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, 17th ed. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck and Co., Inc, 1999, 881-3.

Broquist HP (1994) Carnitine, in Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 8th ed., Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M (eds.) Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, pp. 459-465. Casey A, Greenhoff PL (2000) Does dietary creatine supplementation play a role in skeletal muscle metabolism and performance? Am J Clin Nutr 72(suppl):607S-17S. Columbani P, Wenk C, Kunz I, et al. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on physical performance and energy metabolism of endurance-trained athletes: a double blind crossover field study. Eur J Appl Physiol 1996;73:434-9.

Dal Negro R, Pomari G, Zoccatelli O, Turco P. L-carnitine and rehabilitative respiratory physiokinesitherapy: metabolic and ventilatory response in chronic respiratory insufficiency. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 1986;24:453-6.

Dal Negro R, Turco P, Pomari C, De Conti F. Effects of L-carnitine on physical performance in chronic respiratory insufficiency. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 1988;26:269-72.

Del Favero A. Carnitine and gangliosides. Lancet 1988;2:337 [letter].

Dipalma JR. Carnitine deficiency. Am Fam Physician 1988;38:243–51.

Digiesi V, Palchetti R, Cantini F. The benefits of L-carnitine in essential arterial hypertension. Minerva Med 1989;80:227-31.

Giamberardino MA, Dragani L, Valente R, et al. Effects of prolonged L-carnitine administration on delayed muscle pain and CK release after eccentric effort. Int J Sports Med 1996;17:320-4.

Green RE, Levine AM, Gunning MJ. The effect of L-carnitine supplementation on lean body mass in male amateur body builders. J Am Diet Assoc 1997;(suppl):A-72.

Harris RC, Soderlund K, Hultman E (1992) Elevation of creatine in resting and exercised muscle of normal subjects by creatine supplementation. Clin Sci 83(3):367-374.

Kendler BS. Carnitine: an overview of its role in preventive medicine. Prev Med 1986;15:373–90.

Kobayashi A, Masumura Y, Yamazaki N. L-carnitine treatment for congestive heart failure—experimental and clinical study. Jpn Circ J 1992;56:86–94.

Murray MT. The many benefits of carnitine. Am J Natural Med 1996;3:6-14 [review].

Tamamogullari N, Silig Y, Icagasioglu S, Atalay A. Carnitine deficiency in diabetes mellitus complications. J Diabetes Complications 1999;13:251–3.

Yesilipek MA, Hazar V, Yegin O. L-Carnitine treatment in beta thalassemia major. Acta Haematol 1998;100:162-3. CREATINE MONOHYDRATE: Almada A, Mitchell T, Earnest C. Impact of chronic creatine supplementation on serum enzyme concentrations. FASEB J 1996;10:4567.

Becque MD, Lochmann JD, Melrose DR. Effects of oral creatine supplementation on muscular strength and body composition. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2000;32:654-8.

Casey A, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Howell S, et al. Creatine supplementation favorably affects performance and muscle metabolism during maximal intensity exercise in humans. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E31-E7.

Earnest CP, Almada AL, Mitchell TL. High-performance capillary electrophoresis-pure creatine monohydrate reduces blood lipids in men and women. Clin Sci 1996;91:113-8.

Earnest C, Almada A, Mitchell T. Influence of chronic creatine supplementation on hepatorenal function. FASEB J 1996;10:4588.

Earnest CP, Snell PG, Rodriguez R, et al. The effect of creatine monohydrate ingestion on anaerobic power indices, muscular strength and body composition. Acta Physiol Scand 1995;153:207-9.

Felber S, Skladal D, Wyss M, et al. Oral creatine supplementation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a clinical and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Neurol Res 2000;22:145-50.

Feldman EB. Creatine: a dietary supplement and ergogenic aid. Nutr Rev 1999;57:45–50.

Green AL, Hultman E, Macdonald IA, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments skeletal muscle creatine accumulation during creatine supplementation in man. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E821–6.

Green AL, Simpson EJ, Littlewood JJ, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments creatine retention during creatine feeding in humans. Acta Physiol Scand 1996;158:195-202.

Greenhaff PL. Creatine and its application as an ergogenic aid. Int J Sport Nutr 1995;5:94-101.

Greenhaff PL. The nutritional biochemistry of creatine. J Nutr Biochem 1997;8:610-8 [review].

Greenhaff PL, Bodin K, Soderlund K, et al. Effect of oral creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle phosphocreatine resynthesis. Am J Physiol 1994;266:E725-30.

Greenhaff PL, Casey A, Short AH, et al. Influence of oral creatine supplementation on muscle torque during repeated bouts of maximal voluntary exercise in man. Clin Sci 1993;84:565-71.

Harris RC, Soderlund K, Hultman E. Elevation of creatine in resting and exercised muscle of normal subjects by creatine supplementation. Clin Sci 1992;83:367-74.

Hultman E, Soderlund K, Timmons J, et al. Muscle creatine loading in man. J Appl Physiol 1996;81:232–7.

Juhn MS, O’Kane JW, Vinci DM. Oral creatine supplementation in male collegiate athletes: a survey of dosing habits and side effects. J Am Diet Assoc 1999;99:593–5.

Kreider RB, Ferreira M, Wilson M, et al. Effects of creatine supplementation on body composition, strength, and sprint performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1998;30:73-82.

Poortmans JR, Auquier H. Renaut V, et al. Effect of short-term creatine supplementation on renal responses in men. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 1997;76:566–7.

Poortmans JR, Francaux M. Long-term oral creatine supplementation does not impair renal function in healthy athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999;31:1108–10.

Pritchard NR, Kaira PA. Renal dysfunction accompanying oral creatine supplements. Lancet 1998;351:1252–3 [letter].

Sewell DA, Robinson TM, Casey A, et al. The effect of acute dietary creatine supplementation upon indices of renal, hepatic and haematological function in human subjects. Proc Nutr Soc 1998;57:17A.

Silber ML. Scientific facts behind creatine monohydrate as a sports nutrition supplement. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 1999;39:179–88 [review].

Sipila I, Rapola J, Simell O, et al. Supplementary creatine as a treatment for gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina. N Engl J Med 1981;304:867-70.

Stone MH, Sanborn K, Smith LL, et al. Effects of in-season (5-weeks) creatine and pyruvate supplementation on anaerobic performance and body composition in American football players. Int J Sport Nutr 1999;9:146-65.

Stout JR, Eckerson J, Noonan D, et al. The effects of a supplement designed to augment creatine uptake on exercise performance and fat-free mass in football players. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1997;29:S251.

Tarnopolsky MA. Potential benefits of creatine monohydrate supplementation in the elderly. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2000;3:497-502 [review].

Tarnopolsky M, Martin J. Creatine monohydrate increases strength in patients with neuromuscular disease. Neurology 1999;52:854-7.

Tarnopolsky MA, Roy BD, MacDonald JR. A randomized, controlled trial of creatine monohydrate in patients with mitochondrial cytopathies. Muscle Nerve 1997;20:1502-9.

Toler SM. Creatine is an ergogen for anaerobic exercise. Nutr Rev 1997;55:21-5 [review].

Vandenberghe K, Gills N, Van Leemputte M, et al. Caffeine counteracts the ergogenic action of muscle creatine loading. J Appl Physiol 1996;80:452–7.

Vandenberghe K, Goris M, Van Hecke P, et al. Long-term creatine intake is beneficial to muscle performance during resistance training. J Appl Physiol 1997;83:2055-63.

Walter MC, Lochmuller H, Reilich P, Klopstock T, Huber R, Hartard M, Hennig M, Pongratz D, Muller-Felber W. Creatine monohydrate in muscular dystrophies: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Neurology. 2000 May 9;54(9):1848-50. PMID: 10802796

Walter MC, Reilich P, Lochmuller H, Kohnen R, Schlotter B, Hautmann H, Dunkl E, Pongratz D, Muller-Felber W. Creatine monohydrate in myotonic dystrophy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. J Neurol. 2002 Dec;249(12):1717-22. PMID: 12529796



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Inflama Rest - Natural COX-2 Inhibitor for Joint Comfort
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Date: June 02, 2005 12:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Inflama Rest - Natural COX-2 Inhibitor for Joint Comfort

It happens. You reach for something and feel a sudden discomfort. Your joints and muscles may feel tender from overuse. Inside, your cellular systems are out of alignment, resulting in lessened mobility. Source Naturals understands how difficult joint discomfort can be to live with. We are deeply committed to developing well-researched formulas that address the root cause of joint distress. Our Bio-Aligned Formulas™ bring alignment to multiple interdependent body systems. Only this type of indepth formulation can provide the long-term relief you are looking for. Regain your comfort with Source Naturals INFLAMA-REST. Unlike many products that contain just a few ingredients to offer temporary relief, INFLAMA-REST is a Bio-Aligned Formula™, scientifically designed to address aches. INFLAMA-REST goes deep to the underlying cause of joint discomfort. These systems include: inhibition of pathways involved in joint discomfort, joint and muscle function, DNA protection and antioxidant defense.

Addressing Joint Comfort on a Deep Cellular Level

Discomfort can come from many places. From your head to your toes there are many tissues that can become uncomfortable from everyday use. Joint discomfort starts when stress, such as tissue damage, causes an imbalance of the biochemical pathways on a deep cellular level. The body has its own “innate intelligence” encompassing more than just the thoughts in the brain. It consists of ongoing and complex chemical reactions regulated by a wide variety of enzymes and chemical messengers. These reactions can sometimes get out of balance – but you can control and inhibit key body chemicals that would otherwise lead to cellular irritation. For example, certain types of prostaglandins that regulate normal physiological functions such as blood flow, are maintained at low levels in all our cells under everyday conditions. In response to stress, a message is sent to the outer membranes of certain cells to convert their fatty acids into arachidonic acid, the raw material for prostaglandins. This stress also directs cells to produce Cyclooxygenase enzyme- 2 or COX-2. This enzyme converts arachidonic acid into Prostaglandin E2, a particular type of prostaglandin specifically responsible for irritation on a cellular level. The result: joint discomfort. But that doesn’t have to happen. By supporting inhibition of the culprit COX-2, you can decrease Prostaglandin E2 production to bring your joint tissues back into a healthy and comfortable balance.

Support COX-2 Inhibition

INFLAMA-REST includes herbs that support inhibition of COX-2 in a variety of pathways. Ginger, turmeric and green tea all support direct COX-2 inhibition. But there are other places in our biochemical communication system where COX-2 production can be inhibited. Two additional factors that lead to COX-2 production are nitric oxide and the enzyme that produces it, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Nitric oxide is a free radical associated with cell growth and regeneration, blood vessel elasticity and COX-2 enzyme production. Resveratrol, rosemary and turmeric support iNOS inhibition, thus inhibiting your body’s over-production of nitric oxide and the COX-2 enzyme. A related irritation factor is also one of the latest scientific discoveries in cellular health - Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-kappa-B). NF-kappa-B works at the DNA level – at the blueprints of cells. When activated, this factor controls the genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation and regeneration. And blocking this factor is also associated with inhibition of both COX-2 and iNOS enzymes. Stinging nettle, milk thistle and Chinese Skullcap all block unhealthy NF-kappa-B activation in your body and thereby help support COX-2 inhibition.

Cytokine Inhibition

Compounds called cytokines, or interleukins, can also stimulate biochemical pathways leading to joint discomfort. Cytokines are chemical messengers produced by the immune system to regulate defensive activity when they are stimulated. For example, cytokines are released by macrophages in response to stimuli such as tissue damage. This results in rapid escalation and amplification of cell number and response. Constant stress can shift this system out of balance, resulting in tissue discomfort. Bringing these compounds back into balance can preserve your short-term comfort and longterm health. INFLAMA-REST contains curcumin from the spice turmeric. Curcumin assists the body’s inhibition of cytokine activity to support reduced cellular irritation. And Bioperine®, which is derived from black peppercorns, is added to assist curcumin assimilation.

Stress Response: Joints and Muscle Support

Inhibition of chemical messengers involved in joint discomfort is just part of a Bio-Aligned strategy for relieving discomfort. Research has shown that emotional stress, particularly long-term, can directly affect the body and set in motion mechanisms that cause physical discomfort. Ashwaganda and Chinese Skullcap (S. baicalensis) are herbs that help modulate the body’s response to stress and may help ease aches and discomfort. Boswellia, ginger, quercetin, milk thistle, feverfew, Oregon grape root and bromelain (an enzyme found in pineapples) provide additional soothing relief to your cells and tissues. Essential nutrients are also vital to maintaining your joint comfort. The tocotrienol forms of vitamin E, along with selenium, protect cell membranes from lipid-based free radicals. Magnesium aids energy metabolism in muscles and can reduce tenderness as well as muscle spasms. Zinc is essential for normal cellular repair mechanisms such as wound healing and is important for the growth and maintenance of connective tissue. And manganese works to protect cells from oxidation and to build healthy connective tissue as well, an essential component of healthy joints and muscles.

Protecting Your DNA

To reduce cellular irritation, you need to protect the DNA in your cells. DNA is the blueprint for all of the molecules in the body. If your DNA is altered or damaged, then needed molecules may not be produced, leading to short-term and eventually long-term damage. Curcumin, from turmeric, has been shown in in-vitro studies to protect DNA against strand breakage. Quercetin has also been shown to directly protect DNA against strand breakage and base oxidation from free radicals and damaging chemicals, according to recent in-vitro research.

Providing Powerful Antioxidant Cellular Protection

Antioxidants are selfless bodyguards of your cells. They donate their own electrons to stabilize free radicals in your body. Thus, antioxidants absorb the damage that would have been done to your tissues. Some regulatory chemicals, such as Nitric oxide, are powerful free radicals and oxidants. Oxidants also activate NF-kappa-B. Tissues, lipids, proteins and DNA are extremely sensitive to oxidation. Quercetin, milk thistle, turmeric, ginger, rosemary, vitamin E and resveratrol are all antioxidants that help modulate the activity of these compounds as well as protect cells and tissues from damage. Plus, Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), one of the most important enzyme antioxidants found in your body, has been added in a new cutting-edge form. The vegetarian SOD used in INFLAMA-REST is attached to Gliadin, a wheat protein, that has demonstrated significantly better absorption than SOD alone.

Six Lifestyle Strategies for Fewer Aches


1. Try Yoga or Tai Chi. Low-impact exercise based on slow fluid movements can improve mobility and flexibility as well as greatly reduce stress.
2. Get in the pool. Exercising while in the pool reduces strain on the joints in addition to strengthening muscles.
3. Maintain a healthy weight. Excess weight adds pressure to joints and connective tissues.
4. Eat omega-3s. Omega-3 fatty acids found in salmon, flax seeds, or in supplement form support healthy joints and tissues.
5. Stay hydrated. Water is the basis of lubrication in connective tissues such as joints and skin and also supports detoxification.
6. Supplement with glucosamine, chondroitin, MSM and hyaluronic acid. These supplements can help maintain healthy connective tissues. Source Naturals is pleased to partner with your local health food store to provide INFLAMA-REST as a comprehensive Bio- Aligned Formula for relieving joint discomfort by protecting, nourishing and soothing irritated cells. Make INFLAMA-REST part of your health plan to live without joint discomfort.

  • INFLAMA-REST is a Bio-Aligned Formula™ Multi-System Support for Joint Comfort

    Inhibition of COX-2: Turmeric, Ginger, Chinese Skullcap, Green Tea, Resveratrol, Boswellia, Silymarin, White Willow Inhibition of Cytokine Turmeric, Stinging Nettle, Feverfew Inhibition of Rosemary, Green Tea, Resveratrol, Turmeric, Quercetin, Chinese Skullcap NF-kappa-B Activation Silymarin, Chinese Skullcap, Stinging Nettle, Rosemary, Resveratrol Stress Response: Ashwaganda, Magnesium, Chinese Skullcap, Oregon Grape, Feverfew, White Willow DNA Protection Turmeric, Quercetin, Rosemary Antioxidant Defense Silymarin, SOD Gliadin, Turmeric, Rosemary, Tocotrienols, Resveratrol, Ginger, Selenium, Manganese, Zinc Prostaglandin & Leukotrine Synthesis Joint & Muscle Support Inhibition of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Production



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