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Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often VitaNet, LLC Staff 8/19/18
This often forgotten berry has some amazing health benefits Darrell Miller 4/2/17
Health Benefits Of Eating Cashew Nuts Darrell Miller 12/28/16
Staying Healthy Means Keeping Your Blood In The Proper PH Darrell Miller 10/21/07
Exotic Herbs From The Amazon Basin Darrell Miller 6/22/07
Memory And Focus Darrell Miller 5/8/07
PsoriaClear New from Source Naturals Darrell Miller 8/1/06
Night Health: A new approach to improving sleep. Darrell Miller 5/12/06
Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK Darrell Miller 12/27/05
Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral Darrell Miller 11/20/05
Endnotes Darrell Miller 7/25/05
Conclusion Darrell Miller 7/25/05
Improove Memory ... Darrell Miller 6/9/05




Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often
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Date: August 19, 2018 05:53 PM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often





Okra is a gut-friendly vegetable you need to be eating more often

Okra is so good for you. Many people do not realize the benefits of vegetables and what they offer you. People need to have vegetables as part of their daily diet due to the nutrients that they provide. Overall, they are so healthy for the mind and for the physical body. They help speed up the metabolism and allow for fats to be released from the body. The more people eat things like okra, the better they will feel!

Key Takeaways:

  • Eat as many vegetables as you possibly can as they are so healthy!
  • Eating foods like this can really help speed up metabolism which can rid fat.
  • Okra is very healthy and is a vegetable that is often forgotten about.

"Multiple studies have also shown that the benefits of okra aren’t limited solely to improving overall digestive health. A study made by the Agricultural Research Service of the USDA indicated that okra, together with other vegetables like beets, asparagus, eggplants, and cauliflower, handled the binding of bile acids better than the reference drug cholestyramine."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-08-18-okra-is-a-gut-friendly-vegetable-you-need-to-be-taking-more-often.html

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This often forgotten berry has some amazing health benefits
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Date: April 02, 2017 11:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: This often forgotten berry has some amazing health benefits





The blackberry is the forgotten berry. It rates highest in antioxidants according to research done. According to some research blackberries can block cancer cells from developing. The berry also contains high levels of Vitamin K, also linked to cancer prevention. Vitamin K also can help with cardiovascular issues by preventing plaque build up. The blackberry can also help fight chronic inflammation as well as providing antibacterial benefits. The fresher the berry, the better the results, meaning the flash frozen berries are still beneficial, but not as.

Key Takeaways:

  • Blackberries score very high with regard to antioxidant capacity: higher than strawberries, blueberries and red raspberries
  • Because of the high levels of vitamin K in blackberries, when eaten regularly they can be very effective in lowering the risk of cancer
  • Want to make your dentist happy? Eat more blackberries. Their anti-inflammatory characteristics can help reduce the number of oral infections

"Blackberries are the often forgotten child of the berry family."

Read more: http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-03-29-this-often-forgotten-berry-has-some-amazing-health-benefits.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4338)


Health Benefits Of Eating Cashew Nuts
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Date: December 28, 2016 12:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Health Benefits Of Eating Cashew Nuts





Cashews are delicious, but their health benefits are too often forgotten. Eating cashews can be a good, guilt-free way to curb hunger, so can help you manage your weight. That means they can help you avoid heart problems and diabetes. Their magnesium reduces fatigue, which in turn improves bone and blood health. They additionally have anti-bacterial properties. And they've even been implicated in fighting gall stones and cancer.

Key Takeaways:

  • Cashew nuts are loved by numerous people across the world for its special taste and health benefits. This special nut is used in a multitude of dishes across the globe.
  • cashew nuts provide all the needed nutrients to our body. While some believe that these are unhealthy and loaded with fat, the truth is quite the opposite.
  • The antioxidants present in the nuts reduce free radicals and aids the body in utilizing iron for enhanced bone health.

"Cashew nuts are loved by numerous people across the world for its special taste and health benefits."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//asianetindia.com/health-benefits-of-eating-cashew-nuts/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEdgwoLiV5b9y9JDA0kVltJkHFhpA

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Staying Healthy Means Keeping Your Blood In The Proper PH
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Date: October 21, 2007 07:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Staying Healthy Means Keeping Your Blood In The Proper PH

The blood should be electrolytically neutral, or very slightly alkaline. The proper pH for blood should be 7 or just above it, and many claim that it should be 7.35. In fact the truth is that your blood pH should be between 7.2 and 7.6. Outside these limits and you could have serious health problems, with your brain particularly being affected.

For those who have forgotten their school chemistry, pH is a measurement of the level of acidity or alkalinity of an aqueous solution. Anything over 7 is said to be alkaline, and below 7 is acidic. Where the pH has to be maintained at a certain level, a material called a buffer is used that counteracts the effects of other acids and alkalis to maintain the desired pH range. Buffers are very common in nature, as would be expected of life forms that depend upon water and aqueous solutions for their survival. Blood is an aqueous solution containing plasma, blood cells, nutrients and various other ingredients in both solution and dispersed solid form.

The human body possesses a very effective pH maintenance system that depends on various buffers, the kidneys and the lungs. Lets have a closer look at buffers and how they work. pH is, in fact, a measurement of the concentration of hydrogen ions (H+) in a solution. The way a buffer works is to absorb or release H+ ions to keep the hydrogen ion concentration at a specific level. If there are too many H+ ions present in the blood, and it becomes too acidic, then the buffer will mop up the excess. If there are too few, and the blood becomes too alkaline, then the buffer will release more hydrogen ions into the blood. In this way the pH is maintained at the limits mentioned above.

Buffers in the human body include some forms of protein, phosphates and also hemoglobin. However, if the pH variations are more than just occasional, the buffers have a limited capability, and a more permanent solution is needed. If the blood is continually becoming too acidic, the bicarbonate ion is used to clear them up. Just as bicarbonate of soda is used to clear up excess acidity in your stomach that causes indigestion, so it can be used to clear up excess acidity in the blood. But how do we get the bicarbonate into the blood?

When the lungs inhale oxygen, they then exhale carbon dioxide. The bicarbonate ion, also called the hydrogen carbonate ion, is formed in the blood by dissolved carbon dioxide. The faster we breathe the more carbon dioxide we exhale and the less is left in the blood to form bicarbonate. The slower we breathe, the more carbon dioxide is available in the blood for bicarbonate. Thus, when our blood acidity increases we breathe slower, and when it decreases we breathe faster since less carbon dioxide is needed in the blood to form bicarbonate to neutralize the acid.

The kidneys also help to regulate the pH of the blood, although the biochemistry involved is fairly complex, and will not be covered here. It is enough to state that the body has a number of routes by which it can control the pH of the blood.

Current thinking is that alkaline and acidic foods should be balanced in your diet in order to place less of a strain on the body’s pH control systems. Since the blood pH must be slightly alkaline, then it might make sense to eat a slightly alkaline diet. However, it is not the actual food that matters, but what happens when the food is digested. Hence, orange juice is classed as an alkaline food even though it is high in citric acid and itself has a low pH. The same is true of lemons. They taste very sour, yet the result after digestion is alkaline. It is the end result that counts. After all, the stomach acid is very strong and very highly acidic, and eating slightly alkaline foods is not going to alter that. The digestive juices have to be highly acidic to break down the organic matter.

It had been calculated that a mix of around d 75% alkaline and 25% acidic food is a good combination of the two types to provide approximately the desired blood pH. Among the common acidic foods are meat, fish, poultry, plums, grains, eggs, wine, cheese and offal. The alkaline foods are most fruits and vegetables, orange and lemon juice, melons, potatoes and chocolate. Hence, it is possible to eat beef and chicken, and have the odd glass of wine so long as we eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables. There is nothing at all unusual with that diet, and it underlines the importance of eating a healthy balanced diet. While more greens and whole foods are definitely healthier for you, you should not eat exclusively an alkaline diet.

If your blood pH is on the high side of the limit, then you can eat a bit more meat or fish, and if on the low side eat a more vegetarian style diet. It is important, however, that you eat healthily, irrespective of whether you are eating alkaline or acidic foods. Through history, the human race has adopted a more acidic diet than the ancient hunter gatherers. Grains are a relatively recent invention, introduced after the invention of stone tools to mill them, and dairy products are also relatively recent in terms of the whole of human history. Even the consumption of meat only began after mankind learned first how to trap and then developed tools to enable them to kill their prey.

Human biochemistry, then, has developed from a predominantly vegetarian diet. However, protein is still very important, and while protein intake is necessary, should comprise no more than 20% - 25% of your total food intake. The rest should comprise of mainly fruits and vegetables, with whole rather than refined or processes foods predominating. Sugar was not eaten in quantity until the industrial revolution.

Measuring the pH of your blood is easy to do. It is simply a matter of using pH paper strips and checking the color change with your blood. They are available at most pharmacies and health food stores. If your pH level varies from 7.4 or 7.5, then you should change your diet accordingly. Higher than this, then eat more acidic foods, and if lower you should eat more alkaline food. It is simple equation, and the changes you will have to make to your diet will be minimal. Some of these changes can be made by the use of supplements that are carefully balanced to maintain your blood in the proper pH.



--
Buy alkaline Supplements at Vitanet, LLC ®

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Exotic Herbs From The Amazon Basin
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Date: June 22, 2007 05:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Exotic Herbs From The Amazon Basin

Although many traditional herbal medicines have yet to find complete scientific corroboration in the West, it follows logically that people wouldn't use an herbal product for centuries if it didn't work.

Many of the popular herbs we all recognize as having great health benefits were only recently considered pretty exotic. Even green tea - a staple in China for centuries -has only lately gone main stream.

So it will likely be with herbs from the Amazon basin and its environs. The Amazon basin is one of the most bountiful environments on the planet. Explorers and botanists from the West have looked to this region for generations for the "next big thing." Of course, in many cases, the "next big thing" has already been in use for centuries.

In this issue of Ask the Medicine Hunter, we're going to look at some energizing and life- stimulating herbs that also happen to have great antioxidant properties, too. Best yet, many of them are available to us here from companies that practice fair trade policies.

Let's take a look at some of the herbal powerhouses coming out of the Amazon (and its nearby neighborhoods):

Maca (Lepidium meyenii) has been cultivated for a long time at least 2000 years. Related to brassica family plants like radishes, mustard and cabbage, its foliage does actually look somewhat radish-like, but grows close to the ground.

Maca is cultivated by the Andean people in Peru's central highlands, and contains a plethora of beneficial compounds that enhance overall health and vitality. The tradition of cultivating maca is an old one some strains have been found in Incan sites that date from 1600 B.C. During early European colonization, maca was used by the local native culture as a form of currency, much of the way cocoa was used by the Aztecs, further north in pre-Columbian Mexico.

Maca thrives in high altitudes - between 10,000 and 16,000 feet. The harsher the conditions, the better it grows, or so it seems. In fact, efforts to grow the plant in Central Europe haven't been as successful - maca seems to enjoy its home turf the best. In Peru, maca is a popular and beloved nutrient-packed superfood, and is commonly powdered and mixed into drinks at roadside stands throughout the Andes.

Q. I've heard of maca being used for healthy libido - are there any other benefits?

A. Maca is a natural energizer, and although it is recognized for it's libido enhancing abilities, it has other uses, too, acting as an adaptogen - similar to rhodiola or ginseng. In fact, in South America, maca is known as "Peruvian Ginseng." Though maca is not ginseng at all, some of the benefits of both plants are similar.

In any event, maca is recommended for boosting the immune system, menopause support, and hormonal balance in general. For daily use, maca is most recognized as a great source of energy and all-day endurance. Alkaloids from maca root may be partially responsible for both maca's energizing and libido boost. Research shows that maca affects the hypothalamic-pituitary (HPA) axis - boosting energy and overall aphrodisiac prowess in men and women. Maca contains novel compounds called macamides and macaenes, which have been proven in animal studies to significantly enhance energy, stamina and sexual function reasons people have been so consuming maca for 2000 years.

There are other serious reasons why maca is such an excellent plant. One group of compounds in maca is the isothiocyanates-aromatics constituents that are responsible for the "hotness" of mustards and radishes - fellow members of the brassica family. Isothiocyanates from other members of the brassica family may reduce the risk of breast and stomach cancer. Although the same constituents specifically from maca haven't beentested, it's plausible that they could have the same effects.

Q. I've heard a little about guarana extracts - is it just caffeine?

A. Guarana is widely loved for its mild stimulating effect, which is due to caffeine. But this is by no means this Amazonian herb's sole beneficial compound. Guarana (Paullinia cupana) is so logically ingrained in the culture of Brazil that it's practically a rival (actually out-sells) Coca-Cola in its soft-drink form. Like many other indigenous herbs, guarana was in use locally well before European settlement. Its Latin name comes fromthe German botanist C.F. Paullini, who first encountered the herb in the 1700s. This evergreen vine typically climbs fairly far up the Brazilian forest trees. The seed is the part that gets used. In one clinical study, guarana boosted the memory alertness of participants, even when the caffeine level per dose was a low 9 mg., as compared with approximately 100 mg for a cup of coffee. This effect suggests that other agents than caffeine contribute to a feeling of well being.

Guarana also contains powerful antioxidants including catechin, epicatechin and proanthocyanidins, which protect cells against destruction from free radicals, and impart benefits to the body's tissues and blood. The small seed of this plant is powerful in its health benefits.

Catuaba Bark:

Catuaba (Erythroxylum catuaba) is a common tree found in South America from Brazil to Peru, in the same genus as the coca plant. Catuaba contains components known as alkaloids. These alkaloids (called catuabine A, B, and C) are probably responsible for themental boost most people get when they take catuabe-based supplements or mixes.

There may be little confusion regarding catuaba, because various species and genus typesuse the common name. As a result, "catuaba" gets bandied around a lot, and one person'scatuaba may not be the next. Read labels carefully. The catuaba I've had the best luck with is Erythroxylum catuaba.

Coffee Fruit:

One of my favorite drinks in the world is coffee, and I'm sure at many people reading thisconsider it the essential part of their morning, too.

The part of coffee that we use the most is the seed of the coffee fruit - which appears as a bright, red berry. Most of the time, this fruit is sloughed off and left behind in the process of making coffee - it's really too delicate to last long in hot conditions.

But advances in technology have tapped a previously discarded resource. Though the fruit of coffee is available in any coffee-growing economy, a high antioxidant commercial extract of "coffee cherry" is now available from the fruits of coffee plants in Mexico.

Coffee fruit has many of the attributes of other dark-colored, anthcyanin-rich fruits. Coffee fruit (also referred to as "coffee cherry") appears not to be just another antioxidant, however. Current research on this once-forgotten, former castoff shows impressive abilities to decrease tumor size, and possibly even prevent their formation in the first place. It seems that the elements in coffee berry activate T-lymphocytes in such a way that mammary tumors are shrunk or simply put on hold. It will be fascinating to see how this science plays out.

Muira Puama Bark:

Muira puama (Ptychopetalum olacoides) grows between 15 to 45 feet high. Native to theAmazon basin of Brazil, the dried bark has been used for centuries as a traditional energysupport. Components include beta-sitosterol, campesterol and lupeol.

Muira puama, like other central nervous stimulants has been researched lately for its ability to boost memory retrieval and protect neural (brain) tissue. Who knows? Maybe this traditional ingredient could someday be on the cutting edge of natural medicines fighting Alzheimer's, much the way green tea and turmeric are currently. In one unpublished French study of 262 men with low libido and poor erectile function, 62% experienced significant improvement after taking an extract of Muira puama for two weeks.

Acai Berry:

Acai (Euterpe acai) berry is a traditional favorite (and readily available) food source for people in the Amazon. The tree is a tall-growing palm with berries that provide - a rich source of anthocyanins, potent purple pigments with extraordinary high antioxidant activity.

Once harvested, acai fruits decay rapidly. As with coffee fruits, special processing is the surest way to make certain the nutrients of acai berry make it to those of us outside the Amazon basin.

However, these wonderful fruits not only fight against free radical damage, but help our natural digestive enzymes and boost natural immune defenses, too. In fact, current research is investigating whether compounds in acai may have a fighting effect on leukemia, too. So far, the results have been very positive.

Look for supplements made using organically-grown, fair trade acai berry. The best companies ensure that the local people harvesting acai and the communities where they live gather more than just short-term benefits. The best companies work not just to provide jobs, but better lives for generations to come.

Q. What is sustainability and fair trade, anyway?

A. Sustainability refers to a set of naturally occurring circumstances, or intentionally designed practices and principles, which ensure that all parts or members of a situation are adequately nourished to promote their healthy continuance. In current parlance, sustainability often refers to practices and programs designed and implemented to keep natural systems healthy and flourishing. Many such programs focus on environmental protection and preservation of traditional cultures. In the world of medicinal plants, sustainable practices include organic agriculture, species management, fair trade, and benefit-sharing programs.

In other words, sustainability pays people fair wages, puts resources back into their communities, and ensures that the resources that benefit us all are going to be around for a long time. It is an earth-friendly, people-friendly concept of commerce that happily, is taking root around the world.

Conclusion:

The traditional cultures that use - and have used - these ingredients for generations wouldn't have done so if they hadn't been effective. Fortunately we live in an era when formerly locally-used herbs are now available far beyond their previous range. We are also fortunate to have companies and individuals working hard to make sure that the people who tend and care for these precious resources are paid fairly for their efforts, andthat their families and communities benefit from this commerce as well.

The great thing about using traditional herbs and ingredients that have been gathered in this manner is that you know they'll be around for a long time.



--
Exotic Herbs at Vitanet

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Memory And Focus
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Date: May 08, 2007 02:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Memory And Focus

Memory & Focus

 

Some people think getting older often means getting slower. It’s true that as we age, we may find we can’t walk quite as fast, climb as many flights of stairs, or play sports as hard as we could when we were twenty. However, we k now that a healthy diet, regular exercise, and the right dietary supplements can make a huge difference in our health, strength, and mobility as we age.

This is true for our mental abilities as well. We may not think as quickly as we used to, might misplace our keys more often, and experience more “tip-of-my-tongue” word searches. These so-called “middle-aged moments” most often have minor consequences: a missed appointment or the forgotten name of an acquaintance. However, in a small number of cases, these mental slips can also be the first sign of serious diseases of aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease of other dementias.

The good news is, just like our physical health, we can improve how we function mentally. Eating healthy foods, taking the right supplements, and participating in regular mental exercise can significantly increase our mental endurance, improve our memory, and optimize our ability to focus.

In fact, groundbreaking and ongoing research has discovered that specific herbs and vitamins, particularly Ginkgo Biloba, Bacopa monnieri, folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12, and the important co-enzyme and antioxidant, alpha lipoic acid, all have powerful effects on memory and focus. These nutritional supplements have been scientifically shown to quickly reduce mild age-related memory chances, as well as greatly reducing the risk of developing more serious problems like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, or other brain diseases later on in life.

 

Q. What is the difference between age related memory decline and dementia?

A. As we get older, our nerve cells need more time to spark and connect, slowing the process of bringing memories and events to mind. Another theory is that, as we age, we accumulate more knowledge and memories. The mind then has to sort through much more data to reference a memory. Almost everyone middle-aged and older notices this slowdown. Memory decline and problems with mental focus are a normal part of aging.

While it’s true that the older we get, our chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease increase, this illness is not a normal part of aging. Alzheimer’s is an irreversible, progressive dementia that slowly kills nerve cells in areas of the brain where memory, learning, though, and language take place. Often first appearing as people begin retirement, Alzheimer’s disease makes the “golden years” a time of loss and devastation. Memories vanish, relationships are erased, and independence is gradually lost.

After Alzheimer’s disease, the second most common cause of dementia in older people is multi-infarct dementia. Caused by a series of mini-strokes that damage or destroy brain tissue over time, multi-infarct dementia usually affects people between the ages of 60 and 75. Men are slightly more at risk. High blood pressure is the most significant risk factor for multi-infarct dementia.

Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, strokes, Huntington’s disease, Creutzfelt-Jakob disease, and alcoholism can also cause progressive and irreversible dementia.

While normal age-related memory and focus loss may mean we can’t remember where we put our car keys, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia may mean we can’t remember what our car keys are used for.

 

Q. Are any types of memory and focus loss reversible?

A. Yes. As women enter menopause, they frequently experience trouble remembering. This memory interference is caused by hormone fluctuations and can affect speech, thinking, and attention. Symptoms of menopause-related memory loss and poor focus include recognizing faces less well than in the past, missing scheduled appointments, and misplacing articles. Once a woman passes through menopause, her ability to remember and focus most often improves.

Certain medications, such as the heavily prescribed cholesterol lowering drugs called stains, can temporarily interfere with memory. Low vitamin B levels, artherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), and thyroid disease can cause disruption of mental focus and memory loss. These problems usually resolve with treatment of the underlying disorder.

A certain type of stoke, called a transient ischemic attack (TIA) can cause memory loss that may be reversible. A TIA is a brief episode of stroke symptoms that come on quickly. Sometimes referred to as a “mini-stroke” or “warning stroke,” a TIA is caused by a temporary interruption in the blood supply to the brain. But, unlike a stroke, a TIA does not lead to permanent brain damage. While a TIA is usually short-lived, it is likely to occur again if not properly managed and can be a warning of future stroke.

 

Q. I seem to forget a lot of things. How can I be sure I don’t have Alzheimer’s disease or some other dementia?

A. If you, or other around you, are concerned about your memory, you should be examined by your health care practitioner. Once the cause of your memory and focus problem is diagnosed, treatment can begin. All causes of memory loss and mental focus disruption can be treated, even Alzheimer’s disease. While presently irreversible dementias cannot be cured, the progression of the disease may be slowed, and in some cases, stopped..

Research on memory loss and mental focus disruption has increased dramatically in the past few years. Discoveries regarding Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, as well as age-related loss of memory and focus have recently been made. Most importantly, many new treatment options, including the use of nutritional supplements, have been developed.

 

Q. How can nutritional supplements improve memory and focus?

A. Several herbs and vitamins have been demonstrated to improve memory and mental focus. While some nutritional supplements work now to improve memory and focus, others work to prevent problems we might develop later.

One of the most researched herbs, Ginkgo biloba, has been found to be effective in improving currently experienced memory and focus loss; in other words, problems we are having now. Ginkgo has been studied in individuals who have age-related memory loss, as well as in those with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. It seems that ginkgo can improve many brain functions, such as speeding up memory recall, protecting brain cells from chemical changes and free radical damage, improving blood flow to the brain, and helping nerve cells communicate with each other better.

Several studies examined ginkgo’s effect in healthy people who were experiencing normal age-related memory and focus problems. They determined that ginkgo improved memory, attention, and clarity of thinking. Ginkgo can also help restore memories that may be lost in TIAs, those mini-strokes that were discussed earlier.

In studies of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, the results showed that ginkgo slowed down the disease in those severely afflicted and actually improved those with very mild or moderate disease. In one of these studies, ginkgo was compared to four prescription cholinesterase inhibitors, medications commonly used to treat individuals with Alzheimer’s disease. Using written mental tests, the researchers found that ginkgo worked just as effectively as the prescription drugs. While those taking one of the cholinesterase inhibitors dropped out of the study because of disturbing side effects, ginkgo had no side effects and improved symptoms equally as well.

 

Q. Hoe does Bacopa monnieri help memory and focus?

A. Like ginkgo, bacopa works on the memory and focus problems we are experiencing now. Bacopa grows in India and has a long history as a natural medicine. In a recent study, bacopa was compared to a placebo in its effect on memory. Adults between the ages of 40 and 65 were divided into 2 groups. Half got the bacopa and half got a placebo. Researchers, who didn’t k now which patients got the bacopa, tested both groups’ memory before the study, at three months, and when the study ended six weeks later. The results showed the group taking the bacopa extract was able to remember new information much better than the group taking the placebo.

 

Q. How does alpha lipoic acid help memory and focus?

A. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) is a vitamin-like coenzyme that prevents memory and focus problems we might have later on. ALA is an incredibly powerful antioxidant that works especially well with other antioxidants. An antioxidant’s job is to disarm damaging free radicals, those naturally occurring molecules that damage cells and cause disease. ALA has potent antioxidant action in almost all the tissues of the body, helps generate energy from food an oxygen, can get directly to the nerves, and plays an important role in the “antioxidant network”.

Researchers have discovered unmistakable free radical damage in Alzheimer’s disease. Accordingly, ALA’s effect in the illness has been studied extensively. Researchers have learned that ALA not only prevents free radical damage in Alzheimer’s disease, but also regulates protective chemicals in the brain that help improve symptoms.

In a recent study, people with Alzheimer’s disease were given tests that measured through and memory. They were then given ALA supplements for an average of 11 months. At the end of the study, the participants were tested again. The results showed that every person had higher scores on the thought and memory tests than they had at the beginning.

ALA is unique among antioxidants, as it can neutralize free radicals in both the fat and the water of cells. In contrast, the well known vitamin C is only water-soluble, while the popular antioxidant vitamin E is only soluble in fat. Because ALA is easily absorbed, enters cells and tissues in a highly usable form, performs a variety of antioxidant actions (including rejuvenation of other antioxidants), and is both fat and water soluble, many researchers label ALA an “ideal antioxidant”.

 

Q. How do vitamins B12 and B6 help memory and focus?

A. Vitamin B6 is an essential nutrient in the regulation of nerve transmissions. It is required by the nervous system for normal brain function, and it may also help with mood.

Like ALA, vitamins B6 and B12 help prevent memory and focus problems further on down the road. One important recent discovery is the role of homocysteine in brain diseases. These important B vitamins can reduce homocysteine, an amino acid (the building blocks of protein) that is produced in the human body. Homocysteine irritate s blood vessels, makes it easier for blood to clot, and can cause cholesterol to become more harmful.

Researchers have learned that people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias (including Parkinson’s disease) have elevated homocysteine levels. IN fact, t he amount of homocysteine in the blood corresponds to the severity of the disease. Most people with a high homocysteine level don’t have enough folate, vitamin B5 or vitamin B12 in their diet. Replacing these vitamins helps return the homocysteine level to normal.

Reducing homocysteine levels may prevent the occurrence of Alzheimer’s disease, or other brain diseases, and improve the symptoms of those already afflicted.

 

Q. What about folic acid?

A. Folic acid has long been recognized as a vital nutrient for the brain and spinal cord. Recent research has demonstrated that folic acid has significant importance in Alzheimer’s disease.

An ongoing study of Alzheimer’s disease that began in 1986 has been studying 678 members of the School Sisters of Notre Dame in the hopes of learning how the disease develops, how it might be prevented, and how to treat it. Data collected in the study includes biographies the sisters wrote upon entrance to the order, blood samples from the sisters while they are living, and information gained from the voluntary donation of their brains after death.

Aptly named the “Nun Study,” ground breaking discoveries have already been made. It seems that diet and nutrition have a dramatic influence in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Sisters who had high levels of folic acid showed little evidence of Alzheimer’s-type damage in their brains after death. And, those nuns who had Alzheimer’s disease in spite of high folic acid levels had profoundly less brain damage from the disease. In fact, some sisters who had no outward evidence of Alzheimer’s disease while they were living had surprisingly extensive damage in their brains after death.

 

Q. Besides taking ginkgo, bacopa, B vitamins, folic acid, and ALA, is there other things I can do to prevent Alzheimer’s disease?

A. You may not know if you have a serious B-vitamin deficiency. Routine lab work does not measure the amount of B vitamins in your blood. You might want to ask your health care practitioner to have your B vitamin level in your blood measured, especially if you are having memory and focus problems. Keep in mind that this type of lab work is fairly expensive, however.

Supplements do not replace the need for a healthy diet, especially a diet with high levels of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and omega-3 fatty acids. Keeping your body healthy helps keep your brain healthy as well.

It also seems that the use-it-or-lose-it theory applies to our brain as well as our body. Research has shown that people who seek opportunities to keep mentally active, such as reading books, newspapers, and magazines, solving crossword puzzles, playing card games, and visiting museums, lower their risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Conclusion

Dealing with age-related memory loss may be both frustrating and frightening. As the population of America gets older, dementia is continuing to affect a larger proportion of society. Prevention of these devastating diseases has become increasingly important.

In fact, more and more research shows prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is a reality. And age-related memory loss can successfully be improved as well. Taking the scientifically validated nutritional supplements ginkgo, bacopa, vitamins B6 and B12, folic acid, and ALA can improve age-related memory loss and potentially prevent the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias as we age.



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PsoriaClear New from Source Naturals
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Date: August 01, 2006 12:10 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: PsoriaClear New from Source Naturals

Strangely enough, the secret of soft, smooth, silky skin may be a prickly, thorny bush from the inhospitable mountains of Russia and northern China. The berries of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) are so rich in vitamins and nutrients that they were legendary in China, Russia, and Europe for centuries, but then were forgotten. After many years of being planted as a protective hedge— the thorns are apparently quite vicious—the sea buckthorn is being rediscovered for its nutrients, and particularly, for its amazing properties in skin regeneration.

The oil of the sea buckthorn is one of numerous compounds in Source Naturals PSORIACLEAR ointment, a formula that moisturizes and replenishes the skin cells.

The bounty of the earth has been gathered for this unusual and effective topical ointment— a convenient, natural aid for healthy, glowing skin.

Legendary benefits

Pegasus, the magnificent flying horse of Greek mythology, was said to have obtained his phenomenal strength from sea buckthorn—berries and leaves so nutritious, they must have been cultivated by the gods on Mount Olympus.

The plant became so identified with Pegasus and legendary racehorses, that sea buckthorn’s botanical name, Hippophae means “shiny horse.” But beyond legend, the benefits of sea buckthorn were discussed in ancient texts such as the Tibetan Rgyud Bzi, by Greek healers Theophrastus and Dioskorid, as well as noted by the court physicians of the Tang Dynasty of China. Used in Russia, Poland, Germany, the Himalayas, and Scandinavia, the sea buckthorn was known throughout the eastern hemisphere and used in traditional herbalism for centuries. Products made from sea buckthorn are valued for their rejuvenating and restorative properties.

Scientific Confirmation

Modern studies confirm the nutritious qualities of sea buckthorn. The berries are a natural source of vitamins A, E, B- 1, B-2, K, and P, as well as several carotenes, tocopherols, and flavonoids. The berries are second only to rose hips and acerola in vitamin C content. Most importantly for skin, however, the seeds of the sea buckthorn contain a very high content of essential fatty acids, oleic (C18:1), linoleic (C18:2), pentadecenoic (C15:1), palmitoleic (C16:1), heptadecenoic (C17:1), linolenic (C18:3), eicosenoic (C20:1), eicosadienoic (C20:2), erucic (C22:1) and nervonic (C24:1). Its antioxidant qualities have also been confirmed in modern studies.

Natural Ingredients

The additional ingredients in PSORIACLEAR are natural components that could be found in many farms and forests worldwide: beeswax, animal fat, fatty acids, vitamin C and carotenoids. Source Naturals is pleased to bring you PSORIACLEAR, an easy-to-use topical ointment that has had tremendous success in supporting smooth, healthy, silky skin. Unlike many skin ointments, it is made with natural products; it contains no corticosteroids, hydrocortisone, nor paraffin. Use it as part of your own wellness program, taking charge of your own health and well-being.

Reference

Rosch D, et al.2004. J Agric Food Chem 52 (22):6712-8.

Chen, Y, et al. 2003. Formation and Development of New Blood Cells 26(8):572-5.

Rosch D, et al. 2003. J Agric Food Chem 51 (15):4233-9.

Chopra RN, et al. 1986. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants.

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Night Health: A new approach to improving sleep.
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Date: May 12, 2006 05:41 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Night Health: A new approach to improving sleep.

Our night health, including the quality of our sleep and dreams, may be the most critical overlooked factor contributing to both emotional and physical illness in modern times. For millions, night is a time of growing frustration and deepening struggle with insomnia as well as compromised and insufficient sleep. Mounting data has confirmed that sleep problems are strongly associated with virtually all major illnesses ranging from cardiovascular disease to diabetes, infections and cancer, and obesity to depression.

Night health refers to a new approach to sleep and dreams that integrates complementary and alternative medicine with effective conventional perspectives. It is essentially a comprehensive body-mind approach to sleep. The first in a series of articles introducing the concept of night health, this article begins with a closer look at the limitations of the simulated sleep offered by sleeping pills. It then examines the basic alternative of supplemented sleep: the place of natural sleep-supporting supplements. Finally, it offers suggestions for increasing the utilization of such alternatives by supplementing supplements with essential information, education and guidance offered by a new and unique software program and the first book about integrative sleep health.

Simulated Sleep

As the public becomes increasingly aware of the health ramifications of sleep disturbances, more and more people are turning to sleeping pills. In fact, according to the IMS Health research, about 42 million prescriptions for sleeping pills were filled last year in the U.S. This represents a nearly 60 percent increase over the past five years alone. Some projections anticipate that the current $2.7 billion in annual sleeping pill sales will more than triple by 2010.

But instead of solving the problem, sleeping pills often make sleep problems worse. Sleeping pills commonly result in dependence. They can alter normal sleep architecture, cause amnesia and residual daytime “hangovers,” and they often result in rebound insomnias when discontinued. Some sleep specialists argue that sleeping pill use is further associated with significant increases in mortality. Given the sense of desperation that can accompany insomnia, even such very serious concerns have not prevented sales of sleeping pills from skyrocketing in recent years.

We are currently witnessing an unprecedented advertising campaign on the part of the pharmaceutical industry designed to convince the public that sleep medications are indeed a safe and effective strategy for addressing sleep problems. Despite clever and seductive advertising, however, it remains highly questionable whether sleeping pills can truly offer us sleep. I believe it is more accurate to say that they result in a kind of artificial or simulated sleep. Compared to natural slumber, sleeping pills cause a chemical knockout. Unfortunately, so many people have slept poorly for so long, they have forgotten what it is like to experience truly restorative, deep and refreshing natural slumber. Instead, many people now hold a naïve, limited sense of healthful sleep, confusing it with being knocked out. And sleeping pills satisfy that very naïve notion of sleep.

Supplementing sleep

Rather than artificially simulating sleep with chemical knockouts, sleep-promoting supplements such as melatonin, valerian, and other botanicals support that body’s own sleep-facilitating mechanisms more naturally. Such products work in greater harmony with nature and, unlike conventional drugs, they do not stimulate sleep, they supplement sleep. I think of natural supplements inviting us to sleep. The very potency of many natural products lies in their very gentleness, which works cooperatively with both body and mind to induce healthful sleep.

I believe that the potential benefits and markets for such supplements remain largely untapped. Consumers’ expectations that sleep aids should knock them out rather than gently assist them in letting go into sleep must be addressed through targeted education and information campaigns. Consumers also need to learn how to use alternative sleep supplements in the context of a healthy sleep lifestyle or positive night health.

Supplementing supplements

As helpful as they can be in promoting night health, sleep supplements alone will not do the trick. In fact, I believe many people get discouraged and discount the potentially positive benefits of sleep supplements after using them without proper guidance and understanding. Sleep supplements work best when they are geared to work synergistically as a part of a larger night health promotion program.

The availability of a wide range of over-the-counter health supplements offers an important freedom in healthcare choices. But with increased freedom comes increased responsibility. Consumers need to become significantly more informed. Particularly with regard to night health, such supplements need to be personalized and prescriptive. When it comes to sleep health, one size does not fit all. Whether we choose melatonin or valerian or a specific blend depends upon who we are and exactly what we need. By prescriptive I do not mean ordered by a physician, but specifically tailored to the needs of the individual.

Because of a significant shortage of health care professionals knowledgeable about sleep and the alarming trend towards increased use of sleeping pills, I have assisted in the development of a unique software program that provides sleep solutions that are both personalized and prescriptive. After more than a decade in development, the sleep advisor—an expert software system that thoroughly evaluates and provides personalized comprehensive recommendations for improving sleep—is now available.

More recently, I completed the first truly integrative book on night health. Healing night: the science and spirit of sleeping, dreaming, and awakening offers a new, comprehensive perspective on night health that complements the sleep advisors high pragmatic approach. Together, healing night and the sleep advisor offers essential supplements to sleep supplements.

Rubin R Naiman is a psychologist and clinical assistant professor of medicine at the university of Arizona’s health sciences center. He is also the sleep and dream specialist for dr. Andrew weil;s world renowned program in integrative medicine. Currently he serves as the sleep specialist at Miraval Resort, and is in private practice in Tuscon, AZ.

The above article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat a particular illness. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of a holistically competent licensed professional health care provider. The information in this article has not been evaluated by the food and drug administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Rubin R. Naiman, PhD
Integrative Sleep and Dream Psychology
Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine
Program in Integrative Medicine
University of Arizona
Sleep and Dream Specialist
Miraval Resort
Tucson, Arizona
520-770-1003
rrnaiman@cox.net
www.drnaiman.com
www.thesleepadvisor.com



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Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK
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Date: December 27, 2005 09:49 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK

Effer-C NUTRITION YOU CAN DRINK

  • 1000 mg of Vitamin C Per Serving
  • Helps Restore Vital Electrolytes
  • Includes CoQ10 and Alpha Lipoic Acid
  • High in Energy-Producing B Vitamins
  • 4 Great Tasting Flavors

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is unquestionably one of life’s most important nutrients. Everyday we unknowing rely on it to help protect cells, produce energy, repair tissue and replenish lost electrolytes. Ironically, humans are just one of a handful of living creatures unable to produce our own supply of this vital nutrient. In fact, your dog can naturally manufacture upwards of ten times the amount of vitamin C that you might obtain in an entire day from food.

To make matters worse, vitamin C can be a terribly stubborn nutrient. Not only are we incapable of producing it, but getting adequate amounts from the diet is a task all in itself. Today’s typical diet has become just that, typical. The convenience of fast food, sodium-rich snacks and over-processed heart bombs has reduced our once healthy society to a scrambling cluster of time-pressed professionals who’ve somehow forgotten what it’s like to actually prepare balanced, nutritious meals. This makes obtaining the nutrients we so desperately need, next to impossible.

As if that wasn’t enough, vitamin C has a short halflife. Half lives measure the amount of time that it takes for one-half of a nutrient to be depleted from the bloodstream. In the case of vitamin C, it has a half life of just 30 minutes. For the sake of argument, let’s assume that your 7:00 AM breakfast includes an orange that contains a modest 70 mg of vitamin C. By 8:00, you’re left with only 35 mg. By 9:00, a mere 17 mg. And by the time lunch rolls around, you’ll be lucky to have any vitamin C in your system at all. This should be of great concern to anyone who doesn’t carry a bushel of oranges around at all times. Because aside from the fact that the body rapidly depletes its reserve of vitamin C, it also depends on what remains to carry out an long list of biological tasks. When it’s not there, everything suffers - energy, metabolism, immune response, cartilage integrity and so on.

So how does one contend with this taxing concoction of unceasing stress, high-throttle lifestyle, endless toxins and pathetic dietary habits? It’s actually much simpler than you might imagine. Thanks to new technology in the nutritional sciences, getting the C you need no longer requires carrying around bottles of capsules or huge sacks of fruit. Effer-C™ from NOW® is an effervescent vitamin C unlike any other, and was designed to quickly replenish the vital electrolytes needed to keep you running strong. With a nutritional profile superior to other fizzy C drinks, a taste that won hands-down in blind tests and an exceptional grade of ascorbic acid, Effer-C™ is clearly the smart choice.

Vitamin C

Starting with a exceptional grade of Vitamin C was the first step in formulating this superior drink. Fueled by 1000 mg of highly absorbable, gentle vitamin C, you can be assured that you’re getting enough C to keep you tip-top for hours. By utilizing a buffered, non-acidic vitamin C, Effer-C™ offers fast assimilation to boost energy and restore vital electrolytes without causing gastric irritation.

B-Complex

Busy lifestyles rob you of so much more than just time. Physical stress and mental anxiety can drain even the healthiest individuals of energy producing, mood supporting B vitamins. As these reserves diminish, so does the ability to stay motivated, focused, patient, responsive and energetic. Effer-C™ is bursting with a full B profile that contains as much as two times the amount of certain B-vitamins found in other brands.

Calcium/Magnesium

Calcium and magnesium have become synonymous with strong, healthy bones. Aside from their structural supporting properties, these two minerals work synergistically to help support the body’s adenosine triphosphate (ATP) energy reserves. Individually, magnesium is present in virtually every human biological process. Many of today’s most common elements (alcohol, fluoride, processed foods) can hinder your ability to retain optimal levels of this vital nutrient. Effer-C™ brings them right back!

Chromium

This essential trace mineral is a primary component in the synthesis of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. Chromium also has a direct influence on the efficacy of our metabolism, in addition to how well we use glucose. Even a slight deficiency in chromium can result in fatigue, anxiety and glucose intolerance. Effer-C™ contains 20 mcg of chromium - more than even the most popular effervescent C supplement.

Anti-oxidants

Part of what makes Effer-C™ so effective is its unique antioxidant profile. By adding more alpha lipoic acid (ALA) than similar competing products, in addition to 5 mg of CoQ10 and zinc, Effer-C™ provides powerful protection against harmful, cell damaging free radicals. If you haven’t experienced the nutritional rush that Effer-C™ delivers, you don’t know what you’re missing. NOW makes it easier than ever to stay energized and fully replenished throughout the day, during workouts and even on the road. Available in four delicious flavors (orange, lemonlime, raspberry and cranberry Effer-C™ is a simple and effective way to maintain high levels of vitamin C and unlock the energy that’s just waiting within.

EFFER-C RASPBERRY from NOW EFFER-C LEMON LIME from NOW EFFER-C CRANBERRY from NOW EFFER-C ORANGE from NOW



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Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral
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Date: November 20, 2005 07:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride is an “essential” mineral for humans. It is abundant in ionic trace mineral preparations. It is a major mineral nutrient that occurs primarily in body fluids. Chloride is a prominent negatively charged ion of the blood, where it represents 70% of the body’s total negative ion content. On average, an adult human body contains approximately 115 grams of chloride, making up about 0.15% of total body weight.1 The suggested amount of chloride intake ranges from 750 to 900 milligrams per day, based on the fact that total obligatory loss of chloride in the average person is close to 530 milligrams per day. As the principle negatively charged ion in the body, chloride serves as one of the main electrolytes of the body. Chloride, in addition to potassium and sodium, assist in the conduction of electrical impulses when dissolved in bodily water. Potassium and sodium become positive ions as they lose an electron when dissolved and chloride becomes a negative ion as it gains an electron when dissolved. A positive ion is always accompanied by a negative ion, hence the close relationship between sodium, potassium and chloride. The electrolytes are distributed throughout all body fluids including the blood, lymph, and the fluid inside and outside cells.2 The negative charge of chloride balances against the positive charges of sodium and potassium ions in order to maintain serum osmolarity.

Pivotal Roles of Chloride in the Body

In addition to its functions as an electrolyte, chloride combines with hydrogen in the stomach to make hydrochloric acid, a powerful digestive enzyme that is responsible for the break down of proteins, absorption of other metallic minerals, and activation of intrinsic factor, which in turn absorbs vitamin B12. Chloride is specially transported into the gastric lumen, in exchange for another negatively charged electrolyte (bicarbonate), in order to maintain electrical neutrality across the stomach membrane. After utilization in hydrochloric acid, some chloride is reabsorbed by the intestine, back into the blood stream where it is required for maintenance of extracellular fluid volume. Chloride is both actively and passively absorbed by the body, depending on the current metabolic demands. A constant exchange of chloride and bicarbonate, between red blood cells and the plasma helps to govern the pH balance and transport of carbon dioxide, a waste product of respiration, from the body. With sodium and potassium, chloride works in the nervous system to aid in the transport of electrical impulses throughout the body, as movement of negatively charged chloride into the cell propagates the nervous electrical potential.

Deficiency of Chloride

Deficiency of chloride is rare. However, when it does occur, it results in a life threatening condition known as alkalosis, in which the blood becomes overly alkaline. A tedious balance between alkalinity and acidity is in constant flux, and must be vigilantly maintained throughout the entire body. Alkalosis may occur as a result of excessive loss of sodium, such as heavy sweating during endurance exercise, and in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms include muscle weakness, loss of appetite, irritability, dehydration, and profound lethargy. Hypochloremia may result from water overload, wasting conditions, and extensive bodily burns with sequestration of extracellular fluids. In a situation in which infants were inadvertently fed chloride-deficient formula, many experienced failure to thrive, anorexia, and weakness in their first year of life.3

Excess Intake?

Excessive intakes of dietary chloride only occur with the ingestion of large amounts of salt and potassium chloride. The toxic effects of such diets, such as fluid retention and high blood pressure, are attributed to the high sodium and potassium levels.4 Chloride toxicity has not been observed in humans except in the special case of impaired sodium chloride metabolism, e.g. in congestive heart failure.5 Healthy individuals can tolerate the intake of large quantities of chloride provided that there is a concomitant intake of fresh water. Other situations in which increased blood levels of chloride are seen include diseases of improper waste elimination that occur in kidney diseases. Excess chloride is normally excreted in the urine, sweat, and bowels. In fact, excess urinary excretion of chloride occurs in high salt diets. Excessive intakes of chloride can occur in a person with compromised health in addition to an unhealthy diet. However, those that follow a healthy diet and lead an active lifestyle may need to consider supplementing their diet with this important mineral.

Chloride vs. Chlorine

The mineral supplement chloride is very different from the gas chlorine. While elemental chlorine is a dangerous gas that does not exist in the free elemental state in nature because of its reactivity, although it is widely distributed in combination with other elements. Chloride is related to chlorine however, as one of the most common chlorine compounds is common salt, NaCl. Chloride is a by-product of the reaction between chlorine and an electrolyte, such as potassium, magnesium, or sodium, which are essential for human metabolism. Chloride salts are essential for sustaining human metabolism and have none of the effects of isolated chlorine gas.

Sources of Chloride

Chloride occurs naturally in foods at levels normally less than 0.36 milligrams per gram of food. The average intake of chloride during a salt-free diet is approximately 100 milligrams per day. Unfortunately, chloride is found commonly combined with undesirable dietary sources. The most common of these negative sources is table salt. Table salt is made from a combination of sodium and chloride ions. Other unhealthful sources include yeast extracts, processed lunchmeats, and cheeses. Healthier sources of chloride include kelp (seaweed), ionic trace minerals, olives, rye, tomatoes, lettuce, and celery, although not in large enough amounts to supply the needs of an active adult.6 In its original form, however, chloride is leached from various rocks into soil and water by years of weathering processes. The chloride ion is highly mobile and is transported to closed basins, such as the Great Salt Lake, or oceans.7

Summary

Chloride is a highly important, vital mineral required for both human and animal life. Without chloride, the human body would be unable to maintain fluids in blood vessels, conduct nerve transmissions, move muscles, or maintain proper kidney function. As a major electrolyte mineral of the body, chloride performs many roles, and is rapidly excreted from the body. Active adults that eat a healthy diet devoid of salt and illnesses in which vomiting and/or diarrhea are profuse warrant the supplementation of additional chloride. Replacement of chloride is essential on a daily basis to maintain regular metabolic function. Chloride is safely utilized by the body, without negative health effects. Of the negative health effects that have been associated with diets high in chloride, these are mainly attributable to the accompanying sodium and potassium, two other electrolyte minerals to which chloride is often attached

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Wesson LG. Physiology of the human kidney. New York, NY, Grune and Stratton, 1969: 591

2 Weast RC, ed. CRC handbook of chemistry and physics, 67th ed. Boca Raton, FL, CRC Press, 1986.

3 Kaleita TA. Neurologic/behavioral syndrome associated with ingestion of chloride-deficient infant formula. Pediatrics 1986 Oct;78(4):714-5

4 Beard TC. A salt-hypertension hypothesis. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 1990;16 Suppl 7:S35-8

5 Seelig M. Cardiovascular consequences of magnesium deficiency and loss: pathogenesis, prevalence and manifestations--magnesium and chloride loss in refractory potassium repletion. Am J Cardiol 1989 Apr 18;63(14):4G-21G

6 Altschul AM, Grommet JK. Food choices for lowering sodium intake. Hypertension 1982 Sep-Oct;4(5 Pt 2):III116-20

7 Gelb SB, Anderson MP. Sources of chloride and sulfate in ground water beneath an urbanized area in Southeastern Wisconsin (Report WIS01 NTIS). Chemical abstracts, 1981, 96(2):11366g.



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Endnotes
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:37 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Endnotes

Endnotes


1 John R. Lee, M.D., NATURAL PROGESTERONE: THE MULTIPLE ROLES OF A REMARKABLE HORMONE, Revised. (BLL Publishing, Sebastopol, California: 1993), 4. See also U.S. Barzel, “Estrogens in the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a review.” AM J MED, (1988), 85: 847-850 and D.R. Felson, Y. Zhang, M.T. Hannan, et al., “The effect of postmenopausal estrogen therapy on bone density in elderly women.” THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE. (1993), 329: 1141-1146.
2 Darrell W. Brann, “Progesterone: The Forgotten Hormone?” PERSPECTIVES IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE. Summer, (1993), 34:4, 642. See also A.I. Csapo and B.A. Resch, “Induction of preterm labor in the rat by the antiprogesterone.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. (1979), 134:823-27.
3 Penelope Ody, THE COMPLETE MEDICINAL HERBAL. (Dorling Kindersley, New York: 1993), 52.
4 Daniel B. Mowrey, THE SCIENTIFIC VALIDATION OF HERBAL MEDICINE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1986), 112.
5 Lee, 16.
6 Ibid., 52.
7 C. Norman Shealy, M.D., DHEA THE YOUTH AND HEALTH HORMONE. (Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Connecticut: 1996), 34.
8 Lee, 4.
9 Ibid., 101.
10 Ibid., 50.
11 Ibid., 51.
12 Ibid., 101.
13 Ibid., 52.
14 Ibid., See also “Progesterone: Safe Antidote for PMS.” MCCALL’S MAGAZINE. October, (1990), 152-56 and Linda Carol Graham, “Do You Have a Hormone Shortage?” REDBOOK. February, (1989), 16.
15 Ibid.
16 Rita Elkins, M.A., DEPRESSION AND NATURAL MEDICINE. (Woodland Publishing, Pleasant Grove, Utah: 1995), 129.
17 Lee, 84.
18 Ibid., 87.
19 Ibid.
20 Alan R. Gaby, M.D., PREVENTING AND REVERSING OSTEOPOROSIS. (Prima Publishing, Rocklin, California: 1994), 150. See also John, R. Lee, M.D. “Osteoporosis reversal: the role of progesterone.” INT CLIN NUTR REV. (1990) 10:3, 384-91 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Osteoporosis reversal with transdermal progesterone.” LANCET. (1991), 336, 1327 and John R. Lee, M.D., “Is natural progesterone the missing link in osteoporosis prevention and treatment?” MED HYPOTHESES. 35, 316-18.
21 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 4.
22 Ibid., 102.
23 Ibid.
24 Shealy, 34.
25 Lee, NATURAL PROGESTERONE, 71. See also R.A.Hiatt, R. Bawol, G.D. Friedman and R. Hoover, “Exogenous estrogen and breast cancer after bilateral oophorectomy.” CANCER. (1984), 54, 139-44.
26 Lee, 4. See alsoR.B. Gambrell, “The Menopause: Benefits and Risks of Estrogen-Progesterone Replacement Therapy,” FERTIL STERIL, 1983, (37, 457-74).
27 Ibid., 75
28 Ibid., 72. See also, L.D. Cowan, L.Gordis, J. A. Tonascia, and G.S. Jones. “Breast Cancer Incidence in Women with a History of Progesterone Deficiency. JOURNAL OF EPIDIMIOLOGY, 1981, (114) 209.17.
29 Schealy, 35.
30 Ibid..
31 Lee, 74.
32 Schealy, 35.
33 Lee, 102.

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Conclusion
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Date: July 25, 2005 10:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Conclusion

Conclusion

Natural progesterone in cream or other transdermal forms appears to be one of the most effective and safe supplements for the treatment of various hormonally related disorders. It may well be superior to estrogen replacement therapy in some cases and should be utilized and evaluated for its superior therapeutic actions. No longer the “forgotten hormone,” natural progesterone, especially in the form of wild yam extract, is nothing less than remarkable in its physiological actions. While so many women are turning to synthetic hormones, tranquilizers, and analgesics to manage PMS and postmenopausal miseries, natural progesterone may well be the best and safest alternative. Getting the word out while scientific studies continue to support the credibility of using natural progesterone is currently underway. It would be nothing less than tragic if an affordable and safe substance like wild yam extract remained unused due to a lack of knowledge. The word is spreading rapidly. Dr. Lee put it well when he stated:

I must conclude with a tribute to what I call the women’s underground communication network, the vast informal woman-to-woman communication network that spreads hormone and health information with astonishing speed and extent around the world. An informational and health revolution is underway, thanks to the networking of intelligent, concerned women.33 I consider myself most fortunate to have become acquainted with natural progesterone synthesized from wild yam. For me, the discovery of this safe and marvelous supplement has been nothing less than extraordinary. It has made what was once a life lived at the mercy of the hormonal upheavals into one that is much more even-keeled, healthier and full of optimism.

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Improove Memory ...
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Date: June 09, 2005 05:49 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Improove Memory ...

Mesmerizing Memory by Cal Orey Energy Times, January 1, 1999

In the 60s, the same rock 'n' rollers who belted out "One pill makes you larger and one pill makes you small," often espoused the belief that certain pills could expand the mind. While counter-culture pill purveyors were pilloried for their pill-popping claims, 90s nutritional research has uncovered a stash of supplements that may amplify mental improvement.

Like a blues singer bending a high note, researchers are now humming with dramatic assertions that certain nutritional supplements can sustain and enhance concentration and memory function. For instance, studies reveal possible benefits for cognitive powers from vitamin C, magnesium and Ginkgo biloba. A recent report in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA 278:1327-1332) said that an extract of Ginkgo biloba "can stabilize and, in some cases, improve the cognitive function and social behavior of demented patients."

A researcher in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences noted that a daily dose of vitamin E may "help protect the brain and its memories from the ravages of time." And the beat goes on: other evidence indicates that zinc, iron and boron may pump up short-term memory attention span and cut the time it takes to perform mental tasks.

Neuronutrients
Neuronutrients-mentally helpful vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, amino acids and trace elements-offer an exciting key to keeping mental functions from succumbing to the degenerations of aging and disease. According to Dharma Singh Khalsa, MD, author of Brain Longevity (Warner Books) and an energetic campaigner for mental fitness through nutrition and exercise, vitamin E "can not only prevent deterioration of the brain, but actually reverse an important element of deterioration." Dr. Khalsa describes vitamin E as one of the most potent antioxidants, a fighter of the electrically charged free radicals that attack and break down cell membranes and nerve endings.

Lester Packer, PhD, professor of molecular and cell biology at UC Berkeley, told a joint 1996 United Nations-World Health Organization conference on Aging that "there is a growing body of evidence indicating that the free radical theory of aging and aging-related disease is valid," and that dietary and supplemental antioxidants can help fight illness and mental deterioration.

Vitamin E and other memory aids are believed to protect brain chemicals called neurotransmitters, "the ferrymen of the brain's communication system," that influence concentration and memory. Experts say that sustaining the level of these nerve chemicals in the brain can potentially improve all mental processes.

Brain Well-Being
"Your brain is intricately bound up with your physical state of well-being and is, therefore, vulnerable to any kind of physical abuse, especially that of chemical or substance abuse," report Thomas H. Crook III, PhD, and Brenda Adderly, MHA, co-authors of The Memory Cure (Pocket Books).

Too much alcohol, for example, commonly causes progressive mental decline, according to Secrets of the Superyoung (Villard) by David Weeks and Jamie James. The authors also point out that "the memory tends to worsen noticeably after 15 years of alcohol drinking, and much sooner in people who go on massive binges."

"The effects of cigarette smoke are subtler because the poisonous effects of carbon monoxide in each puff are temporarily offset by the alerting effects of the nicotine," they add. Can't remember the name of that singer cavorting in a music video? Tests have shown that smokers are worse at connecting peoples' names to their faces than nonsmokers.

Cognition Ignition
A first step in beginning your brain-boosting regimen consists of intensified intellectual activity, insists Rebecca Rupp, writer of Committed to Memory: How We Remember and Why We Forget (Crown): n Keep working: The mental challenges and social interactions of a job prevents lapses in the brain's synapses.

n Learn something new: A second language, musical instrument, or unique puzzles and games keep neurons working like new.

n Turn off the TV: Read. Studies show that passively watching TV requires less concentration than eating cereal. Mental rejuvenation also requires physical activity. Exercise increases oxygen flow to the brain, which supports memory, concentration and cognition. One study has shown that exercise significantly brightened the moods of middle-aged and older women, regardless of whether they were pre- or post-menopausal, with or without hormone replacement therapy.

Supplemental Brain Help
As you provide for your physical and mental vitality through healthy exercise and diet, you can augment your regimens with other supplements that research has shown to boost brain power.

Antioxidants, including the previously mentioned vitamin E (You haven't forgotten vitamin E already, have you?), provide crucial help for vigorous cerebral function. The free radicals created by tobacco smoke, air pollution, ultraviolet light and certain carcinogenic chemicals deconstruct cell membranes and may foster microscopic brain cell havoc. Antioxidant enzymes convert free radicals to more neutral, benign substances and nutritional antioxidants can neutralize free radicals by linking up with them.

Vitamin C, a brainy antioxidant all star, performs so well that, according to Dr. Khalsa, its levels in the brain are almost 15 times higher than in other parts of the body. This nutrient, he asserts, aids mental and physical longevity. In a UCLA study, people who ingested at least 300 mg of vitamin C daily lived more than six years longer than those who ingested less.

Mental Fat
As a brain protector, selenium ranks high. Your brain consists of about 60% fat and selenium is a master at restricting detrimental fat oxidation. At the same time, zinc takes part in antioxidant processes that quell free radicals and strengthens neuronal cell membranes, protecting nerves from damage.

Added to this mix, magnesium also scavenges free-radicals, according to Dr. Khalsa. Plus, experts recommend grape seed extract (phytochemicals that protect a wide range of cellular structures) to safeguard nerve cells and mental capacity.

B Vitamins for the Mind
John W. Rowe, MD, president of Mount Sinai Hospital and School of Medicine in New York and author of Successful Aging (Pantheon) states that "there is a significant relationship between blood levels of folic acid and vitamins B12 and cognitive decline." In other words, these vitamins seem to be necessary to eliminate a protein called homocysteine, which has been implicated in the development of coronary heart disease and cognitive problems. (Support for Dr. Rowe's conclusion appeared in the American Journal for Clinical Nutrition 63-306.)

Iron Mind
Iron also may strengthen memory. Since iron is involved in distributing oxygen to brain cells (and every other cell in the body), when you lack this mineral you may find it hard to concentrate. In the early 1990s, Harold Sandstead, MD, professor of preventive medicine at the University of Texas, discovered that women whose diets lack zinc and iron experienced more difficulties on standard exams than women with an adequate dietary supply. In his study of women aged 18 to 40, Sandstead found that giving these women more zinc and iron raised their scores on memory tests and average of 20%.

Boron plays a crucial part in mental function. Scientists at the USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center have linked boron deficiencies to chronic lethargy and fatigue. In brain studies, they found that the electrical activity of the gray matter in the boron deficient indicated increased drowsiness and mental sluggishness.

Huperzine Boost
Borrowed from Chinese folk medicine, Huperzine A (HupA) recently has attracted attention from researchers who credit it with enhancing cognitive function and helping folks suffering from disease-related dementia. HupA is an extract of the club moss Huperzia serrata and has been used for centuries in China to treat fever, inflammation and, most recently, dementia. Dr. Alan Kozikowski, professor of chemistry in the neurology department at Georgetown University's Drug Discovery Program, a researcher who first synthesized HupA and studied it extensively, reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA, 277 (10):776-March 1997), that HupA is safe, having been used to treat 100,000 people in China.

HupA basically protects the brain from free radical damage (due to low levels of antioxidant defenses) and maintains or enhances crucial neurotransmitter action. More specifically, HupA helps reduce the breakdown of acetylcholine, the vital neurotransmitter, and makes this substance more bioavailable. In addition, HupA helps make choline accessible to the brain for the synthesis of acetylcholine, according to a study in Neuropharmacology (30, 1991: 763-768).

Normally, the brain manufactures sufficient levels of the chemical phosphatidylserine, a lecithin-derivative that helps boost neurotransmitter release, but deficiencies of vitamin B12 and folic acid, or of essential fatty acids, may retard that production. Low levels of phosphatidylserine in the brain are related to impaired mental function and depression in the elderly. Scientists reporting in Aging (5, 1993; 123-33) describe "good results" using phosphatidylserine in the treatment of age-related cognitive ills.

Ginkgo Brain Power
Researchers also have demonstrated that Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) increases brain function mostly by boosting acetylcholine receptors and the transmission of nerve impulses, with no significant adverse reactions. GBE is effective not only for folks with Alzheimer's; it also helps when mental function is impaired by vascular deficiencies or depression. Keep in mind that experts believe that GBE requires about 12 weeks of supplementation to reach optimal effectiveness.

Another ingredient in what seems like an alphabet-soup of brain nourishment is DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), an omega-3 fat essential for normal brain function. Researchers met recently at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center's Nutrition Information Center to discuss "Keeping Your Brain in Shape: New Insights into DHA." Their findings revealed links between low levels of DHA and Alzheimer's, depression, memory loss, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and certain behavioral traits including aggression and hostility.

Mostly Fat
Since so much of the brain is fat, material like DHA forms the building block of brain tissue and the primary structural fatty acid in its gray matter. Although it is critical for mental and visual well being, the average American's consumption of DHA has declined since we're eating less of DHA's dietary sources: animal organ meats and eggs.

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health point out, however, that fish is an excellent dietary source of DHA. In their studies, they discovered that depression rates in Japan and Taiwan, where fish ranks a top spot on the menu, are significantly lower than in North America and Europe.

DHA also is crucial to the neurological development of children, according to findings published in Pediatrics (vol. 101, no. 1, January 1998). Researchers suggest that DHA-rich breast milk should be the model for infant formulas that enhance babies' neurological development. Scientists also have correlated some behavioral problems in children-ADHD, for example-to DHA deficiencies.

If you are a vegetarian, or have other cause for concern about a potential lack of DHA in your diet, you can rely on dietary supplementation of DHA. Bruce J. Holub, PhD, of the University of Guelph in Canada provided vegetarians in his research project with DHA supplements over a 42-day period and substantially increased their DHA blood levels.

The bottom line to enhanced mental performance is to take a balanced approach, says Robert Snider, MD, who specializes in preventive medicine in Massena, New York. "Maintaining brain power includes exercise, stress reduction and good nutrition." The message to keep in mind: Don't lose your nutritional balance or you could lose a piece of your peace of mind.

Recommended Reading: & Brain Builders (Reward Books, 1995), by Richard Leviton.

Brain Longevity (Warner Books, 1997), by Dharma Singh Khalsa, MD.

Omega 3 Oils to Improve Mental Health, Fight Degenerative Diseases and Extend Life (Avery, 1996), by Donald Rudin, MD, and Clara Felix.

Successful Aging (Pantheon, 1998), by John W. Rowe, MD, and Robert L. Kahn, PhD.



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