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Protein And Its Role In Bodily Functions Darrell Miller 11/9/07
Q. If these three natural products are taken together, could they over-stimulate my immune Darrell Miller 11/22/06
Taming the Tingle – ALA helps fight nerve damage caused by diabetes…and more. Darrell Miller 11/9/06
The healing power of borage oil Darrell Miller 6/19/06
Pancreatin 8x Digestive Enzymes for Total Health Darrell Miller 6/8/06
Promise of Evening Primrose Oil Darrell Miller 6/3/06
TMG Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/7/05
Takeing Cat's Claw, IP-6 and Maitake Mushroom over stimulate immune system? Darrell Miller 11/11/05
PREGNENOLONE - The Balancing Hormone Darrell Miller 6/4/05
Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ... Darrell Miller 6/2/05
COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR - Supports Immune System Integrity Darrell Miller 6/1/05
Re: Its in the Blood Darrell Miller 5/9/05



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Protein And Its Role In Bodily Functions
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Date: November 09, 2007 05:00 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Protein And Its Role In Bodily Functions

Protein is an essential organic compound composed of 20 or more amino acids which are joined by peptide bonds. Proteins serve as structural material such as connective tissue, and hair (i.e. collagen and keratin) can function as enzymes and hormones, as transporters of essential substances such as oxygen, antibodies, or Regulators of gene expression. The importance of protein cannot be overstated in its effects on overall health regardless of age. Dieters using the low-protein diet can be seriously lacking in many essential nutrients including minerals such as zinc, iron, manganese, chromium, copper, etc. These deficiencies can lead to chronic illness, fatigue and make mental function more difficult.

In order to fight sickness and disease, our immune systems need to be in optimum performance. Something you may not have realized but our immune system are almost all protein based. Providing the body with the correct proteins is like providing the proper building blocks of the immune system and can help to fight the common cold and infections better. Proteins are also used to repair muscles during exercise.

There are eight essential amino acids which the body cannot manufacture and which we must derived from our diet each day. The essential amino acids are (i) isoleucine, (ii) leucine, (iii) lysine, (iv) methionine, (v) phenylalanine, (vi) theronine, (vii) tryptophan, and (viii) valine. With this list of proteins it is possible to determine where we can find these amino acids and incorporate them into our diet. We need protein in our diet on a daily basis, especially for muscle function which requires a particular mix of amino acids which are not found in many food sources. For example, to increase muscle mass, you need glutamine, carnitine, taurine, and arginine amino acids.

Now that we know we need protein daily in our diet and that protein is essential to life. So the next question you may have is what kind of proteins are the best? Quality proteins found in your local grocery store can be found in meat, nuts, eggs, and other foods. If you turn to your local health food store, look at soy, casein, whey and egg proteins. The type of protein you take will depend upon what you are capable of eating, i.e. taste. Some people have trouble eating whey protein, while others cannot pallet egg protein.

The best protein found in nature however is derived from egg whites. Egg proteins are not only complete in its supply of what the body needs, the egg is rich in chlorine, niacin, potassium, magnesium, riboflavin, selenium, vitamin K, sulphur, and omega-3. An added bonus to eating egg whites is the lack of cholesterol and sodium in the yoke. Eggs are also one of the most tolerable proteins in the human body where over 90 percent of the proteins derived from eggs is digested into the individual amino acids our bodies need. By eating egg derived protein you are essentially supplying the body with the raw materials it needs for proper function. So, if you have been troubled by fatigue, poor hair and nails the answer may be to increase your protein intake or try an all natural egg white protein for three to four weeks and see what a difference it will make in your health and appearance

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Q. If these three natural products are taken together, could they over-stimulate my immune
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Date: November 22, 2006 01:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Q. If these three natural products are taken together, could they over-stimulate my immune

A. That is a very good question. And at first glance, it might seem a possibility. However, one of the most amazing aspects of all three nutritional products, POA cat’s caw root extract, maitake d-fraction, and IP-6 with inositol, is their ability to both strengthen a weakened immune system and calm down a hyperactive immune system. They modulate the immune system.

The POAs in Cat’s claw root extract do not take over the immune system’s job, they simply strengthen the body’s immune system so it can do its job better. Maitake D-fraction does not act on cancer cells directly, it encourages the body’s own immune system Regulators to act. IP-6 with inositol does not increase NK cells, it increases NK cell activity. In other words, these three natural discoveries strengthen and balance the immune system without the fear or over-stimulation.

In fact, it is theorized that cat’s claw root extract, maitake mushrooms, and IP-6 with inositol may work synergistically. Meaning, together they strengthen and balance the immune system even better when they are taken together. However, if you use a cat’s claw supplement that contains any amount of TOAs, not only will the good “spirits” of the POAs be cancelled, experts believe that they will interfere with IP-6 with inositol as well. That’s why it is vital to choose a cat’s claw supplement that is 100% TOA-free and says so on its label.

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Taming the Tingle – ALA helps fight nerve damage caused by diabetes…and more.
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Date: November 09, 2006 01:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Taming the Tingle – ALA helps fight nerve damage caused by diabetes…and more.

For some people the constant tingling in their feet is the worst part. Others feel like their feet are being stabbed or burned, or that their extremities are simply lifeless. All these folks suffer from peripheral neuropathy, nerve damage that afflicts nearly 30% of people with diabetes aged 40 and older. And if the discomforting sensations are not enough, neuropathy can lead to falls, wounds that won’t heal, even amputation.

Untold numbers of individuals have been helped by alpha lipoic acid (ALA), a supplement that European practitioners have used as a standard neuropathy treatment for 30 years. ALA (also known as thioctic acid) assists in the chemical reaction that generates energy within cells. It serves as a universal antioxidant—a substance that can fight tissue-damaging free radicals in both the fatty watery parts of a cell-and helps the body create additional free radical fighters, such as glutathione. ALA can even help regenerate several other antioxidants, including coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and vitamins C and E.

Defying diabetes

People with diabetes need antioxidant protection as much as anyone. Fortunately for them, though, ALA fights this insidious disorder in many other ways.

Diabetes occurs when the body can no longer effectively use glucose (blood sugar), its main energy sources; ALA helps shepherd glucose out of the blood and into cells. It also interferes with glycosylation, a process in which glucose sticks to proteins such as the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) that carries cholesterol through the bloodstream. That’s important because this “sticky” LDL can adhere to arterial walls, creating a major risk factor for heart disease. ALA combined with exercise appears to make insulin, the hormone that controls glucose usage, more effective. What’s more, early research indicates that ALA can deflect another cardio hazard by interfering with the ability of salt to push blood pressure upward (molecular and Cellular Biology 12/03).

ALA Annotations – what is it? Alpha Lipoic acid, a substance the body creates naturally.

What it Does: ALA, a powerful antioxidant in its own right, plays a vital role in the creation and renewal of other antioxidants. It is used to treat peripheral neuropathy; nerve damage caused by diabetes, and is also under investigation for possible therapeutic effects in other disorders, including multiple sclerosis and age-related cognitive decline.

Diabetes doesn’t just attack the nerves and the heart—its effects are felt throughout the body. That’s why scientists are examining whether ALA can tackle other diabetic complications: in lab studies it has forestalled diabetes-related kidney and eye damage. (Check blood-sugar levels regularly when using ALA, especially if you’re taking other glucose Regulators.)

Protecting Nerves

While diabetes is one of the most common causes of nervous system damage, it isn’t the only one. In test tube studies ALA has promoted chemical reactions that encourage neurons (nerve cells) to survive and grow; as a result some scientists believe this natural antioxidant may eventually play a role in treating degenerative nerve disorders. Such research is in its beginning stages, but the results are still intriguing. For example, in mice ALA has slowed progression of a disorder that mimics multiple sclerosis in human beings (Journal of Neuroimmunology 3/04) and improved age-related memory loss when used with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), another antioxidant supplement (Journal of Neurochemistry 3/03). A number of other conditions that become more common with age may also benefit from ALA, including arthritis and thinning skin.

If you suffer from both diabetes and the nerve damage it causes, ask your practitioner about ALA. It just may help your feet and the rest of you feel happy. –Lisa James



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The healing power of borage oil
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Date: June 19, 2006 01:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The healing power of borage oil

Borage oil, extracted from the seed of the blue, star shaped borage flower, is gaining much attention by alternative health practitioners and main stream medicine alike for its profound medicinal properties. Whereas the oil is getting all the redit, it is actually the oil’s active component, gamma linoleic acid (GLA), which has drawn the interest of researchers. The majority of the early studies done on GLA, dating back to the late 1940’s, were conducted with the oil of evening primrose. For rezones cited in the title, more bank for the buck, borage seed oil is now thought to be s superior source of GLA compared to evening primrose oil. Other plants forms and food concentrates that contain appreciable amounts of GLA include black currant seed oil and spirulina.

Why GLA Supplementation?

A body with healthy biochemistry has the ability to produce GLA from the most essential fat linoleic acid. Linoleic acid is found most abundantly in the omega 6 family of oils, including safflower, sunflower, and corn oil. While it has been estimated that a majority of Americans and Europeans consume far to many omega 6 fatty acids in proportion to the beneficial omega 3 fatty acids (by approximately 10:1). Most biochemists agree optimal ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids should be approximately 1:1. Despite the obvious over consumption of omega 6 oils rich in linoleic acid, some individuals lack the ability to convert linoleic acid to the much needed GLA.

As is the example with many of our modern day nutrient deficiencies, the adulteration of our food supply by today’s processing methods has much to do with the faulty fat metabolism suffered by many. A prime example is the hydrogenation process utilized to convert liquid polyunsaturated oils into semi-solid, altered saturated fats for use as margarine and commercially processed foods. Hydrogenation is accomplished by subjecting the oils to temperatures in excess of 250 C, and bombarding them with hydrogen ions in the presence of the heavy metal nickel, which irreversibly changes the chemical structure of the fatty acid molecule from a healthful “cis” configuration to a dangerous “trans” configuration. When these products are eaten in excess they are known, in some cases, to block the enzymatic conversion of linoleic acid to GLA. In addition to the damaging effects of hydrogenation, certain essential fatty acid nutrient cofactor deficiencies may exist to further complicate the conversion. Vitamins pro-A, A, C, E, B-2, B-3, B-6, pantothenic acid, B-12 biotin and the minerals calcium, magnesium, potassium, sulfur and zinc are all involved in essential fatty acid (EFA) metabolism.

Particular interest should be given to those afflicted with diabetes, cystic fibrosis, asthma, alcoholism, multiple sclerosis. For a myriad of reasons, including cofactor deficiencies, these individuals lack the enzymatic ability to convert linoleic acid to GLA and must obtain a direct source of GLA for proper hormonal regulation. In addition, excessive consumption of animal fats containing acachidonic acid competes for the same metabolic pathways occupied by GLA, thus minimizing its biological action.

These potential negating effects can simply be diverted to consuming a food source or supplement containing GLA which bypasses any previously necessary enzymatic conversion and floods the metabolic pathways with beneficial GLA. Nutrient deficiency should also be addressed. Here lies the true power of GLA.

Prostaglandins, biochemical Regulators

Whereas GLA is the power, the prostaglandins deliver the punch in this biological equation. Just as linoleic acid is normally converted to GLA, GLA is further converted into the prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). Many of the benefits derived from GLA supplementation are a result of the hormonal regulatory action of the prostaglandins. Just like the “parent” precursors they are made from, the hormone-like prostaglandins orchestrate a host of important biochemical activities. Their general regulatory effects include the control of arterial muscle tone, sodium excretion through the kidneys, blood platelet “Stickiness,” inflammatory response and the immune function, just to name a few. The list may be endless as scientists continue to discover the regulating effects of prostaglandins. One way in which GLA has shown to decrease the probability of allergic and inflammatory conditions is by competing with arachidomic acid, which when left unchecked may potentiate a hyperimmune response.

Healing Power

As a result of the powerful regulating effects derived from the conversion of GLA to healthful prostaglandins, borage oil and other GLA supplements have shown to be beneficial in the treatment and relief of many classic and modern day health problems. The disease of diabetes, cystic fibrosis, asthma, multiple sclerosis are thought to be helped by bringing about a balance in an otherwise faulty fatty acid metabolism. According to a study released in the journal diabetes care, supplementation with GLA has shown promise in the reversal of diabetic neuropathy (a condition where the nerves degenerate and symptoms of pain and numbness follow). The study concluded that all diabetics should be considered for dietary protocol of GLA. Other conditions shown to benefit include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, skin conditions, arthritis, allergies, weight loss, improved behavior of hyperactive children and increased strength of hair and nails. Cited in the book, Super Nutrition For Menopause, written by the renowned nutritionist Ann Louise Gittleman, is one of the most popular applications of GLA supplementation in the relief of menstrual pain. Sufferers use a maintenance does up to the seventh day prior to menstruation, then double the dose for the duration of their menstruation. Dietary restrictions of meat, dairy and eggs during this time has also shown to compliment this regiment. Many would agree with Ms. Gittleman’s credo in allowing mother nature to cure our ails before relying on synthetic drugs which often come with side effects.

More Bang for the Buck

Now comes the challenge of acquiring a GLA supplement suited to meet your needs. With the help of the information below you may maximize your desired result while at the same time stretching your dollars. Lets take a look at the facts. We will limit out narrative to the tree most popular forms of GLA supplementation: 1) borage oil, 2) evening primrose oil and 3) black current seed oil. Potency is an important factor, as the higher the GLA content per gram, the more likelihood of greater biological activity. Borage oil contains 24% GLA, or 240mg per 1000 mg capsules. Black current seed oil contains 18%, or 180mg per 1000 mg capsule and evening primrose oil contains 10% GLA, or 100mg per 1000 mg capsule. While black currant seed may appear to run a close second to borage and have a slight edge on evening primrose, it contains a potent GLA inhibitor and should be considered last on the list. equally, if not more important than potency, is purity. Make it a practice not to purchase any oil product unless full disclosure of the method of extraction is printed on the label. If it is not, you may assume that the oil has been extracted in one of the following ways. Unfortunately, the popular use of the chemical hexane to extract oils is not required for disclosure. This method employs submerging cracked seed in a gasoline like substance (Hexane) and then slowly allowing it to evaporate off yielding 90% oil recovery. This is the most common method used to extract evening primrose oil because of the incredibly small, hard seed and low oil content. The second creative ploy is the claim that the oil has simply been extracted by a new high-tech method called supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE). This process “pregrinds” the seeds then subjects them to pressures of 6000 – 10000 psi in the presence of the gas CO-2. Under such intense pressure CO-2 gas becomes a liquid in which the seeds are submerged, ultimately yielding a 95% oil recovery. Look for oils that are labeled as “expeller pressed” without the damaging effects of light, heat and oxygen. The products should be contained in opaque (light resistant) bottles to protect them from the damaging effects of light. Optimally, you should find them in the refrigerated section of your local health food store. Due to the higher percentage of oil contained in the borage seed, as compared to evening primrose and black current, borage is typically priced well below the others making it the most potent and economical choice. All things considered an expeller pressed borage oil, contained in an opaque plastic bottle, may provide you the absolute best source of unadulterated GLA supplementation.

One company that provides such a product and always fulfills the quality requirements listed is Barlean’s Organic Oils. Their organic flax oil and borage oils are available at VitaNet.



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Pancreatin 8x Digestive Enzymes for Total Health
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Date: June 08, 2006 06:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Pancreatin 8x Digestive Enzymes for Total Health

  • As the digestive system is supported, the stress on the pancreas is reduced, enabling it to do its second job, regulating the body’s blood sugar by the production of insulin.
  • Encapsulated to maximize the bioavailability of enzymes.
  • Digestive health, supported by digestive enzymes, helps ensure that you are getting the most out of the food you eat, enabling the body to absorb and use the nutrients you consume.

A healthy pancreas positively affects the energy of the entire body. Pancreatic hormones are Regulators of blood sugar through insulin and glucogen. If the pancreas is compromised, it becomes overworked by trying to produce enzymes for digestion. Important energy hormones are not produced, leading to possible blood sugar imbalances.



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Promise of Evening Primrose Oil
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Date: June 03, 2006 01:11 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Promise of Evening Primrose Oil

Today, we know that the oil from the seeds of evening primrose contains a high amount of the active ingredient, gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an oil quite similar to other essential fatty acids (EFA) of the omega-6 variety. In fact, evening primrose oil is one of the few substances found in nature that contains significant amounts of GLA. It was only as recently as the 1970’s that researchers discovered among its potential therapeutic benefits, GLA aids the body’s formation of important prostaglandins (known as PGE1) that moderates inflammatory processes. (Prostaglandins are molecules that act as vital cell Regulators.)

While the body manufactures gamma-linolenic acid from linoleic acid, one of the essential fatty acids, optimal production is often inhibited by dietary deficiencies, age related enzymatic deficiencies and intake of excess amounts of saturated fat. Indeed, it is interesting to note linoleic acid has little to no biological activity in and of itself. It’s true value is in its conversion to GLA. When we take additional GLA, we encourage increased formation of PGE1, which produces a variety of health benefits.

Health experts say that prostaglandin E1 series aids the body by inhibiting or reducing inflammation, blood clumping, blood clots, abnormal cholesterol production and formation of malignant cells. (In particular, GLA reduces risk of arterial spasm and abnormal clots, important factors in heart attacks and strokes. Another beneifit is lowering blood pressure.) The PGE1 series also maintains important electrolyte balances and normalizes insulin secretions.

Other health conditions that can benefit from GLA include arthritis; skin disorders such as eczema, acne, dermatitis; allergies and asthma; premenstrual syndrome; multiple sclerosis; fibrocystic breast disease; and depression.

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TMG Fact Sheet
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Date: December 07, 2005 02:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: TMG Fact Sheet

TMG Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 03/07/05

LIKELY USERS: People with high homocysteine levels; People with risks of developing Alzheimer’s Disease; People needing greater metabolism of fats; People with liver detoxification challenges; People consuming alcohol KEY INGREDIENTS: TMG is composed of three methyl groups attached to a glycine atom. It can “donate” methyl groups.

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: TMG is a metabolite of the B vitamin family product called Choline. Choline has 4 methyl groups, TMG has 3 and DMG has 2. These substances plus Folic acid, Vitamin B-12 and SAM-e are all methyl donors. Methyl donors can contribute methyl groups to biological processes such as liver function, detoxification and cellular replication (production of new cells). Methylation protects the kidneys and stimulates production of the fat-transporting molecule l-carnitine.

TMG helps the liver metabolize fats, preventing the accumulation of fats in the liver. It also helps to detoxify chemicals in the liver, while protecting the liver from being damaged by those chemicals.

Methylation with TMG helps to convert the dangerous, inflammatory chemical homocysteine into the amino acid methionine. TMG may lower homocysteine when B-6, B-12 and folic acid cannot.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT INFORMATION: TMG is also known as Betaine and is a component of Betaine hydrochloride (Betaine HCl), a stomach acid supplement that is very acidic. But Betaine HCl is not used in the same way as TMG. TMG is not highly acidic and will not supplement low stomach acid.

TMG may be useful for autistic children, along with B-6 and magnesium. It may also be useful in strengthening the body’s immune response against pathogenic bacteria. There is very preliminary evidence that TMG and methyl donors may help against some forms of seizures.

DMG has been used as a sports supplement. TMG is 50% more effective than DMG in any application where the methyl groups are useful. Otherwise, they can used interchangeably.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: One serving per day, or up to 6,000 mg., as needed.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: SAM-e, Milk Thistle (Silymarin), Dr. Verghese’s Liver Detoxifier & Regenerator, Antioxidants, NAC, Homocysteine Regulators, D-Flame, Detox Support

CAUTIONS: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement.

People with Parkinson’s or taking L-dopa should not use methyl donors like TMG without a physician’s specific approval and supervision. There are no other known drug interactions with TMG.

This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. This is not an official publication by any company, nor has this information been screened or approved by the FDA or any private company.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. REFERENCES:

General:

Craig SA. Betaine in human nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Sep;80(3):539-49. Review. PMID: 15321791

Methylation:

Barak AJ, Tuma DJ. Betaine, metabolic by-product or vital methylating agent? Life Sci 1983;32:771-4 [review].

Benson R, Crowell B, Hill B, et al. The effects of L-dopa on the activity of methionine adenosyltransferase: relevance to L-dopa therapy and tolerance. Neurochem Res 1993;18:325–30.

Chambers ST. Betaines: their significance for bacteria and the renal tract. Clin Sci 1995;88:25-7 [review].

Charlton CG, Crowell B Jr. Parkinson’s disease-like effects of S-adenosyl-L-methionine: effects of L-dopa. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1992;43:423–31.

Charlton CG, Mack J. Substantia nigra degeneration and tyrosine hydroxylase depletion caused by excess S-adenosylmethionine in the rat brain. Support for an excess methylation hypothesis for parkinsonism. Mol Neurobiol 1994;9:149–61.

Cheng H, Gomes-Trolin C, Aquilonius SM, et al. Levels of L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase activity in erythrocytes and concentrations of S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine in whole blood of patients with Parkinson’s disease. Exp Neurol 1997;145:580–5.

Crowell BG Jr, Benson R, Shockley D, Charlton CG. S-adenosyl-L-methionine decreases motor activity in the rat: similarity to Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms. Behav Neural Biol 1993;59:186–93.

Selhub J. Homocysteine metabolism. Annu Rev Nutr 1999;19:217-46 [review].

Homocysteine:

Brosnan JT, Jacobs RL, Stead LM, Brosnan ME. Methylation demand: a key determinant of homocysteine metabolism. Acta Biochim Pol. 2004;51(2):405-13. Review. PMID: 15218538 Gahl WA, Bernardini I, Chen S, et al. The effect of oral betaine on vertebral body bone density in pyridoxine-non-responsive homocystinuria. J Inherit Metab Dis 1988;11:291-8.

Olthof MR, van Vliet T, Boelsma E, Verhoef P. Low dose betaine supplementation leads to immediate and long term lowering of plasma homocysteine in healthy men and women. J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4135-8. PMID: 14652361

Olthof MR, Verhoef P. Effects of betaine intake on plasma homocysteine concentrations and consequences for health. Curr Drug Metab. 2005 Feb;6(1):15-22. PMID: 15720203

Schwab U, Torronen A, Toppinen L, Alfthan G, Saarinen M, Aro A, Uusitupa M. Betaine supplementation decreases plasma homocysteine concentrations but does not affect body weight, body composition, or resting energy expenditure in human subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Nov;76(5):961-7. PMID: 12399266

Selhub J. Homocysteine metabolism. Annu Rev Nutr 1999;19:217-46 [review].

van Guldener C, Janssen MJ, de Meer K, et al. Effect of folic acid and betaine on fasting and postmethionine-loading plasma homocysteine and methionine levels in chronic haemodialysis patients. J Intern Med 1999;245:175-83.

Wendel U, Bremer HJ. Betaine in the treatment of homocystinuria due to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency. Eur J Pediatr 1984;142:147-50.

Wilcken DE, Wilcken B, Dudman NP, Tyrrell PA. Homocystinuria—the effects of betaine in the treatment of patients not responsive to pyridoxine. N Engl J Med 1983;309:448-53.

Wilcken DE, Dudman NP, Tyrrell PA. Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency--the effects of betaine treatment in pyridoxine-responsive patients. Metabolism. 1985 Dec;34(12):1115-21. PMID: 3934499

Liver function:

Babucke G, Sarre B. Clinical experience with betain citrate. Med Klin 1973;68:1109-13 [in German].

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Badakhsh S, Tuma DJ. The effect of betaine in reversing alcoholic steatosis. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1997;21:1100-2.

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Matti J, Tuma DJ. Dietary betaine promotes generation of hepatic S-adenosylmethioine and protects the liver from ethanol-induced fatty infiltration. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1993;17:552-5.

Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Tuma DJ. Betaine, ethanol, and the liver: a review. Alcohol 1996;13:395-8 [review]. PMID: 8836329

Freed WJ. Prevention of strychnine-induced seizures and death by the N-methylated glycine derivatives betaine, dimethylglycine and sarcosine. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1985 Apr;22(4):641-3. PMID: 2581277

Junnila M, Barak AJ, Beckenhauer HC, Rahko T. Betaine reduces hepatic lipidosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in Sprague-Dawley rats. Vet Hum Toxicol 1998;40:263-6.

Ji C, Kaplowitz N. Betaine decreases hyperhomocysteinemia, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and liver injury in alcohol-fed mice. Gastroenterology. 2003 May;124(5):1488-99. PMID: 12730887

Kettunen H, Tiihonen K, Peuranen S, Saarinen MT, Remus JC. Dietary betaine accumulates in the liver and intestinal tissue and stabilizes the intestinal epithelial structure in healthy and coccidia-infected broiler chicks. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2001 Nov;130(4):759-69. PMID: 11691612

Kim SK, Kim YC, Kim YC. Effects of singly administered betaine on hepatotoxicity of chloroform in mice. Food Chem Toxicol 1998;36:655-61.

McCarty MF. Co-administration of equimolar doses of betaine may alleviate the hepatotoxic risk associated with niacin therapy. Med Hypotheses. 2000 Sep;55(3):189-94. PMID: 10985907

Murakami T, Nagamura Y, Hirano K. The recovering effect of betaine on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol 1998;44:249-55.

Poschl G, Stickel F, Wang XD, Seitz HK. Alcohol and cancer: genetic and nutritional aspects. Proc Nutr Soc. 2004 Feb;63(1):65-71. Review. PMID: 15070439

Semmler F. Treatment of liver diseases, especially of fatty liver with betaine citrate. Ther Ggw 1977;116:2113-24 [in German].

Zapadniuk VI, Panteleimonova TN. [Cholagogic effect of trimethylglycine in normal animals of different ages and in experimental atherosclerosis] Biull Eksp Biol Med. 1987 Jul;104(7):30-2. Russian. PMID: 3620644

Autism & Seizures:

Rimland B. Seizures, Vitamin B6, DMG, and Sudden Speech. Autism Research Review International. 1996;10(2):1.

Roach ES, Carlin L. N,N-dimethylglycine for epilepsy. N Engl J Med. 1982;307:1081-82.

Vitamin B6/DMG. Letters to the Editor, Autism Research Interview International. 1994;8(2):6.

Immunity:

Reap EA, Lawson JW. Stimulation of the immune response by dimethylglycine, a nontoxic metabolite. J Lab Clin Med. Apr1990;115(4):481-6.

Safety:

Hoorn AJ. Dimethylglycine and chemically related amines tested for mutagenicity under potential nitrosation conditions. Mutat Res. 1989 Apr;222(4):343-50. PMID: 2468082



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Takeing Cat's Claw, IP-6 and Maitake Mushroom over stimulate immune system?
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Date: November 11, 2005 06:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Takeing Cat's Claw, IP-6 and Maitake Mushroom over stimulate immune system?

Q. If these three natural products are taken together, could they over-stimulate my immune system?

A. That is a very good question. And at first glance, it might seem a possibility. However, one of the most amazing aspects of all three nutritional products, POA cat’s claw root extract, maitake d-fraction, and IP-6 with inositol, is their ability to both strengthen a weakened immune system and calm down a hyperactive immune system. They modulate the immune system.

The POAs in cat’s claw root extract do not take over the immune system’s job, they simply strengthen the body’s immune system so it can do its job better. Maitake D-fraction does not act on cancer cells directly, it encourages the body’s own immune system Regulators to act. IP-6 with inositol does not increase NK cells, it increases NK cell activity. In other words, these three natural discoveries strengthen and balance the immune system without the fear of over-stimulation.

In fact, it is theorized that cat’s claw root extract, maitake mushrooms, and IP-6 with inositol may work synergistically. Meaning, together they strengthen and balance the immune system even better when they are taken together. However, if you use a cat’s claw supplement that contains any amount of TOAs, not only will the good “spirits” of POAs be cancelled, experts believe that they will interfere with IP-6 with inositol as well. That’s why it is vital to choose a cat’s claw supplement that is 100% TOA-free and says so on its label.

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PREGNENOLONE - The Balancing Hormone
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Date: June 04, 2005 01:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PREGNENOLONE - The Balancing Hormone

Pregnenolone

Hormones are potent Regulators of the most intricate biochemical functions involved in our metabolism, growth, development, emotion and behavior. For our bodies to function properly, our hormones must be in balance with one another. But aging, stress and environmental factors can contribute to hormonal imbalances, with serious impact on our well-being. Today, science has rediscovered a beneficial hormone with the capacity to reduce stress, fatigue and support mental alertness. This hormone is broad – spectrum in its influences - with the ability to balance the levels of other hormones in our bodies. Unfortunately, our production of this hormone declines as we grow older - suggesting the desirability of supplementation. Introducing: Source Naturals PREGNENOLONE.

A Wide Range of Beneficial Properties

Pregnenolone - a hormone produced from cholesterol in our adrenal glands, liver, skin, testicles, ovaries, and brain - was the subject of intense interest in the 1940’s. Some of the earliest studies, performed by well-known researcher Hans Selye, found it to be helpful in reducing stress and fatigue. Additional studies were conducted throughout the decade, with positive results. Pregnenolone supplementation was found to benefit people who were under excessive stress. It also was reported to support joint and tissue function and to contribute to skin elasticity. Pregnenolone is believed to affect stress levels through its influence on the adrenal glands, which produce more steroid hormones when people are under stress. Pregnenolone may also affect brain chemistry in beneficial ways. It has been found to inhibit the GABA receptors in brain cells - which may result in increased mental alertness. It may also stimulate the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors, which play an important role in regulating synapses, thus influencing learning and memory.

Pregnenolone: The Unique Hormone

Much of the current interest in pregnenolone is related to its role as “the grandmother of all steroid hormones.” Pregnenolone is the starting point from which all steroid hormones are manufactured in our bodies. As a “hormone balancer,” it has the capacity to increase the levels of steroid hormones that are deficient in our bodies and to reduce the levels of excess circulating hormones. Some scientists believe pregnenolone is converted into other hormones only as they are needed by our bodies. The conversion of pregnenolone follows different pathways, depending upon cellular requirements. Pregnenolone may be converted into DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), which in turn can be changed into androgens (including testosterone), estrogens and other steroids; or, it may be converted into any or all of a chain of hormones including progesterone, corticosterone, and aldosterone. These characteristics make pregnenolone unique. Because cells may only convert pregnenolone into other hormones on an “as needed” basis, pregnenolone may correct imbalances in the levels of some hormones, without affecting others. This is a great advantage over steroid hormones like DHEA, which may create excess estrogen and testosterone. Pregnenolone is also distinctive because of the innumerable bodily activities it can influence. As a steroid hormone precursor, it is believed to be involved in every biochemical action exhibited by any steroid hormone. This means it may impact memory, mental alertness, stress responses, female reproductive cycles, the body’s natural defenses, and joint and tissue function. With such a wide spectrum of involvement, the potential uses of pregnenolone could be boundless. Source Naturals PREGNENOLONE is available in 10 mg sublinguals and tablets, as well as in 25 mg tablets. All potencies are sold in 60 and 120 tablet bottles.

References
1. Akwa, Y., et al. J. Cell Biology, (1993). 121(1), 135-143. 2. Flood, J.F., et al. (1995, Apr.). Physiology and Behavior, 57(4), 669-73. 3. Flood, J.F., et al. (1995). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 92, 10806-10810. 4. Flood, J.F., et al. (1992). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 89, 1567-1571. 5. Henderson, E., et al. (1950). J Clin Endocrinology, 10, 455-474. 6. Hoagland H. (1944). Science, 100(2587), 63-67. 7. Jung-Testas, Z.Y., et al. (1989). Endocrinology, 125(4), 2083-2091. 8. Mayo, W., et al. (1993). Brain Research, 607, 324-328. 9. Pincus, G., et al. (1945). Psychosom. Med., 7, 347-352. 10. Pincus, G. & Hoagland, H. (1944, Apr.). Aviation Medicine, 98-115. 11. Pincus, G. & Hoagland, H. (1945). Psychosom. Med., 7, 342-346. 12. Roberts, E. (1995). Biochemical Pharmacology, 49(1), 1-16. 13. Roy, R., & Bélanger, A. (1992). Endocrinology, 131(3), 1390-1396.



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Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ...
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Date: June 02, 2005 12:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Heart Science - A Five-Tiered Approach to Heart Health ...

Heart Science 30 tabs

Your heart is crucial to every function of your body. It is the sole organ which pumps oxygen-rich blood through the entire circulatory system, feeding your cells and making life possible. Only recently are Americans realizing the importance of a proper low-fat diet, regular exercise, giving up cigarette smoking, and cutting down alcohol consumption to maintaining a healthy heart. Unfortunately, there has been a huge gap in the number of nutritional supplements which provide nutrients and herbs to support normal heart function. That’s where Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE comes in. Two years in the making, and backed by numerous scientific studies, the nutrients in HEART SCIENCE are some of the most soundly researched of all. Combining high potencies of these super-nutrients, HEART SCIENCE is the most comprehensive, cutting edge nutritional approach to proper heart care available.

Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE— The Five Tiered Approach to Heart Health

Your heart never rests. Even while you sleep, your heart must keep working, relying on the constant generation of energy by the body for its very survival. If this vital organ stops beating for even a short amount of time, all bodily functions cease and life ends. Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE helps support heart function on the chemical, cellular, structural, and energetic levels. This broad spectrum formula includes ingredients specifically geared for
1) generating energy,
2) decreasing harmful homocysteine levels,
3) fighting oxidized cholesterol,
4) maintaining the heart’s electrical rhythm, and
5) protecting artery and capillary linings.

Energy Generators for An Energetic Organ

Every day, the human heart beats about 104,000 times, pumping over 8,000 liters of blood through the body! Because it requires so much energy to perform efficiently, the experts at Source Naturals included specialty nutrients in HEART SCIENCE such as Coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine — integral factors in the body’s energy production cycles — to enhance the body’s energy supply.

There are three main interconnected energy generating cycles in our cells — the Glycolytic (sugar-burning) cycle, the Krebs’ (citric acid) cycle, and the Electron Transport Chain. Together they supply about 90 to 95% of our body’s entire energy supply, using fats, sugars, and amino acids as fuel. Coenzyme Q10 is one of the non-vitamin nutrients needed to maximally convert food into ATP (the energy producing molecule). It is the vital connecting link for three of the four main enzyme complexes in the Electron Transport Chain, the next step in energy generation after the Krebs’ cycle. Using the raw materials generated by the Krebs’ cycle, the Electron Transport Chain produces most of the body’s total energy! The heart is one of the bodily organs which contains the highest levels of CoQ10, precisely because it needs so much energy to function efficiently.

CoQ10 is one of the most promising nutrients for the heart under investigation today. It has been postulated that as a result of its participation in energy production, CoQ10 improves heart muscle metabolism and the electrical functioning of the heart by enhancing its pumping capacity.8 Many factors such as a high fat diet, lack of exercise, and cigarette smoking can lead to suboptimal functioning of the heart, and therefore failure of the heart to maintain adequate circulation of blood. Interestingly, people whose lifestyles reflect the above factors also tend to have depleted levels of CoQ10 in the heart muscle.10

Researchers suggest taking between 10-100 mg per day of CoQ10;18,29 HEART SCIENCE provides an impressive 60 mg of CoQ10 per 6 tablets. Similar to CoQ10, L-Carnitine is important for energy production in heart cells. It is a natural amino acid-like substance which plays a key role in transporting fatty acids, the heart’s main source of energy, to the mitochondria, the “power plants” of each cell, where they are utilized for the production of ATP. Heart and skeletal muscles are particularly vulnerable to L-Carnitine deficiency. Studies have shown that supplementation with LCarnitine improves exercise tolerance in individuals with suboptimal heart and circulatory function, and seems to lower blood lipid status and increase HDL (good) cholesterol.16, 22 Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE contains 500 mg of this extremely important compound.

Like CoQ10 and L-Carnitine, B Vitamins help improve the ability of the heart muscle to function optimally. Each B Vitamin, after being converted to its active coenzyme form, acts as a catalytic “spark plug” for the body’s production of energy. Vitamin B-1, for example, is converted to Cocarboxylase, which serves as a critical link between the Glycolytic and Krebs’ Cycles, and also participates in the conversion of amino acids into energy. A deficiency of B coenzymes within contracting muscle cells can lead to a weakened pumping of the heart.21

HEART SCIENCE is formulated with high quantities of the most absorbable forms of B Vitamins providing maximum nutrition for the high energy demands of heart cells.

Homocysteine Regulators

B Vitamins also play a crucial role in the conversion of homocysteine, a group of potentially harmful amino acids produced by the body, to methionine, another more beneficial amino acid. While it is normal for the body to produce some homocysteine, even a small elevation in homocysteine levels can have negative implications. It is well documented that individuals who are genetically predisposed to having elevated homocysteine levels (homocysteinemics) tend to have excessive plaque accumulation in the arteries and premature damage to endothelial cells (cells lining the blood vessels and heart).26 Researchers have found that even those without this genetic abnormality, whose homocysteine levels are much lower than those of homocysteinemics, still have an increased risk for premature endothelial damage and the development of plaque in the arteries.24, 26 One study conducted among normal men and women found that those with the highest levels of homocysteine were twice as likely to have clogged arteries as were those with the lowest levels.24 Furthermore, it was found that the lower the research subjects’ blood levels of folate and B-6, the higher their homocysteine levels.24 Another study found that Folic Acid administered to normal men and women who were not even deficient in folate caused a significant reduction in plasma concentrations of homocysteine!3 In order to regulate homocysteine levels, it is critical to provide the body with sufficient amounts of B-6, B-12, and Folate, whether through the diet or through supplementation. HEART SCIENCE includes high levels of these three nutrients, providing B-6 in the regular and coenzyme form for maximum utilization.

The Dangers of Oxidized LDL Cholesterol

While many people have heard that high cholesterol levels may negatively affect normal heart function, few people understand exactly what cholesterol is, or how it can become harmful. Cholesterol is a white, waxy substance produced in the liver by all animals, and used for a variety of necessary activities in the body. Your liver also manufactures two main kinds of carrier molecules which transport cholesterol throughout the system: Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and High Density Lipoprotein (HDL). Cholesterol is either carried out by LDL from the liver to all tissues in the body where it is deposited, or carried back by HDLs which remove cholesterol deposits from the arteries and carry them to the liver for disposal. Because of this, LDL cholesterol is considered damaging, while HDL is considered protective. Problems occur when there is too much LDL cholesterol in the body and not enough HDL.

When the body becomes overloaded with fat, an over-abundance of LDL particles are manufactured to process it, and they in turn become elevated in the body to a degree that the liver cannot handle. Rich in fatty acids and cholesterol, these particles are highly susceptible to free radical attack (oxidation). Once oxidized, LDL particles are no longer recognized by the body, which attacks them with immune cells. Immune cells which are bloated by oxidized lipids (called foam cells) are a key factor in the development of “fatty streaks” — the first sign of excess arterial fat accumulation. The bloated immune cells accumulate in artery lesions and create plaque in blood vessels, leading to obstruction and constriction of the vessels. Plus, these lodged foam cells continue to secrete free radicals into the bloodstream, making the problem worse.

The development of lesions in the arteries is not an uncommon problem. Arterial (and all blood vessel) walls are composed of a chemical matrix which holds the endothelial cells in place. That endothelial layer is the first and most important line of defense in preventing large molecules, such as cholesterol and fat, from entering the vessel wall. This matrix is composed of proteins, collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans (amino sugars). Arterial lesions can be caused by suboptimal collagen and elastin synthesis due to three factors: 1. Vitamin C deficiency (since Vitamin C is a key building block for collagen and elastin); 2. excessive consumption of rancid fats, or heavy usage of alcohol or cigarettes; and 3. free radical damage. Once these lesions are created, the body attempts to repair them by depositing LDL cholesterol — similar to the way one would patch a tire. If that cholesterol is not oxidized, i.e. chemically changed to a harmful, unstable molecule, then this process does not create a problem. But when arterial lesions are “patched” with foam cells, arterial walls suffer page 3 page 4 even more damage, because those foam cells release free radicals which can further damage cell membranes.

Unfortunately, most people have a lot of oxidized cholesterol floating through the bloodstream. The typical American diet, with its low antioxidant intake and overconsumption of fried and overcooked foods, contributes to the overall levels of harmful oxidized cholesterol. In fact, the average American intake of antioxidants is low even by USRDA standards, making Americans particularly prone to having high levels of oxidized cholesterol.

Cholesterol Fighters

Fortunately, there are concrete steps you can take to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol, and its subsequent ill effects on health. In addition to cutting out high-cholesterol and fatty foods, supplementation can protect existing cholesterol and all tissue cells — from oxidation. Antioxidants, substances which scavenge and neutralize free radicals, protect the cardiovascular system by halting the oxidation of cholesterol, and helping to prevent plaque accumulation in the arteries and the continual secretion of free radicals by foam cells. Supplementing the diet with high amounts of Vitamin C, a key antioxidant, also encourages a more healthy “patching” of existing lesions by using collagen (made from Vitamin C) instead of cholesterol. HEART SCIENCE contains generous amounts of the following antioxidants for their protective benefits:

  • • Beta Carotene, a plant pigment, is the naturally occurring precursor to Vitamin A. When the body takes in high enough amounts of Beta Carotene, this lipid-soluble free radical scavenger concentrates in circulating lipoproteins and atherosclerotic plaques, where it performs its antioxidant functions. Beta Carotene is particularly unique and powerful as an antioxidant because it is capable of trapping a very toxic form of di-oxygen, called singlet oxygen, which can result in severe tissue damage. Beta Carotene is one of the most efficient quenchers of singlet oxygen thus far discovered. Six tablets of HEART SCIENCE provide an unprecedented 45,000 IU of Beta Carotene!
  • • Vitamin C is found in plasma, the watery component of blood, where it functions as a potent antioxidant. In addition to strengthening artery linings through collagen manufacture, Vitamin C is involved in the regeneration of Vitamin E within LDL particles. Vitamin C also plays an important role in the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids by the liver, a crucial step in reducing blood cholesterol levels. Once converted into bile acids, and then into bile salts, cholesterol can be excreted from the body, preventing build-up. Supplementation with Vitamin C may lower levels of LDL cholesterol and increase those of HDL cholesterol.25 It may also have a part in actually removing cholesterol deposits from artery walls — good news for people who are already experiencing plaque buildup.25 Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE provides 1,500 mg of Vitamin C in its bioactive mineral ascorbate form.
  • • Vitamin E, together with Beta Carotene, protects lipids from free radical attack. It is the major antioxidant vitamin that is carried in the lipid fraction of the LDL particle, where it protects the LDL particle from damaging oxidation. Within an LDL particle, one molecule of Vitamin E has the ability to protect about 200 molecules of polyunsaturated fatty acids from free radical damage! Vitamin E also aids in protecting the heart by interfering with the abnormal clumping of blood cell fragments, called platelets, within blood vessels.4 It has been shown to inhibit the formation of thromboxanes and increase the production of prostacyclins, which together decrease abnormal platelet aggregation.11 A high potency of Vitamin E — 400 IU’s — is included in six tablets of HEART SCIENCE in the natural d-alpha succinate form, recognized by scientific researchers to be the most absorbable form!
  • • Selenium is an important mineral which has only recently gained attention. When incorporated into the enzyme Glutathione Peroxidase, it has highly powerful free radical-scavenging abilities, and has been shown to work synergistically with Vitamins A, C, and E. An essential mineral, Selenium used to be derived from eating foods grown in Selenium-rich soil. However, modern agricultural practices have depleted soil of its natural Selenium content, leaving many Americans deficient in this vital nutrient. Several epidemiological studies show that the incidence of advanced fatty deposits in blood vessels is much greater in individuals living in geographic areas of the United States and other parts of the world where the Selenium content of the soil is very low.27
  • Proanthodyn,™ an extract of grape seeds, is being called the most powerful antioxidant yet discovered. This highly potent, water-soluble bioflavonoid contains between 93-95% proanthocyanidins, the highest concentration of any nutrient available today. The protective actions of proanthocyanidins may help to prevent the development of plaque in artery walls by inhibiting the free radicals which are produced during the oxidation of cholesterol. The optimal daily amount (100 mg) of Proanthodyn is included in six tablets of HEART SCIENCE. In addition to the protective actions of antioxidants, several other nutrients can contribute to healthier cholesterol ratios.
  • • Chromium is a trace mineral which functions to aid the entrance of glucose into cells. Six tablets of HEART SCIENCE provide 300 mcg of Chromium in the form of Chromate® Chromium Polynicotinate and Chromium Picolinate — the most bioactive forms of Chromium. Not many people are familiar with the vital role Copper plays in the body. This trace mineral is found in all tissues of the body, and is particularly concentrated in the heart. Copper is part of several enzymes, and, in this capacity, is necessary for the development and maintenance of the cardiovascular system, including the heart, arteries, and other blood vessels. Because of its role in elastin production, Copper deficiency can severely damage blood vessels and heart tissue. In fact, researchers have found an inverse relationship between Copper status and increased risk for heart damage.10
  • • L-Proline and L-Lysine are two natural amino acids which show exciting promise in helping to prevent fatty deposits in blood vessels. Researchers have recently identified a particle associated with LDL called apoprotein (a) which is believed to be a main culprit in plaque development. 17 Scientific investigation has revealed that the lipoprotein (a) particle has an adhesive quality that makes the lipoprotein fat globule stick inside blood vessels. The sticky fat globules accumulate, leading to fatty deposits in blood vessels and the subsequent clogging of the arteries. L-Proline and L-Lysine tend to form a barrierlike layer around the apoprotein (a) particle, helping to push it away from the blood vessel wall, and impeding deposit.21

    The Regulating Trio

    Three nutrients — Magnesium, Potassium, and Taurine — work closely together in the body to help maintain the normal electrical rhythm of the heart, promote proper fluid balance, and prevent excessive Calcium levels from building up in the heart and artery linings.

  • • Magnesium is one of the single most important nutrients for maintaining a healthy heart. It plays an extremely vital role in maintaining the electrical and physical integrity of the heart muscle. It has been well established that Magnesium deficiency predisposes humans to serious disruptions of normal cardiac rhythm. One theory is that because Magnesium has a relaxing effect on muscle tissue, inadequate Magnesium stores may make the coronary arteries more susceptible to muscle spasm.10 Too little Magnesium can cause a Calcium/Magnesium imbalance, which can lead to the influx of too much Calcium into heart cells, and potentiate spasms in heart tissue. Another point for consideration is that because it relaxes the blood vessels, Magnesium keeps these vessels open, allowing for maximum blood flow to the heart. Magnesium also has the unique ability to stop unnecessary blood clotting by helping to reduce platelet adhesion.31 Blood clots are naturally produced by the body as a protective device to stop excessive blood flow when the body is injured. The clotting response happens when the body senses that the normally smooth blood vessel linings are rough, indicating that there is a cut. However, sometimes the body mistakes the rough surface of plaque-covered arteries as cuts, and creates unnecessary blood clots. Or, if a high fat meal has just been eaten, tiny fat globules called chylomicrons enter the bloodstream and can cause platelets to become abnormally sticky, possibly creating clots. When these clots flow through the bloodstream and reach a part of the artery which has plaque buildup, normal blood flow is blocked, and the amount of blood which reaches the heart is severely compromised. Magnesium is also crucial for the entrance of Potassium — a key mineral for many bodily functions — into the cells. Even if the body’s Potassium stores are high, without enough Magnesium, the Potassium will not be able to enter the cells and be utilized by the body. 300 mg of Magnesium (75% of the U.S.RDA) are contained in each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE. Along with Magnesium, Potassium helps to regulate normal heartbeat and blood pressure, and is necessary for the contraction and relaxation of muscle tissue. Potassium and Sodium are present in all body fluids; Potassium is found primarily within cell fluids, while Sodium is usually present in fluids surrounding cells. Together, they function to maintain the normal balance and distribution of fluids throughout the body. The body ideally should have a Potassium/Sodium balance of about 1:1; however, because the body holds onto Sodium, yet eliminates Potassium quickly, it is important that the dietary ratio of these two minerals be at least 3:1. Unfortunately, the typical American diet, with its emphasis on processed, salty (Sodiumrich) foods and lack of fresh fruits and vegetables, severely alters the body’s natural Potassium/ Sodium balance. Diets in the United States are extremely high in Sodium — sometimes containing as much as 15 times the recommended daily intake! A high Sodium/low Potassium diet interferes with the normal regulation of heartbeat and blood pressure, and has been linked with elevated blood pressure.25 Taurine is an amino acid which helps normalize electrical and mechanical activity of the heart muscle by regulating Potassium flux in and out of the heart muscle cells.

    Artery Lining Protectors

    Your arteries form an integral part of your cardiovascular system, carrying blood away from the heart to nourish other parts of the body. In a healthy heart, blood surges through the arteries with every beat of the heart. The arteries expand with each pulse to accommodate the flow of blood. When arteries become hardened and narrowed by the build-up of plaque, they can’t expand and are not able to transport blood efficiently throughout the body. This inability to open up increases blood pressure, putting a strain on the heart as well as the arteries. HEART SCIENCE includes ingredients specifically geared to protect against plaque formation within arteries and maintain the flexibility of these vital blood vessels. N-Acetyl Glucosamine (NAG) is a key amino sugar which forms the building blocks of mucopolysaccharides. Mucopolysaccharides, which are long chain sugars, are an integral component of connective tissue. They combine to form gel-like matrixes which are present throughout tissues in the body, helping to maintain the elasticity of blood vessels which must continually adapt to the changing pressures of blood flow. Each daily dose of HEART SCIENCE provides 500 mg — a substantial amount — of this vital tissue building block. There is evidence indicating that Silicon, a natural mineral, may protect against plaque formation in the arteries. Silicon is found mainly in connective tissues, where it helps bind the body’s chemical matrix. Bound Silicon is found in high amounts in arterial walls. Researchers have found that there is a steady decline in the Silicon content of the aorta and other arteries as we age. This may be due to the low fiber content of the typical American diet, since fiber is a key dietary source of Silicon.23 HEART SCIENCE includes 400 mg of Horsetail herb extract, a natural source of Silicon. Hawthorn Berry is without question the herb most widely used to encourage normal heart function. The beneficial actions of Hawthorn Berry on cardiac function have been repeatedly demonstrated in experimental studies. Supplementation with Hawthorn Berry has been shown to improve both the blood supply to the heart by dilating coronary vessels, and the metabolic processes in the heart, resulting in normal, strong contractions of the heart muscle.34 Also, Hawthorn may inhibit the angiotensen converting enzyme, which is responsible for converting angiotensen I to angiotensen II, a powerful constrictor of blood vessels.34 Bromelain, a natural enzyme derived from pineapples, has become well-known for its neuromuscular relaxing properties. Researchers have reported favorable results when using Bromelain for soothing vascular linings. Initial research also indicates that Bromelain may break down fibrin, the glue which holds platelets together to form blood clots.6

    Capillary Strengtheners

    Capillaries are the smallest, yet some of the most important, blood vessels. If you think of your cardiovascular system as a series of roads which transport blood and oxygen, then your arteries are akin to interstate highways, your arterioles are the main city boulevards, and your capillaries are local residential streets. Capillaries are so small, in fact, that single red blood cells actually have to fold up to fit through them. Because of their tiny size and the intricate nature of their network throughout the body, capillaries are responsible for actually nourishing each individual tissue cell! Along the length of the capillaries are small openings called slit pores through which oxygen, glucose, and nutrients leave the capillaries and enter the surrounding interstitial fluid. From there, they cross cell membranes and nourish the cells. Similarly, the waste products of cells enter the fluid and cross over into the capillaries, where they are then transported to the liver and kidneys for disposal. If the capillary slit pores are torn or have lesions, then blood proteins and Sodium will leak out and cause the interstitial fluid to take on a more gel-like nature. This makes the transfer of oxygen and nutrients to the cells more difficult, as well as the disposal of cell waste products, turning the fluid into a stagnant swamp instead of a flowing river. In addition to its powerful antioxidant actions, Proanthodyn also helps protect collagen and elastin, the main constituents of tissue in the capillaries, and throughout the body. It is absolutely essential for capillary walls — which are only one cell thick — to be strong and stable, so that they do not allow blood proteins to leak into the interstitial fluid. Once the interstitial fluid takes on a gel-like consistency, the surrounding cells literally become starved from lack of nutrition. The exciting news is that the proanthocyanidins contained in Proanthodyn are among the few substances yet discovered which can help strengthen capillary walls, ensuring the liquid nature of the interstitial fluid.2 Plus, proanthocyanidins help keep capillary and artery walls flexible, allowing for proper blood flow to the heart.

    Heart Smarts

    The 1990’s mark a decade of increased awareness among Americans of important health issues. Much of the discussion has revolved around protecting that precious center of life we call the heart. Simple lifestyle change is one of the most effective ways to maintain and protect the functioning of the cardiovascular system. In order to take a holistic approach to heart care, make sure you include plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables (organic, if possible) in your diet, and cut down on fatty and cholesterol-forming foods. Reduce your salt and alcohol intake to a minimum. Try to get regular, sustained aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes three times a week. Don’t smoke – or if you do smoke, try to eat even more fresh fruits and antioxidant-rich vegetables to counter the amount of free radicals being produced in your body. Lastly, consider adding Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE to your health regimen. HEART SCIENCE, the most comprehensive formula of its kind, provides targeted protection to the entire cardiovascular system. By approaching the promotion of normal heart function on five different levels — through the inclusion of ingredients which supply energy, decrease harmful homocysteine levels, fight cholesterol build-up, help regulate electrical rhythm, and protect artery and capillary linings — HEART SCIENCE is the perfect addition to a holistic approach to heart care.

    Source Naturals HEART SCIENCE™


    The Five Tiered Approach to Heart Health
    Six tablets contain:
    Vitamins and Minerals %USRDA
    Pro-Vit A (Beta Carotene) 45,000 IU 900%
    Vit B1 (Thiamine) 50 mg 3333%
    Vit B3 (Inositol Hexanicotinate) 500 mg 2500%
    Vit B6 (Pyridoxine HCl) 25 mg 1250%
    Coenzyme B6 (Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate)
    25 mg yielding: 16.9 mg of Vit B6 845% (Total Vitamin B6 Activity) (41.9 mg) (2095%)
    Vit B12 (Cyanocobalamin) 500 mcg 8333%
    Folic Acid 800 mcg 200%
    Vit C (Magnesium Ascorbate) 1500 mg 2500%
    Vit E (d-alpha Tocopheryl Succinate) 400 IU 1333%
    Chromium (ChromeMate® †Polynicotinate-150 mcg & Chromium Picolinate††-150 mcg) 300 mcg *
    Copper (Sebacate) 750 mcg 37.5%
    Magnesium (Ascorbate, Taurinate & Oxide) 300 mg 75%
    Potassium (Citrate) 99 mg *
    Selenium (L-Selenomethionine) 200 mcg *
    Silicon (From 400 mg of Horsetail Extract) 13mg *
    * U.S. RDA not established.
    Other Ingredients and Herbs
    Coenzyme Q10 (Ubiquinone) 60 mg
    L-Carnitine (L-Tartrate) 500 mg
    Hawthorn Berry Extract 400 mg
    Proanthodyn™ (Yielding 95 mg of Proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract) 100 mg
    L-Proline 500 mg
    L-Lysine (HCl) 500 mg
    NAG™ (N-Acetyl Glucosamine) 500 mg
    Bromelain (2000 G.D.U. per gram) 1200 G.D.U.
    Taurine (Magnesium Taurinate) 500 mg
    Horsetail Extract (Yielding 31 mg of Silica) 400 mg
    Inositol (Hexanicotinate) 50 mg

    Reference:
    1. Azuma, J., Sawamura, A., & Awata, N. (1992, Jan). “Usefulness of Taurine... and its Prospective Application.” Japanese Circulation Journal, 56(1), 95-9.
    2. Blazso, G and Gabor, M. (1980). “Odema-inhibiting Effect of Procyanidin.” Acta Physiologica Academiae ScientiarumHungaricae, 56(2), 235-240.
    3. Brattstrom, E. L, Hultberg, L. B., & Hardebo, E. J. (1985, Nov.). “Folic Acid Responsive Postmenopausal Homocysteinemia.” Metabolism, (34)11, 1073-1077.
    4. Colette, C., et al., (1988). “Platelet Function in Type I Diabetes: Effects of Supplementation with Large Doses of Vitamin E.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 47, 256-61.
    5. England, M. R., et al. (1992, Nov. 4). “Magnesium Administration and Dysrhythmias...A Placebo-controlled, Double-blind, Randomized Trial.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 268(17), 2395-402.
    6. Felton, G. E. (1980, Nov.). “Fibrinolytic and Antithrombotic Action of Bromelain...” Medical Hypotheses (11)6, 1123-33.
    7. Grundy, S. M. (1993, Apr.). “Oxidized LDL and Atherogenesis: Relation to Risk Factors...” Clinical Cardiology, 16 (4 Suppl.I), I3-5.
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    9. Heineke, et al. (1972). “Effect of Bromelain (Ananase) on Human Platelet Aggregation.” Experientia V. 23, 844-45.
    10. Hendler, S. S. (1991). The Doctors’ Vitamin and Mineral Encyclopedia. NewYork: Fireside.
    11. Jandak, et al. (1988, Dec. 15). “Reduction of Platelet Adhesiveness by Vitamin E Supplementation in Humans.” Thrombosis Research 49(4), 393-404.
    12. Jialal, I., et al. (1991, Oct. 15). “Beta-Carotene Inhibits the Oxidative Modification of Low-density Lipoprotein.” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 1086(1), 134-8.
    13. Jialal, I. & Fuller, C. J. (1993, Apr. 16). “Oxidized LDL and Antioxidants.” Clinical Cardiology, Vol. 16 (Suppl. I), I6-9.
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    15. Kamikawa, T., et al. (1985). “Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Exercise Tolerance...” American Journal of Cardiology, 56, 247-251.
    16. Kosolcharoen, P., et al. (1981, Nov.). “Improved Exercise Tolerance after Administration of Carnitine.” Current Therapeutic Research, 753-764.
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    COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR - Supports Immune System Integrity
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 01, 2005 11:48 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR - Supports Immune System Integrity

    COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR

    Colostrum, the first “mother’s milk, plays an important role in the body’s immune system—and your immune system needs to be in top shape to withstand all the foreign influences that pervade our environment. Now Source Naturals offers you COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR, a powerful new weapon developed through the use of breakthrough nutritional technology. Transfer factors are isolated from cow’s colostrum. As a result, each capsule of these immune system messengers contains significantly higher transfer factor activity (minimum 20 potency units) than our regular colostrum. Source Naturals is among the first national supplement companies to make this important, innovative product available to the general public.

    Colostrum and Immune Health

    Colostrum is the nourishing “milk” given to newborn mammals by their mothers. It is secreted only in the first 48 to 72 hours after birth. Although colostrum’s importance to newborn health, and specifically to the development of a strong immune system, has been known for years, research on colostrum’s use as a dietary supplement has flourished only since the 1970’s and 1980’s.

    Transfer Factor: What Is It?

    Transfer Factors are chemical messengers of the immune system. These chemical compounds (ribonucleoprotein molecules) convey important information from certain white blood cells developed in the thymus gland to the body’s other T-cells. This information can be conveyed from one organism to another, and from one species to another. Scientists have been studying the role of Transfer Factors in the immune system since the 1940’s. However, they have only recently been able to develop the technology to mass-produce Transfer Factor. The Transfer Factor used in COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR is prepared using an advanced proprietary technology that ensures a purified and potent product.

    Advanced Proprietary Technology

    The bovine colostrum in COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR goes through a molecular ultrafiltration process that enriches its Transfer Factor content. Ultrafiltration also removes high-molecular weight materials such as growth hormones and protein allergens, as well as low-molecular weight products such as antibiotics, lactose and steroids. The material is then freeze-dried and assayed for potency. The assay measures Transfer Factor activity, ensuring that the product is potent enough to produce an immune response in the body both before and after encapsulation. Each capsule of COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR contains a fraction of bovine colostrum supplying 5 mg of Polyvalent Transfer Factor, with a minimum of 20 potency units per capsule. COLOSTRUM TRANSFER FACTOR is available in bottles of 30 and 60 capsules.

    References
    Fudenberg, H. and G. Pizza. 1994. Transfer Factor in 1993: new frontiers. Progress in Drug Research, 42. Birkhauser Verlag: Basel. Jeter, W. et al. Oral administration of bovine and human dialyzable transfer factor to human volun teers. In Kahn, A. and C. Kirkpatrick, eds. Immune Regulators in Transfer Factor. 1979. Academic Press: New York. Kirkpatrick, C. et al. 1995. Murine transfactors: dose-response relationships and routes of adminis tration. Cellular Immunology, 164: 203-206. Thomas, C. ed. 1997. Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary. F.A. Davis, Co.: Philadelphia. Wilson, G.B. and G. Paddock. 1998. Immune Inducers - Antigen Specific “Transfer Factors.” Animune, Inc.: Greenville.



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    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 09, 2005 06:10 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

    It's in the Blood

    Natural alternatives abound for managing cholesterol levels, backed by a growing body of research ©VR By Paul Bubny

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) last July lowered the threshold for considering the use of statin drugs—a move which some say was motivated more by profits than scientific evidence. For example, the Center for Science in the Public Interest pointed out that eight of the nine authors behind the new recommendations had financial ties to statin manufacturers, which stand to reap billions of dollars more from a category that grossed $14 billion in the U.S. last year. And though the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in January decided against authorizing over-the-counter (OTC) sales of statin drugs, drug companies would still like to see this happen.

    “The medical establishment’s pushing of these drugs to becoming the number one category of prescribed drugs in the world has led them to keep lowering the total cholesterol number that triggers the drug recommendation,” said Neil E. Levin, C.C.N., D.A.N.L.A., nutrition educator, product formulator, and “Truth Advocate” for NOW Foods (Bloomingdale, IL), which produces a number of supplements for addressing cholesterol. “This is despite the lack of evidence that total cholesterol means much as regards cardiovascular risks.

    “Other tests are much more important in terms of predicting risks, including CRP (C-reactive protein), the balance of different cholesterol fractions, and homocysteine,” he continued. “Add adult-onset diabetes to the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD).”

    At the same time, the allegation that enormous sales potential lay behind the lower threshold for prescribing statin drugs illustrates how widespread the problem of hypercholesterolemia (elevated total cholesterol) is. More than 100 million Americans have elevated cholesterol (total cholesterol values of 200 mg/dl and higher), and of these, more than a third have high cholesterol (levels of 240 mg/dl and higher), according to the American Heart Association. Those numbers have unfavorable implications for the incidence of CVD, as high cholesterol is considered a risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke.

    While statin drugs haven’t garnered the same degree of negative publicity that COX-2 inhibitors have suffered lately, safety concerns have arisen nonetheless. For one thing, these drugs lower the liver’s production of coenzyme Q10 (coQ10) along with its production of cholesterol. “CoQ10 is related to energy production and immune functions, is an antioxidant, and [is] an important cardiovascular nutrient,” Levin said. “It is not good to lower one’s coQ10 levels by half!”

    Moreover, said Levin, statins increase the tendency of muscle tissues to break down. “Combined with inactivity or certain drugs, this can stimulate muscle wasting,” he said. “Muscle is where a good deal of calories are burned, so a loss of muscle could affect mobility and energy production, potentially adding to obesity problems. These muscle changes occurred in patients and persisted for years after treatment was discontinued, as shown by muscle biopsies, even if no obvious muscle problems were observed by the patients.”

    And the last word on the subject may not have been spoken. Predicted Dr. Frank King, Jr. president of King Bio Natural Medicine (Asheville, NC), “Once the appropriate studies are finished, these drugs, along with hypertensives, will hit the fan bigger than the COX-2 inhibitors.”

    Also looking toward the future, Levin said that of the 20 million Americans who will be “targeted” for statin drug prescriptions under the new NCEP guidelines, “Some of these will want to try natural methods first. Others will rebel at the side effects of the drugs and experiment with alternative products.”

    King and Levin both saw opportunity for natural products in the fallout from drug safety concerns, with King projecting that sales of his company’s cholesterol-related homeopathic remedies will double in 2005. “The reports of deaths from drugs will always overshadow the trumped-up studies and news reports blasting dietary supplements,” said Levin. “Vioxx knocked vitamin E off the media’s radar screens pretty rapidly, though we still see ignorant reporters citing that [Johns Hopkins] vitamin E analysis as if it were true. But the comparable safety of supplements means that open-minded people will want to at least try natural therapies before signing in to a lifetime of drug therapies. Meanwhile, the studies on natural products will continue to build our credibility.”

    Those studies keep coming in, with at least four major findings published in the past few months, plus a heart-health claim on walnuts authorized by FDA. They join a raft of earlier findings that link natural products—branded and otherwise—to healthy cholesterol levels.

    "Blur of Products"

    With so many natural alternatives to cholesterol drugs available, it can be hard to keep track. “As with any other category, the blur of products as they cascade over several shelves means that the retailer needs to have a good sense of what works and what they want to recommend to their customers,” Levin said. “Really, each person needs a protocol that would include antioxidants, fiber, vitamins, herbs, and oils. The pre-mixed cholesterol support formulas are a good starting place.”

    To help retailers get a sense of “what works,” here is an alphabetical discussion of several nutrients that have demonstrated benefits in serum cholesterol levels. They include the following:

    Barley may help lower cholesterol, according to a report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2004, vol.80, no.5: 1185-1193). Twenty-five adults with mild hypercholesterolemia consumed a controlled diet low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol for 19 weeks. They then added whole-grain products containing barley to their diets that contained low (0 g), medium (3 g), or high (6 g) amount of beta-glucan per day for five weeks. Total cholesterol was reduced by 4 percent 9 percent, and 10 percent, respectively. The diet with the highest amount of beta-glucan led to a decrease in LDL cholesterol of 17 percent.

    Chromium. There’s evidence, Levin said, that chromium in doses of 500 mg a day may decrease levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the so-called “bad” cholesterol) and total cholesterol while raising levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good” cholesterol). At the annual meeting of the American College of Nutrition last October, a poster presentation on the safety of Benicia, CA-based InterHealth Nutraceuticals’ ChromeMate niacin-bound chromium won first prize; among other things, the presentation cited chromium’s role in maintaining healthy blood lipid levels.

    Fatty Acids. The latest in a long line of studies demonstrating the benefits of fatty acids in heart health is a study published in The International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics in December 2004. It showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid, can restore normal blood vessel function in children with inherited high cholesterol. The study, which used Martek DHA produced from microalgae, concluded that restoration of normal blood vessel function has the “potential for preventing the progression of early coronary heart disease in high-risk children.”

    “The evidence continues to accumulate on the cardiovascular benefits of DHA for people of all ages,” said Henry “Pete” Linsert, Jr., chairman and CEO of Martek Biosciences, an ingredient supplier based in Columbia, MD. “This study clearly indicates that DHA played an important role in healthy blood vessel function in the children in this study.”

    On the Omega-Research.com Website maintained by fish oil manufacturer Nordic Naturals (Watsonville, CA) can be found summaries of several earlier studies linking omega-3 fatty acids to maintaining healthy blood lipid levels, as well as related benefits such as elasticity of the arteries. In a 2003 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, it was found that women receiving a mixture of 4 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and DHA along with 2 g of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) had lower levels of LDL cholesterol after 28 days compared to those who received either the EPA/DHA supplements without DHA, EPA/DHA with a smaller dose of GLA, or GLA alone.

    Flax is another source of omega-3s, and Arkopharma/Health From The Sun (Bedford, MA) offers FiProFLAX in a variety of forms. Marketing director Hugues P. Mas said the flax is “QAI [Quality Assurance International] certified organic and guaranteed GMO [genetically modified organism]-free.” On its Website, the company offers a cholesterol quiz geared to consumers, discussing the importance of omega-3s as well as other nutrients.

    Garlic. Adding to an already considerable body of research demonstrating that garlic can lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides while increasing HDL cholesterol, researchers at UCLA in 2003 reported that Kyolic aged garlic extract reduced or inhibited plaque formation in the arteries of 19 cardiac patients taking statin drugs.

    Lead researcher Matthew Budoff, Ph.D. commented at the time that the study “suggests that aged garlic extract may be a useful and beneficial dietary addition for the people who have high cardiovascular risk or who have undergone heart surgery.” Budoff has since presented several trade show seminars sponsored by Los Angeles-based Wakunaga of America, the makers of Kyolic.

    Guggul. In use for centuries as a component of Ayurvedic medicine, guggul—a gummy resin tapped from the Commiphora mukul tree, which is native to India—has been studied since the early 1960s for its hypolidemic (blood-lipid lowering) properties. Sabinsa Corp. (Piscataway, NJ), an ingredient supplier which produces a standardized extract under the brand name Gugulipid, says the studies on guggul indicate that its hypolipidemic activity can be attributed to more than one mechanism of action.

    Among the possible mechanisms are: inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, enhancing the rate of excretion of cholesterol, promoting rapid degradation of cholesterol, thyroid stimulation, alteration of biogenic amines, and “high affinity binding and anion exchange.”

    Homeopathy. “Homeopathy activates the body’s own control system to work properly,” said King. “This is the safest and most curative approach to take.

    “Forcing the body into biochemical change even naturally doesn’t actually have the curative action of homeopathy,” King continued. “Homeopathy can even correct the genetic predispositions to disease we may have inherited from as deep as a thousand years into our family chain.” King Bio makes Artery/Cholesterol/BP, a homeopathic formula intended to help tone heart muscles and blood vessels.

    Low glycemic index foods. In a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that high glycemic load is negatively correlated to serum levels of HDL cholesterol. Assessing the relationship between blood levels of lipids and diet in a test population of 32 healthy males and females ages 11 to 25, the researchers found that glycemic load accounted for 21.1 percent of the variation in HDL cholesterol. They concluded that glycemic load appears to be an important independent predictor of HDL cholesterol in youth and noted that dietary restrictions without attention to glycemic load could unfavorably influence blood lipids.

    Medicinal Mushrooms. Although its product SX-Fraction is intended primarily to address high blood sugar, Maitake Products, Inc. (MPI, Ridgefield Park, NJ) found in a clinical study that LDL cholesterol in diabetic patients declined modestly (from 142 mg/dl to 133 mg/dl) over a two-month period. Those taking SX-Fraction also lost about 7 lbs. in the same time period.

    “The more impressive lowering of cholesterol, however, comes from the dietary fiber that is found in all medicinal mushrooms,” said Ellen Shnidman, manager of scientific affairs at MPI. She cited animal studies which documented the cholesterol-lowering properties of four different mushrooms: maitake, shiitake, agaricus, and enokitake.

    For example, a study reported in the September 1996 issue of Alternative Therapies showed “a 44 percent reduction in total cholesterol in rats consuming maitake mushroom in their diet,” said Shnidman. “This cholesterol reduction is accompanied by weight loss, relative to rats eating a similar high-choelsterol diet without mushrooms. Apparently, cholesterol is excreted by the rats in sufficient quantity to aid in weight loss.”

    Oat bran. A 2004 consumer study conducted by the Natural Marketing Institute (NMI, Harleysville, PA) for Nurture, Inc. (Devon, PA), which produces the ingredient OatVantage, found that 63 percent of consumers managing their cholesterol levels prefer oat-based ingredients.

    Oat bran is the subject of a health claim authorized by FDA in 1999, and NMI research found that 69 percent of respondents preferred the FDA-permitted health claim, “Helps Lower Cholesterol,” over the model structure-function claim, “Helps Maintain Healthy Cholesterol Levels.” “This is significant for food, beverage, and dietary supplement manufacturers who want to increase sales by using a more consumer-desired claim on the product label,” said Griff Parker, Nurture CEO.

    Plant sterols. Also the subject of an FDA-approved claim for heart health, plant sterols (structurally similar to cholesterol in humans) can block the absorption of cholesterol, according to a number of studies. In an “Ask the Doctor” publication (available online at www.atdonline.org), Decker Weiss, N.M.D. noted that sterols enter the same receptor sites that cholesterol enters on its way to the bloodstream. “The cholesterol, being blocked from absorption, remains in our intestines where it is eventually excreted,” Weiss wrote. General Mills has just introduced Yoplait Healthy Heart, a yogurt high in plant sterols.

    Policosanol. A mixture of fatty alcohols derived from sugar cane or beeswax, policosanol has been favorably compared in clinical studies to several types of prescription drugs for managing cholesterol. On its own, policosanol was found in a 1999 study to reduce LDL cholesterol while raising levels of HDL cholesterol.

    Probiotics. “Several studies have indicated that consumption of certain cultured dairy products resulted in reduction of serum cholesterol, as well as triglycerides,” wrote Dr. S.K. Dash, president of probiotic manufacturer UAS Laboratories (Eden Prairie, MN), in his Consumer Guide to Probiotics. Among other studies, Dash cited two controlled clinical studies from the VA Medical Center at the University of Kentucky.

    “In the first study, fermented milk containing [Lactobacillus] acidophilus was accompanied by a 2.4 percent reduction of serum cholesterol concentration,” he wrote. “In the second study, a different L. acidophilus strain reduced serum cholesterol concentration by 3.2 percent. Since every 1 percent reduction in serum cholesterol concentration is associated with an estimated 2 to 3 percent reduction in risk for coronary heart disease [CHD], regular intake of fermented milk containing an appropriate strain of L. acidophilus has the potential of reducing risk for [CHD] by 6 to 10 percent.”

    Dash said his company’s DDS Probiotics contain DDS-1 L. acidophilus, “which has been researched and demonstrated to show cholesterol-lowering effect.”

    Psyllium. “Internal cleansing is very important” in maintaining healthy cholesterol levels, “especially if you do it with a lot of fiber,” said Sunil Kohli, vice president of Chino, CA-based Health Plus, Inc. The cholesterol-managing ability of fiber in general and psyllium in particular is “very well-established,” he said.

    However, Kohli said, “It will probably do you no good if it’s random. It should be done on a regular basis, and it should be supervised. Consulting the doctor or pharmacist is important.”

    Soy. The protein in soy “has evidence of lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, based on reviews of studies using over 20 g of soy protein per day,” said Levin. “Soy isoflavones are considered only partly responsible for this effect.”

    Sytrinol. A patented proprietary formula derived from natural citrus and palm fruit extracts and containing citrus polymethoxylated flavones and palm tocotrienols, Sytrinol has been shown in clinical trials to improve total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides by up to 30 percent, 27 percent, and 33 percent, respectively. Having just wrapped up Phase III of a long-term trial of Sytrinol, Chicago-based SourceOne Global Partners, which owns the exclusive worldwide license for intellectual property associated with the ingredient, is commencing a study that combines Sytrinol with plant sterols.

    Tocotrienols. On its Website discussing the science and benefits of tocotrienols (www.tocotrienol.org), ingredient supplier Carotech Inc. (Edison, NJ) identifies several benefits for blood lipid levels. Tocotrienols, according to the Website, have been shown to “inhibit cholesterol production in the liver, thereby lowering total blood cholesterol;” “[suppress] hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity [and result in] the lowering of LDL cholesterol levels;” and “inhibit cholesterogenesis by suppressing HMG-CoA reductase.”

    New Weapons

    There are also nutrients that are emerging as potential weapons in the fight against cholesterol. Levin cited rice bran oil, resveratrol, pantethine, l-carnitine, and niacin as showing promise.

    With all of this, Levin said, it’s important for retailers to remember that “they are not allowed to discuss diseases and remedies unless there is an approved FDA health claim allowed on the label, as with soy protein and plant sterols. What is allowed are structure-function claims such as ‘cholesterol support,’ ‘promoting normal, healthy circulation,’ ‘homocysteine Regulators,’ etc.”

    Supplementation is only one tool for managing cholesterol levels, manufacturers pointed out. “Besides nutrition, lifestyle is a key to controlling cholesterol,” Levin said. “Eating a variety of antioxidant-rich foods will prevent the liver from churning out cholesterol as a ‘cheap’ antioxidant. The body uses oxidized cholesterol to patch leaky and damaged blood vessels, so the ability to build healthy collagen is a must, using nutrients like vitamin C, Pycnogenol, rutin, hyaluronic acid, and MSM.

    “Don’t forget exercise and stress reduction,” he added. “Stress results in high cortisol levels—usually accompanied by poor blood lipid levels—and a lack of good sleep to produce unhealthy people.” VR

    Vitamin Retailer Magazine, Inc., 431 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick, NJ 08816 //www.oprmagazine.com/

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