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  Messages 1-10 from 10 matching the search criteria.
The Health Benefits Of Cypress Oil Darrell Miller 2/16/14
Horse Radish Darrell Miller 10/28/09
Marshmallow Root Herb Darrell Miller 8/12/09
BoneSet For Fevers Darrell Miller 6/9/09
Carbohydrate Loading Darrell Miller 10/17/06
OsteoBoron™ Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/8/05
Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet Darrell Miller 12/8/05
Natural Progesterone and PMS Darrell Miller 7/25/05
PROPER DOSAGES OF PYCNOGENOL CAN DETERMINE ITS EFFECTIVENESS Darrell Miller 7/13/05
Echinacea Darrell Miller 6/24/05



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The Health Benefits Of Cypress Oil
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Date: February 16, 2014 02:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Health Benefits Of Cypress Oil

What is cypress

cypress leavesCypress oil is extracted from a plant animal types that is local to the Mediterranean district. The taxonomic name of the plant is Cupressus Sempervirens. It is an enduring bush, which develops to something like 28 meters in tallness and is described by a Tapered shape and dim takes off. The oil is concentrated from the twigs and stems of the tree, through a procedure reputed to be steam refining. Cypress oil justifies a wide show of health profits, and has been utilized since time immemorial to treat various sicknesses and health issue. Give us a chance to elucidate some of these profits.

Health Benefits of Cypress Oil

Diuretic – Cypress oil holds diuretic lands, which animate the excretory framework and thusly wipes out the gathered poisons from the form. If not uprooted, these poisons can prompt the onset of life undermining maladies and issue, which turn lethal with time. Cypress oil encourages the sound stream of pee and guarantees that all the advanced poisons in the figure are flushed out of the framework before they make inside confusions.

Circulation – Cypress oil has been discovered to be extremely gainful in controlling and pushing the productivity of the form's circulatory framework. The oil controls haemostatic and styptic lands, which empower the optimal conveyance of supplements all around the figure. The haemostatic lands held in the oil are a characteristic coagulant that accelerates the clotting of blood. The styptic lands avert the constriction of veins for standardized blood flow.

Cosmetic - Cypress oil has regenerative lands and has been discovered to be exceptionally restorative for the skin. It is extremely powerful in mending scars and appalling imprints brought on by pimple inflamation on the face. Its extraordinary astringent lands assistance lessen extreme sleekness in the skin. Skin contaminations, for example, perpetual pimple inflamation, which emerge because of the over emission of oil from the sebaceous organs can in this manner be regulated utilizing Cypress oil.

Pain Relief - Cypress oil is a common pain relieving and is extremely powerful in alleviating ache. The oil is adequately used to assuage constant ache initiated by ailment or osteoarthritis. Its pain relieving lands are upgraded when it is mixed with helichrysum.

Weight Loss – Cypress oil has been found to advertise weight reduction in ladies by lessening the gathering of cellulite in the form. Being a common diuretic, the oil invigorates and increments the recurrence of pee and thus flushes out the overabundance fats from the figure through the pee.

Detoxifier – Cypress oil is a common detoxifier. It disposes of the development of unsafe poisons in the form through discharge and sweat. In spite of the fact that overabundance sweat is destructive for the form, breaking into a sound sweat through activity has dependably been energized by M.d.s and health specialists for the support of great health. Cypress oil invigorates the sweat organs, consequently flushing out the poisons in the form through the pores of our skin.

The range of health profits inferred from Cypress oil had been known since medieval times when the Greeks and Assyrians misused its healing lands to treat an assortment of disquietudes. Today, analysts keep on disentangling its restorative uses and have made noteworthy revelations relating to the enthusiastic and mental health profits got from the use of this wonderful oil.

Caution:

Please evade Cypress oil throughout pregnancy because of its circulatory and hormonal impacts. When you would like to utilize Cypress oil while you are pregnant please counsel a qualified proficient aromatherapist, as it might be particularly gainful in certain circumstances.

There are numerous modest, manufactured duplicates of sweet-smelling oils, yet these are not proposed for remedial utilization. For best comes about buy the most noteworthy quality oils you can conceivably find. Use confirmed natural fundamental oils, or oils that have been tried and are free from pesticide.

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Horse Radish
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Date: October 28, 2009 11:39 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Horse Radish

Horse RadishThe horseradish plant is a perennial plant that is part of the Brassicaceae family, which includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbages. Native to southeastern Europe and western Asia, the plant is popular around the world today. The horseradish plant grows up to five feet tall and is mainly cultivated for its large, white, Tapered root. The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. However, when cut or grated, enzymes from the damaged plant cells break down to produce allylisothiocyanate, which often irritates the sinuses and eyes. Once grated, if the plant is not mixed with vinegar or used immediately, the root darkens and loses its pungency. It quickly becomes unpleasantly bitter when exposed to air and heat.

Horseradish has been cultivated since ancient times. The Delphic Oracle in Greek mythology told Apollo that horse radish was worth its weight in gold. Horseradish was known in Egypt by 1500 BC and has been used by Jews from Eastern Europe traditionally in Passover. The plant is discussed by Cato in his treatises on agriculture. It is thought that horseradish is the plant known as Wild Radish by the Greeks. Both the root and leaves of the horseradish plant were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages, with the root used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain. This herb was taken to North American during Colonial times. It is not certain as to where the name horseradish come from. Some believe that it derives by misinterpretation of the German Merettich as mare radish. Others think the name comes from the coarseness of the root. The common thought in Europe is that it refers to the old method of processing the root called hoofing, in which horses were used to stamp the root tender before grating it.

For at least two thousand years, horseradish has been cultivated. It was brought to America by early settlers and used to treat conditions such as pain from sciatic, colic, and intestinal worms. Horseradish provides antibiotic action that is recommended for respiratory and urinary infections. The volatile oil in horseradish has the ability to work as a nasal and bronchial dilator. Internally, it has been used to clear nasal passages, alleviate sinus problems, help with digestion, work as a diuretic, aid with edema and rheumatism, and cleanse various body systems. Also, horseradish has been used to stimulate digestion, metabolism, and kidney function. Horse Radish This herb helps promote stomach secretions to aid in digestion. Horseradish can be used as a compress for neuralgia, stiffness, and pain in the back of the neck. Additionally, this herb can be used as a parasiticide.

The root of the horseradish plant can be used to provide antibiotic, antineoplastic, antiseptic, bitter, caminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, hepatic, parasiticide, mild purgative, rubefacient, sialagogue, stimulant, and stomachic properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iron, phosphorus, sodium, and vitamins A, B-complex, and P. Primarily, horseradish is extremely beneficial in dealing with loss of appetite, circulation, coughs, edema, excessive mucus, sinus problems, internal and skin tumors, and worms.

Additionally, this herb is very helpful in treating arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, congestion, gout, jaundice, kidney problems, irritated membranes, neuralgia, palsy, rheumatism, skin conditions, water retention, and wounds. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by horseradish, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Marshmallow Root Herb
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Date: August 12, 2009 11:30 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Marshmallow Root Herb

The marshmallow plant can be found in southern and western Europe, western Asia, and the northeastern region of North America. The plant originally grew in salty soils, but now it thrives in moist, uncultivated ground. The fleshy, upright stems of the marshmallow plant reach a height of three to four feet. The pale yellow roots are Tapered, long, and thick. They have a tough, yet flexible, exterior. The short-stemmed leaves are round, with irregularly toothed margins and three to five lobes. The leaves and stem are covered with a soft and velvety down. The flowers have five reddish-white petals. The whole plant, especially the root, is filled with a mild mucilage.

Since ancient Egyptian times, marshmallow has been used as food and medicine. One of the herbs found in the grave of a Neanderthal man in a cave in Iraq was marshmallow. This herb was used anciently for irritated throats and intestinal tracts. The Europeans used marshmallow for bronchitis, colds, and coughs. This was because of its soothing and healing properties. Native Americans also used marshmallow to treat snakebites and wounds.

This herb is responsible for helping to expel phlegm and relax the bronchial tubes while soothing and healing. The herb aids in healing lung ailments such as asthma and inflammation. The soothing and healing properties that are found in the mucilage in marshmallow make it a valuable herb for many lung ailments. Also, it is useful on sore throats, infections, diarrhea, dysentery, skin irritations, and for coughs. This herb is a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant. This fact makes it good for both the joints and the gastrointestinal tract. Marshmallow is used as a poultice with cayenne, which allows it to help with gangrene, blood poisoning, burns, bruises, and wounds.

Studies have found that the mucilaginous properties of marshmallow yield a soothing effect on the mucous membranes. A study that was done on animals showed some indication of a reduction in blood sugar levels and hypoglycemia activity. This may be beneficial for diabetics.

The root of the marshmallow plant are used to provide alterative, anticatarrhal, anti-inflamamtory, antilithic, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, galactagogue, lithotriptic, mucilant, nutritive, and vulnerary properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, iodine, iron, pantothenic acid, sodium, and vitamins A and B-complex. Primarily, marshmallow is extremely beneficial in treating asthma, bed-wetting, bleeding, boils, bronchitis, emphysema, kidney problems, lung congestion, nervous disorders, pneumonia, urinary incontinence, urinary problems, uterine problems, whooping cough, and wounds. Additionally, this herb is very helpful in dealing with allergies, breast problems, burns, constipation, coughs, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery, sore eyes, gangrene, gastric disorders, glandular problems, inflammation, intestinal problems, kidney stones, absent lactation, liver disorders, irritated membranes, excessive mucus, and skin disorders.

In order to obtain the best results when supplementing with this, or any herb, it is important to consult your health care provider before beginning any regimen while on medications. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by marshmallow, please feel free to consult a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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BoneSet For Fevers
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Date: June 09, 2009 12:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: BoneSet For Fevers

Boneset was used by Native Americans for a valuable remedy against colds, flu, and fevers. Other common names that boneset is identified by include: thoroughwort, vegetable antimony, feverwort, agueweed, Indian sage, sweating plant, eupatorium, crossword, thoroughstem, thoroughwax, and wild Isaac. In most cases, boneset has been used primarily to treat fevers. They introduced boneset to the settlers in the New World. From 1820 through 1916, boneset was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. This herb was also listed in the National Formulary from 1926 through 1950. Boneset has been used to restore strength in the stomach and spleen. It has also been used as a tonic for acute and chronic fevers. Dr. Edward E. Shook actually felt that boneset was beneficial for every kind of fever humans are subjected to. He also believed that it had never failed in overcoming influenza.

Recent research has found that boneset contains antiseptic properties that help to promote sweating. These properties also help in cases of colds and flu. Boneset has also been shown to contain antiviral properties and strengthen the immune system by enhancing the secretion of interferon. Additional studies have found that boneset is effective against minor viral and bacterial infections by stimulating white blood cells. Additionally, this herb has been used to treat indigestion and pain and may also contain some mild anti-inflammatory agents to help with conditions like arthritis.

Boneset is a perennial herb that has an erect stout and a hairy stem. It grows from two to four feet high, with branches at the top. The leaves of the boneset plant are large, opposite, united at the base, and lance-shaped. They grow anywhere between four to eight inches in length and Taper into a sharp point. The edges of these leaves are finely toothed, with prominent veins. These leaves help to distinguish this plant species at first glance. The flower heads of the boneset plant are terminal and numerous, being large, and having anywhere from ten to twenty white florets. The plant possesses an aromatic odor, with an astringent and strongly bitter taste. This plant species varies considerably in size, hairiness, form of leaves, and inflorescence. It can typically be found flowering from July to September.

The entire herb is used to provide alterative, anti-inflamamtory, antiperiodic, antiviral, diaphoretic, emetic, febrifuge, purgative, nervine, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in boneset include calcium, magnesium, PABA, potassium, and vitamins C and B-complex. Primarily, boneset has been shown to be extremely helpful in dealing with chills, colds, coughs, fever, flu, malaria, pain, rheumatism, typhoid fever, and yellow fever. Additionally, this herb is beneficial in treating bronchitis, catarrh, jaundice, liver disorders, measles, mumps, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, scarlet fever, sore throat, and worms. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by boneset, please contact a representative from your local health food store.

Although there is no recent clinical evidence that guides the dosage of boneset, traditional use of the herb suggests that a dose be about two grams of leaves and flowers. The internal use of this herb should be tempered by the occurrence of hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in this plant. For those women who are pregnant or lactating, this herb should not be used, as there have been documented adverse effects on those women who are pregnant and/or lactating.

Boneset is available in capsule, tablet, and liquid extract forms at your local or internet health food store. Look for name brands to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

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Carbohydrate Loading
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Date: October 17, 2006 01:50 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Carbohydrate Loading

Carbohydrate loading is an ergogenic technique devised for endurance athletes to trick the muscles into storing more fuel than it normally would. Although carbohydrate loading has been hailed as an innovative training technique in the past few years, the discovery of carbohydrates as the preferred fuel of the body dates back several decades. In 1939 two scientists named Christiansen and Hensen demonstrated that the body burns carbohydrates before drawing upon its fat and protein. The research found that the body readily uses carbohydrates as fuel for the muscular and nervous system with minimal wastage and toxic by products – unlike the case with protein and fats.

The body stores carbohydrates in the form of glycogen in the muscles and liver. This glycogen helps the liver to detoxify otherwise dangerous substances. It also supplies a readily available source of glucose to maintain the essential blood sugar level. Glycogen stored in a muscle is available for energy use for only that particular muscle, unlike glycogen stored in the liver, which is available systemically. At rest, and during low-intensity exercise, the body burns about an equal mixture of fat and carbohydrate for energy purposes. However, as work intensity increases, carbohydrates become the dominant fuel because of its quick availability. Laboratory research has shown that an exercise intensity of less than 40-50 percent VO2 max, the body burns mostly fat, and the degradation of stored glycogen is minimal.

The situation changes during high intensity exercise, when carbohydrates become the sole source of energy. The activity itself is limited by the availably of glycogen as an energy source.

Muscle glycogen is five times more available as an energy source for intensity exercise as compared to liver glycogen. When the muscle glycogen becomes depleted, the muscle its self begins to fail, and fatigue rapidly sets in marathon running, this dreaded phenomenon is known as “hitting the wall”.

Since it is obvious that the availability of glycogen is a limiting factor in endurance athletic events, exercise physiologists devised ways to increase glycogen storage in the body. In 1967 two Swedish exercise physiologists came up with carbohydrate loading, also called glycogen loading, as a method of supper-compensation of glycogen through diet and exercise.

Hydrate loading usually is approached by any of the following means:

  • Consumption of high (complex) carbohydrate and high protein foods while limiting intake of refined sugars, 3-4 days before competition. This results in a glycogen level 40-60 percent above normal.
  • Exercise to exhaustion for several days, followed by a carbohydrate-loading period. This will deplete stored glycogen and then double its reserves.
  • A combination of low carbohydrate consumption and exhaustive exercise. The athlete eats only proteins and fats for 3 days, followed by eating only carbs for the next 3 days. On the carbo-concentration days, the athlete exercises minimally, so as not to interfere with the glycogen storage process.

According to researchers David Costill, Ph.D., carbohydrate consumption in excess of 600 grams daily won’t result in proportionally larger amounts of synthesized glycogen. In the first 24 hours of carbo-loading, the type of carbs eaten is not of critical importances. However, after the second day, Costill suggests eating complex rather refined or simple sugars.

Complex carbs are those which contain lots of intact fiber, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. An exception to this rule is pasta, which is a refined sugar but is good to ingest during carbo-loading. Complex carbs tend to maintain a steady output of the hormones insulin, which activates the enzymes glycogen synthetase, essential for effective glycogen storage.

Most experts today advocate a gradually Tapering exercise program while increasing carbo consumption to about 525 grams daily. This avoids the problems associated with the low-carb period, such as fatigue, weakness, potassium loss and muscle tissue loss.

One day prior to competition, the athlete rests completely and consumes about 550 grams of carbohydrates.

The carbohydrate loading program should be limited to three times a year. More often than seems to decrease its effectiveness. Costill suggests that athletes engaged in intense exercise on a daily basis consume about 70 percent of their daily calories in carbohydrates. This will maintain adequate glycogen levels in both the liver and muscles, according to Costill.

Carbohydrate loading is of no real benefit in athletic events lasting less than 60 min, because lesser activity time does not deplete glycogen levels enough to inhibit work capacity of endurance.

Carbohydrate loading isn’t for everyone. Each gram of cellular glycogen is stored with 2.7 gram of water. This rapid water storage makes some people feel stiff and tight, resulting in decreased performance. The only way to determine if the carbohydrate loading works for you is to try it – carefully!

--
Discount Vitamins

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OsteoBoron™ Fact Sheet
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Date: December 08, 2005 05:09 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: OsteoBoron™ Fact Sheet

OsteoBoron™ Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 8/8/05

LIKELY USERS: People looking for joint support; People looking for bone density support; People who want to normalize Vitamin D levels

KEY INGREDIENTS: FruiteX-B™

STRUCTURE/FUNCTION CLAIMS: Boron is an important trace mineral for bone and joint health throughout life, as well as for the development and maintenance of healthy bone density. 1,2,4,6,8,9 NOW® OsteoBoron™ is a patented (US Patent # 5,962,049) complex of Boron and Fructose that is safe and more bioavailable than other forms of Boron. 3,7 NOW® OsteoBoron™ is a superior form of Boron that has been the subject of clinical studies demonstrating its efficacy in the support of healthy joints. 7,10 NOW® OsteoBoron™ has also been shown to be safer than other Boron supplements. 3,7

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES:

FruiteX-B™ is a patented ingredient that contains boron in a form that is chemically identical to the natural plant forms of boron found in food (Calcium Fructoborate). In human and animal studies this patented form of boron, taken at an amount equal or equivalent to 6 mg. per day, improved bone ash (bone minerals) and Vitamin D status in Vitamin D deficient subjects. In human studies, measurements of joint discomfort were dramatically reduced when taking this dosage for about 2 months. The dose used in most of these studies was equivalent to 2 capsules a day of NOW® OsteoBoron™, a form that has been shown to be biologically more beneficial than other forms of boron.11

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: One vegetarian capsule twice a day, preferably at separate meals. This dose can be doubled for people with more severe deficiencies, though a physician should normally be consulted in such cases.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Vitamin D, Calcium, Magnesium, copper, Silica/silicon, natural sources of phytoestrogens (plant sourced), Ipriflavone, Bone Strength or Bone Calcium formulas

CAUTIONS: None.

SPECIFIC: Please note any supplements currently consumed which may also contain boron, such as multiple mineral or multiple vitamin formulas, and cut your serving size of NOW® OsteoBoron™ to compensate. People who eat a lot of produce, fruit and nuts may also get a substantial amount from their food and may want to reduce their servings of NOW® OsteoBoron™ accordingly. NOW® OsteoBoron™ is safer (has less toxicity) than boron citrate. Boron may buffer body levels of estrogen, so women at risk from high estrogen should consult a physician before using NOW® OsteoBoron™, even though this problem has not been noted for food source borons.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. This document has not been reviewed by the FDA or by the company posting it. Information given here may vary from what is shown on the product label because this represents my own professional experience and understanding of the science underlying the formula and ingredients. When taking any new formula, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

1. Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M (eds.) (1994) Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, Eighth Edition. Chapters 20-26, 28, 30. Lea & Febiger Philadelphia.
2. Chang EB, Sitrin MD, Black DD (1996) Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary, and Nutritional Physiology. Chapter 9, Absorption of Water-Soluble Vitamins and Minerals. Lippincott-Ravin, Philadelpia
3. Miljkovic D (1999) Boron and carbohydrate complexes and uses thereof. U.S. Patent # 5,962,049.
4. Neilson FH (2000) The Emergence of Boron as Nutritionally Important Throughout the Life Cycle. Nutrition 16(7/8):512-514.
5. Schaafsma A, de Vries PJ, Saris WH (2001) Delay of natural bone loss by higher intakes of specific minerals and vitamins. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 41(4):225-249.
6. Devirian TA, Volpe SL (2003) The physiological effects of dietary boron. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 43(2):219-213.
7. Miljkovic ND, Miljkovic DA, Ercegan GM (2002) Osteoarthritis and Calcium Fructoborate Supplementation: An Open-Label Study. FutureCeuticals Internal Study.
8. Sheng MH-C, Taper J, Veit H, Qian H, Ritchey SJ, Lau K-H W (2001) Dietary Boron Supplementation Enhanced the Action of Estrogen, But Not that of Parathyroid Hormone, to Improve Trabecular Bone Quality in Ovariectomized Rats. Biol Trace Elem Res 81:29-45.
9. Naghii MR, Samman S (1997) The effect of boron supplementation on its urinary excretion and selected cardiovascular risk factors in healthy male subjects. Biol Trace Elem Res 56(3):273-286.
10. Travers RL, Rennie GC, Newnham RE (1990) Boron and Arthritis: The Results of a Double-Blind Pilot Study. Journal of Nutritional Medicine 1:127-132.
11. Periasamy M, et al. (2001) J Org Chem, 66, 3328-3833

--
Fight Bone Loss at Vitanet ®

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Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet
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Date: December 08, 2005 04:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet

Butterbur Extract Fact Sheet

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 8/1/05

LIKELY USERS: People wanting to support healthy blood flow to the brain and healthy neurological function 1-6,10 Those maintaining normal seasonal immune responses 7-10

KEY INGREDIENTS: 75 mg of Guaranteed Potency Butterbur Root (Petasites hybridus) Extract, min. 15 Sesquiterpenes as Petasines; 200 mg of Feverfew Leaf (Tanacetum parthenium) min. 0.4% Parthenolides

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) is a native shrub of Europe, North America, and Asia that has been used by herbalists for centuries. Modern scientific studies have demonstrated that Butterbur supports healthy blood flow to the brain and healthy neurological function.1-6, 10 In addition, Butterbur may help to maintain balanced seasonal immune responses.7-10 In a synergistic base of guaranteed potency Feverfew leaf.11-26

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: NOW Butterbur is free of harmful levels of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs), the undesirable compounds naturally found in Butterbur, so it is safe to use regularly.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: Take one VCap one to three times per day, or as directed by your physician.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: Magnesium, Ulcetrol, B-2, B-12, Fish Oil (EPA, DHA), SAM-e, Ginger, Ginkgo Biloba

CAUTIONS: None.

SPECIFIC: Do not discontinue use abruptly; Taper off use if discontinuing. Discontinue use at least 14 days before surgery or oral surgery. Use with caution if you have ragweed allergies or blood disorders and let your physician know that you plan to use it before you take it. May be contraindicated for pregnant women.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. This information is based on my own knowledge and references, and should not be used as diagnosis, prescription or as a specific product claim. Information given here may vary from what is shown on the product label because this represents my own professional experience and understanding of the science underlying the formula and ingredients. When taking any new formula, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. REFERENCES:

1. Diener HC, Rahlfs VW, Danesch U (2004) The First Placebo-Controlled Trial of a Special Butterbur Root Exract for the Preventio of Migraine: Reanalysis of Efficacy Criteria. Eur Neurol 51:89-97.
2. Lipton RB, Gobel H, Einhaupl KM, Wilks K, Mauskop A (2004) Petasites hybridus root (butterbur) is an effective preventative treatment for migraine. Neurology 63:2240-2244.
3. Pothmann R, Danesch U (2005) Migraine Preventiuon in Children and Adolescents: Results of an Open Study With a Special Butterbur Root Extract. Headache 45:196-203.
4. Rapaport AM, Bigal ME (2004) Perventive migraine therapy: what is new. Neurol Sci 25:S177-S185.
5. Wu SN, Chen H, Lin YL (2003) The mechanism of inhibitory actions of S-petasin, a sequiterpene of Petasites formosanus, on L-type calcium current in NG108-15 neuronal cells. Planta Med 69(2):118-124.
6. Wang G-J, Wu X-C, Lin Y-L, Ren J, Shum AY-C, Wu Y-Y, Chen C-F (2002) Ca2+ channel blockin effect of iso-S-petasin in rat aoritic smooth muscle cells. Eur J Pharmacol 445(3):239-45.
7. Lee DKC, Carstairs IJ, Haggart K, Jackson CM, Currie GP, Lipworth BJ (2003) Butterbur, a herbal remedy, attenuates adenosine monophosphate induced nasal responsiveness in seasonal allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy 33:882-886.
8. Lee DKC, Haggart K, Robb FM, Lipworth BJ (2004) Butterbur, a herbal remedy, confers complementary anti-inflammatory activity in asthmatic patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids. Clin Exp Allergy 34:110-114.
9. Lee DKC, Gray RD, Robb FM, Fujihara S, Lipworth BJ (2004) A placebo-controlled evaluation of butterbur and fexofenadine on objective and subjective outcomes in perennial allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy 34:646-649.
10. (No Author) (2001) Petasites hybridus (Butterbur). Alt Med Rev 6(2):207-209.
11. Hayes NA, et al. The Activity of Compounds Extracted from Feverfew on Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells. J Pharm Pharmacol. Jun1987;39(6):466-70.
12. 2 Groenewegen WA, et al. A Comparison of the Effects of an Extract of Feverfew and Parthenolide, a Component of Feverfew, on Human Platelet Activity In-vitro. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1990;42(8):553-57.
13 Capasso F. The Effect of An Aqueous Extract of Tanacetum parthenium L. on Arachidonic Acid Metabolism by Rat Peritoneal Leucocytes. J Pharm Pharmacol. Jan1986;38(1):71-72.
14. 4 Bejar E. Parthenolide Inhibits the Contractile Responses of Rat Stomach Fundus to Fenfluramine and Dextroamphetamine but not Serotonin. J Ethnopharmacol. Jan1996;50(1):1-12.
15. 5 Prusinski A, Durko A, Niczyporuk-Turek A. [Feverfew as a Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine]. Neurol Neurochir Pol. 1999;33(Suppl 5):89-95.
16. 6 Barsby RW, et al. Feverfew Extracts and Parthenolide Irreversibly Inhibit Vascular Responses of the Rabbit Aorta. J Pharm Pharmacol. Sep1992;44(9):737-40.
17. 7 Pittler MH, Vogler BK, Ernst E. Feverfew for Preventing Migraine (Cochrane Review). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(3):CD002286.
18. 8 Pattrick M, et al. Feverfew in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Study. Ann Rheum Dis. 1989;48:547-49.
19. 9 Makheja AM, et al. A Platelet Phospholipase Inhibitor from the Medicinal Herb Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium). Prostaglandin Leukotri Med. 1982;8:653-60. 20. 12 Drug Identification Number Notification. Drugs Directorate, Therapeutic Products Division, Health Protection Branch, Health Canada . Ottawa , Canada
20. 12 Drug Identification Number Notification. Drugs Directorate, Therapeutic Products Division, Health Protection Branch, Health Canada. Ottawa, Canada.
21. 14 Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press; 1996:119-21.
22. 15 PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd ed. Montvale , NJ: Medical Economics Company; 2000:307.
23. 16 Pribitkin ED. Herbal therapy: what every facial plastic surgeon must know. Arch Facial Plast Surg. Apr2001;3(2): 127-32.
24. 17 Schmidt RJ. Plant dermatitis. Compasitae. Clin Dermatol. Apr1986;4(2):46-61.
25. 18 Heck AM, et al. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin. Am J Health Syst Pharm. Jul2000;57(13): 1221-7.
26. 19 Newall CA, et al. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. London : The Pharmaceutical Press; 1996:119-21.



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Natural Progesterone and PMS
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:02 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Natural Progesterone and PMS

Natural Progesterone and PMS

When a woman’s body experiences an imbalance of progesterone resulting in estrogen dominance, a variety of pre-menstrual symptoms can result. Estrogen dominance can occur when a progesterone deficiency is present. PMS refers to a whole host of symptoms which can vary from woman to woman. Conventional therapies for PMS involves the use of antidepressants, diuretics, counseling, nutritional regimens and synthetic hormones. Interestingly, most symptoms which commonly characterize PMS are also typical of estrogen dominance. Due to this observation, Dr. John R. Lee gave natural progesterone to his patients with PMS and obtained some impressive results. “The majority (but not all) of such patients reported remarkable improvement in their symptoms-complex, including the elimination of their premenstrual water retention and weight gain.”10 Let’s quickly review the hormonal flux which characterizes the menstrual cycle. During the week following the end of the menstrual period, estrogen is the dominating hormone which initiates the buildup of the uterine lining once again. At the same time, eggs in the ovary begin to mature. Estrogen levels also contribute to the secretion of more vaginal mucous at this time making the tissue environment more conducive to sperm survival and motility. From ten to twelve days after the beginning of the last period, estrogen levels will crest and then begin to Taper just prior to ovulation and when the egg (corpus luteum) has matured enough to produce progesterone.

Consequently, progesterone will dominate during the second half of the cycle. Increased levels of progesterone cause the body temperature to rise, the continued development of the uterine blood-filled lining, and the thinning of cervical secretions. All of these events occur in anticipation of the presence of a fertilized egg. If pregnancy does not occur within 10 to 12 days after ovulation, both estrogen and progesterone levels rapidly fall, which initiates the shedding of the uterine lining (menstruation) and a new cycle begins again. If a woman becomes pregnant, progesterone levels continue to rise and the uterine lining remains intact to receive and nourish the fertilized egg.

Eventually the placenta will produce much higher than normal amounts of progesterone throughout the remainder of the pregnancy. It’s rather easy to see that a woman’s monthly cycle is regulated by the rise and fall of estrogen and progesterone. This perfectly natural fluctuation of hormones can wreak havoc with the health of a woman when imbalances occur. More often than not, a hormonal imbalance consists of a progesterone deficiency. Progesterone was designed by nature to inhibit many of the negative effects of estrogen. If progesterone levels do not balance out estrogen during the last two weeks of the cycle, PMS can become a problem. Dr. Lee illustrates this, saying: “A surplus of estrogen or a deficiency of progesterone during these two weeks allows for an abnormal month-long exposure to estrogen dominance, setting the stage for the symptoms of estrogen side effects.”11

Clearly, natural progesterone may be one of the most, if not the most effective, therapies to deal with PMS miseries. Unfortunately, many women are completely unaware of its action or availability.

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PROPER DOSAGES OF PYCNOGENOL CAN DETERMINE ITS EFFECTIVENESS
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Date: July 13, 2005 12:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PROPER DOSAGES OF PYCNOGENOL CAN DETERMINE ITS EFFECTIVENESS

PROPER DOSAGES OF PYCNOGENOL CAN DETERMINE ITS EFFECTIVENESS

Some doctors who have used Pycnogenol recommend a dose of 20 mg. for every 20 lbs. of body weight to obtain optimal results. This usually averages to approximately 150-200 mg. per person, per day. For therapeutic doses, a saturation level can be obtained by taking an increased amount of Pycnogenol initially and then Tapering off to optimal body weight dosages.

PYCNOGENOL: LIFE-CHANGING COMPOUND

Supplementing the diet with nature’s most powerful antioxidants is certainly paramount in protecting ourselves and our families from the ravages of disease. Studies suggest the earlier we sta rt using Pycnogenol, the better for our biocellular health. While we anxiously await for the cure for cancer and other devastating diseases, we can arm our bodies with the most powerful protective nutrients available. Pycnogenol is the compound of choice.

A WORD CONCERNING TESTIMONIALS

Frequently, sensational claims emerge when new health supplements are introduced. Concerning Pycnogenol, accounts vary from anecdotal to scientific. Unquestionably, when it comes to vision problems, capillary weakness, prostate problems or any type of inflammatory problem, Pycnogenol has already compiled an impressive track record.

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Echinacea
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Date: June 24, 2005 01:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Echinacea

ECHINACEA (Echinacea angustifolia)

Common Names: Black Sampson, Purple Coneflower, Rud beckia , Missouri Snakeroot, Red Sunflower

Plant Parts: roots, rhizome

Active Compounds: echinacoside, polysaccharides (echinacin), antibiotic polyacetylenes, betaine, caffeic acid glycosides, inulin, isobutyl amides, ess ential oil (humulene, caryophylene), isobutyl-alkylamines, resin, flavonoids (in leaves and stems), sesquiterpene esters (echinadiole, epoxy - echinadiole, echinax-anthole, and dihydor-xynardole). Pharmacology: Echinacea contains a variety of chemical compounds which have significant pharmacological functions. It has been the subject of hundreds of clinical and scientific studies which have primarily used an extract of the plant portion of the botanical. The rich content of polysaccharides and phytosterols in echinacea are what make it a strong immune system stimulant. The sesquiterpene esters also have immunostimulatory effects. Glycoside echinacoside is found in the roots of the plant. Echinacin has also been found to possess anti-fungal and antibiotic properties. This component of echinacea also has cortisone-like actions which can help promote the healing of wounds and helps to control the inflammatory reactions of allergies.

Vitamin and Mineral Content: vitamins A, E, C, iron, iodine, copper, sulphur and potassium

Regulatory Status

US: None
UK: General Sales List
CANADA: Over-the-Counter drug status
FRANCE: None
GERMANY: Commission E approved as drug

Recommended Usage: Echinacea works best if it is taken right at the onset of an infection in substantial doses and then Tapere d off. It can be used in higher quantities as a preventative during winter months when colds and flu are prevalent. If using it to maintain the immune system, periodic use is believed to be more effective than continual usage. Typically, one should use echinacea for seven to eight weeks on followed by one week off. Guaranteed potency echinacea is currently available in capsule form only. Safety: High doses can occasionally cause nausea and dizziness. Echinacea has not exhibited any observed toxicity even in high dosages. Anyone who is suffering from any type of kidney disorder should restrict taking echinacea to one week maximum. Very heavy use of echinacea may temporarily cause male infertility.



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