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How does Vitamins B Complex Work on Skin and Hair? Darrell Miller 1/17/18
What Are the Health Benefits Of Pure Natural Jojoba Oil? Darrell Miller 3/27/12
The Essential Woman - Beauty and Balance from Within Darrell Miller 8/13/05
Mane Attraction - lustrous Hair... Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Centering Your Heart Darrell Miller 6/13/05



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How does Vitamins B Complex Work on Skin and Hair?
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Date: January 17, 2018 03:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How does Vitamins B Complex Work on Skin and Hair?





B complex vitamins can solve many skin problems and help make hair healthy and lustrous. B complex includes Niacin (B3), Pyridoxine (B6), Biotin (B7), Folic Acid (B9) and Cobalamin (B12). These vitamins have been found to decrease or prevent eczema, hyper-pigmentation, acne, skin cancer, premature aging, vitilago, and dandruff. Hair follicle size also increases due to B complex. All of the B complex vitamins are present in a healthy diet containing a variety of fruits and vegetables. Where diet is lacking, B complex supplements can be used and are taken by millions of people. There are many health benefits not related to hair and nails that B complex provides. Be sure to get B complex vitamins daily to look and feel your best.

Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamin B is well known for helping people grow stronger hair. Prevent dull and damaged hair by taking the right assortment of vitamins.
  • Both young and old people could benefit from taking Vitamin B themselves. Find the vitamin in stock through various stores across the country.
  • Do the research and be ready to use Vitamin B consistently as well. People have noticed immediate results when they started taking the vitamin.

"Dull, hair fall, lifeless hair and receding hairlines are problems that plague not only older people but also the youth of today."

Read more: http://www.natural-health-news.com/how-does-vitamins-b-complex-work-on-skin-and-hair/

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What Are the Health Benefits Of Pure Natural Jojoba Oil?
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Date: March 27, 2012 07:29 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Are the Health Benefits Of Pure Natural Jojoba Oil?

Jojoba Oil

This is oil which is produced by the seeds of mature jojoba shrubs and it resembles liquid wax depending on whether the oil has been refined or the oil has not been refined. Jojoba oil is rich in very many compounds and substances which make it a very useful oil in and/or on the body for both external and internal uses. The following are health benefits of jojoba oil:-

As a skin moisturizer; jojoba oil in its composition, it is almost similar to the human skin sebum. This makes it a very important oil as it is easily accepted by the skin without necessarily causing any reactions or breakouts which is very common with some other oils. This works very well on those people who have oily skins as the oil helps in balancing the sebum on the skin.This will help in moisturizing skins which are dry and finally help in controlling the production of oil in those individuals who have very oily skins. The oil can be applied on the skin by mixing one or two drops of the oil with any type of moisturizer that on uses then apply it on the skin or it can be applied sparingly on its own. This will clear flakiness of the skin and ultimately improve on its appearance which is always desirable.

Lip balm; jojoba oil is a very important product when it comes to dry lips since it has got many ingredients such as come do genic which will help dried and chapped lips. Small amounts of this oil can be applied on the lips as an alternative to many mouth palms which are available in the market and may be very expensive. Jojoba oil can be applied either during the day or at night to combat dryness.

Hair conditioner; jojoba oil can be used as an air conditioner in improving the shininess of hair. This oil is usually mixed with the conditioner that one uses and then used in cleaning the hair or it can be used on its own by applying some of it on dump air before the hair can be blowdried. This will make hair that was frizzy and dull to become shinny and lustrous which is very desirable in any hair.

Massage oil; jojoba oil can be used in massage hand in hand with any type of oil which slips easily. This will make the whole exercise more enjoyable and will give better results. This oil can be used after taking a shower or a bath as it will always leave the skin hydrated which is very desirable.

Internal Uses of jojoba oil

Cough prevention; jojoba oil is rich in antioxidants and other properties which make it an essential oil when it comes to coughs. By taking small amounts of this oil more especially with honey, it will help in preventing coughs. It can also help in prevention of smoker's cough which may be undesirable and unsightly.

Weight loss; jojoba oil can be used in food preparations and when used and taken, it initiates the breakdown of fats in the body which ultimately leads to weight loss.

Jojoba oil can also be used in the treatment of stomach ulcers and relieving one from constipation without causing any diarrhea.

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The Essential Woman - Beauty and Balance from Within
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Date: August 13, 2005 02:25 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Essential Woman - Beauty and Balance from Within

The Essential Woman - Beauty and Balance from Within

Outward Beauty is a reflection of inner health. Radiant glowing skin, lustrous hair, and strong nails are signs of vibrant inner health. Feminizing hormones, delicately balanced, provide freedom from monthly or midlife female discomforts and beauty in full bloom. The Essential Woman is derived from seeds of botanical flowers such as evening primrose and flax, as well as special plant phyto-nutrients, all recognized for their beautifying and balancing qualities.

Hallmarks of The Essential Woman:

  • -Designed specifically to exceed the health and beauty needs of today’s woman

  • -Supports the healthy structure and function of the female hormonal system

  • -Provides nature’s most honored internal moisturizers

  • -Ideal for all women of all ages

    The Essential Woman is available in liquid and capsules, and can be found in finer health food stores nationwide.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Mane Attraction - lustrous Hair...
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    Date: June 14, 2005 08:19 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Mane Attraction - lustrous Hair...

    Mane Attraction by Chrystle Fiedler Energy Times, February 12, 2004

  • The Nature of Hair
  • Hair's Natural Nutrients
  • Ancient Chinese Hair Secrets
  • Revive Hair Glow
  • Go Natural
  • Everyone wants thick, lustrous hair. Think of the allure attached to the locks of Samson and Lady Godiva and-fast-forward to the present-the full heads of Antonio Banderas and Julia Roberts.

    " We're naturally attracted to hair as humans; it catches the light, it frames the face, we like the feel of it," says Catherine Jones, ND, LAc, a resident naturopathic physician at Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Seattle, Washington. "Fair or not, historically in many cultures, rich, thick hair has been a sign of fertility and strength."

    Along with that allure, latching onto natural ways to have great-looking hair gives you the benefits of looks and health. Every hair starts with a shaft that grows from a root. "The root is contained deep within the hair follicle," says Dr. Jones. "Each one has a sebaceous or oil gland, which supplies the hair with necessary lubrication as it approaches the surface of the scalp." Each hair follicle has its own growth cycle, including a resting period, the telogen phase, when hair falls out. Because of these constant hair phases, each of us loses, on average, about 100 hairs a day.

    " The number of hairs the average person loses in a day tends to increase in the fall as the leaves fall from the tree and tends to decrease in the spring as the bulbs emerge from the soil," Dr. Jones says. "We really are connected to nature." Stress-due to rapid weight loss, infection, anemia, prolonged illness, hormonal changes, hypoactive thyroid disease, autoimmune conditions, eczema or psoriasis-can influence hair growth and loss.

    The Nature of Hair

    Hair consists of proteins, lipids (fats), carbohydrates and pigment (gray hair has reduced pigment; white, none at all). Each shaft's structure is divided into a medulla, a cortex and an outer cuticle. " The cuticle is coated with an outside lipid-like layer, which protects the hair," says Dr. Jones. "As the hair grows out of the follicle, the cortex and cuticle become keratinized and harden." Dry or damaged hair is more susceptible to breakage. "The condition of the cuticle affects how the light reflects off the hair, giving it highlights and luster," Dr. Jones says. "Luster is affected both by what occurs inside the body as the hair is developing and what happens to the hair after it has grown from the shaft."

    Sun, heat, moisture, pollution and hair products, dyes and bleaches can all dull the hair. "Applying chemical solutions to the hair, color, permanent waves or curl relaxers, damage the protein molecules that wrap around the shaft, leaving hair brittle and dull," says Christina Pirello, author of Glow: A Prescription for Radiant Health and Beauty (HP Books).

    Conditioners and oils can leave a residue or weigh hair down. Hair sprays and products that contain alcohol can dry and damage the hair, as can using blow dryers and curling irons.

    Hair's Natural Nutrients

    To combat hair-raising havoc, feed your hair natural nutrients for health. Silica and plants that contain silica/silicon both strengthen hair and promote growth. "Silica is a good mineral for hair health," says Walter Siegordner, founder of The Aurora Group, a personal care company. "It helps in the keratinization process of the cells that produce hair."

    " Silica is a mineral that is involved in the synthesis of bone and connective tissue," adds Dr. Jones. "The hair follicle contains connective tissue so silica may promote the health and function of the follicle itself." Silica-containing herbs include nettles (Urtica dioica), horsetail (Equisetum arvense), oatstraw (Avena sativa) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    Sea plants like seaweed and kelp also provide vital nutrients. "Sea plants are essential ingredients in many natural shampoos and can be used to fortify damaged hair," says Pirello. "They're rich in vitamin A that prevents the build-up of dead skin cells, which can clog the hair follicles, inhibiting the growth and health of the hair, and also contain vitamin B, linked to the prevention of oily hair, baldness and dandruff. Calcium found in sea plants is essential to the structure of the hair shaft."

    Eaten on s daily basis, sea plants are rich in nutrients that help maintain healthy, shiny hair, free of split ends, Pirello says. Try wakame in soups and salads, kombu or kelp in bean and vegetable dishes, nori in sushi, and hiziki and arame as side dishes. Since hair health is affected by digestive health, the fiber found in whole grains also helps. "Fiber prevents accumulation in the intestines that can result in the formation of toxins," says Pirello.

    Miso, she adds, is especially good hair food. It "is rich in living enzymes that ease digestion, fortify the quality of the blood nourishing the body and hair, and provide us with essential oils, vitamins and minerals."

    Key nutritional support includes adequate protein and amino acids, essential fatty acids such as cold-pressed flax seed oil and fish oil, copper, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin D, biotin, iron and vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid). Zinc and selenium can help combat the effects of hyperthyroidism, which can result in thinning, lackluster hair.

    Vitamin C can boost adrenal health. "When the adrenals are overtaxed and become fatigued, hair follicles will go into a resting phase," says Dr. Jones. (If you have a medical condition, she adds, check with your health care practitioner first before taking supplements.)

    Ancient Chinese Hair Secrets

    In Traditional Chinese Medicine, hair is associated with the kidneys' qi, energy that originates in these organs, and with blood quality. " From the traditional Chinese perspective, excess amounts of fat, protein, dairy, sugar, alcohol and salt in the diet acidify the body, damage the Kidney qi and are not good for the hair," says Dr. Jones. A diet rich in vegetables and grains is a great way to support healthy hair. "Iron and mineral-rich foods are considered blood builders and hair tonics. Foods such as blackstrap molasses, seaweed, nettles, and the herb polygonum multiflorum (also known as He Shou Wu and Fo-Ti) have been used throughout the years. Fo-Ti has also been used to prevent graying of the hair and support the immune system."

    Revive Hair Glow

    " Hair is extremely strong but at the same time it's extremely delicate," says Barsoum Bouchar, a cosmetologist and owner of the Virtuoso Salon in Birmingham, Michigan. "Many products work against the hair texture, so the cuticle is always raised. This causes tangles and split ends. With blow dryers, chemicals, colors and styling elements, the hair is tremendously abused." If you don't have to chemically treat the hair, he says, don't.

    When replenishing the hair it's important to remember that it's composed of 97% protein and 3% moisture, says Bouchar. Shampoo cleanses the hair and removes buildup. "A moisturizer brings moisture back into the hair and smoothes the cuticle down, which is what makes hair shiny and gives it bounce. The one key ingredient in both shampoo and moisturizers is aloe vera. It heals the hair." " Avoid products with harsh surfactants like sodium laurel sulfate and propylene glycol," warns Siegordner. "These decrease the circulation in the scalp, reducing the pathway for nutrition to the hair bulb." Conditioners that aren't natural can also cause build-up. "When you apply heat to the hair through blow drying or styling, you end up 'burning' the hair," says Bouchar.

    To stimulate hair growth, add a few drops of essential oils of rosemary, lavender and thyme to jojoba and almond oils, and rub into the scalp. Leave it overnight and then rinse it off. " Essential oils have antimicrobial and antifungal properties, stimulate the circulation to the hair follicles and combat dryness. They also smell good," says Dr. Jones.

    For hair that's not chemically treated, "a vinegar rinse cleanses the hair, removes build-up and boosts shine," says Bouchar. Use one part vinegar to ten parts water, apply after a shampoo, comb though and rinse it off. To naturally lighten the hair, use the same ratio in a lemon rinse for five minutes for, say, four days in a row, and then stop.

    If you want to color your hair, choose natural elements, too. "The best natural dye is henna," says Bouchar. "It's organic, just like hair is." Blonde hair becomes warmer with a coppery tone, brunette hair takes on a mahogany hue, gray hair looks like highlights.

    Go Natural

    To find a good natural hair stylist, Bouchar suggests asking which products they use and why. If your hair is chemically treated, it's especially important to work with a stylist you trust for the best care.

    Keep your eye on the big picture when it comes to hair health. "Be proactive and treat the body holistically," urges Dr. Jones. "Nourish the glands, the organs and the vessels that are responsible for getting the necessary nutrients to the hair follicle. Pay attention to the physical, emotional and mental aspects of health. Once hair is lost it may come back but it will likely be thinner than it was before. It's important to take care of what you have."



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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    Centering Your Heart
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    Date: June 13, 2005 10:15 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Centering Your Heart

    Centering Your Heart by Lisa James Energy Times, January 4, 2004

    The romantic view of the human heart conjures up vivid images: The gallant lover, the committed enthusiast, the wise sage. When the romantic philosophy speaks of the heart, it speaks of things that lie at the very center of what it means to be human.

    Western medical science, though, views the heart as a biomechanical pump-marvelously engineered to be sure, but a physical device amenable to surgical and pharmaceutical tinkering.

    Between romance and technology lies the Eastern path. Eastern medical traditions, including Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and India's Ayurveda, see the heart as a seat of energy that must be kept in right relationship with the rest of the body.

    TCM: Yin, Yang and Qi

    The two great polarities of yin and yang are always shifting and rebalancing, according to Chinese philosophy, in our bodies as in everything else. Yin is dark, inward, cold, passive and downward; yang is light, outward, warm, active and upward.

    The energy that keeps us alive is called qi, or life force. Organs, including the heart, are seen as places where qi resides. Organs supply and restrain each other's qi, which flows along carefully mapped meridians, or channels. Disease occurs when disturbances in qi interrupt the flow of energy so that an organ experiences either a deficiency or excess of yin/yang.

    Circulatory Disturbances

    According to Chinese precepts, disturbances in the heart affect the whole body. "The movement of the blood throughout the body, TCM circulation, is managed by multiple organs, which in turn interact with one another. A failure in any one part of this system can result in pathology," says Jonathan Simon, LAc, an acupuncture expert in private practice and at the Mind-Body Digestive Center, in New York.

    "If there's a circulation issue, all the organ systems are going to be deprived of the nourishment supplied by the blood. The heart seems to have a dramatic effect on everything else in the body," says Ross Rosen, JD, LAc, CA, MSTOM, Dipl AC & CH (NCCAOM), of The Center for Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine P.A. in Westfield, New Jersey.

    Connecting the Dots

    While Western medicine probes the heart's physical functioning, TCM searches for energy imbalances by looking for patterns in a person's complaints.

    "The wrong approach, in my opinion, is to try to relieve a Western ailment before you have established the proper pattern," Simon notes. "For example, I once had a 20-year-old, slim patient who came to me complaining of hypertension. She had seen several other acupuncturists before she got to my clinic, all of whom had prescribed the number-one formula for hypertension in TCM. When I interviewed her, I discerned a very different pattern from the classic one for hypertension. I gave her the formula associated with her pattern, not her symptom, and she had great relief over the next three weeks. After consultation with her Western physician, she began to cut back on her medication, and is now off of her meds."

    TCM emphasizes taking a thorough medical history and using a sophisticated pulse-taking technique called the shen hammer method. Rosen calls pulse "the blueprint of one's health."

    Root Causes

    As in conventional Western medicine, TCM sees diet as a major culprit in heart disease. "Poor diet will cause problems depending upon on the constitution of the person," explains Simon. "For example, if one eats an excess of greasy and spicy food, that may build up and generate excess heat in the body. That may manifest itself as someone with a quick temper, red face and high blood pressure. On the other hand, a vegetarian who eats only salads may have low energy, a sallow complexion and low blood pressure. I try to tell my patients to keep balance in their diets, but to avoid cold, raw and greasy foods."

    TCM also sees unsettled emotions as a source of illness. Stress "creates stagnation in qi and in the blood, eventually," Rosen says. "When stagnation is long or severe, heat starts being produced. We say that heat goes into the blood and steams the body, and heat starts to dry out the vessels. This process winds up turning into atherosclerosis-it kind of vulcanizes the vessel wall. It deprives the vessel of its moisture, which deprives it of its elasticity. Blood pressure starts to increase."

    Managing one's emotions and not overworking body or mind is key, says Rosen: "The heart houses the spirit, the shen. When we see people with imbalances in emotion, the spirit starts to become agitated; once the spirit becomes agitated, the whole heart system goes out of balance."

    Signs of agitation include insomnia, anxiety and an inability to feel joy, along with chest pain and heart palpitations. TCM uses nutrition, herbs and acupuncture to bring the body back into balance.

    Ayurveda: Constitutional Energies

    Like TCM, Ayurveda sees health as a matter of balancing the subtle energies that power our bodies. In Ayurveda, these energies exist as three doshas, or basic constitutions:

    * Vata is cold, dry, light, clear and astringent. The skin of vata individuals is generally dry, thin, dark and cool, with hair that's curly, dark and coarse. Vatas change their minds readily and crave warmth.

    * Pitta is sharp, light, hot, oily and pungent. Pitta people tend to have skin that's soft, fair, warm and freckled, along with fine, fair hair. Quick-witted, pittas hold strong convictions. They prefer coolness, since they tend to perspire profusely.

    * Kapha is cold, heavy, oily, slow and soft. Kapha skin is pale, cold and thick, and kapha hair, which is usually brown, is thick and lustrous. Stable and compassionate, kaphas don't like the cold.

    Few people are one, pure dosha. Most contain varying levels of vata, pitta and kapha (abbreviated VPK), generally with one predominating.

    Doshas Unbalanced

    Ayurveda views the heart as "governing emotions and circulating blood," according to Sophia Simon, MS, LAc, of the Karma Healing Center in Newtown, Pennsylvania. In Ayurveda "heart problems arise mainly due to improper diet and stressful lifestyles," which causes a "derangement of vata dosha. This leads to thickening of the arteries, resulting in angio-obstruction."

    "Stress reduction is very important in heart disease," says Simon. "Meditation helps a lot with stress reduction, especially simple breathing exercises, yoga, etc." Some of Simon's recommendations have a familiar ring: Don't smoke, do exercise, eat a plant-based, low-fat diet. In addition, she says you should:

    * Avoid coffee and other beverages that contain caffeine.

    * Be loving and compassionate to all mankind.

    * Do things in a casual way. Speak softly. Avoid anger, especially holding anger for a long time.

    * Indulge in healthy, whole-hearted laughter.

    In addition, Simon notes that garlic is an Ayurvedic herb "most useful for heart problems.

    Keep your balance: In the great Eastern healing traditions, it is the key to keeping your heart healthy.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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