SearchBox:

Search Term: " Runners "

  Messages 1-10 from 10 matching the search criteria.
Carbohydrates Are Not Your Enemy During Weight Loss Darrell Miller 3/26/17
Running may boost your brain wiring Darrell Miller 12/21/16
What Are The Health Benefits Of The Grain Quinoa? Darrell Miller 2/13/12
Bee Pollen Darrell Miller 5/20/09
Glucosamine Sulfate Darrell Miller 10/2/08
Aloe Vera’s Healing Properties Recognized 1500 years before Christ Darrell Miller 4/21/07
Eating Healthy for Athletes Darrell Miller 10/13/05
Cultivation and Export Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Cross Training Darrell Miller 6/10/05
LYCOPENE - Tomatoes Like You’ve Never Seen Them Before ... Darrell Miller 6/3/05



SOURCE NATURALS Runners' Shield Antioxidant Protection
   30 tabs $11.75 29% OFF $ 8.34
SOURCE NATURALS Runners' Shield Antioxidant Protection
   60 tabs $21.98 29% OFF $ 15.61

Carbohydrates Are Not Your Enemy During Weight Loss
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 26, 2017 02:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Carbohydrates Are Not Your Enemy During Weight Loss





Nutritionist Kimberly Gomer wants people to know that eating carbs while dieting is not bad for you. Carbohydrates are necessary to fuel your diet, the best ones come from potatoes, rice and oatmeal. Carbohydrates fuel your exercise and your brain by creating energy, this is especially important for runners. They also have nutrients and vitamins essential for overall health. Eating healthy carbohydrates to achieve and maintain a healthy weight is a better choice than fueling with protein bars that are often high in sugar.

Key Takeaways:

  • It is a diet myth that carbohydrates are bad for you.
  • Healthy foods and diet is key to weight loss without hunger.
  • Avoid refined carbohydrates. Good carbohydrates are healthy and are present in foods such as potatoes, brown rice, and oatmeal.

"Eating a plant-based diet including vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free dairy/calcium-rich foods, plant protein and small amounts of lean meats is the key for health."

Read more: http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2017/03/nutrition/carbohydrates-not-enemy-weight-loss_73137

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4298)


Running may boost your brain wiring
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 21, 2016 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Running may boost your brain wiring





If you want to boost your brain function, try running. A study conducted at the University of Arizona found that brain scans of Runners showed greater cognitive function that in those of people who do not regularly exercise. The areas that were more active in Runners were also identified as the areas that deteriorate with older age, so there is the question as to whether or not physical activity will help stave off Alzheimer’s and other cognitive issues later in life.

Key Takeaways:

  • Researchers compared MRI scans of a group of male cross country Runners to the scans of young adult males who had not engaged in any kind of organised athletic activity for at least a year.
  • Previous studies have shown that activities that require fine motor control, such as playing a musical instrument, or that require high levels of hand-eye coordination, such as playing golf, can alter brain structure and function.
  • Since functional connectivity often appears to be altered in ageing adults, and particularly in those with Alzheimer’s or other neurodegenerative diseases, it is an important measure to consider, researchers said.

"Make running your New Year’s resolution if you want to boost your brain function, say scientists who have found that cross country Runners have greater connectivity in brain areas linked to planning and decision-making."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//www.tribuneindia.com/news/health/story/337197.html&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjFmZmViMTExOGM5Mzg5YTQ6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFa5jZ1aLlD3qQmQ15bdxP3TmXNwg

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3680)


What Are The Health Benefits Of The Grain Quinoa?
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 13, 2012 01:57 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are The Health Benefits Of The Grain Quinoa?

Quinoa is a gluten free seed rich in dietary fibers with creamy, fluffy and slightly crunchy texture. Its taste is somewhat nutty when cooked. It belongs to the family of spinach, beets, swiss chard and lamb's quarter.It is a complete protein grain with all the essential amino acids. There are nine essential amino acids known as the building blocks of protein. Amino acids help in building strong muscles and nourish the nerves.It is also rich in essential minerals such as manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper and iron.

Quinoa is technically a seed, not a grain of a goose foot plant. The name quinoa came from Greek words chen which means goose and pou which means foot. This is because the leaves of the plant of quinoa seeds resemble the webbed foot of a goose.

Quinoa has been cultivated as early as the 12th century by the Incans, the ancient people of South America. They referred to quinoa as the "mother seed",considered as a sacred grain and gold of the Incans.They believed that it is a gift from gods that possesses enhancing properties.The emperor ritually planted and sowed the first quinoa seed of the season using his golden taquiza, a shovel like planting stick. Quinoa gives energy and increases oxygen to the relay teams of bare footed running messengers who lived in the mountains with an altitude considered high enough where oxygen level is reduced.This is because they were holding ash from quinoa plant and cocoa leaves. This combination increases oxygen in their body to sustain the Runners increasing need for oxygen. In can armies also used quinoa to energize their body from frequent marching for days. Quinoa is part of the native Indian diet to increase their resistance to prevail over harsh living condition in the high mountains.

Today quinoa is making its name popular in the industry of wonder foods.It is so high in protein that builds and nourishes muscle tissues. It is used to treat people with migraine, diabetes and atherosclerosis. It is a good source of magnesium that relaxes the blood vessels. Magnesium reduces attack of migraine by improving blood and oxygen distribution to the brain.

Magnesium combined with high dietary fiber found in quinoa helps in maintaining healthy blood pressure and prevents cardiovascular diseases. Fibers absorb and eliminate bad cholesterol.It prevents plaque that blocks the arteries and enhances blood circulation.This process prevents atherosclerosis, the hardening of the arteries due to fat deposits and plaque buildup that narrows the arteries.

Quinoa is rich in anti oxidants that shields each cells from getting damaged caused by free radicals, pollution, alcohol and medication. It boosts the immunity and increases resistance from stress. Anti oxidants and fibers prevent risks of cancer and diabetes.Obesity and overweight are the most common risk factor of diabetes. Fibers remove toxins and excess fats, improve digestion and maintain healthy body weight to prevent diabetes.While antioxidants enhances cell regeneration and repair. This process lowers risks of cancer.

Quinoa is highin insoluble fiber thatprevents gallstones and helps in cleansing the liver. Whole grains like quinoa reduce asthma, allergic cough and wheezing in children. The protein in quinoa strengthens the muscle tissues of the air passage, thus prevents inflammation that narrows the airways of asthma patients.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2573)


Bee Pollen
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 20, 2009 12:00 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bee Pollen

Bee pollen is made up of the fine powder that is found in the male seed of a flower blossom. Bees transport this powder and mix it with nectar to create their own form of nourishment. The pollen grains are collected and eaten by the bees, but they are also used to pollinate the flowers. Since the beginning of time, bee pollen and honey have been recognized for their astounding healing benefits. Egyptian records going back thousands of years have references to honey and the potential for healing that it holds. Marathon Runners of ancient Greece recognized the value that bee pollen held to increase their strength and endurance. Bee pollen was also revered by European nations and Asian countries for its medicinal value.

Bee pollen is considered to be a complete food due to the fact that it contains every chemical substance that is needed to maintain life. This makes it a great supplement to help build the immune system and provide the body with energy. Recent scientific research has found that bee pollen contains properties which are beneficial to healing, revitalizing, and protecting against radiation therapy. Bee pollen is also a rich source of protein and carbohydrates. This nutrient can not only be used as a food supplement, but also to correct body chemistry and normalize weight.

Scientists at the Institute of Bee Culture in Buressur-Yvette near Paris, in addition to other researchers throughout Europe, have studied the effects of honeybee pollen consumption on human beings. The study concluded that there are exceptional antibiotic properties in bee pollen. It was also found that bee pollen is helpful in treating conditions like chronic fatigue, hay fever, allergies, bronchitis, sinusitis, asthma, colds, balancing the endocrine system, and menopausal symptoms. Additionally, bee pollen can be helpful in treating other conditions such as prostate problems including prostates, infertility, indigestion, constipation, colitis, anemia, high blood pressure, premature aging, depression, and hair loss.

Bee pollen has also been shown to improve one’s concentration and mental function. A study found that a group of students’ mental performance improved drastically when supplementing with bee pollen. This nutrient also reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels. It does this by preventing plaque buildup in the arteries. This supplement is often used by athletes to increase strength, endurance, and speed.

The pollen of bees is used to provide both alterative and nutritive properties. The primary nutrients found in bee pollen are twenty-one amino acids, enzymes, essential fatty acids, and variable vitamins and minerals. These vitamins and minerals depend on the region that the bee pollen is harvested in. Primarily, bee pollen is extremely beneficial in dealing with aging, allergies, hay fever, loss of appetite, lack of endurance, exhaustion, fatigue, a weak immune system, infection, multiple sclerosis, and pregnancy problems.

Additionally, bee pollen can be extremely helpful in treating asthma, high blood pressure, cancer, depression, hypoglycemia, indigestion, liver diseases, prostate disorders, and radiation. Bee pollen is available in capsules, tablets, and bulk powder forms for easy consumption. Always look for name brands to ensure quality and purity of the bee pollen product you purchase. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by bee pollen, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2010)


Glucosamine Sulfate
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 02, 2008 09:36 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Glucosamine Sulfate


It is possible to rebuild joint cartilage with glucosamine sulfate, although how quickly that occurs could depend upon what you take with it. First, though, an understanding of exactly why cartilage deteriorates will be useful in your understanding of how glucosamine sulfate can help towards repairing the damage.

Cartilage has several roles to play in your body, an example of which is to form curved body parts that would otherwise be unsupported, such as the external contours of your ears or a large part of your nose. Without cartilage you ears and nose would flop around a lot, and it is also contained in the spine, to prevent your discs from grinding against each other.

However, the part that we are interested in is as a shock absorber between the bones of your joints. It allows bones to slide over one another without damage, either through friction or shock, and is also nature’s shock absorber, helping to support your weight while you are active. Thus, your cartilage protects from impact damage when you are running or jumping down from a height. This type of cartilage, known as articular cartilage, is bathed in a lubricating fluid known as synovial fluid, which introduces its own problems when your cartilage becomes damaged.

This damage can occur in several ways: as the result of a fall, for example, or direct contact with the joint when playing a physical contact sport such as football or soccer. It can also become damaged through wear and tear over a period of time, such with long distance Runners or soccer players (again), and is also associated with age. Many years of continual use, especially amongst those with active rather than sedentary occupations, eventually lead to wear and damage.

Problems with the joint structure itself, known as osteoarthritis, can also damage the cartilage, as can being overweight for a lengthy period. You can also experience cartilage damage if you are bedridden or other wise immobile for long periods, because the cartilage needs regular movement to function correctly. This is connected with the blood supply, which will be discussed shortly.

Cartilage is constructed of cells known as chondrocytes that generate a fibrous matrix known as collagen, a mixture of amino acids known as elastin that allows the cartilage to return to its original shape after deformation, and non-collagenous matrix tissue containing proteins, water and proteoglycans that contain sulfated glycosaminoglycan chains. That last mixture is often referred to as ‘ground substance.’

One of the problems with cartilage is its lack of a direct blood supply, and it relies on the compression and decompression of the articular cartilage, or on the flexing of elastic cartilage, to create a pumping action that drives blood to the chondrocytes. This is why inactivity can cause cartilage damage, due to a lack of blood supply, and why it is repaired more slowly than other body components.

Once an injury or wear and tear damages a joint, the body’s natural defense, the immune system, is activated, and the major part of that involved in cartilage damage is the inflammatory response. The joint becomes inflamed, the quantity of synovial fluid is increased to provide more protection and swells the joint, and enzymes (hyaluronidase) are produced which, although part of the natural defense system, actually degrade the synovial fluid and the cartilage.

This increases the amount of inflammation and the process becomes self-perpetuating, leading to the condition known as degenerative joint disease (DJD) because the body is unable to produce enough glucosamine to generate the proteoglycan needed for repair.

This is where glucosamine sulfate enters the scene. Glucosamine is a precursor for glycosaminoglycans (GAG), which as mentioned as above are components of proteoglycans in the cartilage matrix ground tissue. It has been shown to stimulate the biosynthesis of proteoglycan, and analysis has shown its presence within articular cartilage after administering it orally to patients with cartilage disease. It therefore makes its way to the right place.

Glucosamine is administered in the form of glucosamine sulfate, the highly electrically charged sulfate groups believed to aid in the compression properties of cartilage. It is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream, although only about a quarter of the oral dose is eventually available to the body, and high concentrations accumulate in the liver, kidneys and in articular cartilage where it is used in the biosynthesis of GAG.

When in solution, glucosamine sulfate separates into ions: sulfate and glucosamine. Glucosamine ions are involved in the synthesis of GAG, that then combine with proteins to form proteoglycans, a component of the non-collagenous matrix of the cartilage. Although glucosamine is the major active component, there is evidence that the sulfate group contributes the stability of the matrix of the connective tissue since the uptake of sulfate ions increases with the amount of glucosamine sulfate used.

Another consideration here is that sulfate is an important part of proteoglycans, and glucosamine sulfate promotes not only the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans, but also of proteoglycans in general. Glucosamine is also active in regenerating the lubricating properties of the synovial fluid, and in hindering the activity of hyaluronidase, the enzyme that breaks down the hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid.

Some people find that glucosamine, taken either alone or in conjunction with chondroitin sulfate and/or methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM), is more effective than the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used to reduce inflammation (e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen) and without the side effects of these substances. MSM contains dietary sulfur, which is necessary for cell structure and healthy cell repair. Methyl sulfone methane is know to be beneficial for painful conditions such as arthritis, and also improves the blood circulation. It might also play a part in helping glucosamine sulfate get to the site of the cartilage damage.

Glucosamine is a large molecule, however, and finds it difficult to make its way to the area around the joint due to the lack of a direct blood supply. It is therefore taken in relatively large doses to ensure that sufficient amounts get to where it is needed. Many people insist that glucosamine sulfate is very effective in reducing, or even eliminating, their pain, and it is finding increasing popularity in the treatment of arthritis and other conditions involving cartilage damage.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1907)


Aloe Vera’s Healing Properties Recognized 1500 years before Christ
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 21, 2007 01:53 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Aloe Vera’s Healing Properties Recognized 1500 years before Christ

Fifteen centuries before the birth of Christ, Egyptian writings acclaimed the miracle plant we know as Aloe Vera, even then referred to as an ancient cure. Cleopatra, Alexander the Great and Aristotle were fans of this strange succulent prized for its soothing, healing and analgesic ability. Indians in central and South America used it to treat burns, kidney and bladder infections, dysentery, stomach and intestinal disorders.

The pulp of the plant has been used to reduce swelling and pain from injuries, while in Mexico its used to treat arthritis and gout. For many years people have kept aloe plants around for emergency burns.

We took a good look at this fascinating botanical wonder. Of the 200 plus varieties, we quickly found that only five or six fit the enzymatic structure for the cosmetic and so-called “medicinal properties” mentioned.

Then while we were studying these succulents in their natural desert setting, we observed the roadrunner bird drinking the juice of the aloe vera, passing up many aloe plants to get to a particular variety, Aloe Barbadensis Miller. We then studied acre after acre and found the roadrunner “peck marks” only on one particular species. The other aloe plants were untouched. In studying this species of plant more carefully, our Houston lab found that, indeed it had much different gel than other aloes.

The products now labeled as Georges Always Active Aloe are exclusively from Aloe Barbadensis Miller, the RoadRunners’ choice. George Warren, an Independent research chemist in Houston, Texus developed the special processing method that prevents the spoilage without diminishing the essential properties of the Aloe Vera plant. This new method completely eliminates the anthraquinones that are mildly toxic and can cause irritation to the digestive tract. Aloins are also removed, which give a bitter taste (and the Greenish color) to Aloe Vera juices along with the starches and sugars from the polysaccharide molecular chain and thus, George “Always Active” Aloe requires no refrigeration, and will not spoil in its natural state. This method adds no water, no preservatives and no chemicals of any kind. The finished product looks and tastes like spring water.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1524)


Eating Healthy for Athletes
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 13, 2005 07:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating Healthy for Athletes

Eating Healthy for Athletes

If you are an athlete, it's important for you to consider your diet carefully. Whether you've been a serious lifelong athlete or have just started to exercise regularly, this applies to you. It's been shown that people who are starting to get into shape need more proteins and other nutrients than even seasoned athletes.

So what makes up proper nutrition for athletes? Well, remember that you need to consume lost of calories if you are exercising regularly. If you aren't overweight, keep in mind that you must eat more than you normally would if you weren't training. Here's a general rule of thumb: consume 8.5 calories for every kg that you weigh. So if you weigh 100 kg (which equals 220 pounds), that would require a consumption of 850 calories for one hour of working out.

It is almost never wise to cut back on your dietary consumption at the same time as embarking on a regular exercise program. If you are considering this, be sure to consult your doctor first. At any rate, an athlete in training should never try to lose more than 2 or 3 pounds each week, at most.

Research suggests that above all, eating a variety of healthy foods is the most important thing you can do. Keep a strong balance, whether you're an athlete or even if you're not.

That means you should be taking in most of your calories from carbohydrates, which include vegetables, grains, oats, wheat, rice, bread, pasta, etc. The exact number that you should aim for is 57% of your diet.

The next largest group is the fats, which should make up about 30% of your diet. Fats are both vegetable based - eg corn oil, and animal based - non-vegetarian shortening. Butter and shortening occur in many foods like cakes, and are examples of saturated fats. In general most of your fat intake should come from the unsaturated fats found in vegetable fats. You should use olive oil for salad dressings and for cooking.

The rest of your diet, 13%, should be comprised of protein. This means fish, poultry, lean red meat, and so on. You can also get protein from nuts.

Proper nutrition means avoiding or consuming only small portions of fried food, cookies, alcohol, candy bars, and that kind of junk food. Instead, eat plenty of fresh, raw vegetables, whole grains, fish, and lean meats.

Remember, exercise expends lots of energy and uses up important nutrients. Athletes should be sure they are eating enough to stay healthy and strong, and to ensure that they have all the vitamins and minerals their bodies need.

There are, however, a huge number of supplements currently available. Most of them have not been scientifically proven to work. Still, some athletes--such as marathon Runners and others in endurance sports-- may require iron supplements. This tends to be the case with women more so than men, but you can get tested if you suspect you need more iron.

You can also see a nutritionist with a good reputation to take an overview of your diet. Also, you may have to supplement while on the road, since diet while traveling tends to be poor.

The other common dietary supplement used by many athletes is an energy snack or drink. These are very useful for athletes in training since they are often easier to consume than a full meal. Ideal if you are having trouble eating a couple of hours before a work out or soon after (both of which are good ideas). Remember though that these bars and drinks are packed with calories, so do count towards your dietary intake.

--Ann Sertanze

Nutritionist Ann Sertanze gives advice online through RHS Nutrition, a specialist website offering nutritional advice for people of all ages. Pay a visit to com

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=841)


Cultivation and Export
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 25, 2005 01:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cultivation and Export

Cultivation and Export

Ginseng is difficult to cultivate and requires a large capital investment. The plants need shade to thrive and are often grown among forest shade trees or under artificial shade. The Asian countries are not able to keep up with the demand for ginseng because of its popularity. The soil has been cultivated for so many years that some believe the nutrients have been depleted. This has increased the value of the American ginseng. The American variety is found growing wild in cool wooded areas with rich soil in the eastern United States.

Ginseng is grown commercially in Wisconsin, Michigan and even as far south as northern Florida, Alabama, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Most of the commercial ginseng is grown in Marathon County, Wisconsin and cultivated under artificial shade. Marathon County seems like an ideal place for ginseng to grow as many serious athletes and marathon Runners use ginseng to enhance their overall performance. In fact, many Olympic athletes take ginseng routinely. The soil in this area is welldrained acidic soil beneficial for growing ginseng. It is grown using fertilizers, pesticides and other chemicals to ensure adequate production and cultivation. Organically grown plants are available but may be hard to find. Wild ginseng grows in isolated patches in some areas of the country but most sources have been depleted. Some ginseng farmers in Wisconsin have been growing the plants for 90 years. Ninety-five percent of the American grown ginseng is sold to foreign markets, with most of it going to Hong Kong and then into China, Korea and Japan.

About 45,000 kg. of the dried ginseng root and about the same amount of the wild root is exported annually.13 The American variety sells for about twice as much as the Asian variety because it is thought to be of a higher quality. The Americans import a large quantity of the Asian and Siberian ginseng, which seems ironic. Wild ginseng of any variety is not as common now, because it has been foraged in its wild state and huge quantities exported for large profits. A special license is now required to dig the wild roots.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=472)


Cross Training
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 10, 2005 02:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cross Training

Cross Training

by column Energy Times, April 1, 1999

If you've ever felt burned out, bored and/or just plain tired of your exercise program, you may be in need of a taste of cross training. When your exercise routine becomes too routine, you run not only the risk of losing your motivation for physical activity, but you may also run an added chance of injury. The possible cause: overusing particular muscles that receive an excessive amount of stress as other muscles practically atrophy while waiting for a chance to show off their stuff.

For instance, if you are a devoted runner who spends hours jogging, your upper body may wither unless you give it a reason not to. At the same time, your achilles, hamstrings, knees and lower back muscles may protest those miles after miles. As Frank Jobe, MD, Neal EllAttrache, MD, and Karen Mohr, PT, point out in Athletic Forever (Contemporary), "Dedicated Runners are among the most injury-prone of all athletes. If running is your main form of exercise, you have a 37 to 56 percent chance of sustaining an injury each year and your chances for a recurrence of that injury are as high as 70 percent."

Simple Principle

The basic principle of cross training is simple: take part in various activities that supplement each other. Runners should lift some weights or at least shoot a few hoops to keep those arms and shoulders toned. Bikers should walk or run now and then to keep their bones healthy. (Bicycling, since it is not a weight bearing exercise, does little to promote bone strength.) Swimmers should find something to do on dry land so that their bones react to gravity and grow stronger. And, no matter what your sport, you should stay well-nourished and supplied with plenty of antioxidants.

As Stephen T. Sinatra, MD, points out in Optimum Health (Bantam), while athletes may enjoy health benefits from exercise, "The vigorous training pursued by competitive athletes renders them more prone to catabolic stress-a situation in which tissues are constantly broken down."

He goes on to point out that the low fat diet many athletes follow may be short of antioxidant nutrients. Unfortunately, that shortage can lead to injury. The metabolic acceleration caused by athletic activity may increase potentially harmful oxidative stress at the cellular level. Without antioxidant nutrients to help quell that stress... Well, the results may not be pretty. Potentially, that kind of oxidative damage may, theoretically, lead to cancer or heart disease. As Dr. Sinatra says, in those circumstances, "the supplemental use of glutathione, vitamins C and E, coenzyme Q10 and magnesium seems reasonable. Some athletes, such as menstruating women, may also need iron supplementation."

In addition, water is crucial for athletes to stay adequately hydrated during activity. According to Daniel Gastelu and Fred Hatfield, PhD, in Dynamic Nutrition for Maximum Performance (Avery), when you run short of water "this can adversely affect performance and, in the long run, can cause peaks and valleys in the athlete's performance." In addition, they advise using sports drinks to stay adequately supplied with electrolytes. "The major electrolytes found in bodily fluids are chloride, magnesium, potassium and sodium."

Electrolytes serve a host of duties, including keeping the heart muscle functioning properly. Gastelu and Hatfield explain, "An electrolyte is an ion that is required by the body to regulate the electric charge and flow of water between the cells and the bloodstream."

Getting Better All the Time

Even if you cross train religiously and try to avoid overdoing one particular sport, sooner or later you may incur injury. If you do (or even before you hurt yourself), the trio of Stanley W. Jacob, MD, Ronald M. Lawrence, MD, PhD, and Martin Zucker, authors of The Miracle of MSM (Putnam), believe that methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) can provide reliable relief for pain and suffering.

"Many people experience rapid relief after starting MSM," say this trio. They go on to claim that "this nutritional supplement has real potential to make a significant impact on the quality of life."

"Your main enemy in the hours following an injury is inflammation," warns Athletic Forever. For injury, they recommend RICE: rest, ice, compression and elevation. In other words, put the injured body part in a firmly wrapped bandage (don't cut off the circulation!) Keep the injury cold but don't put ice directly on it (watch out for frost bite). Rest a while and keep the injury elevated. Then, don't exercise again until you've fully recovered.



--
VitaNet ®
VitaNet ® Staff

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=267)


LYCOPENE - Tomatoes Like You’ve Never Seen Them Before ...
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 03, 2005 10:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: LYCOPENE - Tomatoes Like You’ve Never Seen Them Before ...

Lycopene

It’s hard to imagine that the ancestor of the beefsteak tomato was a tiny yellow fruit first harvested by the Incas. Tomatoes have come a long way since their origin in the Andes, becoming more popular than any other fruit or vegetable in America. (Botanically, the tomato is really a fruit, despite the Supreme Court’s 1893 ruling that it’s a vegetable.) Today, our appreciation of this dietary staple is entering a new chapter. Modern nutrition science has delved into the biochemistry of the tomato and discovered unique phytonutrients with powerful influences on the human body. Utilizing this research, Source Naturals has introduced a concentrated form of the tomato’s most vital nutritional compound: Lycopene.

Tomatoes and their Healthy Red Color

Lycopene is the pigment that gives tomatoes, watermelons and some grapefruits their healthy red color. Found most abundantly in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esulentum), lycopene is a member of the carotenoid family. This group of phytonutrients are major contributors to the health of the human race. (Phyto is derived from the Greek word for plant.)

Over 500 different carotenoids have been identified by science, and almost 10% of them are found in human blood and tissue. Best known is beta-carotene, whose important benefits have been well-documented. Other familiar phytonutrients include allicin from garlic, and capsaicin from chili peppers. Lycopene, lutein, alpha-carotene and betacarotene are the most abundant of the carotenoids present in human blood and tissues. Human breast milk has been found to contain 19 carotenoids, including lycopene. Like many carotenoids, lycopene has evolved as an integral part of human biochemistry, with many benefits to our well-being. Since mammals cannot synthesize it, lycopene must be obtained from the diet.

Lycopene and Prostate Function

One of the most interesting aspects of the way phytonutrients interact with the human body – beyond their broad spectrum antioxidant activity – is their tendency to be “organ specific.” Different carotenoids have an affinity for different organs in the body! In the case of lycopene, it’s the most plentiful carotenoid in the prostate gland. Studies have explored the link between diets high in lycopene and proper prostate function.

Lycopene Protects Cells

Research has shown that lycopene may protect DNA by its powerful antioxidant activity against singlet oxygen free radicals, dangerous foreRunners to cellular damage. Lycopene was found to be the most efficient biological carotenoid to neutralize singlet oxygen – almost 3 times more powerful than beta-carotene. Also, lycopene has a “sparing effect” for beta-carotene: lycopene sacrifices itself to free radicals so that beta-carotene can be reserved for conversion to vitamin A. Lycopene has another ability that has excited further investigation. It increases gap junctional intercellular communication, which is the chemical and electrical coupling between neighboring cells. This enables a healthy exchange of the signals that regulate normal growth – thereby offering a protective influence on cellular reproduction.

Getting the Most From Tomatoes

Until recently, lycopene was not commercially available, and hasn’t been studied as extensively as has beta-carotene. But now, thanks to a unique (non-chemical) proprietary process, lycopene can be obtained from specially bred and cultivated tomato varieties that are rich in lycopene, and very red. Source Naturals LYCOPENE is standardized to 5% lycopene in a base of vegetable oil. It also contains small amounts of other carotenoids, naturally present in tomatoes. While it’s important to continue eating fruits and vegetables, we can also benefit from the fruits of nutritional research. This is especially important since so much of our food supply has become denatured, lacking the traditional nutrition our bodies require. Source Naturals LYCOPENE is a significant step toward reclaiming the nutrients we need to help create a life of health and vitality. Get a taste of the 21st Century – Source Naturals LYCOPENE.

References:

  • • Khachik, F., et al. (1995). Lutein, Lycopene, and their oxidative metabolites... Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, Suppl. 22, 236-46.
  • • Mascio, P., et al. (1989). Lycopene as the most efficient biological carotenoid singlet oxygen quencher. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 274(2), 532-38.
  • • Zhang, L., et al. (1991). Carotenoids enhance gap junctional communication... Carcinogenesis, 12(11), 2109-14.



    --
    VitaNEt ®
    VitaNEt ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=165)



  • VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.