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  Messages 1-13 from 13 matching the search criteria.
Hair health Darrell Miller 7/16/12
Feverfew Darrell Miller 8/1/08
Echinacea Purpurea Root Darrell Miller 6/17/08
Natural Remedies For Bumps, Bruises, Scrapes, and Insect Bites Darrell Miller 11/10/07
Clinical Strength Eye Support FAQ's Darrell Miller 1/11/06
Ideal Vision from Thompson Nutritional Darrell Miller 11/18/05
Calendula Cream – Nature’s Healing Marigold Darrell Miller 11/7/05
Benefits of Total Daily Formula Darrell Miller 10/13/05
The A Team Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Aromessentials Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin Darrell Miller 6/6/05
Natural Progesterone Cream - For Woman of All ages Darrell Miller 6/4/05
Lutein 6mg, 20mg, help stop macular degeneration ... Darrell Miller 6/2/05



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Hair health
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Date: July 16, 2012 08:39 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Hair health

Hair health

Caring for your hair can be quite tricky sometimes, especially if you happen to own a little longer strands than average. The joy of keeping hair is seeing it shinny, silky, strong, consistent and admirable luster that it comes with. However, archiving these properties is next to impossible if there happen to be one to two hair disorders or diseases interacting with your hair.

The commonest and perhaps most frustrating of the hair disorders is hair loss, whichever the cause, the results are nowhere near to pleasing. Other disorders and diseases that make our hair loss its admirable beauty and luster include; trichodystrophy, alopecia areata, Telogen effluvium, Androgenetic alopecia, Infectious folliculitis, Lichen planus, Lupus erythematosus, Ringworms just to name but a few.

You must have noted that a lot of hair shampoos, conditioners and “hair food” gels use a lot of herbal additives nowadays for improvinng hair health. Use of herbs is a natural way that can restore dry damaged or diseased hair and stimulate faster growth of stronger hair strands. You may apply hair herbal solutions directly to your hair and scalp or you may consume them for shiny and healthy hair depending on the formulation. Herbs can also go as far as treating dandruff, hair loss and restoring your luscious locks.

Are hair herbal products safe?

Herbs are a natural and safe way of treating and restoring hair health unlike their synthetic counterparts, this does not however mean that they are completely safe for everyone. Some people may have allergic reactions from use of some herbs so if you suspect any possibility of an allergic reaction you may want to perform a little test before using the herbs. You can apply a small amount on your wrist and check after two days to see if there is any reaction before proceeding to use the particular herb. Be sure to consult with your physician especially if you are pregnant.

Common herbs used to restore hair health

Rosemary: according to experts, rosemary helps fight dandruff, stimulate rapid and strong hair growth, and bring back luster to your hair. To get the above benefits from this herb, you can add rosemary in foods, or formulate rosemary water through socking the foliage in a cub of warm water for some times. You can then use the resulting water to rinse your hair.

Horsetail: this herb is an excellent source of silica. Silica is good at strengthening the hair from its core while restoring the shine. Horsetail herb can be used through deriving a shampoo from its foliage. Add 2-3 table spoons of crashed horsetail leaves into ½ cup of hot water. The mixture is the added to baby shampoo. Use this to shampoo your hair regularly.

Aloe Vera: aloe Vera gel extract is known for its numerous medicinal properties such calming irritated skin in addition to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. When the gel is massaged into the scalp, it has the ability to restore the hair's PH balance while sealing in the hair moisture content and consequently acting as a perfect natural conditioner. Additionally, aloe Vera also stimulates hair growth and therefore used for Alopecia treatment.

Ginkgo Biloba: this is a well known herbal remedy for quite a number of health issues including improving blood circulation to the skin and brain. Due to this medicinal property, Ginkgo Biloba helps in delivering of extra nutrients to the hair follicles and promotes hair growth. It's therefore recommended by most health practitioners for hair loss treatment. Stinging nettle-this herb stops conversion of testosterone to DHT which is the major contributor of hair lose in men. Stinging nettle extracts and powders are available commercially and are most effective when used together with pygeum or palmetto. You can also make green tea from the dried and ground powder of its leaves.

Other similarly useful herbs for restoring your health include Marigold, licorice, chamomile, parsley, birch and burdock.

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Feverfew
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Date: August 01, 2008 12:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Feverfew

It seems more and more common that people are looking at every possibility to wellness before they make a decision on the best form of treatment for them, with many taking their time to search for the best possible solution. Feverfew is a medicinal folk remedy, used abundantly in the past, and is currently being used because of its beneficial effects. For thousands of years, feverfew has been used as a medical treatment and is now becoming one of the most common herbal relievers of migraine pain. Scientific research has recently become available on the use of this herb in treatment of migraines and other forms of inflammation and pain, making interest in feverfew grow rapidly.

The feverfew plant is a member of the Asteracea or Compositae family, along with flowers such as the daisy, sunflower, black-eyed Susan, Echinacea, calendula, dandelion, burdock, and Marigold. Feverfew is often referred to by other names including featherfew, featerfoil, febrifuge, wild quinine, and bachelor’s button. A busy perennial that grows from one to three feet in height, feverfew looks similar to the daisy plant with white rays and a yellow center but is smaller in size. The entire plant has a strong bitter smell which allows it to repel bees and other insects. Many people believe that the name feverfew came from the use of the flower to bring down fevers, while others believe that its name originated from the English version, featherfew, which describes the shape of the leaves on the feverfew plant.

For thousands of years, feverfew has been used for the treatment of an abundant amount of ailments. Although the exact origin of the first use is unknown, references to feverfew can be found all throughout history. In ancient times, feverfew was used in childbirth, to treat fevers, melancholy, and congestion of the lungs, as well as inflammation and swellings. Feverfew was also used for many female problems and strengthening the womb, also promoting menstrual flow. Another use of feverfew was for painful headaches, especially migraines. Feverfew is an extremely complex substance, containing several essential oils such as L-camphor, L-borneol, terpens, and esters. Another active ingredient of the feverfew plant is parthenolide. Parthenolides have been found to inhibit prostaglandins, which are found to be partially responsible for migraines as well as the inflammation process.

With headaches being a problem since the beginning of time, they are one of the most common medical complaints. Migraines are caused due to inflammation of blood vessels in the brain, which causes an intense headache pain. To determine if a headache can be classified as a migraine one should note the following: if only one side of the head is affected; whether flashing lights, blind spots, or feelings of irritability and depression occur immediately before the headache; stomach distress along with nausea and vommitting; and someone in the immediate family also suffering from migraines. The two main contributors to the problem of migraines are the trigeminal nerve system and serotonin, the nerve chemical.

Migraines involve excessive dilation or contraction of the blood vessels that are found in the brain and make up about 6% of the total number of headaches, with about 10% of the population suffering from migraines at any given time of the year, and the majority of these people being women. Migraines can be triggered by the following factors: stress, eating certain foods, alcohol, food additives such as sodium nitrate, changes in weather, seasons, time zones, or altitude, disturbance in sleep patterns, disturbance in eating habits, hormonal fluctuations, pollution, loud noise, flickering lights, constipation, and low blood sugar.

In conclusion, an increase in some of the trigger factors previously listed is thought to be the cause for the fact that the number of individuals suffering from migraines continues to climb, with the occurrence of migraines increasing by almost 60% among all age groups during the past ten years. This may be due to pollutants and poor diets that lack essential fatty acids and plastics that mimic prostaglandins which regulate the inflammation pathways in the body. So if you are suffering from pain, specifically migraines, give feverfew a try.

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Echinacea Purpurea Root
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Date: June 17, 2008 06:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea Purpurea Root

There are nine known species of Echinacea native to the United States and southern Canada. The most commonly used and most potent of them is Echinacea purpurea.

Other common names for Echinacea are purple coneflower, American coneflower and coneflower. The plants contain large heads of flowers that bloom in early to late summer.

In North America, Native Americans used Echinacea more than any other herb for its healing properties. For Europeans and Americans, it was believed to aid in curing Anthrax and snakebites as well as contain antimicrobial properties.

Echinacea is well known for its abilities to boost the immune system and to help fight infections. It is also widely used to prevent infections, colds and the flu. In lesser known medicinal practices, it is used to treat wounds and such skin problems as acne and boils. Some studies have shown that Echinacea has been effective in treating upper respiratory infections.

The whole Echinacea plant is used for treating various indications. Fresh or dried, the plant and roots are used to make teas, extracts, juices or external salves, creams and ointments. As a general rule, the fresh-pressed juice of the Echinacea plant is most effective in treating colds in children. In adults, both the root and herb in combination are most effective.

When taken at the first signs of a cold, Echinacea has been found to reduce the length and severity of cold symptoms. Be aware that Echinacea is not a one-dose fix-it remedy. Begin taking recommended doses at the first signs of a cold. Subsequent doses should be taken regularly, according to the product label, until all symptoms have disappeared.

Unfortunately, many herbal preparations can vary in effectiveness due to a lack of systematic extraction and refining. It is best to research the manufacturers of herbal products to find out how they cultivate and store their herbs. Their methods will cause the chemical compositions to vary greatly. The different parts of the plant that are used vary widely in their chemical makeup as well. One part may be extremely useful as an antimicrobial, while another may stimulate stronger reactions from the immune system. Other factors that may affect the quality of the product you purchase are:

* Species * Plant part * Extraction method * Contamination * Adulteration

Side Effects and Warnings:

When taken orally (by mouth), Echinacea usually does not produce any side effects. In rare cases, some people have experienced allergic reactions and side effects that include:

* Rashes or dermatitis * Pruritus (itching) * An increase in asthma symptoms * Anaphylaxis (life threatening allergic reaction) * Hepatoxicity * Nausea * Dizziness * Dyspnea (difficulty breathing)

All of these symptoms tend to be mild and infrequent. If you suffer from asthma symptoms, you should probably avoid using echinacea. In most cases the most common side effects are gastrointestinal in nature, such as gas or mild cramping. People are much more likely to experience side effects if they are allergic to other plants in the daisy family. These plants include:

* Ragweed * Chrysanthemums * Marigolds * Daisies

Use of Echinacea in children younger than 12 years is not recommended due to lack of sufficient data to support safety. It is also not recommended for use in pregnant or nursing women.

Echinacea should not be used if you have progressive systematic or auto-immune disorders, connective tissue disorders or other diseases that may be related to these. It should not be taken if you are taking immune-suppressants and heap-toxic drugs. It may also interfere with anesthesia.

It is important to communicate with your health care providers. Be sure they are aware of any alternative herbs or other substances you are using and what their purpose is in your daily diet.

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Natural Remedies For Bumps, Bruises, Scrapes, and Insect Bites
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Date: November 10, 2007 09:52 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Remedies For Bumps, Bruises, Scrapes, and Insect Bites

Whether you are a child or an adult you are as susceptible to the damage done to skin and soft tissue by hard activities as anybody else. So what can you look for if you decide have a day outdoors and face the dangers that you will come across that want to leave you bruised ,scratched, scraped, cut and itching from all the falls, knocks, stings and bites that most people experience when they are more used to spending their time indoors?

Bruises are caused by a knock, and can happen without you even being aware of it. The blood vessels get damaged and leak. If you notice it right away, you can lessen the degree of bruising by applying ice or cold water to constrict the capillaries and cut down the flow of blood leaking from them. Some people bruise easier than others, and excessive bruising for no apparent reason could be a symptom of a more serious underlying condition and you should see your doctor.

A bump, or lump, can appear for many reasons, but generally settles down after a while. It can simply be the body's reaction to a hard knock that did not damage the blood vessels, but prompted a natural swelling to protect the area. They can also be caused by insect bites. You don’t always see these little pests – they have lunch then zip off without you even being aware of it until the area begins to itch and swell. However, if you have a lump under the armpit, in your neck or behind your ears it could be a swollen gland and you should contact your physician.

Everybody gets minor scrapes now and again, and when you spend any time outside you can get bitten by insects such as mosquitoes, midges, blackflies, horse flies – you name it, they will lunch on you as on any other animals. You can also get stung by vegetable nasties, though if you do then look around for a remedy. Strangely, many stinging plants have another plant close by that can be used as a remedy. This is likely because, after being stung, people just rubbed whatever was handy on the area and eventually these remedies were discovered.

Thus, dock leaves are often found beside nettles, and touch-me-not beside poison ivy. These are good natural remedies for stings caused through contact with these particular plants, and there are many other natural remedies that can be used for the other everyday hurts that people receive just for carrying out normal activities outside in a natural environment. Let’s have a look at some of the natural remedies that people have used through the ages, and that are still used to this day, even in proprietary creams and salves.

Calendula, or Marigold, is very effective in relieving skin irritations and inflammation. It can be applied topically to relieve the symptoms of bruises, cuts and scrapes, and also for the initial treatment of burns and scalds. It has anti-inflammatory properties and can be used on inflamed or infected cuts and skin lesions. These properties are believed to be due to the high level of flavonoids found in calendula that have anti-oxidant properties and help the immune function to do its work. Among these is the powerful Quercetin with its strong anti-histamine properties.

It also appears to possess anti-viral properties, though the reason for this is not clear and is still under investigation. Marigold also contains carotenoids and triterpene saponins, both of which will contribute to the medicinal effects. The dried flowers or leaves, or the fresh flowers, can be used and it is an old adage that pus will not form where Marigold is used. It is also good for the treatment of insect bites and boils, where it appears to either prevent infection or clear up any that are there. It has also been proven to prevent the seeping of blood from the capillaries in scrapes, and to promote blood clotting.

Calendula was used during the First World War by British doctors to dress wounds and prevent infection. A dressing steeped in a mild solution of calendula extract was enough, and it likely saved many lives.

Another plant with similar properties is the alpine Arnica, which is useful to reduce the swelling and pain of bruises. It works simply by rubbing the leaves on the area when you have a fall or a hard knock. The active ingredients here are again flavonoids, and sesquiterpene lactones along with tannins, carotenoids and thymol. These, along with the flavonoids, stimulate the circulation and carry away any fluids trapped in bruises and swellings.

The sesquiterpene lactones act as anti-inflammatories and boost the immune system, helping to reduce swelling and pain. In fact terpenoid chemicals are common to many of the herbs and flowers that have found a use in the relief of pain in swelling and bruises. The same is true of Ledum, better known as Rosemary, traditionally used for the treatment of burns, ulcers dandruff, and dry skin and to get rid of lice among many other internal and topical applications.

The active ingredients of rosemary (ledum) include mono-, di- and triterpenes and also the ubiquitous flavonoids and camphor and linalool. If you wash down burns, grazes and cuts with a wash of ledum extract, then you will protect the patient from infection at the time when they are most vulnerable to infectious agents.

Hypericum has uses as an anti-inflammatory and antiseptic, and is therefore useful for exactly the same conditions as all of the above. It also has astringent properties, so that like Calendula, Hypericum can be used to prevent the capillary seepage that frequently leads to infections. The active ingredients here are apparently flavonoids again, with their antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Considering that they are among the most common antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents in the plant world; it is no coincidence that flavonoids just happen to be contained in the vast majority of natural treatments for scratches, grazes and bruises. They reduce swelling, pain and inflammation, and also act as antiseptics by disrupting the cell walls of bacteria.

Hypericum is well known by its alternative name St. John’s Wort, where it is used in the treatment of depression. However, the active ingredients here are mainly hyperforin and hypericin, which have little to do with the topical benefits of the plant.

If you have suffered from insect bites and stings, then you would have been thankful had you brought some Apis Mellifica with you. Obtained from bees, this again contains terpenes among many other chemicals, and is used paradoxically in the treatment of bee stings and other insect stings and bites. It’s amazing how many of these old remedies contain terpenes of various types and also flavonoid chemicals. It is useful for most rashes that have raised puffy lumps, such as hives.

Finally, if you manage to stay out without getting any bruises, abrasions, scratches or bites, you will be very lucky. However, if you get sunburn through being out in the sun too long, just look around for some stinging nettle, or Urtica. The leaf contains polysaccharides and lectins that stop the production of prostaglandins in the body that cause inflammation. Your sunburn will ease and you be able to return home relatively symptom free from your day outdoors.

These natural remedies can be hard to find growing naturally due to many factors such as the time of year or your geographical location these herbs may grow in. Alternative sources are available at your local health food store where you can find all the above mentioned herbs in ointments and creams specifically formulated for your needs.



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Clinical Strength Eye Support FAQ's
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Date: January 11, 2006 10:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Clinical Strength Eye Support FAQ's

Clinical Strength Eye Support FAQ's

What makes Clinical Strength Eye Support an effective supplement?

Though there are many biologically active ingredients in the formula the pair that have the greatest body of research to support their inclusion in Clinical Strength Eye Support is Lutein and Zeaxanthin.

According to a study published in the April 2004 edition of Optometry: The Journal of the American Optometric Association, the lutein antioxidant supplementation trial (LAST) concluded that visual function of study participants with symptoms of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) improved with the intake of lutein alone or lutein together with other nutrients, such as antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

Lutein and Zeaxanthin are fat soluble, yellow colored carotenoids found naturally in green leafy vegetables like spinach, egg yolks, corn, peaches and Marigolds. Though these carotenoids are found in fatty tissues throughout the body, by far the highest concentration is found in the macula and retina of the eye. These fat-soluble antioxidants have been found to stop free radical reactions specifically the photo-reactive oxygen species that are particularly damaging to eye and skin tissues.

What role do some of the other key ingredients play? Beta-Carotene is another antioxidant carotenoid found naturally in dark green and orange-yellow vegetables and fruit. Unlike Lutein however Beta-carotene can be converted to Vitamin A as needed by the body. Vitamin A is necessary for proper eye function and may reduce cataract formation. Bilberry, Green Tea, Ginkgo Biloba and Grapeseed extracts contribute compounds called Polyphenols and Anthocyanidins. These antioxidant compounds protect blood vessels that supply needed blood flow to the eyes and peripheral tissues. Rutin and the other Bioflavonoids stabilize the collagen matrix and maintain the integrity of the vital blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to the eyes. Vitamins C and E are antioxidants that inhibit free radical damage and are used by the body to prevent some of the degenerative patterns related to the aging process. Vitamin C may protect the eye from UV rays that can damage the lens and cause cataracts.

Taurine is a sulfur containing amino acid that is the most abundant amino acid in the retina of the eye and plays a role in healthy vision.

Selenium and Zinc are minerals that help the body to produce the important cellular antioxidants Glutathione and SOD that protect eye tissue from oxidative damage.



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Ideal Vision from Thompson Nutritional
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Date: November 18, 2005 01:30 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ideal Vision from Thompson Nutritional

Ideal Vision Dietary Supplement is a powerful blend of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and herbs formulated to provide nutritive support for healthy eyesite. Recent research suggests that supplementing with antioxidants such as zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E and betaCarotene may have potential beneficial effects on eye health in certain population groups.

- 15mg Lutein
- Includes Astaxanthin, Bilberry, and Other Important Antioxidants
- Incredible Price!

Supplement Facts:

  • Serving Size 3 tablets
  • Vitamin A (as natural mixed carotenoids isolated from the sea algae Dunaliella salina) - 25,000 IU
  • Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) - 500mg
  • Vitamin E (as natural source 400 IU d-alpha tocopheryl succinate) - 400IU
  • Riboflavin (B-2) - 10mg
  • Zinc (as Zinc gluconate) - 80mg
  • Selenium (as selenium amino acid chelate) - 100mcg
  • Copper (as cupric oxide) - 2mg
  • N-Acetyl Cysteine (amino acid) - 100mcg
  • Bilberry (fruit extract)(supplying 9mg [36%] anthocyanosides) - 25mg
  • Lutein (as Marigold [tagetes erectus] flower extract)(Supplying 660mcg [4.4%] zeaxanthin) - 1mg
  • Astaxanthin (as astaxanthin complex from Haematococcus pluvialis extract) - 1mg





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Calendula Cream – Nature’s Healing Marigold
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Date: November 07, 2005 02:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Calendula Cream – Nature’s Healing Marigold

Calendula Cream – Nature’s Healing Marigold

Calendula Cream is a superior soothing cream for dry, irritated or sensitive skin. The blend of natural calendula extract in a pure vegetable base is excellent for moisturizing skin, as well as soothing and softening dry hands and face. Calendula officinalis (Marigold) is widely recognized for its proven ability to care for skin problems, from chapped hands to open wounds.

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Benefits of Total Daily Formula
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Date: October 13, 2005 04:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Benefits of Total Daily Formula

Benefits of Total Daily Formula

Mixed Carotenoids

All fruits and vegetables contain carotenes, the plant pigments responsible for the rich variety of colors we enjoy in the natural world. Beta carotene is the most familiar member of the carotene family. But beta carotene never exists by itself; it is always found with other carotenes in foods. We need more than just beta carotene alone. Carotenes are powerful antioxidants, which means they help reduce the body's free radical burden. Research suggests that carotenes work as a team to keep us healthy.5 Total Daily Formula provides beta carotene, alpha carotene, lutein, lycopene, zeaxanthin and cryptoxanthin from natural sources such as algal extracts, carrot oil, Marigold and tomatoes (Caromix®).

Corn-Free Vitamin C

Total Daily Formula uses only corn-free vitamin C (ascorbic acid). The full daily intake of 6 tablets provides an exceptionally generous 800 mg of vitamin C.

Optimum B Vitamin Servings

Total Daily Formula supplies ample amounts of all essential B vitamins. Vitamin B3 is given as niacin plus an extra helping of niacinamide, the non-flush form of this important vitamin. The body uses pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) to deal with stress, so the formula provides 150 mg, which is 15 times the RDA. Vitamin B6 is another B vitamin people may run short of, so 60 mg -- 30 times the RDA -- is supplied. The formula contains 800 mcg of folic acid, the vitamin now recognized by the FDA as essential for prevention of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid also helps prevent accumulation in the body of homocysteine, a metabolite of the amino acid methionine.6 A high blood homocysteine level is now considered to be a risk factor for heart disease.7

Flavonoids

Flavonoids, also known as "bioflavonoids." are plant pigments widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom.8 Previously known as "Vitamin P," because they help reduce capillary permeability (leakiness) flavonoids are now regarded as "semi-essential" non-vitamin nutrients that benefit health in a variety of ways.9 In addition to maintaining the structure of blood vessels, flavonoids function as versatile antioxidants. Flavonoids protect vitamin C from destruction by free-radicals, helping to preserve the body's vitamin C supply.10 Total Daily Formula provides 100 mg of pure flavonoids from 112 mg of citrus extract.

Three superior sources of Calcium

Total Daily Formula contains three of the best absorbed and most effective forms of calcium available. MCHC (microcrystalline hydroxyapatite concentrate) is a naturally-derived compound composed of calcium, plus all the minerals and organic factors in living bone tissue. MCHC has been clinically shown to benefit bone health.11 Calcium citrate malate is a very well-absorbed form of supplemental calcium shown in recent research to be helpful for postmenopausal women.12,13 Calcium glycinate is chelated with the amino acid glycine, one of the most efficient mineral carriers for effective absorption.14,15

Magnesium glycinate

Magnesium is essential for strong bones and healthy hearts. This versatile mineral also regulates nerve function, keeps muscles relaxed and coordinates activity of over 300 enzymes in the body.16 Total Daily Formula contains 100 percent magnesium glycinate for exceptional absorption and gentleness on the intestinal tract.17 Magnesium glycinate has been clinically tested on people with severe malabsorption with excellent results.18

Trace Minerals

Total Daily Formula provides - in addition to zinc, chromium, selenium and iodine - vanadium and molybdenum. Vanadium helps maintain normal blood sugar.19 Molybdenum works as a co-factor for enzymes that help detoxify and eliminate foreign substances from the body.20

Bioperine® for Enhanced Absorption

Bioperine® is a natural extract derived from black pepper that enhances nutrient absorption. Preliminary trials on humans have shown significant increases in the absorption of nutrients consumed along with Bioperine®. 21 Betaine HCL - supplies HCL (hydrochloric acid) to assist digestion. All natural tablet coating made of vegetable concentrate and beta carotene.

Scientific References
1. Cheraskin, E. Ringsdorf, W.M., Clark, J.W. 1968. Diet and Disease. (p. 16). New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing.

2. Morgan, K.J. et. al. Magnesium and calcium dietary intakes of the U.S. population. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 1985;4:195-206.

3. Lakschmanan, F.L., Rao, R.B., Kim, W.W., Kelsay, J.L. Magnesium intakes, balances and blood levels of adults consuming self-selected diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1984;40:1380-89.

4. Mertz, W. The Essential Trace Elements. Fed. Proc. 1970;29:1482.

5. Perry, G. Byers, T. Dietary carotenes, vitamin C and vitamin E as protective antioxidants in human cancers. Annu. Rev. Nutr. 1992;12:139-59.

6. Landgren, F., et. al. Plasma homocysteine in acute myocardial infarction: Homocysteine-lowering effect of folic acid. J Int Med 1995;237:381-88.

7. Clarke, R., et. al. Hyperhomocysteinemia: an independent risk factor for vascular disease. New Eng J Med 1991;324:1149-55. 8. Havsteen, B. Flavonoids, a class of natural compounds of high pharmacological potency. Biochemical Pharmacology 32(7):1141-48.

9. Middleton, E. The flavonoids. TIPS 1984; 5:335-38.

10. Roger, C.R. The nutritional incidence of flavonoids: some physiological and metabolic considerations. Experientia 44(9):725-804.

11. Dixon, A. St. J. Non-hormonal treatment of osteoporosis. British Medical Journal 1983;286(6370):999-1000.

12. Smith, K.T. et. al. Calcium Absorption from a new calcium delivery system (CCM). Calcif Tissue Int 1987;41:351-352.

13. Dawson-Hughes, B. et. al. A controlled trial of the effect of calcium supplementation on bone density in postmenopausal women. New England Journal of Medicine 1990 Sep 27;323(13):878-883.

14. Albion Research Notes Vol. 4, No. 1, ©Albion Laboratories Jan,1995.

15. Ashmead, H.D. Intestinal Absorption of Metal Ions and Chelate, Springfield: Charles C Thomas, ©1985.

16. Wester, P.O., Dyckner, T. The importance of the magnesium ion. Magnesium deficiency-symptomatology and occurrence. Acta Med Scand 1992; (Suppl) 661:3-4.

17. Albion Research Notes Vol. 3, No. 1, ©Albion Laboratories, Feb 1994.

18. Schutte, S., et. al. Bioavailability of Mg diglycinate vs MgO in patients with ileal resections. Abstract 115, AJCN 1992;56(4).

19. Cohen, N. et. al. Oral vanadyl sulfate improves hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. J. Clin Invest 1995; 95:2501-09.

20. Sardesi, V.M. Molybdenum: An essential trace mineral element. Nutr Clin Pract 1993; 8:277-81.

21. Bioperine® - Nature's Bioavailability Enhancing Thermo-nutrient. Executive Summary' 1996; Sabinsa Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.



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The A Team
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Date: June 14, 2005 06:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The A Team

The A Team

by Gregory Meade Energy Times, October 11, 2004

Want the A Team playing to improve your health? When you accumulate enough antioxidants to help you attack the molecular marauders out to mar your well-being, you improve your chances of avoiding illness.

Nowadays you hear plenty of talk about the benefits of antioxidant nutrients. Antioxidants are the ammunition the body uses to fight off internal damage. They offer the body the means to fight against disease but, at the same time, your body must be in the position to use them optimally. That means getting enough sleep, consistently exercising and avoiding overly processed foods. Those lifestyle habits allow your body to garner its resources and effectively implement antioxidants in its quest for well-being.

Your body has a love-hate relationship with oxidation: Can't live without it, often has trouble living with it. For instance, the production of energy in your cells requires oxidation. But the byproducts of that process, problematic molecules called free radicals, have to be chemically changed or eliminated to avoid the damage that results when they interact with other parts of the cell. Left unchecked, these molecular troublemakers can wreak havoc, oxidizing and punching holes in cell membranes and damaging other structures they contact. Antioxidant nutrients are used to defend against oxidation, quell these harmful destroyers and limit the potential harm they can cause.

For a quick glimpse of one of your basic antioxidant defenses, look in the mirror. The color in your eyes represents antioxidant protection against oxidative injury from the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. Sunlight's energy sets loose free radicals every time it enters the lenses in your eyes. Pigments absorb this radiation and, in most cases, render it harmless.

As part of your vision's defenses, two of the antioxidant pigments in your food, lutein and zeaxanthin, are deposited by your body in certain areas of your eyes-in a section called the macula as well as the lens (BJ Opthalmol 1998; 82:907-10).

Lutein and zeaxanthin are classified as carotenoids, chemical relatives of beta carotene, the antioxidant pigment that makes carrots orange, and lycopene, the anticancer red coloring found in tomatoes. These fat-soluble nutrients are also present in algae. In both your eyes and plants, these nutrients absorb the destructive ultraviolet rays that give birth to free radicals.

Blindness Protection

Studies show that consuming large amounts of these pigments lowers your risk of a common form of blindness called age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and drops your chances of age-related cataracts. (More than 30 million people worldwide suffer from ARMD, and cataracts is the leading cause of blindness across the globe.)

When the sun's rays enter the eye, lutein and zeaxanthin absorb and filter out dangerous radiation before it can injure the macula. The macula is the central part of the retina that allows us to see very fine detail. Otherwise, over time, as the macula deteriorates, our vision worsens. In addition, some researchers believe these nutrients help lower your chances of cancer.

Lutein and zeaxanthin are found in spinach, Brussels sprouts, corn, collard greens, green beans, egg yolks, broccoli, cabbage, kale, lettuce, kiwi and honeydew melons. The petals of yellow flowers like Marigolds and nettles are also rich in these antioxidant nutrients.

Broccoli Protection

You can also increase your chances of better sight as you age by consuming sulphoraphane, an antioxidant found in broccoli. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found that sulphoraphane takes part in the body's efforts to shield eye cells from free radicals generated by ultraviolet light (Proc Natl Acad Sci 2004; 101(28):10446-51).

The researchers who performed this study believe that unlike the antioxidant nutrients vitamin C and natural vitamin E, sulphoraphane acts as an "indirect" antioxidant. That means that while those two vitamins are used by the body to directly defuse the harmful oxidative force of free radicals (and then must be replaced or regenerated in the cells), sulphoraphane acts indirectly, boosting the body's immunity defenses. Because of that indirect action, researchers point out, sulphoraphane lasts longer in the body and may produce a more profound, long-term antioxidant effect.

In other laboratory tests, researchers have discovered that sulphoraphane can kill Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium recognized 20 years ago as the cause of debilitating stomach ulcers and often-fatal stomach cancers (Proc Natl Acad of Sci 5/28/02). This research shows that sulphoraphane is even effective against antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter. Adding to its benefits, sulphoraphane can help kill bacteria both inside and outside stomach cells; when this bacteria hides inside of cells it is particularly difficult to fight.

" We've known for some time that sulforaphane had modest antibiotic activity," says Jed Fahey, a plant physiologist at Hopkins. "However, its potency against Helicobacter, even those strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, was a pleasant surprise."

Looking for Mr. Good Diet

For the biggest bang for your antioxidant buck, combine antioxidants with good lifestyle habits. A laboratory study of the heart-healthy effects of taking supplements of the antioxidant vitamins C and natural E along with L-arginine (an amino acid) found that exercise magnifies benefits (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 5/24/04, online). The scientists who performed this study recommend exercise along with antioxidants to boost your nutritional advantage.

The box score shows that when playing with the A Team you've got the best chance of hitting an antioxidant home run.



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Aromessentials
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Date: June 10, 2005 05:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Aromessentials

Aromessentials by Joanne Gallo , February 3, 2002

Aromessentials By Joanne Gallo

But aromatherapy is more than just a '90s-style novelty. The practice of using aromatic essential oils for psychological and physical well-being dates back more than 4,000 years to medicinal practices in Egypt and India.

The term "aromatherapy" was coined in 1937 by French cosmetic chemist R.M. Gattefosse, who discovered the benefits of essential oil after burning his hand in a laboratory accident. Gattefosse immersed his hand into the nearest available cool liquid: a vat of lavender oil. The near miraculous soothing of his pain and rapid healing spurred him to dedicate his life to the study of aromatic plants and their therapeutic effects.

How it Works

For those who turn their noses up at this most seemingly-subtle of senses, keep in mind that the perception of smell is 10,000 times more sensitive than the sense of taste. "The sense of smell is the sense of the imagination," noted French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau; this emotional connection lies at the heart of aromatherapy.

Aromas are transmitted rapidly from olfactory cells in the nose to the limbic system in the brain which perceives and responds to emotion, pleasure and memory. Scents trigger the limbic system to release neurochemicals which influence mood. Well-known neurochemicals like endorphins and serotonin help create a sense of well-being.

When you inhale essential oils, some of the molecules travel to the lungs, where they proceed to enter the bloodstream and circulate throughout the body.

Oils applied to the skin are absorbed into the bloodstream as well. Because they are oil/fat soluble, essential oils are highly absorbed by the body, where they circulate for anywhere from 20 minutes to 24 hours and are eventually eliminated through sweat and other bodily secretions.

Plant Power

Essential oils are extremely potent and volatile: approximately 75 to 100 times more concentrated than dried herbs.

Most essential oils are steam distilled from herbs, flowers and plants. Others are cold expressed from the rind of the fruit, which produces the purest essential oils because no heat or chemical treatment is involved.

The components of various oils are beneficial for a wide variety of beauty and hygiene conditions. Some of the more indispensable essential oils include:

Chamomile (anthemis nobilis): soothing properties for sensitive and inflamed skin; calming, balancing and relaxing.

Clary Sage (salvia sclarea): warming, female balancing herb used for PMS; calms anxiety, tension and stress; also used as a muscle relaxant for aches and pains.

Eucalyptus (eucalyptus globulus): antibacterial; fresh, herbal menthol aroma; widely used as an inhalant for colds, coughs and congestion; excellent for massaging tired or sore muscles.

Geranium (pelargonium graveolens): one of the best all-around tonic oils for mind and body; soothes nervous tension and mood swings; balances female hormones and PMS; gently astringent and antiseptic, it improves general tone and texture of skin.

Jasmine (jasminum grandiflorum): a warm, rich, sensual floral scent used historically as an aphrodisiac; moisturizing for dry/mature skin.

Lemon (citrus limonum): refreshing and invigorating; eases tension and depression; useful for oily skin and treatment of acne.

Peppermint (mentha piperita): cool, menthol, invigorating stimulant; cleans and purifies the skin.

Rosemary (rosmarinus officinalis): stimulating and uplifting; purifying and cleansing for all skin types; warm and penetrating for massage to ease muscular aches and pains.

Tea Tree (melaleuca alternifolia): an antiseptic from the leaves of the Australian tea tree; antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral; excellent for skin irritations like cold sores, insect bites and acne.

Ylang Ylang (cananga odorata): enticing and sensual; helps alleviate anger, stress, insomnia and hypertension; helps balance the skin's sebaceous secretions.

Oil Well

Essential oils can be utilized in a variety of ways: in electric or candle-based diffusers, to spread the aroma through a room; in sachets and air fresheners; added to shampoos and lotions; or diluted and applied to pulse points like the temples, on neck or on wrists. Undiluted essential oils should never be applied to the skin. First mix them with carrier oils: pure vegetable oils such as sweet almond oil, grapeseed oil and apricot kernel oil. Use a general guideline of six to 18 drops of essential oil per one ounce of vegetable oil. Blended, diluted oils are also available which can be used directly on your skin.

Pond's Aromatherapy Capsules come in four scents: Happy, which is fruity and floral; Romantic,with musk and vanilla; Relaxing, a floral and woodsy aroma; and Energizing, with fresh citrus and bright floral scents.

Sarah Michaels offers four essential oil blends: Sensual Jasmine, Soothing Lavender, Refreshing Citrus and Invigorating Peppermint.

The San Francisco Soap Company's Simply Be Well Line features an essential oil light ring set, a diffuser that uses the heat of a light bulb to spread an aroma through your room.

Tub Time

One of the most popular and luxurious ways to enjoy aromatherapy is in a steaming hot bath. Numerous bath products formulated with plant essences can turn your tub time into a rejuvenating experience. Body & Earth features Body Wash, Foam Bath and Soap in five essences: Vanilla Serenity, Lavender Whisper, Playful Peach, Raspberry Rapture and Pear Essence.

The Healing Garden offers a full line of aromatherapy products; try their Tangerinetherapy Wake Up Call Body Cleanser, Gingerlily Therapy Upbeat Bath & Shower Gel; or Minttherapy Fresh Start Bath & Shower Gel.

Simply Be Well products take traditional aromatherapy one step further by combining essential oils with herbal extracts and natural nutrients.

The line includes Shower Gel and Bath Salts in four fragrances: Explore contains ginkgo, eucalyptus, lemon and vitamin B6; Share features dong quai, passionflower, ylang ylang and zinc; Unwind includes kava kava, geranium, lavender and vitamin E; and Celebrate contains ginseng, wild mint, hemp and vitamin C.

Yardley London Bar Soaps, formulated with botanicals and moisturizers, are available in five fragrances: soothing English Lavender, exfoliating Oatmeal and Almond, Aloe Vera for natural healing, skin-softening Chamomile Essence, and astringent Evening Primrose.

Skin Deep

"Aromatherapy and the cosmetic use of essential oils have made a tremendous contribution to skin care," asserts Joni Loughran, author of Natural Skin Care: Alternative & Traditional Techniques (Frog, Ltd.). "Every type of skin (such as oily, dry, and normal) can benefit." Some of the natural products that can help balance your skin include these:

Kiss My Face Foaming Facial Cleanser for Normal/Oily skin features citrus oils which act as antiseptics, Marigold for healing, licorice root for toning, lavender to normalize oil production, plus the antioxidant green tea.

Kiss My Face's Gentle Face Cleaner for Normal/Dry skin includes essential oils plus organic, detoxifying herbs goldenseal and red clover, echinacea and rose hips with natural vitamin C.

Naturistics Almond Facial Moisture Cream contains almond, allantoin and calendula to smooth dry skin; Wild Chamomile Facial Lotion with rose hips and honeysuckle soothes and conditions rough skin.

Simply Be Well products, which use essential oils combined with herbal extracts like ginkgo and dong quai, are available in Body Lotion and Body Mist.

Wicks and Sticks

Perhaps the easiest way to get your aromatherapy fix is to light a candle and just sit back, relax and breathe.

The Healing Garden offers a wide variety of aromatic candles to suit your every mood; try their Green Teatherapy Meditation Candle; Jasminetherapy Embrace the Light Love Candle; or Lavendertherapy Peace & Tranquility Candle.



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Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin
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Date: June 06, 2005 08:45 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin

Skin Eternal

Source Naturals is proud to introduce our new SKIN ETERNAL Cosmetic Line. Our advanced skin care products recharge and revitalize your skin. Each product features scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin. You can nourish your skin with Source Naturals’ richly emollient SKIN ETERNAL CREAM smoothed under your eyes or on your neck. Or use our light, aqueous SKIN ETERNAL SERUM. Both products gently addresses imbalances and infuse skin with visible radiance. For a luxuriant, moisturizing bath, simply add SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL under warm running water. Whatever your individual preference, Source Naturals has a SKIN ETERNAL product that will leave your skin looking refreshed and energized.

Now available from Source Naturals®: a variety of elegant cosmetics to moisturize, smooth and tone your skin.

Your skin is a reflection of your health and well-being. To attain skin that looks truly alive, energized and refreshed, we believe a holistic approach is necessary. This includes nourishing your body with fresh, organic foods, exercising every day to motivate your mind and spirit, and eliminating unhealthy lifestyle choices. As part of this holistic approach, the Skin Eternal™ cosmetic line feeds your skin cells with scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin.

SKIN ETERNAL™ CREAM

Apply this rich and luxurious blend under and around your eyes or massage it with upward strokes onto your neck—your skin will immediately feel the difference! SKIN ETERNAL CREAM features nutrients, natural oils and plant extracts. Included are alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, jojoba oil, MSM, squalane, tocotrienols, and vitamin C-ester, as well as extracts of grape seed, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, sage, Marigold, and grapefruit seed.

SKIN ETERNAL™ SERUM

SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is an aqueous moisturizing serum that contains a rich blend of nutrients and plant extracts. It is easily absorbed, and immediately makes skin feel softer and replenished. SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils, and contains nutrients and herbs unavailable in other topical preparations. These include aloe vera, alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, MSM, vitamins A, C-ester, D-3 and E, and chamomile. Source Naturals also offers SKIN ETERNAL DMAE SERUM.

SKIN ETERNAL™ BATH OIL

OUR NEW SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL adds to your skin’s hydrolipic film, lightly coating your skin with nutrients. It holds moisture inside and protects your skin. Its unique formula is rich in alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, essential fatty acids, vitamins C-ester and E, plus other nutrients and plant extracts. SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils. And it is hypoallergenic and contains no alpha hydroxy acids—so it can be used even on delicate, sensitive skin.

Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Skin: A Strategy for WellnessSM

Eat a Healthy Diet Low-nutrient foods, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates, will not provide the vitamins and minerals your skin needs. Choose unprocessed organic foods, high in antioxidants such as beta carotene (carrots, apricots, and squash), vitamin C (oranges and peppers), vitamin E (cold-pressed oils, nuts and seeds), selenium (tuna, garlic, onions and broccoli) and zinc (whole grains, most seafood, and onions). Essential fatty acids, such as those in oily fish, flaxseed and olive oil, are important for skin repair. Eat high-fiber fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals, and brown rice. Restrict excess sodium intake.

Take Supplements

Key nutraceuticals can help radiate beauty from within, by supporting body systems involved with healthy, radiant skin. These nutraceuticals include alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, ascorbyl palmitate (vitamin C-ester), vitamin E and grapeseed extract. Source Naturals offers you SKIN ETERNAL™ tablets with these five ingredients, to protect against free radical damage and provide cofactors for healthy skin tissue. Source Naturals SKIN ETERNAL PLUS is a Bio-Aligned Formula™, which includes these key nutraceuticals plus 30 more! It is designed to support multiple body systems: antioxidant defense, connective tissue, cell membranes, cell renewal, blood and liver cleansing, muscle and nerve function, and stress response. It is also useful to supplement with essential fatty acids, such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, flaxseed and primrose oil.

Drink Water

Our bodies are made up of 50-70% water, so it’s important to drink at least 1.5 liters daily. Water flushes out wastes, and acts as an internal moisturizer, keeping skin hydrated and supple. Spring water is beneficial since it contains trace minerals vital to healthy skin.

Protect Your Skin from the Sun

Avoid direct sun from 10 am to 4 pm, when ultraviolet radiation is strongest. Use sunscreen even during winter and on cloudy days. Wear a broad-brimmed hat and sunglasses with full UV protection.

Get Plenty of Sleep

Research has shown that skin regenerates itself between 1-3 am; lack of sleep during those hours can cause skin to look dull or puffy. Taking a melatonin supplement can be helpful in supporting your body’s normal sleep cycle.

Exercise Regularly

Exercise increases circulation, which delivers nutrients necessary for a clear, glowing complexion. It also burns off fat, helps eliminate toxins, and is a great stress reliever. Exercise three to five times a week until you are perspiring freely and breathing deeply.

Avoid Excessive Alcohol and Coffee

Alcohol weakens the immune system and depletes nutrients. It causes dehydration, depriving skin of moisture, and overtaxes the liver, which helps keep impurities from reaching other organs. Alcohol consumption can lead to broken or distended capillaries, especially over the nose and cheeks. Caffeine-rich beverages like coffee promote dehydration, leaving skin flaky and dry. Substitute herbal or green tea for coffee.

Stop Smoking

Smoking slows healing and regeneration, causes carbon monoxide to increase in blood, and induces free radical formation. Nicotine constricts blood vessels and reduces blood flow to skin. The benzopyrene in cigarette smoke inhibits absorption of vitamin C, which is important for collagen synthesis.



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Natural Progesterone Cream - For Woman of All ages
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Date: June 04, 2005 01:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Progesterone Cream - For Woman of All ages

Source Naturals® Eternal Woman™ PROGESTERONE CREAM is the first progesterone cream to utilize unique liposomal delivery of key ingredients. Liposomes are micro-penetrating lipid spheres made from lecithin, which pass through skin layers more easily than non-liposomal creams. Source Naturals PROGESTERONE CREAM features natural progesterone from healthful soy. Unlike creams which don’t divulge their progesterone content, Source Naturals PROGESTERONE CREAM is guaranteed to contain 500 mg of progesterone per ounce! This pure white cream softens and smoothes the skin. Along with natural progesterone, it features aloe vera, Mexican wild yam extract, natural vitamin E, lecithin phospholipid, jojoba oil, and extracts of sage, black cohosh root, ginseng, Marigold and grapefruit seed. Rosemary oil is added as a fragrance. Source Naturals PROGESTERONE CREAM is available in 2 and 4 oz jars. It is part of the Eternal Woman line of products and is suitable for women of all ages.

Source Naturals® Eternal Woman™ PHYTO-ESTROGEN CREAM offers some of the finest phytoestrogens in the botanical world, including 60 mg of soy isoflavones per ounce. For the first time ever, soy phytoestrogens are included in a liposomal delivery system. Liposome delivery is ideal for this product because the soy actually becomes part of the liposome membrane—for highest possible penetration of skin cells. Source Naturals PHYTO-ESTROGEN CREAM is an almond-colored cream which can be massaged into smooth skin areas to add oil-rich, moisture-binding protection. In addition to soy isoflavones, every ounce of Source Naturals PHYTO-ESTROGEN CREAM contains 150 mg of pomegranate seed juice (a natural source of estrone), 100 mg of red clover tops extract, 80 mg of black cohosh root extract, and 25 mg of dong quai root extract, along with aloe vera gel, natural vitamin E, grapefruit seed extract, rosemary oil and a natural cherry almond fragrance. Source Naturals PHYTO-ESTROGEN CREAM is available in 2 and 4 oz jars. It is part of the Eternal Woman line of products: for the Freedom to Change ™ naturally.



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Lutein 6mg, 20mg, help stop macular degeneration ...
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Date: June 02, 2005 01:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Lutein 6mg, 20mg, help stop macular degeneration ...

Lutein

One of the more surprising discoveries of modern nutritional science is that the very pigments which give brilliant color to our fruits and vegetables are powerful nutrients which can protect us from the rigors of time and environment. Lutein is one of the most recent discoveries in this field. In our diets, it’s found most abundantly in dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, collards and kale. Like beta-carotene, lutein is a powerful antioxidant which studies show can contribute to the protection of cells. But the most promising application of lutein may be its beneficial influence on the eyes, particularly in regard to macular degeneration. Source Naturals LUTEIN is a concentrated source of this important natural nutrient.

Like the beta-carotene that makes carrots orange and the lycopene that makes tomatoes red, lutein is a carotenoid. It is the pigment that makes corn yellow, and gives Marigolds their brilliant golden color. One of the most interesting aspects of the way carotenoids interact with the human body – beyond their broad spectrum antioxidant activity – is their tendency to be “organ specific.” Different carotenoids have an affinity for different organs in the body. In the case of lutein, it is found concentrated in the structure of our eyes.

Vision and Macular Health

The process of vision involves light being focused through the lens and onto the retina, the paper-thin tissue lining the back of the eyeball. The central portion of the retina, called the macula, receives the most light. Its millions of cells produce the sharp vision needed to read and see objects clearly. With age, tiny blood vessels grow over this area, causing a gradual distortion and loss of vision. This degeneration of the macular region of the retina is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment in the USA today. It affects almost 20% of people past the age of 65. Research has shown that these people have lower than normal amounts of macular pigment, which suggests the protective role played by these pigments. In fact, the latest research suggests that low levels of macular pigment is a cause, rather than a result, of macular deterioration.

Lutein – The Eyes Have It

Lutein and another carotenoid called zeaxanthin are the most dominant pigments in the macular region of the retina. (Source Naturals LUTEIN contains 5-7% zeaxanthin.) Their antioxidant properties help maintain the integrity of the blood vessels that supply the macular region of the retina: providing protection from photo-oxidation, the result of light striking the fatty acids in the retina. It seems that lutein is particularly active against the blue part of the spectrum, which can be the most damaging to our eyes. One study using lutein supplements resulted in a 15% increase in macular pigment levels after 72 days. In another study, people who consumed the equivalent of 6 mg of lutein per day were 40% less likely to experience macular problems. Another study using sets of identical twins demonstrated that macular lutein concentrations were related to dietary lutein. After consumption, lutein is found in significant quantities in blood serum, suggesting high bioavailability.

Our Connection with Plants

In this era of biochemistry, we’re rediscovering our vital connection with plant life. Although research into phytonutrients is relatively new, many plant compounds are being found in significant concentrations in the human body. Their presence in our blood serum, organs, and mothers’ milk suggests they play an important role in our body chemistry, and perhaps explains why we’ve appreciated them as foods throughout history. Like many carotenoids, lutein has evolved as an integral part of human biochemistry, with many benefits to our well-being. Since mammals cannot synthesize it, lutein must be obtained from the diet. Source Naturals LUTEIN is extracted from specially grown Marigold flowers high in Lutein, and purified by an exclusive patented process. So the next time you bathe your eyes in a golden bouquet of Marigolds, remember their beauty really is in the eye of the beholder.

References

  • • Bendich, A., & Olson, J.A. (1989). Biological actions of carotenoids. FASEB 3, 1927-32.
  • • Hammond, B.R., et al. (1995). Investigational Ophthalmology and Visions Science 36, 2531-41.
  • • Khachik, F., et al. (1995). Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 22, 236-46.
  • • Landrum, J. & Bone, R. (1996). In: Sies, H., ed. Advances in Pharmacology, Academic Press, 3-13.
  • • Schalch, W. (1992). Carotenoids in the retina: a review of their possible role in preventing or limiting damage caused by light and oxygen. Free Radicals and Aging, Basel, Switzerland: Birkhouser Verlag, 280-98.
  • • Seddon, J.M., et al. (1994). JAMA, 272(18), 1413-20.



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