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The diet habits you need to change immediately Darrell Miller 11/28/16
What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea? Darrell Miller 12/18/11
New Frontiers in Enzyme Supplementation Darrell Miller 2/16/06
HISTORY Darrell Miller 6/25/05
COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR - Supports Immune System Integrity Darrell Miller 6/1/05




The diet habits you need to change immediately
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Date: November 28, 2016 04:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The diet habits you need to change immediately





We have grown up being told to take changes gradually in order to build a better support system. We are taught that sudden or extreme changes are harder to maintain and may harm us in the end. A study from the University of California is contesting that belief. They had participants spend 5 hours a day committing to healthy habits such as exercise or taking wellness classes. The researchers noticed that several individual changes helped to reinforce the others, which made rapid changes to their wellbeing. We may have to rethink what we were taught as kids.

Key Takeaways:

  • Well research recently published by the University of California in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience has asked us to question that belief.
  • They were also advised to limit the consumption of alcohol, sleep at least eight hours a night and eat a diet of whole foods.
  • Researchers concluded that adopting a number of positive lifestyle changes simultaneously created an upwards spiral in which one positive lifestyle change appeared to support others.

"Many of us know that we need to drink more water but yet it is estimated that up to 70 per cent of us are dehydrated at any one time."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.bodyandsoul.com.au/diet/diets/the-diet-habits-you-need-to-change-immediately/news-story/8b292483a800db4c91042c594734e6ec&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmZjNGVlYTM1NDU3YmZmOGU6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNHSxez1QUh2Dy42BQZ-AkwTafHG_A

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What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea?
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Date: December 18, 2011 08:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is The Difference Between Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea?

In the advent of natural medicine these days it is important for us to also know what we are dealing with. We may feel that it is better because it is all natural but still, just like prescription drugs, herbal medicine also has its attractiveness to those who want to take advantage of people’s needs and momentary lapses of judgement. It does not mean that it is all natural it is good for the body right away, we also need to find out if it is exactly what we need or what we expect it to be. These herbal medicines and supplements in the market today come from plants and they are derived from it by various types of processing. As an example, we can look at Echinacea Angustifolia And Purpurea and what the differences are.

Echinacea

Both of them are species of this plant and we will only be able to understand more about those two if we are able to know their mother so to speak. It is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants and those two are part of the family and it has 7 other brothers and sisters so to speak because there are 9 species all in all including both the E Angustifolia and E. Purpurea. In modern natural medicine it has been known to have a lot of health benefits and the main one being its ability to support the immune system and help activate white blood cells to improve bodily functions. Other studies have learned that it has the ability to influence the increased production of interferon which is an essential part of the body’s defensive response to any viral attacks that may cause infections.

Echinacea Angustifolia

This flowering plant is believed by some to be a miracle plant especially in the natural medicine world. It has shown to have amazing healing powers and this is what makes it a popular part of alternative medicine. Throughout US history it has been used by native Americans and frontiersmen as tonic and somewhat of a cure all treatment for various ailments and rightfully so because in modern science it has been proven to have amazing antiviral and antifungal properties which makes it an effective treatment against infections, certain diseases, common colds and flu. Other uses that it may have are being a treatment for inflammation, skin ulcers and upper respiratory infection which needs more studies to be done but early results seem promising.

Echinacea Purpurea

This specie is not as popular as the other but it also can be effective. It basically is a perennial with long stems and long lasting lavender coloured flowers. It also has the power to help the immune system be stronger and is commonly made as a tea. Studies have shown that it has a mild natural antibiotic characteristic and its extracts has been known to have the ability to increase white blood cell count as well however it is helpful to note that it is better in smaller doses than in large ones.

Both forms posses the same properties primarily immune boosting properties; either one is good to use to help strengthen the body in times of cold and flu and disease.

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New Frontiers in Enzyme Supplementation
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Date: February 16, 2006 04:17 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: New Frontiers in Enzyme Supplementation

New Frontiers in Enzyme Supplementation

By Nick Rana, CN, NOW Quality Assurance

Serrazimes® is a proteolytic (protein digesting) enzyme system containing protease that is derived from edible non-genetically engineered fungi (Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus melleus), that is designed as an alternative for Serrapeptidase (also known as serratio-peptidase and serrapeptase) in dietary supplements used for cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, respiratory, or immune support.

Serrapeptidase was initially isolated from Serratia marcescens, a potentially pathogenic bacteria found in the gut of the Japanese silkworm. Recognized as a pharmacological agent, Serrapeptidase has wide clinical use in Asia and Europe for the management of assorted inflammatory processes (Rothschild, 1991). In recent years, recognition of the efficacy of the Japanese product has lead to growing interest in the US dietary supplement market.

The product’s efficacy and availability over the internet has fueled its popularity in the US dietary supplement industry, where it is used for anti-inflammatory support, cardiovascular support, respiratory support, and as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Recognizing the potential for a "Serrapeptidase-type” enzyme in the U.S. dietary supplement market, the National Enzyme Company developed a protease system that has the same in vitro (lab test) activity as Serrapeptidase, but that is from organisms that have a long history of safe use in dietary supplements. Serrazimes® is the product resulting from this search.

Since the 1960’s, plant and microbial protease enzymes have been studied for their role in the management of inflammation and inflammatory processes. In both animal and human trials, proteolytic enzymes, from a variety of sources, have repeatedly been shown to significantly reduce inflammation resulting from sickness or injury (Ryan, 1967)(Smyth et al, 1967)(Shaw, 1969)(Kumakura et al, 1988)(Lomax, 1999). The earlier research on the anti-inflammatory actions of proteases pointed entirely to their antithrombic and fibrinolytic aspects to explain this phenomenon. However, studies by Parmely (Infect and Immun Sept 1990) and others indicate that, in addition to degrading fibrin, microbial proteases may actually inactivate pro-inflammatory cytokines and to interrupt inflammatory responses.

Persons taking blood thinning or antibiotic medications and those with serious health disorders should consult their medical practitioner prior to taking Serrazimes®. As is the case with most supplements, please consult your doctor about the use of Serrazimes® during pregnancy and lactation.

The Product Development Team at NOW Foods is constantly researching new products like Serrazimes® to provide our customers with the tools that empower them to live healthier lives. Look also for our new unique digestive enzyme formulations from plant sources - backed by laboratory studies - to be introduced in March of 2006.

TECHNICAL NOTES:

Serrapeptidase is a selective alkaline metalloprotease enzyme, meaning that it works to activate specific biological systems of mammals and directly degrades or inhibits IgG and IgA immune factors as well as the regulatory proteins á-2-macroglobulin, á-2-antiplasmin, and antithrombin III (Molla et al, 1989)(Maeda and Molla, 1989).

While originally isolated from Serratia marcescens, a bacteria found in the gut of the Japanese silk worm, Serrapeptidase activity is also found in fermentation extracts of Serratia E-15, Aspergillus oryzae, and Aspergillus melleus. (Salamone and Wodzinski, 1997).

The Serrapeptidase activity of this high potency proteolytic (protein digesting) enzyme is determined using a spectrophotometric assay testing procedure that measures the enzyme’s ability to hydrolyze (digest) a standard casein protein substrate. Laboratory analyses have established that Serrazimes® has a 1:1 enzymatic equivalent of Serrapeptidase activity guaranteed to provide 600,000 specialized proteolytic Units per gram, or 20,000 units per capsule.



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Buy Serrapeptase at Vitanet ®

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HISTORY
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Date: June 25, 2005 12:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HISTORY

HISTORY

Ginseng is one of the oldest and most beneficial herbs in the world. It is probably the most popular adaptogenic herb used in traditional medicine. Shen- Nung’s Pharmacopoeia (A.D. 206-220) rated it the highest and most potent of herbs. People in northern China began using ginseng thousands of years ago. In fact, in 1904, it was suggested that all of the 400 million individuals who lived in China were familiar with and used ginseng to some degree.6 It was used to restore the “yang” quality in the body to heal disorders such as t u b e rculosis, coughs, diabetes, diarrhea, indigestion, nausea, kidney problems, rheumatism, gout, infected sores, insomnia, leprosy, and impotence. It was often used, and is still today, as a tonic to rejuvenate the body after an illness or prolonged stress.

Early herbalists recognized the shape of ginseng as resembling a human figure. They felt this was a sign that the root was valuable for healing the entire body.7 It is often referred to as the “man root” and is the subject of many legends and folk history. Proponents of the “Doctrine of Signatures” felt that because of the roots shape, it could heal any disorder in the body.8 The Chinese were so enthralled with the ginseng root that they even fought wars over the land used for growing it.

The Native Americans also enjoyed the healing, tonic benefits of the American ginseng plant. It was valued by the natives long before the arrival of the Europeans. Many tribes knew well the therapeutic powers of ginseng. They used it to relieve nausea, indigestion, vomiting, stomach problems, bronchitis, earaches, bleeding, asthma, headaches and as an aphrodisiac. The Cherokees referred to ginseng as “The Plant of Life” and used it to help relieve female problems such as menstrual cramps and excessive bleeding. The Mohawks were familiar with the value of ginseng and used it to help relieve fevers accompanying illness.9 The Seneca tribe was known to use ginseng to help elderly individuals prevent difficulties associated with the aging process.10 The Native Americans saw nature as a friend and looked for healing agents within the plant kingdom. American ginseng was used and valued for its medicinal properties. Folklore and customs are now being investigated in this world of modern medicine to rediscover the natural approach in healing and health.

Father Jurtoux has been credited with discovering the American ginseng. He was a French priest transferred from China to Canada around 1709. He collected some of the root near Montreal because they resembled the Panax ginseng. He shipped some back to China where it had a favorable reception. The French soon began employing some of the Native Americans to collect and then exported the American ginseng to China. Word of this fabulous and profitable ginseng spread to the United States. Soon the American ginseng was gathered and exported to China by Americans. Ginseng was a popular item in the early frontier days. It was used not only for trade but for consumption locally. George Washington mentioned ginseng in his personal journal, and famous frontiersmen such as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett were known to have been involved in the exporting of ginseng.

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COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR - Supports Immune System Integrity
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Date: June 01, 2005 11:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR - Supports Immune System Integrity

COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR

Colostrum, the first “mother’s milk, plays an important role in the body’s immune system—and your immune system needs to be in top shape to withstand all the foreign influences that pervade our environment. Now Source Naturals offers you COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR, a powerful new weapon developed through the use of breakthrough nutritional technology. Transfer factors are isolated from cow’s colostrum. As a result, each capsule of these immune system messengers contains significantly higher transfer factor activity (minimum 20 potency units) than our regular colostrum. Source Naturals is among the first national supplement companies to make this important, innovative product available to the general public.

Colostrum and Immune Health

Colostrum is the nourishing “milk” given to newborn mammals by their mothers. It is secreted only in the first 48 to 72 hours after birth. Although colostrum’s importance to newborn health, and specifically to the development of a strong immune system, has been known for years, research on colostrum’s use as a dietary supplement has flourished only since the 1970’s and 1980’s.

Transfer Factor: What Is It?

Transfer Factors are chemical messengers of the immune system. These chemical compounds (ribonucleoprotein molecules) convey important information from certain white blood cells developed in the thymus gland to the body’s other T-cells. This information can be conveyed from one organism to another, and from one species to another. Scientists have been studying the role of Transfer Factors in the immune system since the 1940’s. However, they have only recently been able to develop the technology to mass-produce Transfer Factor. The Transfer Factor used in COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR is prepared using an advanced proprietary technology that ensures a purified and potent product.

Advanced Proprietary Technology

The bovine colostrum in COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR goes through a molecular ultrafiltration process that enriches its Transfer Factor content. Ultrafiltration also removes high-molecular weight materials such as growth hormones and protein allergens, as well as low-molecular weight products such as antibiotics, lactose and steroids. The material is then freeze-dried and assayed for potency. The assay measures Transfer Factor activity, ensuring that the product is potent enough to produce an immune response in the body both before and after encapsulation. Each capsule of COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR contains a fraction of bovine colostrum supplying 5 mg of Polyvalent Transfer Factor, with a minimum of 20 potency units per capsule. COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR is available in bottles of 30 and 60 capsules.

References
Fudenberg, H. and G. Pizza. 1994. Transfer Factor in 1993: new frontiers. Progress in Drug Research, 42. Birkhauser Verlag: Basel. Jeter, W. et al. Oral administration of bovine and human dialyzable transfer factor to human volun teers. In Kahn, A. and C. Kirkpatrick, eds. Immune Regulators in Transfer Factor. 1979. Academic Press: New York. Kirkpatrick, C. et al. 1995. Murine transfactors: dose-response relationships and routes of adminis tration. Cellular Immunology, 164: 203-206. Thomas, C. ed. 1997. Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary. F.A. Davis, Co.: Philadelphia. Wilson, G.B. and G. Paddock. 1998. Immune Inducers - Antigen Specific “Transfer Factors.” Animune, Inc.: Greenville.



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