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  Messages 1-9 from 9 matching the search criteria.
Propolis: The Miraculous Healing Medicine of Antiquity Darrell Miller 5/16/22
Eating more antioxidant-rich foods can reduce your risk of kidney cancer by 32% Darrell Miller 3/14/19
5 ways to relieve period cramps naturally Darrell Miller 7/16/17
Refreshement With A Raw Food Diet Darrell Miller 10/25/16
One plants broad based attack against cancer Darrell Miller 8/16/16
Home on the Range Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Keeping Your Edge - The state of your outer body reflects the inner you. Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Certified Foods Darrell Miller 6/12/05
Herbs in Perspective Darrell Miller 6/10/05



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Propolis: The Miraculous Healing Medicine of Antiquity
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Date: May 16, 2022 03:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Propolis: The Miraculous Healing Medicine of Antiquity

Imagine a natural medicine that is antiviral, antibacterial, and capable of Conquering chronic allergies, preventing and treating cancer, and eliminating fungal and parasitic infections. This medicine exists! It is called propolis, and it has been used as a healing remedy for centuries. We will explore the miraculous properties of propolis and how it can benefit your health!

What is propolis and where does it come from

Propolis is a resin-like substance that bees use to build and repair their hives. It is made from a variety of plant materials, including tree sap, buds, and flowers. Propolis is also known as "bee glue" because of its sticky consistency. bees collect propolis from plants and then add their own enzymes to it, which helps to cure it. Once cured, propolis is used to seal cracks in the hive and fight off bacteria and other invading organisms. Propolis also has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which is why it is often used in natural medicines.

How does propolis benefit your health

This natural substance is also rich in antioxidants, making it beneficial for human health. Numerous studies have shown that propolis can help to boost the immune system, fight inflammation, and improve gut health. Additionally, propolis has been shown to have anti-cancer properties and to be effective against a variety of infections. As a result, this unique substance can be an important part of a healthy lifestyle. While more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits of propolis, there is no doubt that this natural substance can have a positive impact on your health.

How to use propolis for good health

Propolis is a sticky substance that bees use to build and repair their hives. It is also known for its wide range of health benefits. Propolis has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, making it an effective treatment for wounds and skin conditions. It can also help to boost immune system function and fight off infection. When taken internally, propolis can help to soothe the throat and relieve congestion. In addition, propolis has been shown to have cancer-fighting properties. To get the maximum health benefits from propolis, it should be taken in capsule form or as a tincture.

Are there side effects?

Propolis can cause side effects in some people. The most common side effects include itching, redness, and swelling at the site of application. In rare cases, propolis can also cause an allergic reaction. If you experience any side effects after using propolis, discontinue use.

Propolis FAQ's

Q: Can propolis be used on open wounds?

A: Yes, propolis can be used on open wounds. It has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, which makes it an effective treatment for cuts and scrapes.

Q: How long does it take for propolis to work?

A: The time it takes for propolis to work varies depending on the condition being treated. For example, if you are using propolis to treat a skin condition, you may see results within a few days. However, if you are taking propolis to boost your immune system or fight off infection, it may take a week or two to notice any benefits.

Q: Is propolis safe for children?

A: Yes, propolis is safe for children. However, it is important to note that children may be more likely to experience side effects from propolis than adults.

Q: Can I take propolis if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

A: There is no evidence that propolis is harmful to pregnant or breastfeeding women.

As you can see, propolis has a wide range of health benefits. It is a powerful antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent, making it effective for treating wounds and skin conditions. It can also help to boost immune system function and fight off infection. When taken internally, propolis can help to soothe the throat and relieve congestion. In addition, propolis has been shown to have cancer-fighting properties. To get the most out of propolis, it is best to take it in capsule form or as a tincture.

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Eating more antioxidant-rich foods can reduce your risk of kidney cancer by 32%
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Date: March 14, 2019 02:28 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Eating more antioxidant-rich foods can reduce your risk of kidney cancer by 32%

Want to know the secret to reducing your risk of kidney cancer by 32%? It's not as difficult to conquer this secret as you might think. To reduce your risks, simply add more antioxidant rich foods to your diet. These foods are great additions to your diet and with so many choices, it is easy to eat a variety of foods that taste great and that you love that also keep you health and reduce kidney cancer risks!

Key Takeaways:

  • It has been demonstrated from research that eating foods rich in antioxidants can be a good remedy against cancer.
  • The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has reported that it is possible to cut the risk of kidney cancer by 32 percent through eating antioxidant-rich foods.
  • Anti-oxidants which are plentiful in fruits and vegetables can prevent the effects of oxidation on the cells which can lead to kidney cancer.

"Now, a new study review has shown that antioxidants are especially potent against kidney cancer."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-01-02-eating-more-antioxidant-rich-foods-can-reduce-your-risk-of-kidney-cancer-by-32.html

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5 ways to relieve period cramps naturally
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Date: July 16, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 ways to relieve period cramps naturally





For most women, there is a cyclical monthly occasion that consumes their bodies with pain and cramping. While some deal with this pharmacologically, there might be natural alternatives to menstrual symptoms. A recent article on foxnews.com provided several tips that may help relieve menstrual symptoms without turning to pills. The following recommendations were made: Fish oil and Vitamin B12 supplementation, increasing vegetable intake while reducing fats, Magnesium supplementation, exercise, and heat therapy. Of course, this article did recommend seeking a physicians advice before implementing any of these dietary or excercise recommendations.

Key Takeaways:

  • Oils and vitamins from fish, as well as a more vegetable based diet, have been shown to help the pain, as well as other symptoms.
  • Studies have shown that magnesium, through natural or supplemental sources, helps reduces period related pains.
  • Heat helps temporarily stop pain, while exercising during PMS can increase blood flow to decrease symptomatic pain.

"... what if you could relieve period cramps naturally? Some of these remedies might even help you conquer the cramps once and for all."

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/07/10/5-ways-to-relieve-period-cramps-naturally.html

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Refreshement With A Raw Food Diet
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Date: October 25, 2016 10:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Refreshement With A Raw Food Diet

You need to be feeling rejuvenated and completely ready to Conquer the world whenever you get out of bed each and every morning, yet you feel tired and cranky even with eight hours of rest. You have a tendency to feel even slower after your meals, and so you rely on coffee, soda, and energy products to keep you going. But those artificial stimulants are simply just insufficient to provide you the focus and sharpness you have to be productive and in high overall performance through the day. Even worse of all, your family, buddies, and loved ones have begun to complain that you often don't have the time, energy or mood to spend a quality moment with them. Is your insufficient strength holding you back from living a complete life?

Many reasons exist why you feel low and slow. You may either have a certain medical condition that needs diagnosis or your body may be going through several hormonal adjustments. But most people don't have a serious, underlying cause to blame for their insufficient power. Poor diet may lead to this.


The saying "you are whatever you eat" is among the most repeated yet most accurate statements you will hear about food. Try to eat foods that are too fatty, greasy, salty or loaded with too many artificial sugars and synthetic ingredients, and you'll almost certainly feel heavy, greasy, bloated or down once the artificial rush has died down. Compare that when you choose merely the most healthy, freshest and most nourishing fruits and vegetables, and you'll most likely feel healthy, fresh and nourished right after the meal.

Eating organic, whole foods in their raw state is considered the easiest, most natural and most valuable choice if you would like to rejuvenate your energy, enjoy several health benefits and live a richer, longer life. While a raw food lifestyle isn't for everybody, you can still take advantage of the basic principles of this particular diet plan and make a few adjustments that can have a very positive influence on your overall health and well-being. Some individuals accomplish this by including additional raw food recipes in their daily menu or making vegetables and fruits an important part of their dietary plan. Other people choose to make the full transformation by progressively switching to an exclusively raw food lifestyle.

As with most life-changing decisions, the initial step is to get appropriate details and expert guidance to show you the way. Choose an energy plan created for real people, and see genuine results in just a matter of time.

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One plants broad based attack against cancer
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Date: August 16, 2016 02:41 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: One plants broad based attack against cancer

There are a multitude of ways cancer cells can form,  lets look at a few ways and discuss them.

Epigenetics: A process that controls the behavior of genes.  Dietary and lifestyle choices can alter the way our genes work. Exposure to toxins can cause protective genes to goto sleep and allow destructive genes to awaken all due to the way we eat and live.  When this happens, disease can start.

Apoptosis: known as the programed life cycle of cells.  this natural cycle can be interrupted and when this happens, the cell does not die as intended, old and genetically damaged cells form tumors.

Angiogenesis: damaged cancer cells need nutrients and oxygen to survive.  Some cancers are able to form their own network of blood vessels.

Cancer Stem Cells: these are super cancer cells that can remain dormant for years which eventually activate and causes cancer to recur.

Cancer is a very complex disease, todays anti-cancer drugs are designed to address only one single pathway or gene with in cancer cells.  Since cancer is a complex network of hundreds of genes and pathways, conventional drugs are very unlikely to be effective in the end. 

Since a large majority of the drugs are designed around natural plants and their function, it would stand to reason that taking the natural plant would not only be effective but have zero side effects. 

Fortunately, we have a plant that has been validated by thousands of scientific studies.  This plant compound is called curcumin. 

  • Curcumin has shown positive results for virtually every disease it has been research and studied.
  • Curcumin is a strong anti-inflammatory plant and is also a strong antioxidant actually the highest of any food gram for gram.
  • Curcumin's anti-cancer properties make it unique and make it the ideal plant compound to Conquer literally every type of cancer and many other chronic diseases.
  • Curcumin attacks cancer from many directions known as multi-targeting, making it more effective than drugs that are currently being used.
  • Preventative treatment is also preferable.  A healthy diet and lifestyle are scientifically proven to prevent and reduce cancer.  Curcumin should be one plant compound everybody should be consuming to prevent cancer and many other disease.
  • Curcumin can be used in conjunction with conventional medicine to further boost healing in individuals who suffer from various diseases.

If you are somebody you know is suffering from cancer, you should seriously consider taking curcumin or telling family members about this wonderful plant compound.




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Home on the Range
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Date: June 13, 2005 03:52 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Home on the Range

Home on the Range

by Janis Jibrin, RD Energy Times, September 5, 1999

Got chicken? Americans can't seem to get enough of this bird. Last year each of us ate, on average, just about 80 pounds of chicken, a whopping increase over the 49 pounds we each devoured in 1980 and an eight-pound increase from 1995. Part of this food's popularity comes from its lean image as a healthier, less fatty alternative to red meat (don't forget to take the fatty skin off). Chicken's also a cheap protein source: At many popular supermarkets you'll find weekly specials at about a dollar a pound.

But at health food markets, chicken can cost upwards of $1.69 a pound. These birds may be touted as raised in an organic, stress-free environment and on a vegetarian diet, free of antibiotics. For many people, this poultry is a better buy.

The Alternative Chicken

Most of the supermarket chicken you pick up in grocery refrigerated cases are broilers, birds bred to mature in about eight weeks. In comparison, in the '60s, chickens needed 14 weeks to become adult poultry. Conventionally-raised broilers eat grain mixed with whatever's cheapest on the market, such as recycled cooking oil that's been used to fry fast foods and animal parts.

These birds reside in chicken coops the size of football fields and don't see the light of day until transported to the slaughterhouse. On the other roost, alternatively raised chickens are brought up in a variety of ways (see box), but usually enjoy a more relaxed life and diet.

Chickens on the farm receive antibiotics for two reasons: To fight off the diseases that can run rampant through a crowded chicken coop and to encourage faster growth.

Antibiotics Stimulate Growth

Mark Cook, PhD, professor of animal science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, explains, "Gut bacteria trigger an immune system assault, which makes chickens a little feverish, suppresses appetite and slows growth. Antibiotics stimulate growth indirectly, by keeping bacteria levels down, and preventing the immune reaction." When birds get sick, they often get dosed with even more antibiotics.

This widespread antibiotic use has come home to roost and may contribute to the growth of bacteria that, frequently exposed to chemicals, have evolved ways to keep from being killed by pharmaceuticals.

This development threatens human health. Bacterial infections that people contract, once easily cured by penicillin or other drugs, are now tougher to eradicate. For instance, campylobactor, a common bacteria found in chicken, and responsible for some food poisonings, now demonstrates signs of resistance to drugs like floroquinolones. A powerful class of antibiotics, floroquinolones used to dependably Conquer this infection.

"Floroquinolones are an extremely important class of antibiotics, used to treat many types of infections such as urinary tract infection, a wide variety of gastrointestinal illnesses, pneumonia, almost everything," says Kirt Smith, DVM, PhD, epidemiologist, acute disease epidemiology section, Minnesota Department of Health.

A study by Dr. Smith, published in the New England Journal of Medicine (340, 1999: 1525-32), showed that the percent of floroquinolone-resistant campylobactor appearing in infected people in his state-Minnesota-climbed from a little over 1% in infected people during 1992 to 10.2% in 1998. He and other scientists strongly suspect that the rise is a direct consequence of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) decision to allow floroquinolones in poultry feed beginning in 1995.

Although it was nearly impossible for Dr. Smith to trace the precise origin of campylobactor poisoning, he believes chicken was usually the source-and not just U.S. chicken. Many of the infected people had returned from Mexico and other countries.

"Sales of floroquinolones for poultry use in Mexico has increased dramatically," notes Dr. Smith.

Many alternative chicken producers do not use any antibiotic-laced feed at all. Other farmers adjust the feed to lower gut pH, making it more acidic and lowering chances of bacteria. At the U. of Wisconsin, Dr. Cook is developing antibodies to suppress the immune response to bacteria so chickens won't need antibiotics to spur growth. Buying and dining on chicken raised with little or no antibiotics could beneficially lower your risk of contracting a hardy bacterial infection. Better to catch campylobactor from an antibiotic-free chicken than a conventional chicken, speculates Dr. Cook. "There's less likelihood the bug will be resistant, and a better chance your problem can be cured with antibiotics," he explains.

And, looking beyond your own immediate health risk, buying antibiotic-free chicken makes a small contribution to stopping the spread of antibiotic resistant bugs. A Matter of Taste Conventionally raised chickens get little exercise and live only eight weeks, so they're tender but bland.

"There's not much taste in a modern chicken. Free range or organically grown, older birds usually have more taste," notes Dr. Cook.

The days of barnyard chickens happily clucking and strutting around in picturesque nature have disappeared with the family farm. Today, chickens lead a meager existence. After hatching, baby chicks are tossed into a gigantic hen house that is home to up to 30,000 birds. Their short lives are lived within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) mandated 3/4 square foot per chicken. In that squeeze, birds can catch "chicken influenza," especially in winter when it's too cold to let in much fresh air.

Laying hens don't experience much more of a peaceful existence. These birds live their years with about five other hens, so crowded they can't flap their wings. Cages, suspended in the air, let eggs roll into a holding area. So they don't peck each other, hens are often debeaked, a painful process that can cause infection.

Hens go through natural laying and "dry" cycles. Growers manipulate this cycle by "forced molting," depriving hens of food for four to 14 days to keep them constantly laying. By the end of two years, hens are worn out. Their inactivity weakens their bones enough that electrical stunning, the usual method for knocking chickens out before slaughter, shatters their bones. So some wind up being plucked and boiled alive, according to Mary Finelli, program director for farm animals and public health at the Humane Society of the United States. The meat from these hens, tougher than other birds, was probably in your deli lunch sandwich. It's also used in the school lunch program or may end up in dog food.

"Generally, organically-grown broilers and hens have it better because room to move is part of the organic certification process," says Finelli. Finelli suggests visiting chicken suppliers to find out how chickens are treated. Or, she advocates a Humane Society book listing reliable firms. For a local producer call the society: 202-452-1100. According to a Consumer Report report, some growers force chickens out the last week of their lives to brand them "free range." So free range isn't a prime standard for choosing a decently raised chicken. However, turkeys thrive outdoors, so choosing free-range turkey is often a good idea for better tasting poultry.

In any case, organic is your best bet for chicken without pesticides. Make it your main choice for your 80 pound yearly consumption!

To fight cruel treatment of poultry:

• Forced Molting Ban. Forced molting is shocking hens for more eggs. To support petitions banning forced molting write: Docket Manage-ment Branch, FDA, Dept. Health & Human Serv-ices, 12420 Parklawn Drive, Room 1-23, Rock-ville, MD 20857. Include docket # 98P-0203/CP

• Downed Animal Protection Bill (House Bill 443, Senate Bill S515) spares some animals from the tortuous journey from chicken house to slaughterhouse. Mandates humane euthanization.



--
Vitanet ®

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Keeping Your Edge - The state of your outer body reflects the inner you.
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Date: June 12, 2005 05:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Keeping Your Edge - The state of your outer body reflects the inner you.

Keeping Your Edge by Carl Lowe Energy Times, December 2, 2003

If you want to keep your mental edge, better keep your physical edge. As your body goes, so goes your brain: The state of your outer body reflects the inner you.

A flabby body leads to flabby thinking. Weight gain and toneless muscles on the outside are evidence of an out-of-tune brain and thinking processes as soft around the edges as your stomach. But staying in shape physically can boost your mental powers.

As you age, one of the biggest threats to keeping your thoughts sharp is Alzheimer's disease, a progressive brain deterioration (dementia) that destroys your memory and your ability to think.

Today, about 4.5 million Americans suffer Alzheimer's disease. Over a lifetime, the average cost per person suffering this disease adds up to a staggering $175,000. Consequently, according to the Alzheimer's Association (www.alz.org), this disease drains approximately a billion dollars a year from the US economy.

Thanks to an aging population and the growing girth of Americans, the rate of Alzheimer's threatens to explode into an epidemic over the next two decades.

Experts now believe that if you are carrying around too much weight, those extra pounds puts you at a higher risk of losing your thinking abilities. And being seriously overweight greatly expands your chances of developing this debilitating type of dementia.

An 18-year study of about 400 people in Sweden, all aged 70 at the beginning of the research, concluded that your chances of suffering dementia significantly increases with every extra pound (Archives for Internal Medicine 7/03).

Cholesterol Conquers Minds

In addition to the extra risk to your thinking capacity from body fat, having high levels of cholesterol in your blood also threatens your brain's ability to reason. Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found that:

* Excess amounts of cholesterol can lead to accumulation of APP, a protein found normally in moderate amounts in both the brain and the heart.

* Excess APP linked to cholesterol can, in turn, lead to the development of larger amounts of a substance called amyloid protein.

* Pieces of amyloid protein can form plaque on the brain, destroying cells and leading to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

"Past research has shown that high cholesterol levels appear to increase APP levels, which in turn leads to increased levels of beta amyloid protein and the risk of accumulation of amyloid beta peptide," says Vassilios Papadopoulos, PhD, professor of cell biology at Georgetown. "Our research showed that high cholesterol levels also increase the rate at which the amyloid beta peptides break off and form the tangles that kill brain cells." Added to that, the Georgetown scientists have demonstrated that high cholesterol seems to cause the body to boost its production of the protein, apolipoprotein E (APOE), a chemical that normally helps take cholesterol out of cells. But when APOE accumulates, this chemical leads to an excess of free cholesterol, which kills nerve cells.

"Our study adds to the growing body of evidence implicating high cholesterol as a significant risk factor in Alzheimer's disease, and breaks new ground in showing the damage caused by excessive levels of cholesterol," says Dr. Papadopoulos.

Since high blood pressure also increases your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (BMJ 6/14/01), devoting yourself to a heart-healthy lifestyle (eating plenty of fiber, cutting back on saturated fat in red meat and avoiding trans fats in cookies and cakes) can increase your chances of keeping your wits about you as you move through life.

Brain Food

As part of that heart-healthy lifestyle that keeps your brain functioning at top capacity, experts recommend regular helpings of omega-3 fatty acids, the type of fats found in fish, flax and hemp.

In research that focused on people between the ages of 65 to 94, researchers have found that eating seafood at least once a week drops your risk of Alzheimer's by about 60% compared with folks who forego fish (Archives of Neurology 7/03).

Along with fish, the scientists recommended munching more nuts, which are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids.

In the report on the relationship between eating and Alzheimer's, Robert Friedland, MD, of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, noted: "A high antioxidant/low saturated fat diet pattern with a greater amount of fish, chicken, fruits and vegetables and less red meat and dairy products is likely to lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease, as that for heart disease and stroke."

Wake Up Your Brain

If your thinking has been fuzzy lately, take a nap.

Getting enough sleep right after you learn something new helps maintain your learning abilities, according to research at the University of Chicago. In a test of how sleep can help people remember words and language, these researchers taught students to recognize a unique vocabulary spoken by a machine. After the learning session, students were then tested on their new abilities.

The scientists found that students trained in the morning tested poorly when tested later the same evening. But when students were trained right before bedtime and then tested the next morning, their test scores soared (Nature 9/9/03).

"Sleep has at least two separate effects on learning," according to the researchers. "Sleep consolidates memories, protecting them against subsequent interference or decay. Sleep also appears to 'recover' or restore memories."

The concept of this research originated in observations of birds.

"We were surprised several years ago to discover that birds apparently 'dream of singing' and this might be important for song learning," says researcher Daniel Margoliash, professor of biology and anatomy at the University of Chicago.

While you may not dream of singing like a bird, you may dream of having a sharper intellect. Luckily, the tools for sharpening your mental powers are easy to find and put to good use: Methods for keeping your brain in shape are basically the same techniques effective for keeping your body and heart in shape.

Pleasant dreams!



--
Vitanet ®

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Certified Foods
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Date: June 12, 2005 01:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Certified Foods

Certified Foods by Glenda Olsen Energy Times, July 13, 2003

What's in your food, and where does it come from? To most American consumers, that question may seem unimportant. But the answers might surprise you. Your food's origin and processing can make a big difference in its nutritional value, for better and for worse. Increasingly, concern over the quality of food and its influence on health are persuading shoppers to take a greater interest in their food. The result: More visits to natural food stores and more sales of organic food.

Once upon a time, food used to be just food. Crops were grown on family farms, and animals were raised in barnyards. But today, corporations have Conquered food production in a big way. Agribusiness is just that-a big business in which animals and plants are treated like assembly-line items and raised on factory farms.

Organic Regulation

While the term "organic" gets tossed around endlessly in the media, the term is often misconstrued. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), "Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones."

In addition, organic farmers generally do not use pesticides, sewage sludge or synthetic fertilizers. This type of food is also produced without genetically modified organisms and is not subject to radiation used to zap the bugs on food. Today, USDA-approved certifying agents inspect the farms where organic food is raised to ensure organic standards are followed. In addition, the companies that process food and handle organic food have to be USDA-certified. Meeting these standards allows companies to use the USDA's organic label on foods that are at least 95% organic in origin. Labels for foods that contain between 70% and 95% organic content can use the words "Made With Organic Ingredients," but cannot use the seal.

Solid Nutrition

While the debate over the nutritional benefits of organic food has raged for decades, recent research is beginning to turn up evidence that organically grown fruits and vegetables may contain extra helpings of vitamins and other nutrients. A study at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri, found that organically grown oranges contain more vitamin C than conventional supermarket oranges (Great Lakes Regional Meeting, Amer Chem Soc, 6/02).

Theo Clark, PhD, the Truman State professor who investigated the organic oranges, says that when he and his students began their research, "We were expecting twice as much vitamin C in the conventional oranges" because they are larger than organic oranges. To his surprise, chemical isolation combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed that the organically grown oranges contained up to 30% more vitamin C than the conventionally grown fruits-even though they were only about half the size. "We speculate that with conventional oranges, (farmers) use nitrogen fertilizers that cause an uptake of more water, so it sort of dilutes the orange. You get a great big orange but it is full of water and doesn't have as much nutritional value," Dr. Clark says. "However, we can only speculate. Other factors such as maturity, climate, processing factors, packaging and storage conditions require consideration."

Dodging Pesticides

If you want to avoid pesticide residues in your food, research shows that going organic can make it much less likely that you or your family consumes these unwanted chemicals. Research, for instance, into the diets of children (Enviro Hlth Persp 3/03) shows that dining on organic fruits and vegetables, and organic juice, can lower kids' intake of pesticides.

These scientists took a look at the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide breakdown products in the blood of kids ages two to five who ate conventional supermarket produce and compared it with the OP found in organic kids.

The children on the organic diet had less OP in their blood than the other kids. As a matter of fact, the children on the conventional diet had six times the dimethyl metabolites, dimethyl being a pesticide suspected of affecting nerve function and growth. "Consumption of organic produce appears to provide a relatively simple way for parents to reduce their children's exposure to OP pesticides," note the researchers. "Organic foods have been growing in popularity over the last several years," says Jim Burkhart, PhD, science editor for the journal that published the study. "These scientists studied one potential area of difference from the use of organic foods, and the findings are compelling."

GMO Development

On the way to tonight's dinner, researchers have created genetically modified organisms (GMO), plants and animals that have been transgenically engineered. In the food world, that means organisms containing genes inserted from another species. Chances are if you eat food purchased at the typical supermarket, those comestibles contain GMO ingredients. In the United States, food companies are not required to label for GMO content.

A growing number of American consumers are upset about not being told about the GMO products in their food. But industry scientists, worried that informed consumers may someday turn their back on GMO foods, consider consumer ignorance to be an acceptable state of affairs.

For instance, the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) is fighting regulations that would require GMO labeling. According to ASPB President Daniel Bush, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Urbana, "The language...(in these types of regulations) is based on a system of beliefs of what is 'natural,' rather than a scientifically defined set of criteria focused on content and nutritional value. This is a radical departure from food labeling up to now, which is designed to maximize useful information for consumers concerning what is in the food they are buying."

Dr. Bush continues, "There are, of course, examples of voluntary labeling standards in the food industry that reflect how foods are processed, such as organic foods. The voluntary organic labeling standards were sought by the organic food industry. Kosher foods are also labeled as having been produced in accordance with specific beliefs. However, mandatory labeling of targeted production methods has never before been required and we believe would obscure rather than clarify important issues of food safety."

In other words, Dr. Bush opposes GMO labeling because he feels it would unnecessarily stigmatize GMO food items. Others are not so sanguine about the safety of GMO foods.

GMO Objections

The arguments against GMO foods include:

  • * The genes from GMO plants may end up in weeds and other unintended species, creating superweeds that will be difficult to eradicate. Animals, such as fish on fish farms, may interbreed with animals in the wild and cause harmful changes.

  • * People may grow ill or die from unexpected allergies to GMO foods (NEJM 1996; 334(11):688-92).

  • * GMO plants may harm other wildlife, such as butterflies, that depends on pollen from these plants (Nature May 1999; 399(6733):214).

    These types of risks have motivated industry groups to urge more regulation of GMO crops. The Food Marketing Institute, the Grocery Manufacturers of America (GMA) and the National Restaurant Association, plus seven other food groups, are worried that GMO plants grown to produce pharmaceutical drugs could contaminate the food supply and destroy consumer trust in food.

    Mary Sophos, a vice president of GMA, warns, "To minimize the possible risks, a clear system of regulatory enforcement and liability needs to be in place. Until then, no permits for new field trials or for commercialization should be issued because there is no room for trial and error."

    These food industry groups have voiced their concerns to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the USDA. Last year, the USDA forced ProdiGene Inc., a biotech firm, to dispose of 500,000 bushels of soybeans contaminated with a drug meant to treat diabetes. What are the chances of more GMO accidents? No one knows. But if you buy and eat organic, you minimize your risk and maximize your chances of dining on safer food.



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    Vitanet ®

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    Herbs in Perspective
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    Date: June 10, 2005 10:25 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Herbs in Perspective

    Herbs in Perspective by Phyllis D. Light, RH-AHG Energy Times, June 16, 2004

    "I don't claim a cure...I just try to give people some ease," noted Tommie Bass, a traditional Southern herbalist whose life has been the topic of several books, including Mountain Medicine by Darryl Patton (Natural Reader Press) and Trying to Give Ease by John Crellin and Jane Philpott (Duke University Press). That philosophy reflects the perspective embraced by herbalists for eons.

    The traditional use of herbs is incorporated into all cultures. Herbs were the first medicine and the origin of what we now call modern medicine. These plants have not been prescribed to Conquer specific illnesses but instead nourish the body and aid in building overall health.

    Traditional Knowledge

    Observation, psychological need and human instinct form the foundation of traditional herbal knowledge and use. This knowledge has been passed down through generations based on practice and experience. The result: a depth of information about the safe and effective use of herbs that spans thousands of years.

    The goal of a traditional herbalist is to bring the body into balance (homeostasis), prevent disease and support immune functioning. Unfortunately, any kind of therapeutic knowledge can be misused, and that has happened with some herbs, causing some people to question herbal medicine's safety.

    As more people turn to natural therapies, scientists have begun to perform evidence-based research into their safe and effective use. The good news is that much of this research has validated the effectiveness of herbs and supplements.

    Echinacea to the Rescue

    Do the sniffling sneezes that herald a cold have you reaching for your bottle of echinacea? If so, you are in good company. Echinacea (Echinacea spp) is one of the top-selling herbs.

    The colorful American prairie plant was extremely popular during the early 1900s, until the use of modern antibiotics relegated it to the back shelf. But a resurgence of interest in herbs propelled echinacea back into the mainstream in the second half of the twentieth century. And this herb boasts an impressive body of research and has an excellent record of safety.

    For instance, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy have found echinacea to be effective in supporting the body's defenses against upper respiratory tract infections and for reducing the duration of discomforts that accompany the common cold (Pharmacotherapy 2000; 20(6):690-7).

    Although studies have not confirmed its ability to prevent colds, echinacea is widely used by many folks for just that purpose. Researchers have found that echinacea's effectiveness may drop if you use it for eight straight weeks (Am J Health-Syst Pharm 1999; 56(2):121-2). So if you take it for a couple of months, take a couple of weeks off before using it again.

    Flower Power

    St. John's wort is another herb with ancient origins that has experienced a modern resurgence. Named after St. John the Baptist, St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is generally in bright yellow bloom around St. John's Day (June 26). According to herbalist Michael Tierra, author of The Way of Herbs (Pocket Books), St. John's wort affects the liver and the nervous system. In 1984, the German Commission E, a recognized herbal authority, approved St. John's for depressive disorders, and in topical form for acute injuries and first-degree burns.

    Modern research has reaffirmed the use of St. John's wort in the short-term treatment of mild to moderate depression (Cochrane Review Issue 2, 2004). It has also been found to be useful in premenstrual depression (Int J Psy Med 2003; 33(3):295-7). (Researchers have found that the herb may alter how the body processes some prescription medications, so check with your healthcare provider before using such medicines along with St. John's wort.)

    King of Herbs

    " Ginseng (Panax) received the lofty title, King of Herbs, due to its reputation as a tonic and its ability to stimulate the body into healing," notes herbalism writer Darryl Patton. This plant was once so popular in China that it was worth its weight in gold.

    In fact, ginseng is the popular name for two different types of ginseng, American and Korean (Panax quinquefolium and P. ginseng). Both are considered adaptogens, or substances that help the body deal with stress more effectively. And modern research has found that ginseng can be used to improve overall energy and vitality, and to help the body deal more effectively with chronic stress (J Pharm Sci 2003 Dec: 93(4):458-64).

    Researchers have found that ginseng helps boost the immune system (J Med Food 2004 Spring; 7(1):1-6). This ancient herb is also a powerful antioxidant that confers protection on the heart (Biochem Biophys Acta 2004 Feb 24; 1670(3):165-71). In other studies, ginseng has been found to reduce symptoms of menopause, improve endurance and lower blood sugar levels. To avoid overharvesting wild ginseng, most of the herb on the market is now grown on farms.

    Ode to Ginkgo

    Known as the Living Fossil, ginkgo is the oldest known plant in the world. A native of Asia, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) is now found in many US cities, where it has been planted as a quick-growing shade tree. Traditionally, ginkgo was used for disorders and diseases of the lungs and the kidneys, as a remedy for bronchitis and to improve circulation in older people.

    Ginkgo contains substances that act as potent antioxidants by scavenging cell-damaging free radicals, and it is thought to help reduce the risk of disease. By opening capillaries, ginkgo increases circulation, and enables nutrients and oxygen to move around the body, especially to the extremities.

    Indeed, recent research indicates that ginkgo may ease pain associated with arterial disease in the legs (Am J Med 2000; 108:276-81). Other studies support the use of ginkgo for acute stress (J Pharm Sci 2003 Dec; 93(4):458-64) and some cases of hearing loss (Acta Otolaryngol 2001; 121:579-84).

    In a UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute study on ginkgo, researchers found significant improvement in the verbal recall of people who had age-related memory problems. According to Dr. Linda Ercoli, lead author of the study, "Our findings suggest intriguing avenues for future study...with a larger sample to better measure and understand the impact of ginkgo on brain metabolism."

    Tasty Ginger

    Traditionally, fiery ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been used to aid digestion, reduce nausea, relieve gas, reduce symptoms of arthritis and strengthen the heart. Modern researchers have started to validate these traditional uses; ginger has reduced the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness in studies (Aust NZJ Obstet Gynaecol 2003 Apr; 4392:139-44).

    Meanwhile, researchers at the University of Minnesota have applied for a patent on a substance found in ginger, believing it to have anticancer activity. According to Ann Bode, "Plants of the ginger family have been credited with therapeutic and preventive powers and have been reported to have anticancer activity."

    Ginger can be found in natural food stores as fresh or dried root. It often appears in small amounts in herbal formulas as a carrier herb-one that helps move other herbs around the body.

    The best medicine combines the health support of herbs with the scientific rigor of conventional medicine. And as scientists continue to search for new medicine from ancient remedies, we can enjoy the best of both perspectives.



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    Vitanet ®

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