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Osteoporosis And What You Should Know About Bone Health Darrell Miller 3/17/18
Scientists call on feds to allow research on CBD for pets Darrell Miller 12/10/17
Advocacy Update Darrell Miller 5/17/08
Ban against ephedra supplements at any does upheld. Darrell Miller 8/22/06
Nutritional Supplements Could Save U.S. $6.5 Billion. Darrell Miller 1/7/06
Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application Darrell Miller 11/22/05
Endnotes Darrell Miller 7/25/05
<B>References</b> Darrell Miller 7/12/05
Sugar Overload.... Darrell Miller 7/7/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
References Darrell Miller 6/24/05
ENDNOTES Darrell Miller 6/23/05
Vision Quest - help fight eye problems. Darrell Miller 6/18/05
Clean Living Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Federal Court Overturns FDA Ban on Ephedra at Low Doses Darrell Miller 6/9/05
Its not about Ehpedra -- its about DSHEA ... Darrell Miller 5/24/05



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Osteoporosis And What You Should Know About Bone Health
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Date: March 17, 2018 10:15 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Osteoporosis And What You Should Know About Bone Health





Osteoporosis And What You Should Know About Bone Health

The skeleton, the body's framework, changes as we age, as does the body's capacity to grow new bone. When the body experiences too much bone loss. When the body can not grow new bone, or when both happenstances are concurrent, the resulting condition is called osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is not considered curable. But it's progression can be slowed or halted, thereby preventing more bone loss, leading to injury and even death.

There are diagnostic processes that can assess bone damage, even predict the likelihood of damage based on bone mineralization. Once damage is diagnosed and need assessed a treatment plan consisting of diet a regimen and supplementation, augmented by exercise and possibly medication can be implemented.

Key Takeaways:

  • In the U.S. alone, more than forty million individuals aged fifty and older are diagnosed with low bone mass, or osteoporosis.
  • Osteoporosis is a quiet condition, often evincing no symptoms until a bone breaks.
  • A bone mineral density test can identify how susceptible a person is to osteoporosis and is recommended for those over sixty.

"Osteoporosis is a bone disease that occurs when the body loses too much bone, makes too little bone, or both."

Read more: http://www.good4utah.com/good-things-utah/gtu-sponsor/osteoporosis-and-what-you-should-know-about-bone-health/992235724

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Scientists call on feds to allow research on CBD for pets
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Date: December 10, 2017 03:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Scientists call on feds to allow research on CBD for pets





Veterinarians, researchers and pet owners are looking to loosen federal regulations on the use of marijuana products to help treat sick animals. Medical issues in dogs, such as epilepsy, arthritis, anxiety, loss of appetite and inflammation could potentially by helped by marijuana-based drugs and extracts.

Some people are already using marijuana extracts on their animals, such as those containing CBD, which is an element of marijuana that is not psychoactive. However, such extracts continue to be listed as Schedule 1 drugs by the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration, even when they contain little or no THC. THC is the active component in marijuana that causes intoxication.

The Food and Drug Administration has warned that marijuana products for pets sold in animal hospitals or online pet stores are illegal, since such drugs are unapproved. The FDA has suggested it will pursue legal action against those in violation of the law.

However, the policy-making body of the American Veterinary Medical Association, in conjunction with two group councils, is considering making a recommendation to the DEA for marijuana to be declassified as a Schedule 1 drug in order to enable research for both animal and human medical purposes. Declassification could also help prevent pet owners from accidentally overmedicating their animals in the absence of proper guidance from a medical professional.

In September, Republican senator Orrin Hatch of Utah introduced a bill that would facilitate research on use of marijuana-based medications, concurring that the drug is over-regulated, although he continues to oppose recreational use of the drug,.

Some veterinarians note that without sufficient evidence, it remains unsafe to use marijuana products on animals, with concerns about potential toxicity.

Yet researchers are continuing to wait for clearance to proceed on various relevant studies, such as use of marijuana for dogs with osteoarthritis, pruritis and epilepsy. Some research on use of products with CBD has been stopped until federal approval is granted. Gaining approval has been difficult due to government requirements, which continue to be an obstacle to moving forward.

Key Takeaways:

  • people using drugs to reduce pain on their pets. Oils and powders banned.
  • D.C standing in the way of the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes.
  • FDA making marijuana a schedule 1 drug...hence illegal. You can be arrested for using it.

"The concern our membership has is worry about people extrapolating their own dosages, looking to medicate their pets outside the realm of the medical professional"

Read more: https://www.aspentimes.com/news/scientists-call-on-feds-to-allow-research-on-cbd-for-pets/

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Advocacy Update
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Date: May 17, 2008 10:17 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Advocacy Update

Recently, the Natural Products Association has experienced a flurry of activity on the legislative front. One month ago, Natural Products Association members went to Washington, D.C. to meet with their representatives and discuss legislation important to the association and the industry. Many who could not visit Washington in person were part of our "virtual march" on Washington that delivered e-mails, petitions, and videos to Congress on the importance of natural products. Natural Products Day was a great success, boasting higher than ever attendance at our evening Congressional reception, and resulting in additional co-sponsors for S. 771, the Child Nutrition Promotion and School Lunch Protection Act sponsored by Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). The bill now boasts co-sponsorship of more than a quarter of the Senate. Its companion bill in the House of Representatives, H.R. 1363, sponsored by Lynn Woolsey (D-Calif.), has gained an additional five co-sponsors as the result of Natural Products Day meetings and now has 140 co-sponsors. These bills continue to build momentum, thanks to your support.

More recently, the Natural Products Association urged supporters to contact their legislators to include an amendment to the "Farm Bill" allowing food stamp recipients to purchase dietary supplements. This provision was similar to free-standing bills that have been introduced in the current and previous Congresses by Sens. Harkin and Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and have earned the association's support. Although the amendment advanced further than other versions in previous sessions, it did not make the final Farm Bill, which was reported out of conference today. The good news is that the Farm Bill did contain significant increases in nutrition programs and increased funding for organic farming, another supported goal of the Natural Products Association. Because of the strong effort of our supporters on the amendment's behalf, the bill was placed on Congress's radar screens and has greatly improved the chances as stand-alone legislation, S. 770, the Food Stamp Vitamin and Mineral Improvement Act, of seeing passage. We will continue to ask for support on this important bill as this legislative session progresses.

In addition, the Natural Products Association has been leading the fight to protect Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and to keep this important, safe, and effective supplement available to elderly consumers. The same players behind S. 762, which would wrongly classify DHEA as an anabolic steroid, proposed S. 2470 in late 2007 as a misplaced reaction the release of the Mitchell Report, which chronicled the abuse of steroids by professional baseball players. Although DHEA has no performance enhancing attributes, this bill was proposed to limit the access of minors to DHEA. The Natural Products Association and its supporters have worked hard to inform Congress of the benefits of DHEA, and that it is not an anabolic steroid and should not be classified as one. We have been able so far to prevent any movement on the bill, but the association continues to monitor its progress and make sure that this supplement remains accessible to the seniors who need it most.

Thanks to your help, the Natural Products Association continues to have an active presence on Capitol Hill that is felt by legislators. We could not do it without the help of you, our supporters, who know how important it is to stand up for natural products. The impact of your messages to legislators continues to help the Natural Products Association to ensure all natural products - from natural and organic foods to dietary supplements and health and beauty aids - are accessible to Americans. With your continued support we will continue to be known as a vocal group with a wide base of support through the rest of this legislative session and beyond.

To get involved, please visit our action center at www.capwiz.com/nnfa/issues/



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Ban against ephedra supplements at any does upheld.
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Date: August 22, 2006 11:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Ban against ephedra supplements at any does upheld.

A three-judge panel of the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver late last week overturned a 2005 ruling by a Utah district court that had allowed the sale of low-dosage ephedra dietary supplements containing 10 milligrams or less of ephedrine alkaloids.

The appellate decision, which is effective immediately, supports FDA’s original determination that no dosage of ephedra is safe for consumption and means that it is unlawful to manufacture and sell any supplements containing ephedra, even products containing low doses of the herb.

The original ban was challenged in a May 2004 lawsuit by Nutraceutical Corp, and its subsidiary Solaray Inc., which said dried whole-herb ephedra sinica - the type of supplement in their products – had been safely used for thousands of years.

The U.S. district judge in Utah blocked any enforcement action against Nutraceutical for selling supplements containing 10 milligrams or less of ephedra per daily dose. The Utah District Judge said FDA’s process in banning ephedra improperly shifted the burden of proving product safety from the government to supplement manufacturers.

While noting that the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) categorized dietary supplements as foods and are not, therefore, subject to premarket approval by FDA, the appellate panel found that the Utah district court had interpreted this basic provision to narrowly.

The panel said that the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA), of which DSHEA is a part, should not be interpreted “too restrictively” but should instead be read in a manner “consistent with the statute’s overwhelming purpose to protect public health.”

Nutraceutical’s attorney has indicated that the company would appeal the ruling to the full appeals court.



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Nutritional Supplements Could Save U.S. $6.5 Billion.
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Date: January 07, 2006 12:26 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Nutritional Supplements Could Save U.S. $6.5 Billion.

Health Care Crisis Bankrupting U.S. Budget

Nutritional Supplements Could Save U.S. $6.5 Billion.

You probably never heard about it on the radio, nor saw its actions reported on CNN. Others can’t guess what its acronym stands for. The United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) is an investigative arm of Congress examining the receipt and payment of public funds. This government office exists for the sole purpose of communicating to Congress those facts and figures which we, as a society, can’t afford to overlook.

And they are saying that the healthcare system is going to bankrupt us. The agency recently issued a special report called 21st Century Challenges, which concludes that current U.S. fiscal policies are unsustainable and, unless radical changes are initiated relatively soon, will “result in large, escalating, and persistent deficits.

The Money Pit

According to the GAO report, the United States spends more than 15% of our gross domestic product on health care, and that figures growing fast. We spend a larger percentage than is spent by any other industrialized country. What’s even more suprising is how little we get for the money. An estimated 45million Americans are uninsured. The United States continues to compare abysmally to the other industrialized nations in critical areas like infant mortality, life expectancy, and premature and preventable deaths.

Medicare and Medicaid together devour 20% of the federal budget. With the baby boomers—individuals born between the end of WWII 1960—hitting retirement age this year, those figures will only grow larger with each passing year. Unless, as the GAO report says, something is done quickly.

A report released just weeks ago by the Dietary Supplement Education Alliance (DSEA) demonstrates that the government can save at least 6.5 billion in health care cost reductions if nutritional supplements are integerated into the healthcare system.

The Lewin Group, a market research firm, developed a report, entitled: Increasing Quality of Life While Minimizing Costs. It focused in on just two supplements, both of which concern reduction in disease prevention for people over age 65. Omega-3 oil, popular for its reduction in coronary heart disease, is projected to save 3.1 billion dollars. Lutein and Zeaxanthin, which supports healthy vision, will save 2.5 billion dollars if this supplement is added to health care plans, according to the study. Savings would come from reduced hospitalizations and doctor’s fees, as well as reduced nursing home use for those who in good health, could remain independent rather than needing to transfer to live-in care facilities.

Critical Mass

Early last month, a bipartisan caucus on dietary supplements kicked off. It will be co-chaired by Rep. Chris Cannon (R-Utah), and Rep. Fran Pallone (D-N.J.), and its goal will be to examine the manner in which nutritional supplements may become a component of healthcare reform, such as part of an individual flexible Spending Account or health Saving account. As the GAO report indicates, the government interest is reaching critical mass and nutritional supplements are on the verge of entering a new era. As Congressman Cannon said during a November 2nd press conference, government needs to develop a sound policy supporting nutritional supplements “As more and more Americans start taking responsibility for their own health.”

Sources/Links for Further Reading:

Visit the website of the United States Government Accountability Office. //www.gao.gov/

House Government Reform Subcommittee on Human Rights Wellness. //reform.house.gov/

For more information about the Lewin Group’s Health Impact Study, please visit: //www.supplementinfo.org/

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Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application
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Date: November 22, 2005 09:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application

Minerals provide a bounty of healing properties that have scientifically validated their use for topical applications. These applications have been shown to have powerful local and systemic effects. The health of ones skin and hair reflects inner health. Indeed, we judge the health of animals and humans alike by their outward appearance of fur or skin, respectively. The human skin is the largest organ of the body and is highly involved in the detoxification and maintenance processes of health. Skin not only excretes and eliminates toxins; it also has a tremendous capacity to absorb health supportive substances. The pharmaceutical industry frequently takes advantage of the skin’s absorptive capacity with drug therapies. Such therapies include the transdermal delivery of drugs like nicotine, hormone patches, progesterone creams and so forth. Thus, it is apparent that natural therapies can have pronounced and powerful health effects.

Clinical researchers have continued to document the clinical findings that have been observed for decades when it comes to the healing properties of topical minerals. Many of the studies on therapeutic baths have used minerals from the Dead Sea, an ancient inland sea. However, a similar and impressive array of minerals occurs in the other inland sea, the Great Salt Lake. Indeed, the high presence of magnesium from both inland seas appears to be the foremost active mineral. A comparison chart below clearly reflects the mineral analysis and similarity (see chart below). The following survey of medical research reflects a few of the many therapeutic roles for mineral salt baths. Of particular interest are the powerful effects of magnesium salts that are prevalent to both Utah’s Inland Sea and the Dead Sea that exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory disease. Arthritis:

103 patients with arthritic symptoms were treated for 1-2 weeks. They received various bath treatments with the ionic trace minerals. The study showed that the higher concentration baths offered the most impressive results. Those with the greatest physical limitation had the most pronounced improvement. Over 80 percent of the patients reported having less pain, 70 percent reported improved mobility and 60 percent were able to decrease analgesic use (i). In a different double-blind study, the use of warm mineral baths with Dead Sea salt demonstrated a lasting effect for patients suffering from degenerative arthritis. (ii)

Skin:

In a clinical trial conducted by a leading research university in Germany, patients with atopic (eczema) skin disorders immersed their arms in a magnesium chloride rich bath. The participants immersed one arm in tap water the other in the therapeutic magnesium rich bath. The findings showed that skin hydration was improved and skin roughness and inflammation was reduced. The researchers stated “magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation and enhance barrier repair.” (iii) Another study showed that magnesium salts when exposed to both psoriatic and healthy skin cells provided an important anti-proliferative effect (iv). Yet another study showed that the effects of mineral baths from the Dead Sea had lasting effects for upwards of a month after treatment. (v) Head to Head Comparison (vi) (vii)

Utah’s Inland Sea Composition Dead Sea Composition
Magnesium Chloride 1.04% 4.03%
Potassium Chloride 0.64% 0.72%
Sodium Chloride 9% 3.87%
Calcium Chloride 0.08% 1.64%
Chloride 15.12% 21.11%
Sulfates (SO4) 2.13% 0.03%

By: Dr. Chris Meletis N. D.

References:
• (i) Dead Sea Balneoptherapy is Osteoarthritis, Dr. Machety (Hasharon Hospital, Petach-Tikva, Israel). Published in Proceedings of International Seminar on Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases. John Wright-PSG ,1932.
• (ii) Sukenik S, Mayo A, Neumann L et al., Dead Sea bath salts for osteoarthritis of the knee, Harefuah 1995; 129(3-4):100-3, 159, 158.
• (iii) Proksch E, Nissen HP et al., Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin. Int J Dermatol 2005; 44(2):151-7.
• (iv) Levi-Schaffer F, Shani J, Politi Y et al., Inhibition of proliferation of psoriatic and healthy fibroblasts in cell culture by selected Dead –sea salts. Pharmacology 1996; 52(5):321-8.
• (v) Sukenik S, Neumann L, Buskila D et al., Dead Sea bath salts for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Exp Rheumatol 1990; 8(4):353-7.
• (vi) The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Public Information Series #8, 1990.
• (vii) Gwynn, J. Wallace, The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological Public Information Series 51, 1997.

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Endnotes
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Endnotes

Endnotes


1 John R. Lee, M.D., NATURAL PROGESTERONE: THE MULTIPLE ROLES OF A REMARKABLE HORMONE, Revised. (BLL Publishing, Sebastopol, California: 1993), 4. See also U.S. Barzel, “Estrogens in the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a review.” AM J MED, (1988), 85: 847-850 and D.R. Felson, Y. Zhang, M.T. Hannan, et al., “The effect of postmenopausal estrogen therapy on bone density in elderly women.” THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE. (1993), 329: 1141-1146.
2 Darrell W. Brann, “Progesterone: The Forgotten Hormone?” PERSPECTIVES IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE. Summer, (1993), 34:4, 642. See also A.I. Csapo and B.A. Resch, “Induction of preterm labor in the rat by the antiprogesterone.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. (1979), 134:823-27.
3 Penelope Ody, THE COMPLETE MEDICINAL HERBAL. (Dorling Kindersley, New York: 1993), 52.
4 Daniel B. Mowrey, THE SCIENTIFIC VALIDATION OF HERBAL MEDICINE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1986), 112.
5 Lee, 16.
6 Ibid., 52.
7 C. Norman Shealy, M.D., DHEA THE YOUTH AND HEALTH HORMONE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1996), 34.
8 Lee, 4.
9 Ibid., 101.
10 Ibid., 50.
11 Ibid., 51.
12 Ibid., 101.
13 Ibid., 52.
14 Ibid., See also “Progesterone: Safe Antidote for PMS.” MCCALL’S MAGAZINE. October, (1990), 152-56 and Linda Carol Graham, “Do You Have a Hormone Shortage?” REDBOOK. February, (1989), 16.
15 Ibid.
16 Rita Elkins, M.A., DEPRESSION AND NATURAL MEDICINE. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 129.
17 Lee, 84.
18 Ibid., 87.
19 Ibid.
20 Alan R. Gaby, M.D., PREVENTING AND REVERSING OSTEOPOROSIS. (Prima Publishing, Rocklin, California: 1994), 150. See also John, R. Lee, M.D. “Osteoporosis reversal: the role of progesterone.” INT CLIN NUTR REV. (1990) 10:3, 384-91 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Osteoporosis reversal with transdermal progesterone.” LANCET. (1991), 336, 1327 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Is natural progesterone the missing link in osteoporosis prevention and treatment?” MED HYPOTHESES. 35, 316-18.
21 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 4.
22 Ibid., 102.
23 Ibid.
24 Shealy, 34.
25 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 71. See also R.A.Hiatt, R. Bawol, G.D. Friedman and R. Hoover, “Exogenous estrogen and breast cancer after bilateral oophorectomy.” CANCER. (1984), 54, 139-44.
26 Lee, 4. See alsoR.B. Gambrell, “The Menopause: Benefits and Risks of Estrogen-Progesterone Replacement Therapy,” FERTIL STERIL, 1983, (37, 457-74).
27 Ibid., 75
28 Ibid., 72. See also, L.D. Cowan, L.Gordis, J. A. Tonascia, and G.S. Jones. “Breast Cancer Incidence in Women with a History of Progesterone Deficiency. JOURNAL OF EPIDIMIOLOGY, 1981, (114) 209.17.
29 Schealy, 35.
30 Ibid..
31 Lee, 74.
32 Schealy, 35.
33 Lee, 102.

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References
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Date: July 12, 2005 10:28 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: References

References


1Steven Foster, “Milk Thistle.” Nutrition News. Vol. XII, No. 10, 1989.
2Michael Murray, N.D. and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D., Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1991), 82.
3Ibid.
4Michael Murray, N.D., The Healing Power of Herbs. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1995), 245.
5A. Desplaces, et al.: “The effects of silymarin on experimental phalloidin poisoning.” Arzneimittel-Forsch 2 5 , 1975, 89-96.
6Daniel B. Mowre y. Next Generation Herbal Medicine. (Lehi, Utah: Cormorant Books, 1988), 111.
7Christopher Hobbs, Foundations of Health-Healing with Herbs and Foods. (Capitola, California: Botanica Press, 1994), 274.
8Ibid., 275.
9Murray, Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine, 73.
10Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 245.
11R. Braatz. “The effect of silymarin on intoxication with ethionine and ethanol.” Braatz and Schneider, op. cit., pp. 31- 36, 1976.
12Ibid.
13Mowrey, 121.
14Murray, Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine, 82.
15Ibid.
16G. Muzec, “The Effects of the Bioflavonoid Silymarin on the In Vi t ro Activity and Expression of Supero x i d e Dismutase (SOD),” Acta Physiol, (Hungary: 1991), 78.
17Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 244.
18J. Sonnebichler, et.al. “Stimulatory effect of silibinin on the DNA synthesis in partially hepatectomized rat livers: Non-response in hepatoma and other malignant cell lines.” Biochem Pharm 35, 1986, 538-541. 19Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 244. 20Ibid., 248. 21Ibid.



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Sugar Overload....
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Date: July 07, 2005 04:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Sugar Overload....

Sugar Overload

My kids are getting completely overloaded on sugar at school from meals and treats -- my daughter comes unglued and cant study. When i went to grade school, there was no lunch and no sweets available. What a change in society... Amanda Shrewsbury - Spring City, Utah...

You're right to be concerned about school food programs, especially since budget restrictions have led a number of districts to use major fast-food companies as food service providers -- and even worse, to let soda companies stock school beverage machines.

Fortunately, the tide is starting to turn. Los Angeles is just one of a number of cities that are banning soda from their school buildings. Other districts are going so far as to offer organic lunches to there students. you may want to contact your school superintendent, as well as members of your local school board and let them know how you feel about what's best for your children.



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REFERENCES
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Date: June 25, 2005 12:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: REFERENCES

REFERENCES

1Penelope Od y. The Complete Medicinal Herbal. ( New Yo rk : Dorling-Kindersley, 1993) 64. 2I. Hi n d m a rch and Z. Subhan. “The Ps yc h o p h a r - m a c o l o g i c a l Effects of Ginkgo biloba Extract in Normal Healthy Volunteers.” Int. J. Clin. Pharmacol Res., (1984), 89-93. 3B. Gebner and M. Klasser. “Study of the Long-Term Action of Ginkgo biloba Extract on Vigilance and Mental Pe rformance as Determined by Means of Qu a n t i t a t i ve Pharmaco-EEG and Psychometric Measurements.” Arzneim-Forsch. (1985) 35, 1459-65. 4James Brady MD. “A Scientific Herb for Symptoms of Aging.” Doctor’s Best. (Laguna Hills, California). 5G. Vorberg. “Ginkgo biloba Extract (GBE): A Long-Term Study of Chronic Cerebral Insufficiency in Geriatric Patients.” C l i n i c a l Trials Journal. (1985) 22, 149-57. 6Michael Murray N.D., and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D. Encyclopedia of Na t u ral Medicine. ( Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1991) 34. 7F. Juguet, K. Drieu and A. Piriou. “Decreased Cerebral 5-HT1A Receptors During Aging: Re versal by Ginkgo biloba Ex t r a c t , ” J . Pharm. Pharmacol. 1994 Apr. 46(4): 318-8. 8Ody, 64. 9Today’s Herbs, “Ginkgo.” (Provo, Utah: Woodland Health Books, September, 1992) 49. 10Today’s Herbs, 50. 11 F. Hoffmann, C. Beck, A. Schutz and P. Offermann. “Ginkgo Extract EGb 761 (tenobin)/HAES versus naftidr o f u ry l ( Du s o d r i l ) / Haes. A Randomized Study of Therapy of Su d d e n Deafness.” Laryngorhinootologie. 1994 March 73(3): 149-52. 1 2Rita Elkins. The Complete Home Health Ad v i s o r. ( Pl e a s a n t Grove, Utah: Woodland Books, 1994) 233. 13N. Kobayashi, R. Suzuki, C. Koide, T. Suzuki, H. Matsuda and M. Kubo. “Effect of Leaves of Ginkgo biloba on Hair Regrowth in C3H Strain Mice.” Yakugaku-zasshi. 1993 Oct. 113(10): 718-24. 14R. Kaezelmann and F. Kade. “Limitation of the Deterioration of Lipid Parameters by a St a n d a rd i zed Ga r l i c - Ginkgo Combination Product: A Multicenter Pl a c e b o - C o n t rolled Do u b l e - Blind St u d y. ” Arzneimittelforschung. 1993 Sept. 43(9): 978-81. 15A. Tamborini, and R. Taurelle. “Value of Standardized Ginkgo biloba Extract (EGb 761) in the Management of Congestive Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome.” Review Gynecol. Obstet. 1993 Jul-Sep 88(7-9): 447-57.



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References
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Date: June 24, 2005 04:34 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: References

References

1Claire Kowalchik and William H. Hylton, Editors, Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia. (Emmaus, Pennsylvania: Rodale Press, 1987), 176. 2Louise Tenney, “Echinacea”, To day’s Herbs. ( Provo, Utah: Woodland Publishing, Vol. XIII, Number 1, 1993), 1. 3Family Guide to Na t u ral Medicine. ( Pleasantville, New Yo rk : Reader’s Digest, 1993), 303. 4Andrew Weil, MD, Natural Health, Natural Medicine. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1990) 236. 5Gary Gillum, Editor, “Echinacea” To day’s Herbs. ( Provo, Utah : Woodland Books, Vol. I Issue 11, July, 1981), 1. 6PenelopeOdy, The Complete Medicinal Herbal. ( New York : Dorling-Kindersley, 1993), 53. 7Michael Murray, ND and Joseph Pizzorno, ND, Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1991), 58. 8V.H. Wagner and A. Proksch., “Immunostimulatory Drugs of Fungi and Higher Plants”, Economic Medicinal Plant Research . (1985), 1, 113-53. 9Louise Tenney, The Encyclopedia of Natural Remedies. ( Pleasant Grove, Utah: Woodland Publishing, 1995), 50. 10Ibid. 1 1Daniel B. Mowre y, The Scientific Validation of Herbs. ( New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, 1986), 119. 12Murray, 59. 13Michael T. Murray, N.D.. The Healing Power of Herbs. (Rocklin, California: Prima Publishing, 1995), 100. 14J. Mose, “Effect of Echinacin on Phagocytosis and Natural Killer Cells”, Med. Welt. (1983), 34, 1,463-7. 1 5M. Stimple, A. Proksch, H. Wagner, etal., “Macrophage Activation and Induction of Macrophage Cytotoxicity by Purified Polysaccharide Fractions From the Plant Echinacea Purpurea”, Infection Immunity. (1984), 46, 845-9. 16Mowrey, 119. 17Ibid., 250 18Ibid., 119 19Ibid. 20Ody, 176 21Velma J. Keith and Monteen Gordon, The How To Herb Book. (Pleasant Grove, Utah: Mayfield Publishing, 1983), 29. 2 2Louise Tenney, To day’s Herbal Health. ( Pleasant Grove, Utah: Woodland Publishing, 1992), 60. 2 3Daniel B. Mow re y, Ph.D., Echinacea. ( New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, 1995), 31. 24Ibid., 33. 25Ibid., 41. 26C. Steinmuller, J. Roesler, E. Grottrup, G. Franke, H. Wagner and Matthes Lohmann, “Polysacharides Isolated From Plant Cell Cultures of Echinacea Purpurea Enhance the Resistance of Immunosupproes Mice Against Systemic Infections with Candida Albicans and Listeria Monicytogens,” Int-J-Immunpharmacol. 1993, July: 15(5): 605-14. 27Ibid., 43. 2 8U. Mengs, C. Clare and J. Poiley, “Toxicity of Echinacea Purpurea. Acute, Subacute and Genotoxicity Studies , Arzneimittelforschung. 1991, Oct. 41(10): 1076-81.

ADDITIONAL REFERENCES

Becker, V. H. Against snakebites and influenza: use and components of echinacea angustifolia and e. purpurea.. Deutsche Apotheker Zeitung, 122 (45), 1982, 2020-2323. Buesing, K.H. Inhibition of hyaluronidase by echinacin. Arzneimittel- Forschung. 2, 1952, 467-469. Foster, S. Echinacea, Nature’s Immune Enhancer. Healing Arts Press, Rochester, VT., 1991. Hobbs, C. The Echinacea Handbook. Eclectic Medical Publications, Portland, Oregon, 1989. Keller, H. Recovery of active agents from aqueous extracts of the species of echinacea. Chemie Gruenenthal G.M.B.H., GER. Oct . 11, 1956, 950, 674. Kuhn, O. Echinacea and Phagocytosis. Arzneimittel - Fo rxchung, 3, 1953, 194-200. Mc Gregor R.L. The taxonomy of the genus Echinacea (Compositae). Univ. Kansas Sci. Bull. 48, 1968, 113-142.



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ENDNOTES
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Date: June 23, 2005 11:50 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: ENDNOTES

ENDNOTES


1 G.A. Cordell and O.E. Araujo, “Capsaicin: Identification, nomenclature, and pharmacotherapy.” Ann. Pharmacother. 27: 1993, 330-336.
2 A.Y. Leung. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients used in Food. (John Wiley and Sons, New York: 1980.
3 Cordell, 330-36.
4 J.J. Jang, D.E. Defor, D.L. Logsdon and J.M. Ward. “A 4-week feeding study of ground red chile (Capsicum annuum) in male mice.” F o o d - C h e m - T o x i c o l . S e p t . 1992 30 (9): 783-7.
5 John R. Christopher. Capsicum. (Christopher Publications, Springville, Utah: 1980), 27.
6 Jack Ritchason. The Little Herb Encyclopedia, 3rd ed. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1994), 44.
7 Christopher, 4.
8 Juliette Bairacli-Levy. Common Herbs for Natural Health. (Schocken Books, New York: 1974), 41-43.
9 Charles B. Heiser. Nightshades. (W.H. Freeman, San Francisco: 1969), 18.
10 Lenden H. Smith, M.D., E.P. Donatelle, M.D., Vaughn Bryant, Ph.D. et al. Basic Natural Nutrition. (Woodland Books, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1984), 157.
11 J. Jurenitsch et al. “Identification of cultivated taxa of Capsicum: taxonomy, anatomy and composition of pungent principle.” Chemical Abstracts. 91 July 30, 1977: 35677g.
12 Daniel B. Mowrey. The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1986), 159.
13 Ibid., 208-09.
14 Michael T. Murray. The Healing Power of Herbs, 2nd ed. (Prima Publishing, Prima, California: 1995), 71.
15 J. De Lille and E. Ramirez. “Pharmacodynamic action of the active principles of chile (capsicum annuum L.) Anales Inst. Biol. 1935: 6, 23-37. See also C.C. Toh, T.S. Lee et al. “The pharmacological actions of capsaicin and its analogues.” B r i t i s h Journal of Pharmacology. 1955: 10, 175-182.
16 N.A. Castle. “Differential inhibition of potassium currents in rat ventricular myocytes by capsaicin.” Cardiovasc-Res. Nov. 1992, 26 (11): 1137-44.
17 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
18 Ritchason, 46.
19 T. Kawada, et al. “Effects of capsaicin on lipid metabolism in rates fed a high fat diet.” Journal of Nutrition. 1986: 116, 1272-78. See also J.P. Wang, et al. “Antiplatelet effect of capsaicin.” Thrombosis Res. 1984: 36, 497-507, and S. Visudhiphan, et al. “The relationship between high fibrinolytic activity and daily capsicum ingestion in Thais.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1982: 35, 1452-58.
20 K. Sambaiah and N. Satyanarayana. “Hpocholesterolemic effect of red pepper and capsaicin.” Indian Journal of Experimental Biology. 1980: 18, 898-99. See also M.R. Srinivasan, et al. “Influence of red pepper and capsaicin on growth, blood constituents and nitrogen balance in rats.” Nutrition Reports International. 1980: 21 (3): 455-67.
21 Mowrey, 12.
22 Ibid.
23 Toh, 175-182.
24 Mowrey, 12.
25 Ibid., 19-20.
26 Louise Tenney. The Encyclopedia of Natural Remedies. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 42. See also Peter Holmes. The Energetics of Western Herbs. (Artemis Press, Boulder: 1989), 322.
27 Y. Lee, et al. “Flavonoids and antioxidant activity of fresh pepper (Capsicum annuum) cultivars.” Journal of Food Science. May 1995: 60 (3): 473-76. See also L.R. Howard, et al. “Provitamin A and ascorbic acid content of fresh pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum) and processed jalapenos.” Journal of Food Science. M a r c h , 1994: 59 (2): 362-65.
28 J.J. Espinosa-Aguirre, et al. “Mutagenic activity of urban air samples and its modulation by chile extracts.” Mutat-Res. Oct. 1993: 303 (2): 55-61.
29 Ibid.
30 Howard, 362-65.
31 Z. Zhang, S.M. Hamilton, et al. “Inhibition of liver microsomal cytochrome P450 activity and metabolism of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine NNK by capsaicin and ellagic acid.” Anticancer-Res. Nov-Dec. 1993: 13 (6A): 2341-46.
32 C.H. Miller, Z. Zhang, et al. “Effects of capsaicin on liver microsomal metabolism of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine NNK.” Cancer-Lett. Nov. 30, 1993: 75 (1): 45- 52.
33 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 71.
34 Cordell, 330-36. See also Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 70-71.
35 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
36 C.P.N. Watson, et al. “The post-mastectomy pain syndrome and the effect of topical capsaicin.” Pain. 1989: 38, 177-86. See also C.P.N. Watson and R.J. Evans. “The post-mastectomy pain syndrome and topical capsaicin: A randomized trial.” Pain. 1992: 51, 375-79.
37 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 73.
38 Watson, 177-86.
39 C. Nelson. “Heal the burn: Pepper and lasers in cancer pain therapy.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1994: 86, 1381.
40 Ibid.
41 “The capsaicin study group: Effect of treatment with capsaicin on daily activities of patients with painful diabetic neuropathy.” Diabetes Care. 1992: 15, 159-65. See also R. Tanden, et al. “Topical capsaicin in painful diabetic neuropathy. Effect on sensory function.” Diabetes Care. 1992: 15, 8-14, K.M. Basha and F.W. Whitehouse. “Capsaicin: A therapeutic option for painful diabetic neuropathy.” Henry Ford Hospital Medical Journal. 1991: 39, 138-40, and M.A. Pfeifer, et al. “A highly successful and novel model for treatment of chronic painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.” Diabetes Care. 1993: 16, 1103-15.
42 R. Tanden, et al. “Topical capsaicin in painful diabetic neuropathy: controlled study with long- term follow-up.” Diabetes Care. Jan. 1992: 15 (1): 8-14.
43 Ibid.
44 J.E. Bernstein, et al. “Topical capsaicin treatment of chronic post-herpetic neuralgia (shingles) with topical capsaicin. A preliminary study. Journal of American Academy of Dermatologists. 1987: 17, 93-96. See also Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
45 Sid Kircheimer. The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies. (Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania: 1993), 228.
46 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 74.
47 G.M. McCarthy and D.J. McCarty. “Effect of topical capsaicin in therapy of painful osteoarthritis of the hands.” Journal Rheumatol. 1992: 19, 604-07. See also C. L Deal, et al. “Treatment of arthritis with topical capsaicin: A double blind trial.” Clinical Therapy. 1991: 13, 383-95.
48 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 74.
49 Kircheimer, 14.
50 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 74.
51 Michael T. Murray, N.D. and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D. Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. (Prima Publishing, Rocklin, California: 1991), 419.
52 J. Y. Kang, et al. “The effect of chile ingestion of gastrointestinal mucosal proliferation and azoxymethane-induced cancer in the rat.” Journal of Gastroenterology- Hepatol. Mar-Apr. 1992: 7 (2): 194-98.
53 K. G. Yeoh, et al. “Chile protects against aspirin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal injury in humans.” Dig-Dis-Sci. Mar. 1995: 40 (3): 580-83.
54 Ibid.
55 Ibid.
56 L. Limlomwongse, et al. “Effect of capsaicin on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow in the rat.” Journal of Nutrition. 1979: 109, 773-
77. See also T. Kolatat and D. Chungcharcon. “The effect of capsaicin on smooth muscle and blood flow of the stomach and the intestine.” Siriraj Hospital Gazette. 1972: 24, 1405-18, O. Ketusinh, et al. “Influence of capsaicin solution on gastric acidities.” A m e r i c a n Journal of Proceedings. 1966: 17, 511-15, and Mowrey, 48.
57 Mowrey, 48 and Limlomwongse, 773-77.
58 M. Horowitz, et al. “The effect of chile on gastrointestinal transit.” Journal of Gastroenterology-Hepatol. Jan-Feb, 1992 7 (1): 52-56.:
59 Christopher Hobbs. “Cayenne, This Popular Herb is Hot.” Let’s Live. April 1994: 55.
60 V. Badmaev and M. Majeed. “Weight loss, the Ayurvedic system.” Total Health. Aug, 1995: 17 (4): 32-35.
61 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 75.
62 C.N. Ellis, et al. “A double-blind evaluation of topical capsaicin in pruritic psoriasis.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1993: 29 (3): 438-42.
63 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 75.
64 S. Marabini, et al. “Beneficial effect of intranasal applications of capsaicin in patients with vasomotor rhinitis.” Eur Arch-Otorhinolaryngol. 1991: 248 (4): 191-94.
65 Ibid.
66 Mowrey, 242.
67B. Dib. “Effects of intrathecal capsaicin on autonomic and behavioral heat loss responses in the rat. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1987: 28, 65-70.
68 Murray, The Healing Power of Herbs, 72.
69 Christopher, 31.
70 M. Ponce, et al. “ In vitro effect against giardia of 14 plant extracts.” Rev-Invest-Clin. Sept- Oct. 1994: 46 (5): 343-47.
71 Ibid.
72 Humbart Santillo. Natural Healing with Herbs. (Hohm Press, Prescott, Arizona: 1993), 100.
73 Daniel B. Mowrey. “Capsicum ginseng and gotu kola in combination.” The Herbalist premier issue, 1975: 22-28.
74 Ibid.
75 Mowrey, The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine, 102.
76 J. Roquebert, et al. “Study of vasculotropic properties of Capsicum annuum.” Annales Pharmaceutiques Francaises. 1978: 36 (7-8): 361-68.
77 Rita Elkins. Depression and Natural Medicine. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 161.



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Vision Quest - help fight eye problems.
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Date: June 18, 2005 08:34 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Vision Quest - help fight eye problems.

Vision Quest by Phyllis D. Light, RH Energy Times, February 11, 2004

Since your eyes are in constant use every day, exposed to the damaging energy of sunlight and pollutants that waft through the air, these delicate orbs are often in danger of wearing out.

To keep this vital part of your anatomy functioning as you age, you have to feed and care for your eyes properly. Otherwise, you are in real danger of losing your vision and independence.

Your vision may be in danger. Experts estimate that 8 million Americans over the age of 55 are at serious risk of blindness linked to a condition called age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD can wipe out your central vision and is the primary cause of blindness in Western society.

While AMD causes no pain, it blurs the sharp, central vision necessary for driving, reading and other activities where you need to see either up close or straight ahead. During AMD, the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to pick out fine detail, is destroyed. The macula sits at the center of your retina, the nerve center at the back of your eye that senses light and sends optic signals to the brain.

Age is not the only risk factor for AMD. Scientists have isolated a genetic defect that can lead to some forms of macular degeneration (Nature Genetics 2001; 27:89-93). Smoking and excessive exposure to sunlight are other hazards best avoided if you want to save your sight.

In many cases, AMD progresses so slowly that victims of this condition don't even notice that their vision is deteriorating until much of it is irrevocably gone.

Dry and Wet AMD

Wet AMD occurs when blood vessels in back of the retina start to overgrow and leak blood. As this occurs, blood and other fluids push on the macula and quickly damage its sensitive nerve endings. When wet AMD occurs, you lose your central vision rapidly. If straight lines appear wavy to you, you may be suffering from wet AMD. If you notice this or other unusual vision changes, contact an eye care specialist as soon as possible. You need what is called a comprehensive dilated eye exam that can uncover signs of AMD.

Dry AMD strikes the eye when light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly deteriorate, gradually blurring central vision in the affected eye. As dry AMD progresses, a blurry spot in the center of your vision may appear. Eventually, as more of the macula becomes dysfunctional, the central vision in the eye can gradually disappear.

The most common sign of dry AMD is slightly blurry vision. This can make it hard to recognize faces and also make it harder to read without very bright light. Dry AMD generally attacks both eyes, but vision can be lost in one eye while the other eye stays normal. In the early stages of dry AMD, drusen, yellow deposits that gather under the retina, may form. Dry AMD progresses in three stages:

  • • Early AMD: Small drusen form but vision is unaffected.
  • • Intermediate AMD: Many medium drusen appear or, alternately, one large drusen occurs. Center vision is often blurred and reading requires bright lights.
  • • Advanced Dry AMD: Drusen formation is accompanied by deterioration of tissue in the macula. Blurs in central vision expand, eventually destroying most vision. Note: Because of the fast destruction it causes, wet AMD is an advanced form of this disorder that is considered more severe than the dry version.

    Vitamins and Minerals for AMD

    Fortunately, scientists have found ways to combat AMD: An analysis of a study called the national Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) shows that more than 300,000 Americans could avoid losing their sight to AMD if they took daily supplements of antioxidant nutrients and zinc.

    This conclusion, reached by scientists at Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute, is based on research involving more than 4,500 adults suffering various stages of AMD. The study demonstrated that people who already had some AMD could lower their risk of the more advanced form of this condition by 25% when they took vitamin C, natural vitamin E and beta carotene along with zinc. Those suffering from advanced AMD lowered their chances of losing vision by about 19%. (Supplements did not affect the risk of cataracts or the chances of some vision loss for people in the early stages of AMD.)

    " Without treatment to reduce their risk, we estimate that 1.3 million adults would develop the advanced stage of AMD," says Neil M. Bressler, MD, professor of ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins and author of the current study, published in Archives of Ophthalmology (11/03).

    According to Dr. Bressler and the other researchers, people who now have intermediate AMD (some vision loss) in one eye have about a 1 in 16 chance of having their vision deteriorate until they have advanced AMD. They also calculate that about 1 in 4 of those with intermediate AMD in both eyes and 43% of those with advanced AMD in one eye will develop advanced AMD in five years without treatment.

    In their view, older people at risk of AMD blindness should take daily supplements of 500 milligrams of vitamin C, 400 milligrams of natural vitamin E, 15 milligrams of beta carotene, 80 milligrams of zinc as zinc oxide and 2 milligrams of copper as cupric oxide. Evidence also exists that a diet which is high in fat can cause AMD to progress to an advanced stage. The exceptions: The healthy fats found in fish and nuts (Archives of Ophthalmology 2003; 121:1728-37).

    Lutein Protection

    Oddly enough, some of the same pigments that color vegetables and other foods also color your eyes. And scientists believe that those pigments, which are classified as carotenoids, help protect the eyes by helping them fight off the negative effects of caustic molecules called free radicals. Free radicals are formed when the energy from sunlight strikes the eyes and disrupts the composition of natural chemicals found there.

    When scientists compared healthy eyes with eyes suffering from AMD, they found that AMD eyes contained lower levels of lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoid pigments contained in egg yolk, spinach, broccoli and other dark green vegetables (Ophthalmology 2003; 109:1780). Furthermore, they found that levels of these chemicals generally decline as you grow older.

    " This research is a major step toward large-scale clinical studies to prove the extent to which lutein and zeaxanthin protect against age-related macular degeneration," says Paul S. Bernstein, MD, PhD, at the University of Utah School of Medicine at Salt Lake. "We know that these carotenoids are specifically concentrated in the macula of the human eye."

    Dr. Bernstein adds that, as you age, taking supplements containing lutein and other antioxidants may lower your AMD risk. In his investigation, people with AMD who did not take lutein had one-third less lutein in their eyes than older people whose vision was normal.

    Avoiding Cataracts

    Another eyesight hazard is cataracts, in which the eye's lens-the part that focuses incoming light onto the retina-becomes cloudy. Cataracts form when the proteins found in the normally clear lens become damaged; signs include progressively blurred vision (especially outdoors), focusing problems, seeing streaks of light from headlights and stoplights, and colors that look faded.

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. One of every six Americans 40 and older suffers from some degree of cataract; it affects half of all Americans who reach age 80. Nuclear cataracts, the most common form of this disorder, develop in the center of the lens and tend to grow slowly. Cataracts may also develop at the back of the lens; this form is linked to eye trauma and long-term use of certain medications, including steroids.

    Like AMD, cataracts become more common as people age. Up to 40% of individuals between the ages of 75 and 85 have them, compared with only 5% to 10% of those folks under the age of 65. And like AMD, sunlight exposure and smoking increase the risk of developing cataracts, as does the presence of diabetes.

    Lutein and zeaxanthin, the carotenoids that are so plentiful in the macula, are also found in the lens (although in lower concentrations), leading many researchers to believe that these nutrients may help drop your risk of cataract development. Early studies indicate that an increased intake of lutein and zeaxanthin reduces one's chances of needing cataract surgery, the most common surgery in the United States (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1999; 70(4):509-16; 517-24).

    Antioxidants and the Lens

    Scientists believe that free-radical damage is a leading cause of cataracts, and so it isn't surprising that antioxidants have proved useful in preventing this problem.

    Almost 500 women filled out diet questionnaires as part of a very large research effort called the Nurses' Health Study; those who had taken vitamin C supplements for 10 years or longer enjoyed the lowest rates of nuclear cataracts (Archives of Ophthalmology 2001; 119:1009-19).

    So the answer to lowering your risk of eye problems is clear, whether you are already in your mature years or plan to be someday: Lead a healthy, eye-friendly lifestyle, eating a diet filled with colorful fruits and vegetables. Take frequent walks and jogs around the block.

    And yes, when you kick back and take your just-as-frequent doses of antioxidant supplements, you're allowed to take your sunglasses off and see the world clearly.



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    Clean Living
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    Date: June 10, 2005 04:14 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Clean Living

    Clean Living by Phyllis D. Light, RH Energy Times, December 3, 2003

    Just as you wouldn't clean a closet by merely closing the closet door, you can't clean your body by closing your eyes to the toxins that assault our bodies every day. The modern world is filled with natural and manmade chemicals that can accumulate within and cause long-term health problems. So, in between bouts of housecleaning, an internal cleansing can keep your bodily systems feeling as clean as your sparkling household.

    While modern life would be impossible without the chemicals that go into the gadgets and machines on which society thrives, these materials have a dark side: Each day we are exposed to hundreds of substances that have infiltrated our food, water and air. They lurk in our cleaning products, fabrics, personal care products, automobiles and even the building materials in our homes and offices.

    "While our [bodies have] systems of detoxification to deal with and eliminate chemicals to which we are exposed, the sheer volume of these chemicals can overwhelm these detoxification mechanisms, causing these non-lifegiving substances to stay in our bodies where they can damage our health," says Steven Horne, AHG, herbalist and natural health consultant in St. George, Utah.

    Added to this chemical mix, indulgences in alcoholic drinks, cigarette smoke, caffeine and over-the-counter drugs can further challenge your body's cleansing systems.

    Water, Water Everywhere and How Your Health Can Shrink

    Substances in the beverages you consume every day may contribute to the collection of toxins in your body.

    A growing water problem, for instance, flows from the medications excreted into sewer systems and groundwater.

    These drugs have already affected the environment: Estrogen from contraceptives have contaminated lakes and rivers, and caused deformities in fish while impairing the fertility of water animals and the birds who feed upon them. A study released by scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that the fertility rate of adult male fish exposed to synthetic estrogen from contraceptive pills dropped by 50% (Envir Tox & Chem 6/03). Scientists believe these defective animals are like the proverbial canaries in coal mines, reflecting health problems that may also be harming human health in ways we don't yet understand.

    And clean machines can cause unclean bodies: When scientists from Queen's University (Drug Metab Dispos 2003; 31:306) examined the seminal fluid of infertile men, they found extra amounts of the chemical trichloroethylene (TCE), a degreasing agent used in the automotive and metal industries. TCE is also found in adhesives, lubricants, paints, varnishes, paint strippers, pesticides, spot removers and rug cleaning fluids, and it has entered the drinking water in many places.

    Detox for Metabolic Balance

    "Detoxification is the missing link in Western nutrition and an important but unexplored medical therapy," says Elson M. Haas, MD, author of The Detox Diet (Celestial Arts). Dr. Haas believes that when the body accumulates wastes that are not properly eliminated, disease often results: "The key to maintaining metabolic balance is to maximize nutrition and eliminate toxins." Dr. Haas has seen improvement in cholesterol levels, blood pressure readings and pain levels after his patients have detoxed.

    When your body accumulates toxins, cells can stagnate and suffocate. To offset these problems, the body uses its built-in system of detoxification to remove toxins and cellular waste products.

    In protecting itself against toxins, the body can quickly eliminate water-soluble compounds before they cause harm, excreting them in the stool, sweat and urine. Fat-soluble compounds, which make up most of the chemical toxins we are exposed to every day, are not so easily dealt with. The body uses enzymes in the intestines and liver to chemically break down these toxins and convert them into a form that can be pushed out of the body.

    Your body inherits its ability to cope with toxins. But you can help the body in its detox tasks by providing nutrients that aid cleansing.

    Colorful Eating Boosts Detox

    Many experts believe that alkaline foods (fruits and vegetables) help the body detoxify, while meats and acidic processed foods slow the process.

    "The right balance of acid and alkaline foods for each of us is, of course, the key," notes Dr. Haas. Animal products, sugar, white flour, and alcoholic beverages are thought to leave acid residues in the body.

    "Brightly colored foods contain powerful antioxidants that help the liver with the detoxification process," says Brenda Watson, CT, in her book Renew Your Life (Renew Life Press). "...[raw] fruits and vegetables...contain enzymes... [that are] destroyed by cooking."

    These enzymes can help the body detoxify and eliminate undesirable substances. However, Watson cautions, "If the digestive system is weak...too much raw food [can] cause upset, so raw foods should be added to the diet at a pace the body can tolerate. Taking digestive plant enzymes with meals can also aid digestion."

    While those foods in a normal diet can help control toxins, if you have moved toward "toxic overload," or if you want to eliminate candida-a yeast that can cause health problems-Watson recommends a detox diet:

  • *Avoid sugar and artificial sweeteners.

  • *Eat fewer grains.

  • *Avoid fruits and fruit juices; Granny Smith apples are OK, as is lemon juice in herb tea.

  • *Drink fresh vegetable juice.

  • *Avoid yeasty foods such as bread, beer, wine, sauerkraut and commercial salad dressings (olive is oil is acceptable).

  • *No mushrooms or cheese.

  • *No peanuts or peanut butter.

  • *No dairy except a little butter and plain yogurt.

  • *No coffee, tea, pepper, spices or tobacco. (A little herb tea is OK.)

  • *No pickled, smoked or dried meat, fish or poultry.

    Foods that are allowed include:

  • *Gluten-free bread

  • * Raw almond butter
  • *Eggs

  • *Vegetables low in starch

  • *Lentils

  • *Lean meats

  • *Pasta made from rice or quinoa

  • * Nuts and seeds that have been soaked overnight in distilled water

    When preparing dishes in this diet, use plenty of garlic and green foods. "Other anti-candida agents which may be used liberally include ginger, cinnamon, thyme and rosemary."

    According to Watson, following this diet is a first step toward detoxing. If you experience serious difficulties linked to environmental toxins, consult a health practitioner.

    In a world filled with chemicals whose effects are unknown, attention must be paid to the toxins around us. As our machines grow more complex and widespread, our health difficulties linked to these mechanisms may also grow.



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    Federal Court Overturns FDA Ban on Ephedra at Low Doses
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    Date: June 09, 2005 08:41 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Federal Court Overturns FDA Ban on Ephedra at Low Doses

    Federal Court Overturns FDA Ban on Ephedra at Low Doses

    by Rakesh M. Amin and Mark Blumenthal

    A Utah Federal District Court recently limited the scope of a year old Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Final Rule1 banning the sale of all ephedrine-alkaloid dietary supplements.2 The Court’s ruling has a limited affect on the ability of companies to sell ephedrine nationally, but is important regarding FDA procedure for creating rules and enforcement powers. Ephedrine alkaloids are found primarily in the controversial herb ephedra (Ephedra sincica Stapf., Ephedraceae).

    The District Court determined that the FDA’s use of a risk-benefit analysis was against the intent of Congress in passing the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act,3 which presumes all foods are safe and requires the FDA to prove the existence of a significant or unreasonable risk. The court held that to require food producers to establish a benefit before selling their product places an improper burden on them and was inconsistent with Congress’s intent when it passed the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) to clearly place the burden of proof of safety of a dietary ingredient on the FDA.4

    Secondly, the court determined the FDA had to show by a preponderance of the evidence “a significant or unreasonable risk of illness or injury.”5 Therefore, in order to ban all sales of a given product, the FDA must first prove that the dosage amount in the product presents an unreasonable risk.6 Prior to this ruling, the FDA was not required to consider dosage size before banning a substance.

    This ruling has limited effects at the moment since the FDA may appeal this decision. Additionally, the ruling has no effect on the laws of several states (including California, Illinois and New York) which have banned all sales of ephedrine alkaloids in dietary supplements. The ruling also only applies to products containing 10 mg or less of ephedrine alkaloids per daily dosage. Any product exceeding that amount is still banned and will continue to be enforced under the FDA rule.7

    The court, in its ruling, specifically precluded the FDA from taking any enforcement action against Nutraceutical Corporation, the company that filed the lawsuit, for its sale of products containing 10mg or less of ephedra and for the FDA to consider further rulemaking “consistent with this Order”.8 However, the court did not specifically instruct the FDA to refrain from taking enforcement action against other brands containing less than 10mg of ephedrine.9 As such, companies considering launching new products containing ephedrine alkaloids are advised to do so carefully.

    Nutraceutical Corporation president Bruce Hough was cited in The New York Times as saying that the company’s reason for filing the suit was not based on ephedra and that his company had no plans to begin marketing ephedra supplements in the near future.10 Hough was quoted as saying, “We filed it [the lawsuit] because the FDA established rules that could cause problems to the rest of our business.” Hough was referring to the legal basis upon which the FDA banned the sale ephedra. He told the American Botanical Council that the FDA was applying a drug standard of risk vs. benefit to herbs and dietary supplements – technically foods under the law. [Hough B. Personal communication to M. Blumenthal, Apr. 27, 2005.] His company filed the lawsuit in an attempt to deter FDA’s new procedure for creating what he considered arbitrary rules which contradict the plain meaning of existing federal law (DSHEA).

    The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) issued a statement on April 26 clarifying its policy on the sale of ephedra in dietary supplements.11 AHPA has notified all its members that at this time it is the organization’s policy that none of its members should be selling low doses (10 mg or less) of ephedra in dietary supplements until the FDA has clarified its position on the Court decision. At this time it is not clear whether FDA plans on appealing the decision or will implement the new policy set by the Court.

    The court decision does not affect the sale of the herb ephedra in traditional formulations intended for use that is consistent with traditional uses, e.g., pulmonary complaints, and are dispensed by licensed healthcare practitioners.

    As might be expected, court’s decision has stimulated a new round of media and congressional criticism of the relative safety of herbs and dietary supplements as well as DSHEA. For example, a highly critical article by Chris Mooney was posted on the website of the American Prospect on April 25.12 The Prospect is relatively influential in Democratic and progressive political circles in Washington. The article uses language such as the court decision is a “scandal” and a “disturbing ruling”, refers to DSHEA as “a terrible law” and a “peculiar and misguided law” and the “wrongheaded standards encoded in the DSHEA”, and repeats the often-cited media mantra about “unregulated herbal supplements” and that the “FDA has been hamstrung and effectively rendered impotent.”

    More information regarding the sale of ephedrine products or FDA regulations in general is available from the law offices of Rakesh M. Amin at (312) 327-3382 or rakesh@amin-law.com.

    References

    1 21 C.F.R. Pt. 119, Final Rule Declaring Dietary Supplements Containing Ephedrine Alkaloids Adulterated Because They Present an Unreasonable Risk (Published February 11, 2004) (Effective April 12, 2004) available at /dockets/98fr/1995n-0304-nfr0001.pdf

    2 Nutraceutical Corporation and Solaray, Inc. v. Lester Crawford, D.V.M., Acting Commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, et al., Case No. 2:04CV409TC, U.S. District Court for the Central District of Utah; available at gov/reports/204cv409-28.pdf

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    Its not about Ehpedra -- its about DSHEA ...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: May 24, 2005 08:58 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Its not about Ehpedra -- its about DSHEA ...

    On april 14th 2005, a federal court in Utah Ruled against the FDA's ban on low dose ephedra products. The plaintiffs were Nutraceutical Corporation and its subsidiary Solaray. They sued not just to protect their ephedra product, but to protect your access to other supplements. Why did they sue and what does this mean for you?

    Media and Political Rhetoric Vs. Real Science

    Protecting DSHEA and your access to dietary supplements

    Why did Nutraceutical challenge FDA's actions?

  • We wanted to make sure the FDA followed DSHEA (The Dietary Supplement Health And Education Act) and uses sound science to stop the sale of ingredients at dose levels that cause harm.
  • We were concerned about a new concept -- a "Risk-benefit" test -- that caused all supplements to be treated like drugs and gave FDA the power to ban any dietary supplement at its discretion.
  • Dietary supplements should not be treated like drugs. Supplements are typically natural food products. Treating them like drugs -- with pre-market approval and clinical studies required -- would mean an end to consumer access to supplements.
  • We believed our low-dose ephedra product was safe. It was not designed for weight loss, but for traditional uses, like respiratory support.
  • Why did FDA Ban Ephedra?

  • Over eighty years, FDA proposed, withdrew and re-proposed limits on dietary supplements with ephedrine alkaloids. Until the final rule, all the proposed rules exempted low-dose ephedra products.
  • During those eighty years, FDA took few actions against manufacturers who sold high-dose ehpedra. The Result? Negative and often inaccurate publicity surrounding ephedra supplements.
  • In the final Rule, FDA announced to ban all dietary supplements containing any ephedrine alkaloids, but did not ban them in foods like chinese herbal teas.
  • What did the court Decide?

  • Under DSHEA, dietary supplements are to be regulated as foods.
  • Like other foods, Dietary supplements are "presumed to be safe."
  • FDA's "risk-benefit" test is contrary to what Congress intended when they passed DSHEA in 1994.
  • To ban a dietary supplement, FDA must establish that the specific dose recommended in the label presents a significant or unreasonable risk of illness or injury. FDA didnt do that for low-dose ephedra. FDA cant stop Nutraceutical and Solaray from selling their low-dose ephedra product.
  • FDA has to rewrite its Ephedra rule.
  • How does the Decision affect me?

  • The courts rulling protects your access to dietary supplements. FDA cant arbitrarily ban them.
  • The ruling requires FDA to pay attention to dosage in determining if a supplement is dangerous.
  • The rulling prohibits FDA from Treating dietary supplements like drugs -- it must treat them like foods, as DSHEA specifies.
  • Does the ruling mean that ephedra is safe?

  • Nutraceutical's case only involved Solaray® Ephedra, a low-dose whole food product.
  • The court said FDA did not have adiquate scientific evidence that low-dose ephedra is unsafe.
  • Since low-dose ephedra is a food, it is presumed to be safe.
  • The court did not analyze scientific evidence about the safety of ephedra producs at higher doses.
  • What's Next for Ephedra?

  • FDA Must exempt low-dose ephedra at 10mg or less of ephedrine alkaloids per day. FDA must reopen the rulemaking to establish the precise dose level above 10mg ephedrine alkaloids at which ephedra presents a significant or unreasonable risk or illness or injury.
  • FDA can also choose to appeal the court's ruling.
  • We are evaluation the reintroduction of Solaray® ephedra. We want to do it in a way that is consistent with our obligations to our customers and in compliance with the law and the recent court decision.
  • What can I do to protect my access to supplements?

    Let your congressman and Senators know that access to supplements is important to you. A useful website for contacting them is: www.saveoursupplements.org

    contact Nutraceutical by email at: Savesupplements@nutracorp.com

    Note: Solaray® Whole herb ephedra was formulated to have 10mg or less ephedrine alkaloids per daily dose(two servings). © Nutraceutical corporation...



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