SearchBox:

Search Term: " Multi-Mineral "

  Messages 1-6 from 6 matching the search criteria.
What Are The Health Benefits Of A Multi-Mineral Supplement? Darrell Miller 3/5/12
What Are The Essential Minerals Our Body Needs? Darrell Miller 9/16/11
Vitamins and Herbs Darrell Miller 4/3/09
Which Calcium is Best? Darrell Miller 10/17/06
Celebrating Women: Age Is Just a Number Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Life Minerals - Why are Minerals So Important? Darrell Miller 6/2/05



SOURCE NATURALS Coral Calcium Multi-Mineral Complex
   60 tabs $15.98 29% OFF $ 11.35
SOURCE NATURALS Coral Calcium Multi-Mineral Complex
   120 tabs $29.98 29% OFF $ 21.29
SOURCE NATURALS Coral Calcium Multi-Mineral Complex
   240 tabs $56.98 29% OFF $ 40.46
Natures Plus DYNO-MINS MULTI-MINERAL 90
   90 ct $22.60 20% OFF $ 18.08
PETGUARD Multi-Vitamin/Multi-Mineral for Dogs
   50 tab $16.99 32% OFF $ 11.55

What Are The Health Benefits Of A Multi-Mineral Supplement?
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 05, 2012 07:42 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Health Benefits Of A Multi-Mineral Supplement?

MULTI MINERALS

Four to five per cent of the human body weight is made up of minerals, for the body to function properly it must have sufficient supply of minerals because they are essential building blocks for teeth, bones, muscle, soft tissue, nerve cells and the blood. Minerals are needed for proper digestion, muscle response, hormone production, manufacture of antibodies and communication in the nervous system. They also regulate the body's acid, bases and water balance. It is because of these reasons that people need to have a daily consumption of minerals. Plant based minerals are the best way to obtain these minerals but because of diet deficiency's people still need to take supplements.

Multi-Minerals are important for people who have dietary imbalance i.e. people who do not eat balanced diets or those who are on restrictive diets. Multi-Minerals supplements are also important for people who have different dietary needs like elderly people and pregnant women.

SOME MINERALS CONTAINED IN Multi-MineralS AND THEIR BENEFITS

Magnesium is a catalyst in the processing of fats, carbohydrates, calcium, proteins, potassium and phosphorous. There has been a link established by researchers between heart health and magnesium for the heart to be strong and have regular heartbeats a stable amount of magnesium is required. Magnesium is also required for enzymes to function properly and the prevention of diseases that are associated with lack of proper enzyme functioning these diseases includes chronic fatigue and diabetes.

Calcium helps in the maintenance of healthy teeth and bones. it also helps in the utilization of vitamin A, B complex vitamin C and D, manganese, iron, magnesium, zinc and phosphorous.

Phosphorous is found in all cells in the body and is an important aspect of every chemical reaction that happens in the body. Calcium, magnesium, zinc, manganese, zinc and iron work best when taken together with phosphorous.

Iron, protein and copper form the oxygen transporter in the blood stream known as haemoglobin, this helps in maintaining healthy red blood cells. Calcium, copper, phosphorous and cobalt are better utilized when taken with iron.

Copper contributes to our skin and hairs health. Beans, crabs, nuts, meat and the liver are a good source of copper but because of today's hectic lifestyles and diet deficiency's a lot of people may need to take supplements that contain copper. Some cardiovascular diseases and high blood pressure may be caused by a lack of sufficient copper in the body, this mineral also helps in lowering bad cholesterol and strengthening of the immune stem. Manganese is found in very small amounts in the body but it play a crucial role in maintenance of healthy tissue, blood clotting, and prevention of some cancers, maintain brain health and sex hormone regulation.

Chromium is a mineral that is essential when trying to lose weight or when trying to maintain an ideal weight, because of its ability to burn fat and its muscle developing role. People with low levels of chromium have a high probability of developing heart problems and diabetes.

Other minerals include iodine, potassium and molybdenum. Everybody should be taking a multiple vitamin and mineral daily.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2601)


What Are The Essential Minerals Our Body Needs?
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 16, 2011 11:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Essential Minerals Our Body Needs?

Overview

Diseases are something that Americans want to avoid. I think for the most part we know what we need to do, we are aware of the steps we need to take to avoid disease and health issues. For the most part though we are not doing it and I am not one to make excuses but a lot of that has to do with our fast paced life and for us not being able to cope up with our health needs. Our body is a very efficient machine and I feel is probably the best machine out there so to speak. However it will only be able to do this consistently if we make sure it gets a steady stream of essential nutrients.

We all know about vitamins and what benefits it brings and other substance that might help with improving our health but we seldom hear about essential minerals and I for one never really looked at it this way before so I guess it is high time for all of us to know what minerals we may need to focus on depending on the current state of our health.

Essential Minerals

A number of scientific researches have confirmed that in addition to vitamins our body is in need of several essential minerals as well to keep proper function.

Calcium is at the top of the list as it is able to help with so much in our body because first of all it is able to take good care of our bones’ density and maintaining its heath, without it our skeletal system will be weak and will not be able to function properly.

Magnesium is found primarily in muscle tissues and in soft tissues in the bone and also play a primary role in so many enzyme processes.

Iron is also one of the most essential to our body. It is a constituent of blood and muscle and it also acts as an oxygen transport and it is usually used to replenish blood levels lost during menstruation.

Manganese is a mineral which has been known to be responsible for growth and reproduction of bone formation. One of its primary functions as well is to help with energy in the body as it plays an integral role in the metabolism of carbohydrates.

Potassium is able to help with important nerve functions. It aids with better muscle contractions and also prevents the muscle tissues from cramping. It also has been shown to be able to aid in the regulation of blood pressure and keep it at a normal level.

Selenium is the kind of mineral that have been linked to antioxidant properties and with this there have been claims of cancer prevention and cardiovascular diseases. Some studies even have gone as far as suggesting that selenium can be taken to help prevent certain cancers. It also plays a hand in processing fats in the body.

Zinc is a mineral that has proven it essentiality through wound healing. It also has shown to have the ability to increase immune system responses.

Support a healthy body with a good Multi-Mineral supplement!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2436)


Vitamins and Herbs
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 03, 2009 02:52 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vitamins and Herbs

The whole human body is made up of cells that contain their own genetic material. In a healthy body, these cells divide at a controlled rate, growing and repairing damaged tissues and replacing dying cells. This predetermined rate of cell division is what keeps our bodies healthy. If cells keep multiplying when new ones are not necessary, a mass of tissue, often known as a tumor, is formed. This tumor can be either benign or malignant.

Benign tumors are not cancerous and can occur anywhere in the body. Benign tumors do not cause a threat to health, do not metastasize, and do not grow back if removed. Malignant tumors are cancerous and are usually serious. Often times, they can be life-threatening. Malignant tumors grow uncontrollably, interfere with normal metabolic and organ functioning, and have the ability to metastasize and invade other tissues. If a portion of a cell’s DNA is damaged, the cell can become abnormal. When an abnormal cell divides, it forms new cells that are a photocopy of the damaged genetic material. This ongoing process occurs constantly within our bodies. The majority of the time our bodies have the ability to destroy these abnormal cells and maintain a sort of cellular equilibrium. If a crucial part of the DNA is destroyed and the abnormal cells cannot be controlled any longer, cancer forms. All cancer cells have two things in common: growing uncontrollably and having the ability to metastasize. The immune system does not recognize cancer cells as dangerous or foreign.

Although the exact cause for the cell damage that initiates the cancer process is unknown (theoretically free radical damage causes DNA damage), the chain of events that leads to cancer is very complex, and each individual body reacts differently. It is a combination of genetic, behavioral, environmental, and lifestyle factors that are thought to be involved in turning normal cells into abnormal cells, and abnormal cells into cancer.

There are also factors that are believed to slow the process, while other factors can speed up the process. Possible contributors to the development and growth of cancer can be divided into three categories: external, internal, and lifestyle. External factors include unhealthy workplace environments and exposure to air and water pollution, chemicals, pesticides, and herbicides. Included in the internal factors include both genetics and infections. Lifestyle factors are those we personally can most readily control, such as diet, smoking, drinking, and sun exposure. External and lifestyle factors account for 80 percent of cancer deaths in the United States.

Just as each of us looks different, each of our bodies has its own unique composition. Some of us may react adversely to what some of us react well to. This is why some treatments prove to be successful for some, but not for others. This is why dietary wellness and prevention is so important. If we can keep our bodies healthy and avoid known cancer-causing agents, we have a good defense against cancer in the first place.

The following nutrients and supplements are designed for persons who have been diagnosed with cancer, as well as for those who wish to enhance their chances of avoiding the disease: coenzyme Q10, colostrum, DMG, garlic, IP6, melatonin, MSM, proteolytic enzymes, selenium, 7-keto DHEA, shark cartilage, SOD, vitamin A, shiitake extract, acidophilus, chromium picolinate, flaxseed oil, grape seed extract, kelp, l-carnitine, multienzyme complex, a Multi-Mineral complex, multivitamin complex, NAC, raw glandular complex, taurine, and vitamin B complex. Additionally, the following herbs may be beneficial: astragalus, birch, burdock root, cat’s claw, chaparral, chuchuhuasi, cranberry, dandelion, Echinacea, fennel, green tea, licorice root, macela, milk thistle, parsley, pau d’arco, red clover, suma, cardamom, cayenne, ginger, rosemary, sage, thyme, turmeric, ragwort, wood sage, curcumin, essiac, noni, olive leaf extract, rosemary, and boswellia.

All of the above listed herbs and vitamins can help restore the body to good nutrition and help boost the immune system so the body can find and fight back against cancer. Natural vitamins and herbs are available at your local or internet health food store. When purchasing supplements, look for name brand vitamins like Solaray and Source Naturals to ensure you receive quality and you get what you pay for.

*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Natural vitamins and herbs are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Always consult with your professional health care provider before changing any medication or adding Vitamins to medications.



--
Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1986)


Which Calcium is Best?
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 17, 2006 03:52 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Which Calcium is Best?

Customers walking into a health food store today are faced with a vast array of calcium supplements. They might ask: which one should I pick? Which one is best? Not easy questions to answer. All calcium forms will accomplish the same task: providing your body with a nutrient that it needs to build healthy bones and teeth; however, which form of calcium has the features that you want in a calcium supplement? Looking at shelves of calcium products is kind of like shopping for a car; there are many makes and many models—some are basic and others are more sophisticated.

Fortunately, there are many forms of calcium to satisfy your needs. Like the car lot, a health food store offers many options; therefore, you have to select a calcium product that consumers will feel confident in taking regularly and that will provide the most benefit.

Some consumers have done research and will come armed with information. They have already made choices based on advertising, word-of-mouth or an article they have read. They already know the form of calcium they want, be it a “Ferrari” or a “Ford.” If the client doesn’t have a specific preference: asking these basic questions will help in the selection process:

1. Do you prefer tablets, capsules, softgels, liquid or powder?

  • Tablets are for consumers who want high dosage in fewer pills.
  • Capsules are flavorless and may be easier to swallow than tablets for some.
  • Softgels have a slicker surface and may slide down the throat more easily for some.
  • Liquids are easiest to swallow and are available in different flavors.
  • Powders are flavorless, versatile and can be mixed with food or beverages.

2. Do you have high or low stomach acid?

  • Should you use calcium that has buffering action or a calcium that does not further reduce your stomach acid.

3. Do you have absorption issues?

  • Rapid transit time in the bowels may affect a person’s choice of calcium.

What is calcium?

Calcium (Ca) is one of the most important minerals found in our bones and teeth—99 percent of body calcium is found there. But the calcium molecule does not like to travel alone and, in its more basic state, it comes bounded to carbon (C), Oxygen (O), and/or hydrogen (H) molecules or in more complex form, it is bonded to organic or amino acids that act as stabilizing carriers. On most labels, the amount of calcium listed actually indicates the pure or elemental calcium because it is that amount of the calcium that is deemed important to our daily supplementation, not the complex of the materials with which it is bonded.

Where does calcium come from?

Other than the calcium found in bone, the only natural form of calcium found in nature is calcium carbonate, a calcium molecule bonded to one molecule of carbon and three molecules of oxygen (CaCO3). One of the most common minerals on the face of the earth, calcium carbonate is called calcite, aragonite or vaterite by geologists. In its geological form, it constitutes approximately four percent, by weight, or the earth’s crust.

Commercial sources of calcium carbonate used to make supplements are: limestone, dolomite, oyster cell, egg shell, coral and sea water (have you ever seen that white deposit left by hard water? That’s mostly calcium carbonate). Calcium carbonate is the starting material for all other forms of calcium supplements. From this starting material, calcium can be reduced to more concentrated forms, such as oxide or hydroxide or it can be chelated (bonded) to organic acids and amino acids to help support enhanced absorption.

Lets look more closely at the different forms of calcium that are available as supplements.

Calcium Oxide (CaO): this form is 71 percent elemental calcium and is also called “lime” commercially. This is one of the oldest and most inexpensive forms of calcium used in a variety of commercial applications and it is occasionally used in supplements where space and price are a factor. It sometimes can be found in inexpensive mass market calcium/mineral combinations or multivitamin/mineral products and in a unique algal calcium from Japan. Unfortunately, CaO is a strong alkali that may cause stomach distress, which is why it isn’t often used in health food supplements.

Calcium Hydroxide (CaHO): at 54 percent elemental calcium, it is the next highest source of elemental calcium and is also known commercially as “slaked lime.” It is used where space is an issue. Although it is also a strong alkali, it is more stable than calcium oxide. It is most often used as a component of Multi-Mineral formulations or in addition to other forms of calcium (i.e., calcium citrate) to provide potency where space is an issue. It is not often used as a single ingredient in health food supplementation. This is for people who want a high dosage of calcium from a minimum amount of pills in Multi-Mineral formulas.

Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3): at 40 percent elemental calcium, it is the most widely used form of calcium in single ingredient calcium supplements as well as combination supplements. Inexpensive and an abundant source of elemental calcium, it is the only form of calcium found in nature outside of bone. It is the primary form of calcium used in the mass market and in antacid products. This is for people who have high stomach acid and who need a buffering type of calcium. Also for people who want a high dose of calcium in a minimum amount of pills.

Calcium Citrate: at 21 percent elemental calcium, it is one of the most popular forms of calcium supplements in the health food market as well as the mass market. This calcium salt does not lower stomach acid as much as calcium carbonate. This calcium salt is usually recommended for people who have low stomach acid, have had stomach surgery or who need a form of calcium that will not lower their stomach acid further.

Calcium Gluconate and Lactate: these two forms of calcium are high soluble. Since the amount of elemental calcium is much lower (9 percent and 13 percent respectively), they are used more often in powder form and mixed with liquids or food. When mixed in a beverage, the calcium is already dissolved and is ready to be absorbed. This is the best calcium salt for people who have overactive bowels, who have trouble swallowing pills or who don’t like the taste of pre-formed liquid calcium supplements. These calcium powders can be mixed in juices or smoothies or added to food as they are virtually tasteless.

Calcium Orotate and Asporotate: In the mid 20th century, Dr. Hans Nieper, a German scientist, advanced a theory that orotic and aspartic salt forms of calcium are transported directly to cell membranes for better absorption. The Solaray brand developed an asporotate formula, which combines three organic acids: aspartic acid (-Asp), orotic acid (-oro) and citric acid (-tate) into one product. The asporotate formula has become one of the most popular calcium formulas and is exclusive to the Solaray brand. This product is for customers who appreciate the idea of combining the enhanced absorbability of three organic acids into one. Aspartate and citrate are also part of the krebs (energy) cycle and are natural to the body’s metabolic systems and, according to Neiper, calcium Orotate and Aspartate are mineral transporters that enter into the cells to facilitate enzymatic actions rather than being extra-cellular. For people who believe that intracellular calcium is of importance, calcium Orotate and asporotate may be good choice.

Calcium Hydroxyapatite: this is another “natural form of calcium usually as a mineral ash form bovine source bone. Bone meal is also a form of calcium from bovine bone. These forms of animal derived calcium are for customers who want a source that is closest to their own bone matrix. Not for vegetarians.

Calcium Amino Acid Chelates (*HVP): this form is calcium carbonate bonded (Chelated) to a form of amino acid complex such as whole rice concentrate or other grain source. This form is for customers who want the additional bioavailability of amino acids.

Calcium AEP: Another form of calcium endorsed by Dr. Hans Nieper who theorized that calcium would cross the cell membranes more readily when it was combined with phosphatidyl ethanolamine or Amino Ethanol Phosphate (AEP), a nutrient found in nerve sheaths. This highly specialized form is for very educated customers who are proponets of Hans Niepers theory.

So, which form is best?

Calcium, like cars, comes in a variety of forms. Isn’t it wonderful that we have so many choices? The point is, there is no best one, there are only individual choices. Although we have our favorites, taking a calcium supplement, regardless of which one it is, should:

  • Be a matter of personal choice based on how our body feels when taking it.
  • Be in a form that is most convenient or appetizing so that we receive our daily requirements.
  • Take into consideration any personal body limitations we might have .

Our primary concern when choosing a calcium supplement should be to provide our body with the right amount of calcium daily so that our skeleton and teeth can maintain proper mineralization and strength as the cells continuously break down and rebuild. The type of calcium complex we prefer is entirely up to us.

*HVP = Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein



--
Buy Calcium in all forms at Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1411)


Celebrating Women: Age Is Just a Number
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 13, 2005 07:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Celebrating Women: Age Is Just a Number

Celebrating Women: Age Is Just a Number by Carl Lowe Energy Times, March 10, 2004

As women age, their physical needs shift. The health challenges that face a woman in her thirties do not match those of a woman in her fifties.

At the same time, some basic health needs stay constant: At any age, every woman requires a wealth of vitamins, minerals and the other natural chemicals that fruits, vegetables and supplements supply. She also constantly needs families and friends to support her spiritual health.

As the internal workings of your body alter, your lifestyle must stay abreast of those adjustments. Peak health demands a finely tuned health program designed with your individual needs-and your stage of life-in mind.

Ages 30 to 45

When it comes to maintaining health, younger women might seem to have it easier than older women. If they exercise and stay in shape, they maintain more stamina than women 10 to 20 years their senior.

Unfortunately, many women in this age group mistakenly think they don't have to be as careful about their lifestyle habits and their eating habits as they will in later decades. But even if your health doesn't seem to suffer from poor eating choices or a sedentary lifestyle right away, your foundation for health in later life suffers if you don't care for yourself now.

By age 45 you should have established the good habits that will carry you successfully through the aging process. As an added bonus, good lifestyle habits pay immediate dividends. If you pay attention to your nutrients and get plenty of physical activity when younger, you'll feel more energetic and probably enjoy better emotional health.

Set Health Goals

According to Gayle Reichler, MS, RD, CDN, in her book Active Wellness (Avery/Penguin), good health at any age doesn't just come to you-you have to plan for it. In order to stick to good habits, she says, "living a healthy lifestyle needs to be satisfying." Reichler believes that you need to picture your health goals to achieve them: "Every successful endeavor first begins in the mind as an idea, a thought, a dream, a conviction." Good health at this age and in later years requires a concrete strategy and visualization of how your body can improve with a healthy lifestyle.

Your long-term health goals at this age should include an exercise program that will allow you to reach a physically fit old age with a lowered risk of disability. In addition, your short-term plans should encompass losing weight, staying optimistic, living life with more vim and vigor, increasing your capacity for exercise and lowering your stress.

As Reichler points out, "Your long-term goal and your ideal vision establish what you want to achieve....[You should do] something good...for yourself every day and every week that makes your life easier and more consistent with your goals."

Develop an Eating Plan

Today, the average American gains about two pounds annually. As a result, every year a greater portion of the US population is obese and overweight. By controlling your food intake earlier in life, you may be able to avoid this weight gain. In his book Prolonging Health (Hampton Roads), James Williams, OMD, recommends basic changes to your diet that can provide long-term support of your health:

  • • Cut back on sugar. Dr. Williams says that, "Over my more than 20 years of clinical practice, I have found that nothing undermines health more than refined sugar."
  • • Limit your carbohydrates, especially the refined ones. Dr. Williams says you should "substitute whole grain breads for...white bread....[A]void commercial breakfast cereals....[E]at small amounts of beans several times a week."
  • • Cut calories. Cutting the amount of food you eat supports health in a number of ways and is believed to boost longevity. Dr Williams notes, "Calorie restriction is necessary...to normalize your weight...to reduce the metabolic burden of overeating on your liver and intestinal tract and to minimize insulin production from the glucose spikes caused by overeating." Problems with insulin production, linked to diabetes, may result from eating large amounts of sugary foods and little fiber, and are thought to accelerate aging.
  • • Eat mostly low-fat foods. Check product labels to limit fat. Foods that are high in healthy omega-3 fats, like fish and soy, can be eaten more often.
  • • Eat foods high in lean protein. Reichler recommends meats like lean beef, poultry, beans and non-fat dairy. • Eat fish. It provides a wealth of healthy fats and protein. "Fish, because it contains the good omega-3 fats, does not need to be lean; the same is true for soy products that do not have added fat," adds Reichler.

    Get Supplemental Help

    If you're in your thirties or forties and you don't take at least a multivitamin, start taking one today! A large body of research shows that taking vitamin and mineral supplements over a long period of time significantly supports better health.

    Calcium and vitamin D are two of the most important supplemental nutrients, helping to build stronger bones now that can withstand the bone-loss effects of aging.

    Calcium can also help keep your weight down. One study of younger women found that for every extra 300 milligrams of calcium a day they consumed, they weighed about two pounds less (Experimental Biology 2003 meeting, San Diego).

    In the same way, taking vitamin D supplements not only helps strengthen your bones, it can also lower your risk of multiple sclerosis (Neurology 1/13/04). In this study, which looked at the health records of more than 180,000 women for up to 20 years, taking D supplements dropped the chances of multiple sclerosis (although eating vitamin D-rich foods did not have the same benefit). And if you're thinking about having children at this age, a multivitamin is crucial for lowering your baby's risk of birth defects and other health problems. A study at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that women who take multivitamins during pregnancy lower their children's risk of nervous system cancer by up to 40% (Epidemiology 9/02).

    " Our finding, combined with previous work on reducing several birth defects with vitamin supplementation and other childhood cancers, supports the recommendation that mothers' vitamin use before and during pregnancy may benefit their babies' health," says Andrew F. Olshan, MD, professor of epidemiology at the UNC School of Public Health. "We believe physicians and other health care providers should continue to educate women about these benefits and recommend appropriate dietary habits and daily dietary supplements."

    In particular, Dr. Olshan feels that folic acid (one of the B vitamins), and vitamins C and A, are particularly important for lowering the risk of childhood cancers and birth defects.

    Ages 45 to 55

    When you reach this in-between age-the time when most women have moved past childbearing age but haven't usually fully moved into the post-menopausal stage-you enjoy a propitious opportunity to take stock of your health and plan for an even healthier future. One thing that may need adjustment is your sleep habits, as sleeplessness is a common problem for women in this age group. Even if you haven't been exercising or watching your diet until now, it's not too late to start. Making lifestyle changes at this age can still improve your chances for aging successfully.

    For instance, it is at these ages that women should have their heart health checked. Research published in the journal Stroke (5/01) shows that having your cholesterol and blood pressure checked at this time more accurately shows your future chances of heart disease than having it checked at a later date after menopause, in your late fifties.

    " The premenopausal risk factors may be a stronger predictor of carotid atherosclerosis [artery blockages] because they represent cumulative risk factor exposure during the premenopausal years, whereas the risk factors...during the early postmenopausal years have a shorter time for influence," says Karen A. Matthews, PhD, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. In other words, Dr. Matthews' research shows that if you have high blood pressure and high cholesterol before menopause, you are at serious risk for a stroke or heart attack soon after menopause: These are important reasons that you need to start improving your health habits immediately.

    Increase in Heart Disease

    Before menopause, a woman's hormones and other physiological characteristics usually hold down her chance of heart disease. After menopause, when hormones and other bodily changes occur, the risk of heart attacks and stroke in women rises significantly. (Heart disease is the leading killer of women.) At least part of this increased risk is linked to the postmenopausal decrease in estrogen production.

    Dr. Matthews studied about 370 women in their late forties, measuring their weight, their BMI (body mass index, an indication of body fat compared to height), blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar. Ten years later, after the women had entered menopause, she and her fellow scientists used ultrasound to measure blockages in these women's neck arteries (a sign of heart disease).

    The researchers found that indications of potential heart problems (such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and being overweight) when women were in their forties did indeed forecast future difficulties.

    " Women who had elevated cholesterol, higher blood pressures and increased body weight before menopause had increased blood vessel thickening and atherosclerotic plaque formation in the neck arteries after menopause. Such changes in the carotid arteries are associated with an increased heart attack and stroke risk," says Dr. Matthews.

    Heart Health Factors

    The four main lifestyle factors you should adjust at this age to support better heart function are diet, stress, exercise and weight. According to Dr. James Williams, "[M]ore than any other cause, dietary factors are the most critical factor in cardiovascular disease." He recommends eliminating "dietary saturated fatty acids as found in flame-broiled and fried meats." He also urges women to eat more fish and poultry, consume organic fruits and vegetables and cut back on refined sugar.

    Stress becomes an ever more important heart disease factor at this age as estrogen begins to drop.

    " Our study [in the lab] indicates that stress affects estrogen levels and can lead to the development of heart disease-even before menopause," says Jay Kaplan, PhD, of the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (The Green Journal 3/02).

    Dr. Kaplan's research shows that stress in women ages 45 to 55 may reduce estrogen earlier in life and make women more susceptible to the arterial blockages that lead to heart disease. "We know from [lab] studies that stress can lower estrogen levels to the point that health is affected," he says.

    Stress can also hurt bone health: In a study of 66 women with normal-length menstrual periods, estrogen levels were low enough in half of the women to cause bone loss, making the women susceptible to osteoporosis.

    Exercise and Weight

    Although exercise used to be considered to be mainly a young woman's activity, the thrust of recent research suggests that physical activity actually becomes more important to health as you get older.

    A 17-year study of about 10,000 Americans found that exercising and keeping your weight down is probably the most important thing you can do to lower your risk of heart disease as you enter your forties and fifties (Am J Prev Med 11/03).

    Of the people who took part in this study, more than 1,500 people died of heart disease. Those who performed the most exercise were thinner and had a 50% chance less of dying of heart disease than overweight nonexercisers.

    " The fact is that those who both exercised more and ate more nevertheless had low cardiovascular mortality," says Jing Fang, MD, a researcher at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York.

    An added benefit of exercise: If you burn up calories exercising, you can eat more and not have to worry as much about being overweight.

    Supplements and Diet

    If you're a woman at midlife, a multivitamin and mineral is still good nutritional insurance. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables are also important for getting enough phytochemicals, the health substances in plants that convey a wealth of health benefits.

    As you enter this age group, your immune system gradually slows down. To help support immune function, eating produce rich in antioxidant nutrients, and supplementing with antioxidants like vitamins C and E as well as carotenoids, can be especially important. For example, a study of people with ulcers found that people with less vitamin C in their stomachs are more likely to be infected with Helicobacter pylori, the bacteria that can cause peptic ulcers and is linked to stomach cancer (J Amer Coll Nutr 8/1/03).

    This research, which looked at the health of about 7,000 people, found that vitamin C probably helps the immune system fend off this bacterial infection.

    " Current public health recommendations for Americans are to eat five or more servings of fresh fruits and vegetables a day to help prevent heart disease, cancer and other chronic diseases," says Joel A. Simon, MD, MPH, professor of medicine at the University of California at San Francisco.

    Calcium and Bones

    At midlife, calcium continues to be a vital mineral for supporting bone health.

    According to Gameil T. Fouad, PhD, "It has been routinely shown that a woman's calcium status and level of physical activity (specifically, the degree to which she participates in weight-bearing exercise) are positively associated with bone mineral density. It is less well appreciated that this is a process which takes place over the course of a lifetime."

    Dr. Fouad adds that calcium works in concert with other vitamins and minerals to keep bones healthy: "Research in the United Kingdom involving nearly 1,000 premenopausal women over age 40 illustrates those women with the highest bone density tended to have the highest intake of calcium. Surprisingly, this study also demonstrated that calcium does not act alone: those women with the best bone health also had the highest intakes of zinc, magnesium and potassium."

    Dr. Fouad stresses that supplements should go together with a lifestyle that includes enough sleep and exercise to help the body stay in top shape.

    " As a general guideline," he says, "a woman concerned with her mineral intake should take concrete steps to make sure she is getting adequate rest, is eating a well-balanced diet focused on fresh fruits, vegetables and lean protein as well as getting adequate exercise....A Multi-Mineral containing bio-available forms of zinc, magnesium, copper and selenium is probably a safe addition to anyone's routine. Taking these proactive steps dramatically reduces the chances that deficiencies will arise."

    Ages 55 and Beyond

    Entering the post-menopausal phase of life can present challenging opportunities for a new perspective on life and health. While some signs of aging are inevitable, experts who have looked at how the human body changes with age are now convinced that healthy lifestyle habits can improve how well you can think, move and enjoy life well past age 55.

    As Dr. Williams notes, "In your fifties, the force of aging is undeniably present: Your body shape changes and organ function declines, both men and women have a tendency to gain weight....Heart disease becomes more common, energy and endurance are considerably reduced and your memory begins to slip."

    But Dr. Williams also points out that you don't have to age as rapidly as other people do. He believes you should employ a "natural longevity program...[that starts] to reverse the course of aging as early as possible."

    One key to staying vital as you age is your outlook on life, an aspect of life that's greatly enhanced by strong social ties.

    Avoiding the Aging Slowdown The latest research shows that one of the most crucial ways to slow the effects of aging is to exercise and keep your weight down. It won't necessarily be easy, though. The change in hormonal balance at this age makes the body more prone to extra pounds (Society for Neuroscience Meeting, 11/12/03).

    " In women, it has been demonstrated that major weight increases often occur during menopause, the time in a woman's life in which cyclic ovarian function ends and the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone decline," says Judy Cameron, PhD, a scientist in the divisions of reproductive sciences and neuroscience at the Oregon Health & Science University.

    In Dr. Cameron's lab trials, she has found that the decrease in estrogen after menopause "resulted in a 67% jump in food intake and a 5% jump in weight in a matter of weeks."

    In other words, the hormonal changes you undergo as enter your late fifties causes your appetite to grow as well as your waistline: Developments that increase your chances of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke and joint problems.

    Vigilance against this weight gain is necessary to save your health: Start walking and exercising. Research on exercise in people aged 58 to 78 found that getting off the couch for a walk or other physical activity not only helps control weight but also helps sharpen your thinking and helps you become more decisive (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2/16-20/04, online edition). This recent study, done at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, found that performing aerobic exercise improved mental functioning by 11% (on a computer test).

    " We continue to find a number of cognitive benefits in the aerobic group," says Arthur F. Kramer, PhD, a professor of psychology at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at Illinois. "The brain circuits that underlie our ability to think-in this case to attend selectively to information in the environment-can change in a way that is conducive to better performance on tasks as a result of fitness." In simple terms, that means that walking at least 45 minutes a day boosts brain power as well as protecting your heart.

    An Herb for Menopause

    The physical changes that accompan> y menopause can be uncomfortable. But traditional herbal help is available: Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), an herb used for eons by aging women, has been shown in recent studies to be both safe and effective (Menopause 6/15/03).

    " This [research] should reassure health professionals that they can safely recommend black cohosh to their menopausal patients who cannot or choose not to take HRT [hormone replacement therapy]," says researcher Tieraona Low Dog, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico Department of Family and Community Medicine.

    While HRT has been used to help women cope with menopause, a flurry of studies in the past few years have shown that HRT increases the risk of heart disease and cancer. Instead, black cohosh, which alleviates such menopausal discomforts as hot flashes, has been shown to be much safer.

    Keeping Track of Crucial Vitamins

    While continuing to take multivitamins and minerals at this age is important, some experts believe that as we grow older, vitamin D supplementation, as well as taking antioxidant nutrients, is particularly vital. Arthritis is a common affliction of aging, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one particularly destructive form of this joint problem. But taking vitamin D can significantly lower your risk of this condition.

    When scientists analyzed the diets of 30,000 middle-aged women in Iowa over 11 years, they found that women who consumed vitamin D supplements were 34% less likely to suffer RA (Arth Rheu 1/03).

    Other vitamins are equally important to an older woman's well-being. For example, vitamins C and natural E have been found to lower the risk of stroke in those over the age of 55 (Neurology 11/11/03). In this study, smokers who consumed the most vitamin C and natural vitamin E were 70% were much less likely to suffer strokes than smokers whose diets were missing out on these vitamins.

    Rich sources of vitamin C in food include oranges and other citrus fruits, strawberries, red and green peppers, broccoli and brussels sprouts. Sources of vitamin E include vegetable oils such as sunflower seed, cottonseed, safflower, palm and wheat germ oils, margarine and nuts.

    Saving Your Sight

    After age 55, your eyes are particularly vulnerable. Eight million Americans of this age are at risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition that destroys structures in the back of the eye necessary for vision (Arch Ophthal 11/03). But you can drop your risk of AMD by taking supplements of antioxidant vitamins and zinc, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute.

    Their research shows that a dietary supplement of vitamins C, natural vitamin E and beta carotene, along with zinc, lowers the chances of progressing to advanced AMD in certain at-risk people by about 25%. Daily supplements also reduced the risk of vision loss by about 19%.

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin also help protect aging eyes. When scientists compared healthy eyes with eyes suffering from AMD, they found that AMD eyes contained lower levels of these vital nutrients (Ophthalmology 2003; 109:1780). Furthermore, they found that levels of these chemicals generally decline as you grow older.

    Healthy at All Ages

    When it comes to designing a healthy lifestyle, general rules like these can be followed, but you should individualize your plan to fit your needs. No matter which type of exercises you pick out or what healthy foods you choose, look for a strategy and a plan you can stick to. If you think a selection of foods are good for you but you absolutely hate their taste, chances are you won't be able to stick to a diet that includes them.

    The same goes for exercise: Pick out activities that you enjoy and that you can perform consistently. That increases your chance of sticking to an exercise program.

    Staying healthy is enjoyable and it helps you get more out of life every day, no matter what stage of life you're in.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray vitamins - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=335)


    Life Minerals - Why are Minerals So Important?
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 02, 2005 01:14 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Life Minerals - Why are Minerals So Important?

    Why Are Minerals So Important?

    The value of adequate mineral intake for overall health cannot be overstated. Their effects are vast and broad; their deficiencies devastating. Minerals are components of body tissues and fluids that work in combination with enzymes, hormones, vitamins and transport substances. Minerals participate in nerve transmission, muscle contraction, cell permeability, tissue structure, blood formation, acid-base balance, fluid regulation, blood pressure control, protein metabolism and energy production. The human body requires large amounts of some minerals, and trace amounts of others, while some minerals – such as Lead, Mercury and Aluminum – are toxic to the body. Those minerals that are essential to health in relatively high amounts – Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sulphur, Sodium, Chlorine, and Magnesium – are called macrominerals. Trace minerals – Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Iron, Chromium, Selenium, Iodine and Molybdenum, to name a few – are those which are present in the body in minute amounts, but are just as essential to health as the major minerals. One of the main functions of minerals in the body is to activate enzymes. Magnesium, for example, activates over 300 different enzymes, while Zinc “turns on” over 100. Enzymes are catalysts, functioning in the cells to accelerate chemical reactions. All of these chemical reactions collectively are referred to as “metabolism”, which is the very basis of life.

    Why Do We Need Minerals Now More Than Ever?


    I. The Decreasing Levels of Minerals in Today’s Foods Unlike the compost fertilizers of the past, today’s “high-tech” fertilizers do not replace many of the nutrients essential to both the natural growth of crop plants and to human beings, who depend on them for adequate nutrition. As a result, even a “good” diet may provide less nutrition than is generally required. In addition, many modern food additives bind minerals so tightly in food that they can no longer be absorbed or utilized by the body. A moderate intake of one such additive, EDTA (estimated American daily intake is 50-100 mg), was found in a scientific study to reduce iron absorption by 50%! Dietary studies have shown that mineral deficiencies are so prevalent, it’s rare that anyone gets even the minimum RDA levels of them all. The following are examples of the unfortunate findings:

  • • A study by the USDA in the mid-1980s on Chromium status in adults found that NONE of the people tested consumed even the lower level of the Chromium “Safe & Adequate Intake” range of 50 to 200 mcg.
  • • It is estimated that up to 90% of all Americans may be Magnesium-deficient, even by RDA standards (considered by many Magnesium experts to be already too low).
  • • A study published in the prestigious American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in the late 1970s found 70% of Americans getting less than the 15 mg RDA for Zinc, with most getting only 8- 11 mg per day.
  • • Among Americans who do not eat a high-dairy diet or take Calcium supplements/antacids regularly, virtually no one will achieve the current 1000 mg per day RDA for Calcium.
  • • According to nutritionists, women not taking Iron supplements would need to consume a 3000 calorie diet daily(!) to regularly achieve the U.S.RDA for Iron of 18 mg. Yet most women, especially those who are weight-conscious, consume less than 2000 calories a day, many as little as 1200-1500 calories!


    II. The Increasing Need for Minerals in Today’s Environment and Lifestyle Various aspects of the modern environment and lifestyle — some of which are discussed here — severely affect mineral nutrition in the body.

  • • The results of studies conducted in Michigan and Maryland medical facilities show that physical and psychological stress in healthy adults produces acute deficiencies of trace minerals despite otherwise adequate dietary intake. Given the fact that many adults in America are not healthy by medical standards, the loss of minerals with stress is possibly even greater than has been measured.
  • • In addition, many of the prescription drugs that Americans commonly take chelate, or bind, with one or more minerals, making those minerals unavailable to the body. For example, diuretics flush Potassium out of the body and deplete Magnesium, and sedatives can lower blood levels of Calcium and Magnesium.
  • • Heavy metal toxicity is also a major problem in modern America. Cadmium, Mercury and Lead, for example, are cumulative poisons, toxic even in low doses, and are increasingly prevalent in our environment because of their industrial uses. In the 1960s alone, over 200 million pounds of lead per year were released into the environment from the use of leaded gasoline. Data, published in 1987, indicates that people who have a good supply of the minerals Calcium, Zinc, Iron, Selenium, Copper, Chromium, and Manganese in their diets are largely protected against heavy metal poisoning. Conversely, if these minerals are deficient in the diet, there is a much greater danger of heavy metal toxicity.
  • • Poor diet, cigarettes, alcohol, drugs, and the heating and spoiling of polyunsaturated fats all deplete mineral levels and produce damaging free radicals in the body. Minerals such as Selenium, Iron, Copper and Manganese, and Vitamins, such as C, work in the body to neutralize free radicals and thus diminish their harmful effects.

    What Is The Krebs’ Cycle? And What Are “Krebs’ Cycle Minerals”?

    The Krebs’ Cycle is the energetic root of life, taking place in every cell of the body. It produces 90% of the body’s total energy in the form of ATP. Krebs’ Cycle Minerals are those which are bound to the organic acids used in the Krebs’ Cycle. Such mineral complexes are increasingly becoming the standard in mineralinclusive supplements because they’re so good at what they do: Transport. They are especially effective at penetrating various cell membranes and organelle membranes, thus carrying their mineral partners inside the cell. Many of these organelles have membranes to keep out biochemical invaders; therefore, not just any substance can penetrate cells and their organelles.

    Source Naturals’ Life Minerals™: Optimal Mineral Supplementation

    All this technical and scientific information has been brought together by the experts at Source Naturals into one comprehensive Multi-Mineral formula: Life Minerals™. Many of the minerals in Life Minerals™ — Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Manganese and Iron — are bound to some of the best known transport agents in the body, the Krebs’ Cycle organic compounds. In addition, there are minerals not usually found in other mineral supplements, such as Silicon, Boron, Copper, and Molybdenum. Plus there are the Vitamins B6, C and D3, which have been shown to significantly enhance mineral absorption and utilization. In addition to the Krebs’ Cycle minerals, Life Minerals™ also uses superior forms of other minerals. The Zinc is OptiZinc™ Zinc Monomethionine, shown in scientific studies to be highly bioavailable, offering increased absorption. The Chromium is ChromeMate®, the non-yeast Glucose Tolerance Factor Chromium, believed by many to be the most superior form of Chromium. Copper Sebacate, a more bioavailable form of Copper, is also included. Minerals are crucial to both the structure and function of the body in hundreds of ways. But what good are mineral supplements if your body cannot utilize them to their fullest advantage? Supplementing your diet with Life Minerals™ is an important aid against deficiencies that may be more significant than suspected. By providing minerals with the highest bioavailability, and including significant potencies of each, Source Naturals’ Life Minerals is your best chance of reaping all the benefits that minerals have to offer.



    --
    VitaNet ®
    VitaNet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=162)



  • VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.