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Cancer fighter found in broccoli

old message Cancer fighter found in broccoli Darrell Miller 07/27/05


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Date: July 27, 2005 10:05 AM
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Subject: Cancer fighter found in broccoli

Remember when your mother told you to eat your broccoli? Research shows that mother just might know best. In a recently published paper, Dr. Paul Talalay of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine indicates that studies in his lab show broccoli is rich in sulforaphane, a chemical that works as a powerful anti-cancer compound in laboratory mice.

Other studies have shown that a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables—which include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and others— can significantly reduce the risk of cancer of the bowel, stomach and breast. Until now, the exact reasons why these vegetables had this effect we re not very clear. Until now, that is. According to Dr. Talalay, it appears that at least one anticancer ingredient in the vegetables is sulforaphane, which essentially causes cells to expel cancer-causing toxins. In addition, Dr. Talahay said that this study was the first to show that a high-potency compound isolated from vegetables could accelerate the detoxification process in cells.

The published report outlines how the research team isolated sulforaphane from broccoli, then fed it to a group of mice. When cells in the mice we re examined after five days, the scientists found that the chemical had triggered enzymes known to neutralize carcinogens within cells. Be yond this study, Dr. Talalay indicates that research will shift to the long-term effects of the chemical. “Our prediction is that sulforaphane will block tumor formation in animals and presumably in man.” In earlier studies, Dr. Talalay and others have shown that certain proteins in cells, called phase I enzymes, can take innocent chemicals and turn them into cancer-causing agents.

Other proteins, called phase 2 enzymes, tend to block formation of carcinogens. According to the study, sulforaphane is a potent activator of phase 2 enzymes. The Hopkins researchers will conduct tests to determine how much broccoli must be consumed to establish an effective anti-cancer level of sulforaphane in cells.

Over a decade of research has been done on cruciferous vegetables and there are large databases that confirm that cruciferous vegetables substantially reduce the risk of disease, specifically cancer. Studies show substances in these vegetables that have anti-cancer properties which cause the body to speed up production of enzymes, therefore being capable of neutralizing cancer agents. The studies also show these pre vent damage to our DNA and slow the aging process. In women, metabolic processes are regulated which eliminate the bad (and maintain the good) estrogen, therefore substantially reduce the risk of breast cancer. Shortly after the NCI study was released, John Hopkins School of Medicine revealed similar studies.



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