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Take Indian kudzu if you're diabetic: It keeps your kidneys healthy VitaNet, LLC Staff 11/10/18
Kudzu Root: Beneficial Herb or Just a Hyped Plant Invader? Darrell Miller 5/27/17
Motion Sickness Darrell Miller 2/26/09
Addiction Recovery With Chinese Herbs Like Kudzu Darrell Miller 11/28/07
Kudzu - Herbs with alcohol intake suppressive agents ... Darrell Miller 5/25/05
KudZu, Treatment of alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse Darrell Miller 5/19/05
Increase Energy and Adapt to stress with Kudzu... Darrell Miller 5/17/05



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Take Indian kudzu if you're diabetic: It keeps your kidneys healthy
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Date: November 10, 2018 09:51 AM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Take Indian Kudzu if you're diabetic: It keeps your kidneys healthy





Diabetes is a serious and chronic condition, which as it progresses can wreak havoc on an array of bodily systems. One potential victim of the havoc is the kidneys. They endure a great deal of oxidative stress in a body that is constantly fighting the effects of diabetes. This ongoing stress overtime does damage the kidneys and can eventually destroy them The condition of oxidative stress endured by kidneys functioning under an ongoing onslaught of diabetic effects is known as diabetic nephropathy. In a worse case scenario it can lead to total renal failure. The organic tuber, Indian Kudzu, is an Aryuvedic medicine staple, besides housing a wealth of antioxidants. Researchers from a Banaras Hindu University recently decided see whether the oxidative power of Indian Kudzu might be able to stand tall against the stress endured by kidneys undergoing diabetic onslaught, thereby protecting them from the ravages of the stress. The study, which used rodent subjects, proved that though oxidative stress in the diabetic rodent subjects was high, the kudzu was able to reduce or reverse some of the damage, due in part to its ability to improve human antioxidant enzyme activity.

Key Takeaways:

  • Diabetes can have many negative effects, including diabetic nephropathy, which can damage and even destroy the kidneys.
  • The condition is caused by oxidative stress, a state that regular consumption of the Indian Kudzu can help slow down and block, making it an effective adjunct to hypertension protocols.
  • The premise that the Kudzu would prove protective was upheld in a study done at A Banaras Hindu University that made use of rodent subjects.

"The tubers are a treasure trove of antioxidants that reduce the effects of oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species related to aging and various ailments."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-11-06-indian-kudzu-for-diabetics-it-keeps-kidneys-healthy.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5825)


Kudzu Root: Beneficial Herb or Just a Hyped Plant Invader?
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Date: May 27, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Kudzu Root: Beneficial Herb or Just a Hyped Plant Invader?





Originally native to Asia, the kudzu root has had a divided perception in the United States. Used for many years in Chinese medicine, the kudzu has instead been seen as a harmful plant for many Americans. However, further research shows that the kudzu root does indeed has beneficial properties if used the right way. Whether it be fighting disease by reducing inflammation, easing an upset stomach, or even treating alcoholism, the kudzu root has been looked at a bit more favorably on the side of one's health. It is not without its drawbacks, however, as not only is the plant itself seen as a yard pest, but ingesting the root while on birth control can weaken the effects of the birth control and as it slows blood clotting, it could be a danger to those who are already on blood clotting medication. Regardless of the studies that have been shown, it is still clear that more research needs to be completed on kudzu root before a final verdict can be made on whether it is truly beneficial or just another yard pest.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Chinese cook it in many dishes for both medicinal purposes and flavor, but in the United States, it has a bit of a pesky reputation as an invader that takes over telephone poles, yards and trees.
  • Kudzu root has been given the honor of helping reduce the painful effects of a hangover, though it seems that if overused, it could be more harmful than good.
  • The Preventative Medicine Center (PMC) suggests kudzu as a remedy for an upset stomach caused by digestive issues.

"The Preventative Medicine Center (PMC) suggests kudzu as a remedy for an upset stomach caused by digestive issues."

Read more: https://draxe.com/kudzu-root/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4707)


Motion Sickness
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Date: February 26, 2009 12:43 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Motion Sickness

Motion sickness is the result of motion causing the eyes, the sensory nerves, and the vestibular apparatus of the ear to send conflicting signals to the brain, causing a loss of equilibrium or a sense of vertigo. Most often, it is experienced in a car, airplane, train, boat, elevator, or swing. Contributing factors to this illness are anxiety, genetics, overeating, poor ventilation, and traveling immediately after eating. A susceptibility to things like offensive odors, sights, or sounds can often precede an attack of motion sickness. Typically, women are affected by this condition more frequently than men are. Elderly people and children under the age of two are usually not affected.

Those people who suffer from motion sickness experience symptoms including severe headaches, queasiness, nausea, and vomiting while flying, sailing, or traveling in automobiles or trains. Other symptoms of motion sickness include cold sweats, dizziness, excessive salivation and/or yawning, fatigue, loss of appetite, pallor, severe distress, sleepiness, weakness, and occasionally, breathing difficulties that make one feel as if they are suffocating. If motion sickness is severe, an attack can make a person feel completely uncoordinated, and sometimes and injury can occur from loss of balance. The motion sickness typically goes away once the stimulus is removed. However, it can also persist for hours or days. If a person suffers from motion sickness for a prolonged amount of time, they may experience depression, dehydration, or low blood pressure. Motion sickness can also worsen any other illnesses that a person already has.

Many natural remedies have been greatly successful in treating motion sickness. The prevention of motion sickness is the key, as it is far easier to prevent than it is to cure. Once excessive salivation and nausea set in, usually it is too late to do anything but wait for the trip to be over so that recovery can begin.

The following nutrients have been recommended to help prevent motion sickness. Unless otherwise specified, the dosages given are for adults. For children between the ages of twelve and seventeen, the dose should be reduced to three-quarters of the recommended amount. For children between six and twelve, one-half of the recommended dose should be used, while one-quarter of the amount should be used for children under the age of six.

Charcoal tablets can be used as a detoxifier. Five tablets should be taken one hour before travel. Magnesium, which acts as a nerve tonic, should be taken in dosages of 500 mg one hour before a trip. To help relieve nausea, 100 mg of vitamin B6 should be taken one hour before a trip, and then 100 mg should be taken again two hours later. Additionally, black horehound can help to reduce nausea. Butcher’s broom, Kudzu, and motherwort are great for helping to relieve vertigo. Ginger is beneficial in suppressing nausea, making it an excellent treatment and preventive for nausea and upset stomach.

Lastly, peppermint tea sooths and calms the stomach. Also, a drop of peppermint oil on the tongue is a great way to provide relief from nausea and motion sickness. Peppermint can also be taken in a lozenge form. To learn more information about the above nutrients, contact your local or internet health food store.

--
Fight Mostion Sickness at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1971)


Addiction Recovery With Chinese Herbs Like Kudzu
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Date: November 28, 2007 12:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Addiction Recovery With Chinese Herbs Like Kudzu

Kudzu is Chinese herb that has been identified for the treatment of alcoholism. Anybody who has even had an addiction will tell you that addiction recovery is one of the most difficult of the tasks that life throws at us. Whether it is an addiction to tobacco or to heroin or anything in between is not easy, and those that join the ‘self-afflicted’ lobby do not help, but for the Grace of God...

Alcohol addiction is now potentially the most prevalent addiction in the world. There are now more that drink alcohol than smoke, and alcohol related problems are more than just a social problem, but cause the deaths of over 100,000 annually in the USA. One shudders at the thought of the world-wide death toll. It has been suggested that chemical addictions, as opposed to physical habits, can have chemical cures. Although the jury is still out on this one, there have been some positive results achieved in the treatment of addicts with natural remedies.

One of these natural remedies is the Chinese herb, Kudzu. Kudzu is a climbing vine that can grow just about anywhere: in fields, lightly forested land and mountains. It is found throughout China, and also in the south eastern states of the USA. The reason for this strange distribution is that the plant was introduced to the USA by Japan at the 1876 Centennial Expo in Philadelphia.

The large blooms attracted gardeners who propagated them, and when it was discovered that the plant made good forage for animals, Florida nurserymen grew it as animal feed. Its effect in preventing ground erosion rendered it popular during the 1930s and 40s when farmers were paid up to $8 an acre for growing Kudzu. Fodder and groundcover were the original uses of this vine in the USA irrespective of its medicinal uses on the other side of the Pacific.

Prior to it being recognized as a useful treatment for alcoholism, the vine had been used in China for generations for the treatment of such conditions as headaches, flu, high blood pressure symptoms, dysentery, muscular aches and pains and the common cold. It is still used to treat digestive complaints and allergies, and find use in modern medicine in the treatment of angina.

It is the root that is mainly used, which at up to six feet tall provides a plentiful supply of its active ingredients. These include isoflavones including daidzein and isoflavone glycosides, mainly puerarin and also daidzin. However, it is in its application in the treatment of alcohol addiction that the root is currently creating interest.

Studies in the 1960s on animals bred with an alcohol craving indicated that daidzein and daidzin reduced their consumption of alcohol when offered it, and further studies have indicated that the mechanism of this was by inhibition of enzymes necessary for metabolizing alcohols. This has not yet been successfully repeated in humans, but the effects on animals cannot be just coincidental. Or can it? That question can only be answered by those for whom Kudzu has been found effective, although many laboratory studies have shown that it certainly reduces the alcohol consumption of those with a habitual heavy intake of the substance.

Of all the other substances that have been used in an attempt to reduce the extent of alcoholism in the Western world, none have been found truly effective. The three recognized treatments of Campral (Acamprosate Calcium), approved by the FDA in July, 2004, Naltrexone (Revia) and Antabuse work in three different ways. Campral is useful only once you have stopped drinking and have detoxed, Naltrexone interferes with the pathway in the brain that ‘rewards’ the drinker and Antabuse gives unpleasant side effects that are meant to put the drinker off drinking.

Although all have side effects of one type or another, they have been approved by the FDA, and must therefore be assumed safe if used as recommended. However, none are natural, and Kudzu has been found to have no known side effects. It is a type of pea, and did you know that it grows about one foot a day? Luckily it only grows to about 20 feet!

It is Kudzu’s lack of side effects that renders it so attractive as a treatment for alcoholism, although more tests are needed before the evidence for its effectiveness can be declared cast iron. Most of the tests to date have been carried out on heavy drinkers rather than true alcoholics, but they have all found the plant effective in reducing the amount that each member of the study drank, even though no limitations were placed on them.

Future studies should probably be designed to determine if the treatment is safe for such groups as pregnant women, young people and those with specific medical complaints such as liver problems. Naltrexone should not be used by anybody with serious liver problems, and even campral is only suitable if you have no more than a moderate liver problem. Since alcoholics can reasonable be expected to also suffer from liver disease, then a treatment that is safe for such people would be very welcome.

A 2002 meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism in San Francisco named Kudzu and St. John’s Wort as being the two most promising treatments for alcoholism. The mention of St. John’s Wort raises an interesting point, and one that must be discussed. That is the question of standardized doses, and what can happen if doses of natural products are not standardized with respect to the identified active constituent.

The reason for the importance of this is that not all sources of a particular herb are equally well endowed with active constituents. Although, for example, a dose of 2.5 grams daily of Kudzu root might be recommended, how does the percent content of isoflavones in different roots vary. That variation will mean that the amount of active ingredient taken in one 2.5g dose will differ from that in another, unless there is standardization.

The reason St. John’s Wort brought this to mind is that with this herb, used for some psychological problems such as depression, the active ingredient content was standardized. It was standardized to 0.3% hypericin, a napthodianthrone that causes an increase in dopamine levels. However, standard doses of St. John’s Wort gave inconsistent results and the reason for this could not be identified. It now has been. The active ingredient is now known to be not hypericin, but hypeforin, what is known as a prenylated phloroglucinol. The herb is now standardized on this substance.

This is a demonstration of the importance of identifying the active ingredients in a herbal treatment accurately, and also of standardizing doses. Kudzu doses must be standardized if their effect is to be consistent. There is now little doubt that addiction recovery is possible with Chinese herbs like Kudzu, and who knows what else the ancient civilizations such as the Chinese have to offer us.



--
Let Vitanet, LLC Help With Addiction Recovery

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1641)


Kudzu - Herbs with alcohol intake suppressive agents ...
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Date: May 25, 2005 09:25 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Kudzu - Herbs with alcohol intake suppressive agents ...

Kudzu and the discovery of daidzin and its anti-dipsotropic activity

  • Kudzu has diadzin a substance that has shown to reduce alcohol consumption in all lab test results.
  • Definition:

  • aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), the major enzyme involved in the detoxification of acetaldehyde, the primary and highly reactive metabolic intermediate of ethanol(alcohol) metabolism.
  • D A I D Z I N : A PO T E N T I A L A G E N T FO R T H E T R E A T M E N T O F A L C O H O L DE P E N D E N C E

    A. Anti-Dipsotropic Activity of Daidzin and Crude Extract of RP

    For more than a millennium, extracts containing RP or FP have been used apparently safely and effectively for the treatment of ‘‘alcohol addiction’’ in China.

  • in 1993 proof of anti-dipsotropic effects of daidzin (A substance found in Kudzu) -- 12 At a dose of 1.5 g/kg/day, i.p., a crude alcoholic extract of RP reduced hamster ethanol intake by more than 50%
  • Intake of Kudzu may help reduce alcohol consumption in those with abusive consumption of alcohol.



    -- VitaNet®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=100)


    KudZu, Treatment of alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse
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    Date: May 19, 2005 09:29 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Kudzu, Treatment of alcohol dependence or alcohol abuse

    For millennia, folk medicines have been used to treat ‘‘alcohol addiction’’ in China. A thorough literature search of the ancient Chinese pharmacopoeias revealed a long list of traditional remedies, including the 16 ‘‘stop-drinking’’ formulae of Sun Simiao (ca. 600 AD) and the ‘‘anti-alcohol addiction’’ formula of Li Dongyuan (ca. 1200 AD), 2 of the most reputed ‘‘medical doctors’’ in the history of Traditional Chinese Medicine. However, like those discovered by the ancient Romans,11 most of the ancient Chinese remedies for ‘‘alcohol addiction’’ were based on psychological aversion: to deter patients from further drinking by associating alcohol drinking with an unpleasant experience. Interestingly, as time went by, treatments based solely on psychological aversion were gradually eliminated from the ancient Chinese pharmacopoeias, presumably because of their ineffectiveness and/or undesirable side effects. The only remedies that have survived this historical trial-anderror scrutiny are those consisting the root (Radix puerariae, RP) or flower (Flos puerariae, FP) of Pueraria lobata (a medicinal plant known to the West as Kudzu). It was on the basis of this historical backdrop, we initiated the search of safe and efficacious anti-dipsotropic (alcohol intake suppressive) agents from RP. This approach has led to the discovery of daidzin,12 an isoflavone that has since been shown to reduce alcohol drinking in all alcohol preferring animal models tested to date.

    Alcohol abuse

    Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence (i.e., alcoholism) are serious public health problems of modern society. In the United States alone, an estimated 13 million adults exhibit symptoms of alcohol dependence due to excessive alcohol intake, and an additional 7 million abuse alcohol without showing symptoms of dependence according to U.S. Government projections from studies conducted in the mid-1980s. Alcohol dependence and abuse are very expensive: in economic and medical terms, it will cost the U.S. well over $200 billion in 1991 with no prospect of falling or leveling off. The social and psychological damages inflicted on individuals as a consequence of alcohol abuse, e.g., children born with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and victims of alcohol-related accidental death, homicide, suicide, etc., are immense.

    While it is generally accepted that alcoholism and alcohol abuse are afflictions with staggering international economic, social, medical, and psychological repercussions, success in preventing or otherwise ameliorating the consequences of these problems has been an elusive goal. Only very recently the public view that alcoholism and alcohol abuse are remediable solely by moral imperatives has been changed to include an awareness of alcoholism and alcohol abuse as physiological aberrations whose etiology may be understood and for which therapy may be found through scientific pursuits. Both alcohol abuse and dependence arise as a result of different, complex, and as yet incompletely understood processes. At present, alcohol research is in the mainstream of scientific efforts.

    Our studies on alcohol (ethanol or ethyl alcohol) have been based on the hypothesis that its abuse can ultimately be understood and dealt with at the molecular level. Such a molecular understanding, if achieved, would provide a basis for the identification and development of appropriate therapeutic agents. Our view hypothesizes that the clinical manifestations of alcoholism and alcohol abuse are the consequence of aberrations or defects within one or more metabolic pathways, affected by the presence of ethyl alcohol. In order to test this hypothesis, our initial studies focused on physical, chemical, and enzymatic properties of human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the enzyme that catalyzes alcohol oxidation according to the following reaction formula:

    CH.sub.3 CH.sub.2 OH+NAD.sup.+ .fwdarw.CH.sub.3 CHO+NADH

    In addition, our studies more recently have focused on the aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) which catalyze the subsequent step in the major pathway of ethanol metabolism according to the following reaction formula:

    CH.sub.3 CHO+NAD.sup.+ .fwdarw.CH.sub.3 COOH+NADH

    Prior to our research (for example, see Blair and Vallee, 1966, Biochemistry 5:2026-2034), ADH in man was thought to exist in but one or two forms, primarily in the liver, where it was considered the exclusive enzyme for the metabolism of ethanol. Currently, four different classes of ADH encompassing over twenty ADH isozymes have been identified and isolated from human tissues. There is no reason to believe that all of these ADH isozymes are necessary to catalyze the metabolism of a single molecule, ethanol, even though all of them can interact with it. We have proposed that the normal function of these isozymes is to metabolize other types of alcohols that participate in critical, physiologically important processes, and that ethanol interferes with their function (Vallee, 1966, Therapeutic Notes 14:71-74). Further, we predicted that individual differences in alcohol tolerance might well be based on both qualitative and quantitative differences in isozyme endowment (Vallee, 1966, supra).

    Our research has established the structures, properties, tissue distribution, and developmental changes for most of the ADH isozymes, which while structurally quite similar, and presumed to have evolved from a common precursor, are functionally remarkably varied. Of the more than 120 publications from our laboratory that relate to the above subjects, the following, arranged in six categories, are especially useful for instruction in the prior art.

  • Kudzu Recovery 60ct

  • Kudzu Recovery 120ct

  • Kudzu Root Extract 50caps

  • Kudzu Root Extract from Solaray 60ct



  • Recover from stress, lessen desire for alcohol, primary cleansing, and liver support


  • --
    VitaNet ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=79)


    Increase Energy and Adapt to stress with Kudzu...
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    Date: May 17, 2005 04:10 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Increase Energy and Adapt to stress with Kudzu...

    Planetary Formulas This product features the roots and flowers of Kudzu (Pueraria lobata), which have long been used in Chinese herbalism to help lessen the desire for alcohol. These are combined with coptis, a primary cleansing and liver-supporting herb from Chinese herbalism, and other key botanicals to support balanced blood sugar levels and enhance energy levels. Kudzu may help restore adrenal glands.

  • Kudzu Recovery 60ct

  • Kudzu Recovery 120ct

  • Try some other brands

  • Kudzu Root Extract 50caps

  • Kudzu Root Extract from Solaray 60ct



  • Recover from stress, lessen desire for alcohol, primary cleansing, and liver support


  • --
    VitaNet ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=63)



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