SearchBox:

Search Term: " cinnamomum "

  Messages 1-4 from 4 matching the search criteria.
Health Benefits of Cinnamon Darrell Miller 1/13/19
Cinnamon may control sugar levels... Darrell Miller 7/8/05
Supports Healthy Blood Sugar Levels-Herbally Darrell Miller 7/5/05
Kal - Vanadyl Complex now with Cinnamon Bark for Blood sugar Darrell Miller 7/1/05



AURA CACIA Essential Oil Cinnamon Cassia (cinnamomum cassia)
   .5 fl oz $7.49 34% OFF $ 4.94
AURA CACIA Essential Oil Cinnamon Leaf (cinnamomum zeylanicum)
   .5 fl oz $8.59 34% OFF $ 5.67

Health Benefits of Cinnamon
TopPreviousNext

Date: January 13, 2019 04:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Benefits of Cinnamon





Cinnamon is not only a delicious spice that can be added to a variety of dishes, but it also comes naturally equipped with several health benefits. Cinnamon is a natural antioxidant, giving it the ability to prevent against certain metabolic disorders, as well as diseases that are brought on by aging. It is also an anti-inflammatory by how it can aid in the production of nitric oxide, a primary contributor in helping the body combat inflammatory responses.

Key Takeaways:

  • Cinnamon is an aromatic spice that comes from the genus Cinnamomum. The true cinnamon species is known as C. verum.
  • Every part of the cinnamon tree – its roots, leaves, flower, fruits, and bark – have medicinal properties and its constituents are cinnamaldehyde, cinnamate, and cinnamic acid.
  • As a cinnamon tree ages, it assumes a darker color because it now contains more residual resinous elements.

"Cinnamon is known to possess anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial properties."

Read more: https://www.news-medical.net/health/Health-Benefits-of-Cinnamon.aspx

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5961)


Cinnamon may control sugar levels...
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 08, 2005 10:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cinnamon may control sugar levels...

Best Cinnamon

  • Use as Part of Your Diet to Help Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*
  • HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS
  • Cinnamon,
    a staple ingredient in apple pie, has remained one of the
    world's favorite spices throughout recorded history. The
    evergreen cinnamon tree (cinnamomum verum), considered to be
    true cinnamon, is native to Sri Lanka. Chinese cinnamon
    (cinnamomum cassia or cinnamomum aromaticum), the cinnamon most
    commonly sold in the U.S., goes by the name “Cassia.” Usage of
    cinnamon in Chinese medicine is said to date back over 4,000
    years. Mentioned in the Bible, cinnamon was imported to Egypt
    and Europe from the Far East by 500 B.C. In addition to its
    value as culinary spice, cinnamon has traditionally been
    utilized as a folk medicine for colds and minor digestive
    complaints. True cinnamon and cassia are very similar; cassia
    has a more pungent flavor. Cassia buds can be found in potpourri
    and used as a flavoring agent in sweets and
    beverages.1

    Recent research has revealed that constituents in
    cinnamon bark called procyanidin Type-A polymers help maintain
    the body's ability to metabolize glucose in a healthy way.* Best
    Cinnamon Extract is Cinnulin PF®, a patented, water extract of
    Cinnamon that contains Type-A polymers. Cinnulin PF® is a
    registered trademark of Integrity Nutraceuticals International
    and is manufactured under US Patent #
    6,200,569.

    Benefits

    Use as Part of Your Diet to Help
    Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*

    In Vitro and Animal
    Studies

    Research has revealed that a number of herbs and
    spices have insulin-like activity.2 In a study by the U.S.
    Department of Agriculture (USDA), cinnamon demonstrated the
    greatest ability to stimulate cellular glucose metabolism among
    49 botanicals tested.3

    In a 2001 study, researchers at the
    USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center showed that bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon trigger an insulin-like response in fat
    cells.4 These compounds stimulated glucose uptake into cells and
    increased glycogen (stored glucose) production via activation of
    the enzyme, glycogen synthase.

    The bioactive compounds in
    cinnamon appear to potentiate insulin activity at the level of
    the cell receptor for insulin. It has been shown that insulin
    resistance involves down regulation of “insulin signaling”
    characterized by dephosphorylation of the receptor.5 Enzymes
    called “protein tyrosine kinases” (PTPases) are believed to
    decrease receptor phosphorylation, and increased PTPase activity
    has been observed in insulin resistant rats.6 Cinnamon compounds
    have demonstrated the in vitro ability to inhibit PTP-1 and
    increase autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor.7

    In a
    recent animal study, cinnamon (cassia) extract was administered
    to rats for three weeks. Following this, the rats were infused
    with insulin and glucose to assess their insulin response.
    Increased phosphorylation of the insulin receptor was observed
    in skeletal muscle of these rats, suggesting that cinnamon has
    the ability to potentiate insulin function by normalizing
    insulin signaling, leading to improved uptake of glucose into
    skeletal muscle.8

    Until recently, the precise molecular
    structure of the bioactive compounds in cinnamon had not been
    clearly defined. The USDA has now determined that the bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon are water-soluble procyanidin Type-A
    polymers of catechin and epicatechin. In a 2004 study, type-A
    polymers were isolated from cinnamon and characterized by
    nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Type-A
    polymers were found to increase in vitro insulin activity by a
    factor of 20. Type-A polymers also exhibited antioxidant
    activity, as measured by inhibition of free radical production
    in platelets. These results suggest that, in addition to
    regulating glucose metabolism, cinnamon may help protect cell
    membranes by controlling the lipid peroxidation associated with
    disruptions in insulin function.9

    HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS

    The effect of cinnamon on glucose and blood lipids
    levels on people with type 2 diabetes was tested in a recent
    randomized, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 60 subjects
    were divided into six groups administered 1, 3, or 6 grams of
    cinnamon daily, in 500 mg capsules, or equal numbers of placebo
    capsules.

    The cinnamon or placebo capsules were consumed for
    two periods of 20 days each. Serum glucose, triglyceride,
    cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol were measured
    after 20 days, 40 days and again at the end of a 20-day wash-out
    period, during which neither cinnamon nor placebo was
    consumed.

    In all three cinnamon groups, statistically
    significant reductions in blood glucose levels occurred, with
    decreases ranging from 18 to 29 percent. Interestingly, glucose
    levels remained significantly lower after the 20-day wash-out
    period (60 days from the study start) only in the group that
    took the lowest cinnamon dose (1 gram daily). The placebo groups
    showed no significant changes.

    Decreases in triglyceride
    levels ranging from 23 to 30% were observed in all three
    cinnamon groups after 40 days. When the study ended at 60 days,
    triglyceride levels remained lower than at the study start in
    the 1 and 3 gram cinnamon groups, but not in the group taking 6
    grams daily. Cholesterol reductions also occurred with the three
    cinnamon doses, with decreases ranging from 13 to 25% that were
    maintained at the study end. For LDL, the 3 and 6 gram cinnamon
    groups showed significant reductions from 10 to 24%, while in
    the 1 gram cinnamon group, non-significant reductions occurred
    after 40 days; LDL levels continued to decrease, reaching
    statistical significance at 60 days. With respect to HDL,
    significant increases were seen only in the 3 gram cinnamon
    group after 20 days; non-significant changes occurred in the 1
    and 6 gram groups after 40 days.

    The overall results of this
    trial demonstrate that cinnamon exerts a beneficial effect on
    blood glucose and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes,
    at daily intakes of 1 gram, and that this low dose is equally
    efficacious as are the higher doses of 3 and 6
    grams.10

    Safety

    The various species of cinnamon are
    classified as GRAS (generally regarded as safe) herbs.11 The
    Botanical Safety Handbook lists cinnamomum cassia a “Class 2b”
    herb; not to be used during pregnancy.12 The water-soluble
    cinnamon extract is largely free of the lipid-soluble components
    of cinnamon most likely to be toxic at high dose of cinnamon and
    long-term consumption of the herb.9

    *This statement has not
    been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product
    is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any
    disease.

    Scientific References

    1. Manniche, L. An Ancient
    Egyptian Herbal. 1989, Austin , TX : University of Texas
    Press.

    2. Khan A, Bryden NA, Polansky MM, Anderson RA.
    Insulin potentiating factor and chromium content of selected
    foods and spices. Biol Trace Elem Res 1990;24(3):183-8.

    3.
    Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM, Anderson R. Insulin-like biological
    activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in
    vitro. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48(3):849-52.

    4. Jarvill-Taylor
    KJ, Anderson RA, Graves DJ. A hydroxychalcone derived from
    cinnamon functions as a mimetic for insulin in 3T3-L1
    adipocytes. J Am Coll Nutr 2001;20(4):327-36.

    5. Nadiv O,
    Shinitzky M, Manu H, et al. Elevated protein tyrosine
    phosphatase activity and increased membrane viscosity are
    associated with impaired activation of the insulin receptor
    kinase in old rats. Biochem J. 1998;298(Pt 2):443-50.

    6.
    Begum N, Sussman KE, Draznin B. Differential effects of diabetes
    on adipocyte and liver phosphotyrosine and phsophoserine
    phosphatase activities. Diabetes 1991;40(12):1620-9.

    7.
    Imparl-Radosevich J, Deas S, Polansky MM, et al. Regulation of
    PTP-1 and insulin receptor kinase by fractions from cinnamon:
    implications for cinnamon regulation of insulin signalling. Horm
    Res 1998;50:177-182.

    8. Qin B, Nagasaki M, Ren M, et al.
    Cinnamon extract (traditional herb) potentiates in vivo
    insulin-regulated glucose utilization via enhanced insulin
    signaling in rats. Diabetes Res Clin Pract
    2003;62(3):139-48.

    9. Anderson R, Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM,
    et al. Isolation and characterization of polyphenol type-A
    polymers from cinnamon with insulin-like biological activity. J
    Agric Food Chem 2004; 52(1):65-70.

    10. Khan A, Safdar S,
    Muzaffar M, et al. Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of
    people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care
    2003;26(12):3215-18.

    11. Duke, JA. Handbook of Phytochemical
    Constituents of GRAS Herbs and Other Economic Plants. 1992. Boca
    Raton, FL: CRC Press.

    12. Botanical Safety Handbook. American
    Herbal Products Association. McGuffin M, et al., eds. 1997; Boca
    Raton , FL : CRC Press.

    Acting as a biochemical
    "super-thiamin," it does this through several different cellular
    mechanisms, as discussed below.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=565)


    Supports Healthy Blood Sugar Levels-Herbally
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 05, 2005 10:18 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Supports Healthy Blood Sugar Levels-Herbally

  • Supports Healthy Blood Sugar Levels-Herbally
  • Ancient Spices for Modern health
  • Weight Loss & Lean Muscle Mass- An Important Key to Increased Insulin Sensitivity

  • Supports Healthy Blood Sugar Levels-Herbally

    The introduction of refined sugars into the modern diet has had tremendous negative health consequences on world health. For example, diabetes, especially insulin-independent diabetes (Type 2), is growing rapidly in the United States particularly among children. This type is partly due to the inability of insulin to effectively transport sugar to receptor sites and into cells, where the sugar can be metabolized. Instead of being "burned up," sugar builds in the blood, creating a potentially serious health problem. This inefficiency can occur for a number of reasons, including: insufficient insulin production due to pancreas dysfunction (though many Type 2 diabetics produce excess insulin); the inability of insulin to carry sugar to receptor sites; a defect in the insulin; or a defect in the receptor that does not allow for the sugar to be transported through the cell membrane. Even if one does not have diabetes, it is important to maintain healthy blood sugar levels through proper diet, exercise, and weight management. This is especially important in children who were recently found to obtain 14% of their daily calories from sweet drinks (sodas), overtaking white bread as the primary source of total daily caloric intake. Regardless of the reason, a number of botanicals, in addition to key lifestyle recommendations, have been shown in modern research to support healthy blood sugar levels by enhance sugar metabolization. (cinnamomum aromaticum syn. C. cassia*) is one botanical that has been shown to have a positive effect on potentiating the effects of insulin.

    *The study referrd to the material used as cinnamomum cassia. The officially accepted botanical nomenclature has changed and is now cinnamomum aromaticum.

    Ancient Spices for Modern health

    Spices have been used historically to increase metabolism, raise body heat (thermogenesis), improve digestion and assimilation, and potentiate the effects of other substances. For this reason, in many herbal traditions, small amounts of hot pungent spices were added to many traditional compounds. Regarding sugar metabolization, a study by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) looked at the potential effects of 49 spices on insulin function (Broadhurst et al. 2000). These researchers found that cinnamon was the most bioactive in directly stimulating cellular glucose metablosim, i.e. the ability of cells to utilize sugar. The same researchers followed up with constituent studies and determined that it was water-soluble compunds in the extract that had this insulin-potentiating effect. This was followed by a clinical trial (60 subjects), also with involvement of the USDA, on the effects of cinnamon for potentiating insulin. The equivalent of 1, 3, and 6 grams (g) of cinnamon powder (approximately 1/4 to 1.5 teaspoons) reduced blood glucose levels 18-29% in 40 days (Khan et al. 2003).

    There was a significant increase in efficency between the 1 and 3 g doses, but an insignificant increase between the 3 and 6 g doses. One mechanism of action that has been postulated is that cinnamon increases the activity of PI-3 kinase, an enzyme that is critical in regulating the ability of glucose to be transported into the cell, where it can be utilized as energy. In addition to its ability to potentiate insulin, the cinnamon also supported healthy triglyceride and cholesterol levels, both important health benefits in general.

    There is an additional benefit of using cinnamon for many Americans; like many spices it is a potent thermogenic agent. This means it can be used as a healthy adjunct to a weight loss program that includes dietary modification and proper exercise. The excessive consumption of simple sugars in conjunction with poor diet and sedentary lifestyles can cause unhealthy blood sugar levels while providing themogenic support can have long-lasting health benefits.

    There have been a number of popular articles on the recent studies. This had led some to ask if crude cinnamon powder can be used with the same effect and safety. This has not been tested. As with all spices, cinnamon is rich in essential oils. Essential oils have beneficial effects, but the insulin-potentiating effect was found to occur in the water extract. This would suggest that many of the oil soluble compunds were lost in the processing. Also, essential oils can be stimulating and irritating, one of the reasons they are generally used in small amounts as flavoring agents. Therefore, it would be best to look for products that contain the water extract to ensure you are delivering the preparation that most closely reflects the preparation used in the studies.

    Weight Loss & Lean Muscle Mass- An Important Key to Increased Insulin Sensitivity

    Maintaining healthy weight and increasing lean body mass are key components in the supporting healthy blood sugar levels. Recently it was reported that only two days of inactivity resulted in a decreased level of insulin sensitivity. Therefore, supporting healthy blood sugar levels is extremely important for those wanting to maintain a healthy lifestyle. In obesity, or in those with a significantly higher percentage of body fat over lean muscle (body mass index greater that 25), it is very difficult for insulin to do its job effectively. The reason is quite simple: fat cells can prevent insulin from actually reaching insulin receptor sites; the fat physically blocks the receptor, and the sugar that should have been burned off through cellular function remains in the blood. It is important to know that, in such cases, there is often nothing at all wrong with the pancreas (the insulin-producing organ), the insulin, or the receptor sites. The fat simply prevents insulin and sugar from reaching their target. In many cases, people are over-producing insulin in an attempt to get more sugar to the receptor sites. After awhile, the pancreas can become exhausted and no longer produce adequate amounts of insulin. Therefore, a primary therapy for supporting healthy blood sugar levels is proper weight management through diet and exercise.

    References

    Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM, Anderson RA. 2000. Insulin-like biological activity of culinary and medicinal plant extracts in vitro. J agric Good Chem. 48(3):849-852. Khan A, Safdar M, Khan M, Khan K, Anderson R. 2003. Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of people with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 26912):3215-3218.

    Roy Upton is trained in Western and traditional Chinese herbalism, and has been a professional herbalist for 18 years. He is past president and current vice-president of the American Herbalists Guild (AHG) and is also executive director and editor of the American Herbal Pharnacopoeia. an organization dedicated to the development of authoritative monographs on botanicals used in supplements and medicines. Roy is general manager of Planetary Formulas and a memeber of the Standards Committee of the American Herbal Products Association. He is the author of several books, including St. John's Wort and Echinacea in the Keats Publishing Good Herb Series and co-author of the Botancial Safety Handbook, published by CRC Press. Roy lectures and writes extensively.

    Disclaimer: The above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider. The information in this article has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.



    --
    Vitanet ®


    Also try: Now Vitamins brand for low priced vitamins!

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=547)


    Kal - Vanadyl Complex now with Cinnamon Bark for Blood sugar
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 01, 2005 03:07 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Kal - Vanadyl Complex now with Cinnamon Bark for Blood sugar

    Cinnamon May Help Lower Blood Sugar!

    Kal Vanadyl Complex

    Vanadyl Complex - Dietary supplement contains Cinnamon Plus a variety of natural ingredients intended to provide nutritive support for normal, healthy blood glucose, and glycogen synthesis. The formula Contains:


    450mg of GFT-Plex Proprietry Blend - made up of natural enzymes and antioxidants that may naturally assist the body in healthy glucose regulation:

  • Cinnamon Bark (cinnamomum Verum) - comes from the Ceylon cinnamon variety (cinnamomum Zeylanicum), also known as "True" cinnamon, which is said to have the finest and most delicate flavors and oils of cinnamon varieties. The bark contains oligomers and other compounds that are belived to help assist glucos utilization.

  • Bay Leaf (Laurus Nobilus) - possesses powerful antioxidants that may provide nutritive support for healthy glucose oxidation.

  • Clover Flowers (Syzgium Aromaticum) - Thought to contain more antioxidant capacity than any other food. Also belived to help support glucos oxidation and contains certain phenolic compounds that may help provide nutritive support for healthy glucose metabolism.

    100mg Vitamins C (as ascorbic Acid) - a water soluble nutrient that may help support carbohydrate metabolism and healthy blood glucose levels.

    50 mcg Chromium (as Chromium Picolinate) - an essential micromineral that may also help provide nutritive support for healthy carbohydrate metabolism.

    10mg Vanadyl Sulfate - the salt of the mineral vanadium that may support glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=544)



  • VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.