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CLA in Weight Loss Darrell Miller 1/21/14
Barlean’s Fish Oils Darrell Miller 11/22/07
The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, D-Ribose, L-Carnitine, and Magnesium Darrell Miller 5/18/07
Probiotics - Our Friendly Bacteria Darrell Miller 6/16/05



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CLA in Weight Loss
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Date: January 21, 2014 10:05 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CLA in Weight Loss

What is CLA

claCLA, or conjugated linoleic harsh corrosive, has been the subject of an assortment of exploration in the previous numerous years. Over 200 studies have indicated that it may assume an exceptionally vital part in weight reduction, as well as in serving to battle disease, diabetes, and atherosclerosis (solidifying of the corridors). It is not made in the human figure, and is discovered commonly in meat and dairy fats, or as an over-the-counter supplement. Artificially, it is a marginally changed type of the fundamental greasy harsh corrosive, linoleic harsh corrosive, and an omega-6 fattening harsh corrosive. The CLA discovered regularly in the sustenance sources is most astounding in dairy cattle and bovines that expend an eating methodology rich in grasses, and the individuals who are nibbling in pastures; instead of the aforementioned bolstered monitored food, for example, grain, feed or silage. To quote Larry Satter, an Agricultural Research Dairy Scientist, "Pasture-nibbled cows had 500% more CLA in their milk than those nourished silage." Since the fat is the particular bearer of the CLA, the substance of the fat in the milk is extremely paramount. The higher the fat substance, the more stupendous the CLA sum is in the milk. This is as opposed to what is proposed when drinking milk. Skim or 1% is constantly proposed over the entire or 2%, to maintain a strategic distance from the overabundance calories and fat, since normally drain was Tanked for the calcium content (or the protein). This adds an entire new profit to drain and dairy items, clearing a path for science to control the CLA substance of milkfat, and may open the entryway the CLA-improved sustenances.

Study on CLA

Scientists accept CLA helps square fat cells that are in the figure from topping off with fat by meddling with a fat-archiving compound regarded as lipoprotein lipase, and additionally, by expanding the affectability of units to the hormone insulin. Creature studies have likewise demonstrated an expansion in lean bulk and fat lessening, or fat blazing; furnishing positive progressions to form sythesis, a decline in general muscle to fat ratio ratios. It is known as a "fat eliminator" on the grounds that it revs up muscle metabolism, in this way, helping increment lean tissue, bringing about the figure to need more calories to capacity (since fat units smolder next to zero calories), accordingly accelerating the fat smoldering procedure to make vigor.

Much stays to be looked into the underlying instruments by which CLA pushes its assorted physiological impacts. The profits are genuine, in spite of the fact that more research with people requirements to be carried out. You ought not feel that taking CLA alone would phenomenally make you shed pounds, in the event that you are not joining a brilliant, solid, overall adjusted eating methodology and activity program on top of it.

Reference:

  1. //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugated_linoleic_acid

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Barlean’s Fish Oils
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Date: November 22, 2007 01:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Barlean’s Fish Oils

It’s usually a common fact that what is best for your body is also what is best for the planet. Eating organic foods instead of processed foods; eating less food overall; and using natural medicine from herbs and nutrients to heal illnesses instead of hazardous pharmaceuticals: are god for the environment and also good for your health. However, there are a few exceptions to this rule. At first glance, one exception is eating fish and taking fish oil supplements. Although these fish oils are a huge benefit to the human body, the toll that fishing is taking on marine ecosystems is far less beneficial to fish populations. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, almost three-quarters of the world’s fish species are gone to a point of no return.

Fish oils are the only abundant natural source of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA. Because most modern diets usually contain abundant omega-6 fatty acids these fatty acids are very low in most people’s diets. Omega-3s work as anti-inflammatory and promote good nerve transmission, heart function, and relaxed, open blood vessels, while omega-6s tend to do the opposite. By using fish oil supplements to raise levels of DHA and EPA, virtually every system of the body is benefited and protected against disease processes. These oils are currently being studied for their use in treatments against high cholesterol, depression, hypertension, and bipolar disorder. The growing popularity of these amazingly healthy foods, along with the ever-increasing pollution and habitat destruction are, together, creating a dangerous depletion of fish in our oceans.

So should we stop eating fish oil? If we do, we’ll be depriving ourselves of one of the world’s most beneficial foods, which helps our cardiovascular system, bones, joints, skin, energy levels, healthy pregnancy, visual acuity, hormone balance, psychological health, thinking ability, and sexual and emotional health. Fortunately, there is an alternative in getting your omega-3s. The answer is through buying your fish oil from a company that is dedicated to sustainable fish practices. Omega-3 is found in fish oil and flax seeds. Some fish oil suppliers use a reef netting to catch Puget Sound salmon, which has been practiced by native people of the northwest for centuries using boats and nets made from cedar. Reef netting has been declared the “best sustainable fishing method in practice today” by the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. Reef nets mimic natural barriers that salmon routinely navigate, where they are caught and taken to a holding Tank on the deck of the boat within minutes. Any by catch is then quickly and easily returned to sea unharmed. Fish oils should be made from anchovy and sardines that have been harvested from the coast of Peru, while their Cod Liver Oil is sourced from Artic cod off the coast of Norway, all of which have very healthy populations. A reputable company will make sure to choose where they source their fish oils, picking only the cleanest, purest fish to provide to consumers. After the oil arrives at a company, it goes through at least five different purification processes which eliminate any toxins and prevent spoilage before distillation.

An Alternative to Oily fish oil

Europharma has come out with Vectomega, a fish oil supplement in tablet form that provides the same great DHA and EPA health benefits that regular fish oil softgels do with out the oil. you have no fear of burping up oil with Vectomega fish oil.



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Fish Oil

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The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, D-Ribose, L-Carnitine, and Magnesium
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Date: May 18, 2007 01:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, D-Ribose, L-Carnitine, and Magnesium

The Awesome Foursome: Coenzyme Q10, L-Carnitine,

D-Ribose, Magnesium

 

The “Awesome Foursome” of Coenzyme Q10, L-Carnitine, D-Ribose, and magnesium helps our hearts metabolize energy more efficiently and protects them from the stress of cardiovascular disease. This powerful combination of nutrients goes directly to the basic biochemistry of cellular energy metabolism. Now let’s take a closer look at how Coenzyme Q10, L-Carnitine, D-Ribose, and magnesium work in synergy to promote cardiovascular health.

 

Coenzyme Q10:

Energy Recycling through the Electron Transport Chain

Coenzyme Q10 is a powerful antioxidant that helps protect the mitochondrial membrane, mitochondrial DNA, and cell walls from free-radical attack. But its most important function in the body is its central role in energy metabolism.

Most – about 90 percent – of the ATP used by cells is recycled as food (fuel) and oxidized in the mitochondria. Fatty acids, carbohydrates, and, occasionally, proteins are carried across the mitochondrial membrane and enter the Krebs’ cycle, moving from step to step and spinning off electrons. These electrons are then handed off to the electron transport chain, where, in the presence of oxygen, the energy from the electrons is captured as a phosphate group is added to ADP to form ATP. This recycling of ATP is called oxidative phosphorylation, and the by-products of these pathways are CO2 and water.

In this fashion, Coenzyme Q10 acts as a gatekeeper of electrons, making sure they are carried to just the right place to pass on their life-giving energy.

What is critical, however, is the simple fact that without Coenzyme Q10 the electron transport chain would totally break down. And since the electron transport chain is (by far!) the largest contributor to cellular energy turnover, its loss would be catastrophic. It is also important to know that there has to be an excess of Coenzyme Q10 in the mitochondria to be maximally effective. Having just enough isn’t sufficient to do the job properly, and having a deficiency seriously affects the mitochondria’s ability to supply the cell with energy.

Cellular stress can cause Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, which places a severe strain on Coenzyme Q10 availability. People with heart disease, hypertension, gingival disease, Parkinson’s disease, and the other disorders we’ve discussed are known to be deficient in Coenzyme Q10. Whether these deficiencies are the cause or the effect of these varied medical problems, the end result is that they sap the life out of their mitochondria and reduce their energy supplies. You see, Coenzyme Q10 cannot function properly if electrons are not coming out of the Krebs’ cycle, and the Krebs’ cycle won’t work without the fuel that’s transported into the mitochondria by L-Carnitine.

 

L-Carnitine:

Transporting the Cellular Energy Fuel

Fatty acids are the preferred energy fuel for hearts and most other cells in the body. L-Carnitine facilitates the beta oxidation of fatty acids as energy fuel. And since fatty acids are the preferred fuel for energy recycling in cells, this action is critical to cell and tissue function. Unfortunately, L-carnitine is deficient in people with heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, lipid metabolic disorders, mitochondrial disorders, and many other disease syndromes we reviewed earlier. This L-carnitine deficiency disrupts the normal metabolism of fatty acids, reducing available energy supplies and leading to the accumulation of toxic by-products of fatty acid metabolism. L-carnitine supplementation revives fatty acid metabolism and restore normal mitochondrial function. But even this powerful improvement in cellular energy metabolism cannot up for the energy drain that comes from the loss of energy substrates caused by low oxygen delivery to the tissue. Only D-Ribose can do that.

 

D-Ribose:

Rebuilding the Cellular Energy Pool

As long as cells and tissues have plenty of oxygen, the pool of energy substrates in the cell remains high. And as long as there is enough L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 available, the process of energy utilization and supply can proceed unimpeded. However, the cellular supply of oxygen can be restricted by acute or chronic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, any number of skeletal – or neuromuscular diseases, or even high-intensity exercise.

When cells are deprived of oxygen the mitochondrial energy turnover becomes inefficient. Remember, oxygen is required to let the oxidative pathway of energy recycling work properly. If the mitochondria are not able to recycle energy efficiently, cellular energy supply cannot keep pace with demand. But the cell has a continuing need for energy so it will use all its ATP stores and then break down the by-product, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), to pull the remaining energy out of this compound as well. What’s left is adenosine menophosphate (AMP). Since a growing concentration of AMP is incompatible with sustained cellular function it’s quickly broken apart and the by-products are washed out of the cell. The net result of this process is a depletion of the cellular pool of energy substrates. When the by-products of AMP catabolism are washed out of the cell, they are lost forever. It takes a long time to replace these lost energy substrates even if the cell is fully perfused with oxygen again.

Ribose is the only compound used by the body to refill this energy pool.  Every cell in the body has the capacity to make ribose, but hearts, muscles, and most other tissues lack the metabolic machinery to make ribose quickly when the cells are stressed by oxygen depletion or metabolic insufficiency.  Ribose is made naturally in the cells from glucose.  In stressed cells, however, glucose is preferentially metabolized for the energy turnover and is not available for ribose synthesis.  So when energy pools are drained from stressed cells, the cells must first wait for the slow process of ribose synthesis before they can begin to replace their lost energy stores.

    Acute ischemia, like that which takes place during a heart attack, heart surgery, or angioplasty, drains the cell of energy.  Even when oxygenated blood flow returns, refilling the energy pool may take ten or more days.  But when oxygen deprivation is chronic, or when energy metabolism is disrupted by disease, there may be so much continual strain on the energy supply that the pool can ever refill without the assistance of supplemental ribose.  Conditions like ischemic heart disease or congestive heart failure fall into this category.  In these situations, supplementing the tissue with exogenous ribose is the only way the cell can keep up with the energy drain.

 

Magnesium:

Switching on the Energy Enzymes

Magnesium is an essential mineral that's critical for energy requiring processes, in protein synthesis, membrane integrity, nervous tissue conduction, neuromuscular excitation, muscle contraction, hormone secretion, maintenance of vascular tone, and in intermediary metabolism.  Deficiency may lead to changes in neuromuscular, cardiovascular, immune, and hormonal function; Impaired energy metabolism; and reduced capacity for physical work.  Magnesium deficiency is now considered to contribute to many diseases, and the role for magnesium as a therapeutic agent is expanding.

    Magnesium deficiency reduces the activity of important enzymes used in energy metabolism.  Unless we have adequate levels of magnesium in our cells, the cellular processes of energy metabolism cannot function.  Small changes in magnesium levels can have a substantial effect on heart and blood vessel function.  While magnesium is found in most foods - particularly vegetables - deficiencies are increasing.  Softened water and a trend toward lower vegetable consumption are the culprits contributing to these rising deficiencies.

 

Supporting the Links in The Energy Cycle Chain – the Synergy

Clearly, each membrane of the “Awesome Foursome” is fundamental to cellular energy metabolism in its own right. Each plays a unique and vital role in supplying the heart with the energy it needs to preserve its contractile force. Each is independently effective in helping hearts work through the stress of disease. And while each contributes immeasurable to the energy health of the cell, in combination they are unbeatable. Allow me to reiterate the step-by-step, complicated cellular processes involved to be sure that you really understand the rationale for using these nutrients.

The cell needs a large, sustained, and healthy pool of energy to fuel all its metabolic functions. Contraction, relaxation, maintenance of cellular ion balance, and synthesis of macromolecules, like proteins, all require a high energy charge to carry their reactions to completion. The energy pool must be preserved, or these fundamental cellular functions will become inefficient or will cease to operate altogether. To keep the pool vibrant and healthy, the cell needs ribose. But even with supplemental ribose, the cell needs the efficient turnover of its energy stores to balance ongoing energy utilization with supply. That’s where CoQ10 and L-carnitine come into play.

The converse is also true. Even if the cell is fully charged with energy, cellular energy supply will not keep pace with demand if the mitochondria are not functioning properly. CoQ10 and L-carnitine work to keep mitochondrial operations running at peak efficiency, and one side cannot work effectively without the other. Even though CoQ10 and L-carnitine can make the energy turnover mechanisms work more efficiently, they cannot increase the cell’s chemical driving force, and their action will be only partially effective. Ribose on the other hand, can keep the energy pool supplied with substrate, but the value of energy pool repletion cannot be fully realized if the substrate cannot be maximally utilized and recycled. Ribose fills the Tank; CoQ10 an L-carnitine help the engine run properly.

Magnesium is the glue that holds energy metabolism together. By turning on the enzymes that drive the metabolic reactions, magnesium allows it all to happen.

These four nutrients must be utilized by cardiologists and other physicians as they treat patients day-to-day. On my own journey, using Coenzymes Q10 for two decades, L-carnitine for more than ten years, D-Ribose for two years, and magnesium equally as long, I’ve seen this “Awesome Foursome” reduce suffering and improve the quality of life for thousands of patients.

The future of nutrition in conventional medicine is very bright, although the integration of nutritional supplements has been a slow and, at times, lonely process.

L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 are finally gaining the recognition they deserve. D-Ribose is emerging as a new player in the complex understanding of metabolic cardiology, and doctors are beginning to discuss the important role of magnesium deficiency in heart patients. As a practicing cardiologist for over thirty years, I see metabolic cardiology as the future for the treatment of heart disease and other complex disease conditions, as well.



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Protect the Heart with D-Ribose, Coenzyme Q10, L-Carnitine, and Magnesium at Vitanet ®, LLC

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Probiotics - Our Friendly Bacteria
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Date: June 16, 2005 10:51 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Probiotics - Our Friendly Bacteria

Probiotics Our Friendly Bacteria

An estimated 10 quadrillion bacteria make their home in the average digestive system. Fortunately, less than one percent of the 400 different species found in the intestine are potentially harmful. The majority of intestinal flora are friendly bacteria, otherwise known as probiotics. These probiotic bacteria support good health by limiting the growth of harmful bacteria, promoting good digestion and increasing resistance to infection.*1

Probiotic bacteria are completely non-toxic. In fact, friendly bacteria have been used safely and effectively for more than 8,000 years, proving their value to human health.*2  Most often, probiotics have been consumed as part of  cultured foods, such as acidophilus milk, yogurt, soy tempeh, and idli (cultured wheat). The friendly bacteria in these foods, specifically Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, and Bifidobacterium bifidum, multiply in the warm, moist environment of the human body by feeding on the carbohydrates and protein in the digestive tract, then establish colonies along the intestinal wall.

Beneficial Roles of Probiotics

Lactobacillus acidophilus and other friendly bacteria play many important roles in maintaining good health.* According to experts, regular consumption of probiotics is the best way to maintain healthy intestinal flora.*3, 4 Lactobacilli species do not survive very long in the colon, so bacteria colonies need to be routinely replenished.*

Healthy digestion:

In addition to producing numerous vitamins, probiotics support healthy digestion.*  Part of the reason fermented foods are healthful is that some of the proteins, fats and carbohydrates are partially digested by the bacteria, which increases overall digestibility and nutritional value of the food.*5, 6

Lactose intolerant individuals may gain even more benefits from probiotics. Lactobacilli bacteria ferment as much as half of the lactose in milk—the part of milk that results in the symptoms of bloating, cramps and gas in lactose intolerant individuals—by converting it to lactic acid. Consequently, people with lactose intolerance report fewer digestive problems with cultured dairy foods compared to fresh milk.*5, 7

The nutritional profile of foods is improved after being cultured with probiotics. Levels of several B vitamins, including vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, niacin, folic acid and pantothenic acid are higher in fermented foods, such as yogurt, cheese, kefir and buttermilk.*5  Fermentation also boosts the digestibility of soy foods.*8

Inhibiting bacterial growth:

Probiotics act as natural antibiotics, slowing the growth of harmful bacteria.*5, 6 These friendly bacteria produce substances, including lactic acid, acetic acid, benzoic acid, hydrogen peroxide and natural antibiotics, which limit the reproduction of certain disease-causing bacteria.*9

Another way that probiotic bacteria maintain a healthy digestive tract is by competing with harmful bacteria in the intestine. When the intestine is full of large colonies of beneficial bacteria, disease-causing bacteria are simply not able to multiply into harmful numbers because there are no available attachment sites on the intestinal wall.* This is one of the ways L. acidophilus inhibits the growth of Candida albicans, coliform (e. coli) bacteria and salmonella.*3, 4, 10, 11

Diarrhea can have many causes, but it always has the same result for the bacteria living in the intestine—it flushes them out, leaving the body vulnerable to the growth of opportunistic bacteria. It is important to replenish the body with probiotics during and after a bout of diarrhea.* Probiotic bacteria can also help keep the colon healthy when traveling.*4

Lactobacilli are one of the primary bacteria found in normal vaginal flora, and their presence is believed to inhibit the overgrowth of harmful bacteria, such as Candida. Lactobacillus acidophilus cultures are a popular folk remedy for vaginal health.*4, 10

Recolonization After Antibiotic Use:

Antibiotics, given to treat bacterial infections, ironically can contribute to unhealthy bacteria growth. Antibiotics destroy bacteria, the good along with the bad, leaving the intestine without its normal, healthful flora. In this compromised state, disease-causing bacteria can multiply unchecked by friendly bacteria.*12 When ingested during and following antibiotic usage, L. acidophilus rapidly restores normal flora, shortening the time that undesirable organisms remain in the gut.*3, 12 Bifidobacterium bifidum can also help normalize the intestinal flora after using antibiotics.*10  

Producing the Best Probiotics

Fermenting foods with lactobacilli has been a time-honored method for both preserving and enhancing foods.  Before refrigeration, fermentation was a valuable way to preserve food safety, and it remains in common usage today.

Nature’s Life uses the same basic principles developed and perfected by prehistoric nomadic peoples to produce Lactobacillus acidophilus products; with the exception that we use modern, high-volume equipment. These improvements, along with trained personnel, scientific methods and quality assurance practices, ensures that every batch meets our high standards of quality.

Our lactobacilli are cultured on nutrient-dense food concentrates, such as soy protein, green peas or non-fat milk. We add natural apple juice, pasteurized clover honey, strawberries, carrot juice or maltodextrin for flavor and to provide carbohydrates for the micro-organisms, plus we use only pasteurized water.

Our growth medium has a broad range of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, amino acids, essential fatty acids, organic acids and naturally occurring plant phytonutrients such as flavonoids and carotenoids with beneficial antioxidant properties. The temperature and moisture are carefully controlled during the several days needed for the bacteria to multiply to peak potency.

At the peak of potency, Nature’s Life Liquid Acidophilus culture is poured directly into sanitized 16 oz. glass bottles and immediately refrigerated at 36°F to maintain peak potency. These liquid products are the most bioactive of all forms of acidophilus because they are dormant, rather than frozen.

For our freeze-dried powders and capsules, the warm liquid culture is immediately poured into containers, sealed and refrigerated. After cooling, the liquid is poured into trays and instantly freeze-dried. The frozen lactobacillus is then processed through a vacuum freezer to lower the moisture level to an absolute minimum. This freeze-dried product is packaged as either powder or capsules. When swallowed, the microorganisms will rehydrate and begin colonizing the gastrointestinal tract with friendly bacteria.

Nature’s Life acidophilus is not filtered, centrifuged or otherwise concentrated or separated from its growth medium to artificially obtain higher concentrations of bacteria per gram or capsule. Centrifuging may damage the lactobacillus by altering the natural clumping, chaining and branching of bacteria cells.*

Nature’s Life probiotic products retain all the benefits of the nutrient-rich growth medium. All the valuable by-products of the bacteria’s metabolism remain in the final product, including B-vitamins, enzymes, organic  acids, antibodies and even naturally occurring antibiotics. The conclusion of experts is that products which are centrifuged or filtered are incomplete.13 14

Quality You Can Trust

Nature’s Life invests significant resources in perfecting the production of high quality Lactobacillus acidophilus cultures. You benefit from our knowledge and experience every time you choose our supplements.

Nature’s Life lactobacillus cultures are manufactured with rigorous specifications using state-of-the-art equipment. All equipment and containers are sanitized to ensure that no contaminants or unfriendly pathogenic bacteria corrupt the quality of the L. acidophilus. The large capacity fermentation Tanks and freeze dryers maintain consistency in each batch.

Nature’s Life Lactobacillus acidophilus meets or exceeds all standards developed by industry associations and government regulations. These standards, established to determine the quality of the finished product, are:

  • Identification of each species based on approved microbiology methods.

  • Confirmation of bacteria potency counts based on standardized testing methods.

  • The use of Good Manufacturing Practices to ensure each batch of product is consistently produced to standards.

  • Potency claims are made on the front panel and certified to be viable through a date printed on the side panel.

All of Nature’s Life Lactobacillus acidophilus products meet the acid test for effectiveness:

  • Enough bacteria survive the high acidity of the stomach and retain their viability and effectiveness.

  • The organisms multiply rapidly in the intestine providing all the benefits of these friendly bacteria.

  • The bacteria effectively inhibit the growth of undesirable bacteria.

 

Using Nature’s Life Probiotics

Nature’s Life probiotics, such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, can survive in the stomach for at least an hour.*15 Nature’s Life recommends taking probiotics either on an empty stomach or with food, however the presence of food can help the organisms stay alive longer.16

 Liquid acidophilus should be treated as a perishable product, since it contains live, active organisms. Like yogurt or milk, acidophilus should be refrigerated and used within a short period of time. Contact Nature’s Life for a recipe on how to make your own soy-based, milk-free yogurt.

References:

  1. Roberfroid MB, Bornet F, Bouley C, et al: Colonic microflora: Nutrition and Health.

  2. Rosell, J.M, Can Med Assoc J, 1932; 26:341.

  3. Alm, L. The effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus administration upon the survival of Salmonella in randomly selected human carriers. Prog Food Nutr Sci, 1983; 7:13-17.

  4. Hilton, E., et al. Ingestion of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus as prophylaxis for candidal vaginitis. Ann Int Med 1992;116:353-7.

  5. Friend, B.A. et al. Nutritional and therapeutic aspects of Lactobacilli. J of Appl Nutr, 1984; 36(2):125-153.

  6. Fernandes, C.F., et al. Therapeutic role of dietary Lactobacilli and Lactobacillus fermented dairy products. Fed of Eur Microbiol Rev, 1987; 46:343-356.

  7. Gorbach SL: Lactic acid bacteria and human health. Ann Med 1990;22:37-41.

  8. Hutchins AM, Slavin JL, and Lampe JW: Urinary isoflavonoid phytoestrogen and lignan excretion after consumption of fermented and unfermented soy products. J Am Diet Assoc 1995;95:545-551.

  9. Shahani, K.M., et al. Natural antibiotic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus and bulgaricus, Cult Dairy Prod J, 1976; 11(4):14-7.

  10. Elmer GW, Surawicz CM, and McFarland LV: Biotherapeutic agents. A neglected modality for the treatment and prevention of selected intestinal and vaginal infections. (review) JAMA 1996;275(11):870-876.

  11. Prajapati, J., et al. Nutritional and therapeutic benefits of a blended spray-dried acidophilus preparation. Cult Dairy Prod J, 1986; 21(2):16-21.

  12. Fernandes, C.F., Shanhani, K.M., Amer, M.A., Control of diarrhea by Lactobacilli, J Appl Nutr, 1988; 40(1):32-43.

  13. Hansen, R., New starter cultures with 100-200 billion cells, North European Dairy J, 1980; 3:62:9.

  14. Klaenhammer, T.R., Microbiological considerations in selection and preparation of Lactobacillus strains for use as dietary adjuncts, J Dairy Sci, 1982; 65:1339-49.

  15. Kurmann, J.A., Rasic, J.L., The health potential of products containing bifidobacteria. Chapter 6 in: Properties of Fermented Milks, Elsevier Science Publishers, Barking, Essex, England, 1991.

  16. Petterson, L., et al, Survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCDO 1748 in the human gastrointestinal tract. XV Symposium, Swedish Nutrition Foundation, 1983.

  17. Fuller, R. Probiotics in man and animal. J Appl Bact, 1989; 66:365-78.

  18. Gilliland, S.E., and Speck, M.L., Instability of Lactobacillus acidophilus in yogurt. J Dairy Sci, 1977; 60:1394-98.

  19. Alm, L., The...effects of various cultures - an overview, Chapter 3 in: Properties of Fermented Milks, Elsevier Science Publishers, Barking, Essex, England, 1991.



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