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Reds Pak has over 150 Nutrients Per Packet Darrell Miller 3/21/18
How to Inhale Himalayan Pink Salt to Help Remove Mucus, Bacteria and Toxins from your Lungs Darrell Miller 3/17/17
Look Younger With This Natural Facial Exfoliator Darrell Miller 11/11/15
Liquid Calcium Citrate - An Overview of What to Discover Darrell Miller 8/1/14
What Does Iron Do For The Body Darrell Miller 5/3/14
Difference between colloidal minerals and ionic minerals. Darrell Miller 12/23/13
EDTA Darrell Miller 1/3/09
Folic Acid Darrell Miller 8/19/08
Coral Calcium Darrell Miller 5/16/08
Mag Active Darrell Miller 4/23/08
Loose Weight By Cutting Dietary Fat Absorption Darrell Miller 12/8/07
Trace Mineral Concentrate (Ionic Charge) Darrell Miller 1/8/07
Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application Darrell Miller 11/22/05
Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral Darrell Miller 11/20/05
What are Ionically Charged Minerals? Darrell Miller 11/20/05
Where Have All the Minerals Gone? Darrell Miller 11/20/05
The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals Darrell Miller 10/13/05
Like Your Body, Its Only Lights Up with “Ionic” Trace Minerals. Darrell Miller 10/13/05
The “Power” of trace Minerals… Darrell Miller 10/8/05
Re: Magnesium Darrell Miller 10/6/05
Strontium Bone Maker 60 VC - Strengthen Bones Darrell Miller 7/27/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/25/05
REFERENCES Darrell Miller 6/22/05
Winter Survival Kit Darrell Miller 6/13/05
COLLOIDALIFE Trace Minerals - The Precious Elements of Life... Darrell Miller 6/1/05



SOURCE NATURALS Ionic Charge Trace Mineral Concentrate
   4 fl oz $20.75 29% OFF $ 14.73
SOURCE NATURALS Ionic Charge Trace Mineral Concentrate
   8 fl oz $39.50 29% OFF $ 28.04
Trace Minerals Research Ionic Chlorophyll 100mg + 100mg
   2oz $25.99 25% OFF $ 19.49
PEACEFUL MOUNTAIN Ionic Colloidal Silver
   6 oz $24.95 28% OFF $ 17.96
Trace Minerals Research Ionic Potassium 99mg
   2 oz $12.79 25% OFF $ 9.59
Trace Minerals Research Ionic Tonic
   32 oz $31.49 25% OFF $ 23.62
Trace Minerals Research Ionic Tonic Sample
   1 oz. $3.29 25% OFF $ 2.47
DR TUNG'S PRODUCTS Ionic Toothbrush Replacement Heads
   2 cts $14.25 34% OFF $ 9.41
DR TUNG'S PRODUCTS Ionic Toothbrush System
   1 ct $32.95 34% OFF $ 21.75
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic B12 1000 mcg
   2fl oz $17.82 25% OFF $ 13.37
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Boron
   2 oz. 48 day supply $14.97 25% OFF $ 11.23
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Calcium 200mg
   2fl oz $14.27 25% OFF $ 10.70
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Chromium
   2 oz. 48 day supply $16.44 25% OFF $ 12.33
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Coper 3mg
   2 fl oz $14.13 25% OFF $ 10.60
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Fulvic Acid with ConcenTrace®
   2 oz. $20.73 25% OFF $ 15.55
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Iodine from Potassium Iodide
   2 oz. $14.04 25% OFF $ 10.53
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Iron
   2 oz. 48 day supply $13.59 25% OFF $ 10.19
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Magnesium
   2 oz. $10.51 25% OFF $ 7.88
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Magnesium 400mg
   4 fl oz $18.18 25% OFF $ 13.64
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Manganese 10mg
   2fl oz $14.21 25% OFF $ 10.66
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Plant Minerals
   17 fl oz (1 Pint) $24.58 25% OFF $ 18.44
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Potassium
   2 oz. $12.39 25% OFF $ 9.29
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Selenium
   2 oz. 48 day supply $14.70 25% OFF $ 11.02
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Strontium 100mg
   2fl oz $13.99 25% OFF $ 10.49
Trace Minerals Research Liquid Ionic Zinc
   2 oz. 48 day supply $10.75 25% OFF $ 8.06

Reds Pak has over 150 Nutrients Per Packet
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Date: March 21, 2018 01:39 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Reds Pak has over 150 Nutrients Per Packet

Contains:

  • Red Fruits
  • Red Vegetables
  • Enzymes
  • Probiotics
  • Concentrace trace Minerals
  • Mangosteen
  • Goji berries
  • Acai
  • Pomegranate
  • Noni

If you are looking for a great reds supplement, give Trace Minerals Research a try, This Reds Pak is Gluten free and Certified Vegan.

Reds Pak is a full-spectrum antioxidant supplement of energy-packed whole foods and extracts, super fruits, vegetables, and other essential nutrients for superior health. It is designed to help maintain cellular integrity, support cardiovascular health and immune system function, provide increased energy, support healthy digestion, and fight against free radical damage.**

Red Pak also Contains a Proprietary Liver Supplement Blend and an Enzyme & Probiotic blend that work together to support healthy digestion and aid in the processing and elimination of harmful toxins.** The digestive enzymes help break down macronutrients and absorption while the probiotics help boost production of the beneficial cultures that naturally reside in the digestive tract for good gut flora and healthy bacterial balance of the intestines.** To complete the formula, a complex of over 72 Ionic trace minerals are added.

Feel the difference, give it a try!

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How to Inhale Himalayan Pink Salt to Help Remove Mucus, Bacteria and Toxins from your Lungs
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Date: March 17, 2017 01:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to Inhale Himalayan Pink Salt to Help Remove Mucus, Bacteria and Toxins from your Lungs





There’s a lot of information on the internet about the benefits of Himalayan salt. Many people don’t realize that unlike table salt, Himalayan salt contains the same 84 natural elements and minerals that are found in the human body, minerals which contribute to your overall health and vitality. Its minerals are in an Ionic state, which means that they are tiny enough for our cells to absorb easily.

Key Takeaways:

  • Himalayan salt contains the same 84 natural elements and minerals that are found in the human body, minerals which contribute to your overall health and vitality.
  • Its minerals are in an Ionic state, which means that they are tiny enough for our cells to absorb easily.
  • Although it’s relatively new to the United States, salt rooms have been used for therapeutic purposes in Eastern Europe for more than 200 years.

"Many people don’t realize that unlike table salt, Himalayan salt contains the same 84 natural elements and minerals that are found in the human body, minerals which contribute to your overall health and vitality."



Reference:

//www.healthnutnews.com/inhale-himalayan-pink-salt-help-remove-mucus-bacteria-toxins-lungs/

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Look Younger With This Natural Facial Exfoliator
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Date: November 11, 2015 06:22 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Look Younger With This Natural Facial Exfoliator

Diatomaceous Earth (also called diatomite) is a siliceous sedimentary rock. The rock is naturally occurring, soft and can be crushed into a fine powder. Like the name suggests, it is extracted from fossilized remnants of diatoms. Diatoms were tiny, hard shelled algae that lived in water. The diatoms skeletons comprise of silica, a natural substance. Over a long time, the diatoms collected on river, lakes and oceans sediments. Because of its fineness, DE acts as a great facial exfoliant. Besides silica, Diatomaceous Earth contains calcium, zinc, copper, magnesium, phosphorus and selenium. These minerals can be absorbed through the skin to complement your diet.


Diatomaceous Earth for Facial Exfoliation

The use of DE as a facial exfoliant is becoming very popular. Today, more than 150 products contain DE as the main ingredient. For facial exfoliation, make sure you use food grade DE. Food Grade DE differs from the DE used in the pool filter. Food grade DE is finer (less abrasive and has been purified) than non-food grade DE.

It is easy to make a facial scrub. Simply mix the powder with enough water to make a paste. Be sure to apply the paste on your face immediately after preparing it. To increase its effectiveness as a facial exfoliator, rub the paste on your face with mild, circular motions. DE has abrasive properties which make it perfect for facial exfoliation.

You can use DE and water alone but for greater results mix DE with 1 tablespoon water, diluted honey or aloe vera juice and coconut oil. This way, not only do you remove microscopic dirt and oil deposits and dead skin but you also leave the skin moisturized. When massaging the paste to your face, refrain from applying it on the area around your eyes. The skin around the eyes is gentle and is often affected by powerful exfoliators and could lead to irritation. Leave the paste for a couple of minutes and use lukewarm water to rinse it off.

Diatomaceous earth looks cylindrical under a microscope. It is also known to carry a negative Ionic charge that scientists claim to be the reason why pathogens are attracted to it and carried out of the body.

Diatomaceous Earth

Benefits of Diatomaceous Earth as a Facial Exfoliator

DE is a naturally occurring ingredient. This means there are no side effects associated with its use. Food grade diatomaceous earth has anti-fungal properties. It acts as a detoxification agent and leaves the skin refreshed and clean. It is a nourishing, lightening and brightening facial exfoliator. It increases the elasticity of the skin and leaves the skin radiant. Diatomaceous earth has been tailored to boost skin immunity and act as an anti-oxidant to fight free radicals. Not only does DE rid your face of dead skin cells but also helps the skin fight premature signs of aging.

Salt and sugar scrubs are effective in facial exfoliation but they are too abrasive to be used every day. Diatomaceous earth is finer and thus a great alternative. You may choose to make a DE paste at home or a buy a product that contains DE (among other natural products).

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Liquid Calcium Citrate - An Overview of What to Discover
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Date: August 01, 2014 05:29 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Liquid Calcium Citrate - An Overview of What to Discover

calcium foodsCalcium

While calcium is quite effective in conditions of improving health, it is valued very little without the addition of magnesium. Calcium in liquid type is much, much more potent than that of the tablet selection.

Absorption of calcium

Due to the fact liquid calcium is drinking water centered, it is virtually a single hundred % to be absorbed by the body. The reality of the subject is that much less than twenty five % of tablet based calcium is absorbed by the body.

Protein prosperous meals like meat cause calcium to be wasted via the urine. Calcium that is obtained from foods and the capsule type of calcium are badly absorbed. This suggests that most individuals are finding a lot significantly less calcium than they would like to believe is the scenario. As liquid Ionic calcium is water primarily based, it is absorbed instantly. This ensures the physique the appropriate quantity of calcium.

It is extremely hard to get the optimum calcium needed for the entire body. This helps make it even far more motive for 1 to take calcium in liquid format relatively than tablet format.

calcium absorptionBenefits of liquid calcium

The digestive process rewards immensely from liquid calcium magnesium. It is excellent for the relief of constipation, indigestion and heartburn. It gains the digestive procedure in other strategies as well and for greatest outcomes, it ought to be taken right after eating.

The production of milk in lactating females is enhanced by the ingestion of calcium. Contractions through labor are also facilitated by calcium. Other advantages are that nerve impulses are regulated and taking calcium enables the clotting of blood.

Calcium deficiency

It is a properly-recognized truth that insufficient quantities of calcium trigger osteoporosis. Calcium deficiency has dire penalties for little ones as it can lead to rickets in kids. Far more important in adults, it causes softening of the bony tissue. This is acknowledged as osteomalacia.

It has been even more reported that the substantial blood pressure and cancer of the colon have also been attributed to insufficient quantities of calcium.

Symptoms of calcium deficiency

An individual can detect a lack of calcium in the body by the presence of tingling and or numbness all around the mouth and the fingertips. Calcium deficient persons will also knowledge painful aches and muscle spasms.

Lack of calcium can be a contributing aspect to currently being obese. It can also retard the method of losing extra fat. It has been uncovered that when a single eats also very little the human body stores all it can, as it does not know when following it will be fed. The identical course of action comes about when the body is starved of calcium.

There is a hormone in the entire body known as calcitriol. This has the power to constrict the arteries. Calcium regulates this hormone. Because of this approach, people today with high blood pressure will notice a drop in the blood strain when ingesting optimum ranges of calcium. Taking calcium also safeguards the nervous technique and the heart.

The system is equipped to create vitamins, but the same are not able to be stated about minerals. For top rated-degree overall health, the entire body involves satisfactory if not abundant amounts of food grade minerals, mainly calcium.

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What Does Iron Do For The Body
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Date: May 03, 2014 05:33 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Does Iron Do For The Body

iron foodsHeath benefits of iron to the body

Iron is a naturally occurring mineral found in numerous nutritious foods. Usually, our body requires it for a variety of functions such as proper growth and development. It hardly exist in the body system as free Ionic and all of it present is either in the iron storage proteins or the hemoglobin, hence the need for the body to acquire from an external source, that is, food or otherwise serious health problems and complications may result. Food varieties such as meat, fish, poultry, fruits and vegetables contain iron capable of maintaining its optimum level in the body system.

Health benefits of iron are numerous, they include-

A) Muscle function.
Iron is usually found in a muscle protein called the myoglobin and is very important for a good or proper muscle health. Myoglobin is responsible for the transportation and diffusion of oxygen from the hemoglobin to muscle cells, a process needed for muscle contraction.

B) Hemoglobin formation.
It is considered as the main health benefit of iron consumption since hemoglobin transports oxygen to all the other different parts of the body.

C) Iron deficiency anemia.
Iron is so vital to the body that in the case of very low levels, one develops anemia. It is also used to treat anemic conditions as well as associated symptoms like headaches, body weakness, fatigue and many more.

D) Brain function.
The human brain uses approximately 20% of the bloodstream oxygen, which is supplied to it by iron making it very necessary for proper brain health.

E) Strengthening immunity.
Iron also improves the body's immune system and therefore diseases cannot get in easily.

F) Body temperature regulation.
Being present in the hemoglobin, which gives the blood its dark red color, iron regulates the body temperature keeping it suitable for various enzymatic as well as metabolic reactions to occur efficiently.

Source

  1. www.newsmax.com

 

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Difference between colloidal minerals and ionic minerals.
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Date: December 23, 2013 02:36 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Difference between colloidal minerals and Ionic minerals.

Minerals are generally divided into two forms.

Colloids Mineral

Colloids are one form of minerals, where minerals are in stable form. In colloidal form, minerals are evenly distributed in the medium. Minerals in this form will remain in large and organized pattern, and thereby remain in suspension without settling down. These types of minerals are not directly absorbed by the body since they don’t have that electric charge like other minerals. The size of these minerals is also one of the reasons for this. So we can define colloids as, it is a substance, which will not diffuse easily when it is suspended in a liquid medium. Though the colloidal minerals are more dispersed in the body, the absorption is not influenced by that. In order to absorb colloidal minerals, body needs to break down these minerals into smaller units.

Ionic Mineral

On the other hand, Ionic minerals can be easily absorbed through the human cell membranes. The main reason for this is, Ionic minerals are charged and so the body needs to apply less amount of energy to get them absorbed. The colloidal minerals need to break down into smaller units to attain electric charge and thereby to get absorbed. The electric charge of Ionic minerals helps them to travel from a region of higher concentration to a region of lower concentration. Atoms or group of atoms together forms the Ionic minerals. They have got charge either positive or negative. During the time of absorption, the body charges the ions and makes absorption easier. Ionic minerals are more easily absorbed by the body than the colloidal minerals, since they have to go through all those process. Even after the different steps of absorption of colloidal minerals, all of them are not utilized by the body. Sodium Chloride and Potassium Chloride are 2 examples for Ionic minerals.

References:

  1. //www.transformyourhealth.com/webnewsletters/dec06/mineralsvstraceminerals.htm
  2. //goaskalice.columbia.edu/whats-difference-between-Ionic-and-colloidal-minerals

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EDTA
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Date: January 03, 2009 12:27 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: EDTA

Calcium is the most damaging mineral that is involved in the calcification of the blood vessel system. Ionic calcium, which is a floating form of calcium, is used by the body in daily functions like muscle contraction and relaxation, nerve impulse transmission, blood coagulation, and others. Calcium is a mineral that is capable of forming complexes with other components, such as proteins. These complexes can eventually lead to the formation of lesions, plaque, and the overall hardening of the blood vessels.

There are four different components that are found mainly in arterial walls which often combine with calcium. Elastin, a type of protein that makes up a good amount of the blood vessel wall, is the substance that allows the arterial wall to be elastic. During the process leading to atherosclerosis, elastin often forms complexes with Ionic calcium, which results in a loss of elasticity.

Collagen, another type of protein that works with elastin to make up the bulk of arterial walls, forms complexes with Ionic calcium, which leads to hardening of the blood vessel. MPCs, which are carbohydrates that contain a number of agents including amino acids, uronic acids, and chondroitin sulfate, are found within the arterial wall where they form complexics with Ionic calcium to promote the formation of atherosclerosis. Beta lipoproteins and pre-beta lipoproteins transport a fatty acid and glycerol combination for storage in the liver, muscles, and other areas of the body.

Although beta and pre-beta lipoproteins form Ionic calcium complexes and initiate the onset of arteriosclerosis, there are lipoproteins that do not form complexes with calcium, but interferes with the formation of Ionic calcium complexes instead. It is clear that Ionic calcium plays a huge role in the formation of arterial plaque and the actual hardening of arteries, due to the complexes it forms with components of the arterial wall. Because EDTA effectively ties up calcium complexes so that it can be eliminated through the urine, it is also clear why EDTA chelation therapy is a successful way to reduce the levels of atherosclerotic plaque and reverse the hardened condition that so often occurs in the artery walls.

EDTA chelation therapy was patented in Germany in 1930 and first used in medicine in 1941 to help with lead poisoning. It wasn’t patented in the United States until 1949, with several papers being published on its therapeutic effects following in the early 1950s. EDTA chelation therapy has been used in the U.S. to treat atherosclerosis since 1952, but was also used for lead poisoning and heavy metal toxicity before that. After its initial use for lead and heavy metal poising, it was noted that EDTA resulted in the reduction of severe pressure and pain in and around the chest, which led to the discovery of its abilities to treat atherosclerosis.

Since then, thousands of scientific articles have been written concerning the many aspects of EDTA chelation therapies as well as its safety, which has been proven by its use on thousands of patients in over three million intravenous treatments by over one thousand doctors in the last fifty years. Not one fatality has been documented when established protocol has been followed, while the FDA approved the new drug application for EDTA without requiring any additional safety studies to determine its safe use. Have you tried oral EDTA?



--
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Folic Acid
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Date: August 19, 2008 08:38 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Folic Acid

Folic acid is an important vitamin to the developing fetus in that it aids cell development, particularly those cells involved in the development of the baby's spine. A deficiency can result in neural tube defects, in which the neural tube, down through which the central nervous system passes, fails to close properly.

However, let's first discuss the substance itself so that its function in that process can be more easily understood. Neither should we ignore the other benefits that folic acid gives us, or the problems we can have in the event of a deficiency.

Folic acid is a form of Vitamin B9, sometimes referred to as Vitamin M. Its anIonic form is known as folate, which is the form in which it is frequently offered in supplements. Incidentally, it gets its name from the Latin for leaf, so is from the same root as foliage. It is water soluble, and like Vitamin C can be leached through the body if not immediately used.

It is available naturally from leafy and green vegetables such as lettuce, broccoli, spinach and peas, but is also available in fortified breakfast cereals, sunflower seeds and some fruits. You would not normally suffer a deficiency, but if you are taking anticonvulsants, have liver problems or undergoing kidney dialysis, then you might need a supplement. Pregnancy, of course, is the important case in which a supplement should be taken, although, surprisingly, many mothers-to-be are unaware of this.

New body cells need folate for their production, particularly when they are dividing and growing rapidly such as during pregnancy and in infancy. The formation of DNA depends on many chemical entities, among them four nitrogenous bases, of which three, thymine and the two purine bases, adenine and guanine, depend on folate for their synthesis. If the growing fetus is lacking folate then DNA synthesis will be hindered. This retards cell division and growth.

Among the conditions this can cause are a form of anemia known as megaloblastic anemia, and neural tube deficiencies, where the sheath that surrounds the main nerve canal up the spine fails to close properly. The best known of such neural tube defects is spina bifida, though any condition caused by a lack of cell division can also occur. Anemia can be contracted by both adults and children, since production of red blood cells takes place constantly throughout your lifetime. These are the reasons why folic acid or folate is used in breakfast cereals.

The biochemistry is fairly simple to understand, and is important because it explains the importance of two other B vitamins, B3 and B12, in DNA synthesis. The initial stages are a six step reaction that forms methyl tetrahydrofolate from folate, starting with the reduction of folate to dihydrofolate, and then a further reduction to the tetrahydrofolate (THF). Vitamin B3 (in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) is an essential cofactor for these reductions. Vitamin B12 is necessary as an acceptor for the methyl-THF so that it can continue along the biochemical pathway - now that is too complex to discuss here!

However, the inference you can rightly draw from this is that a deficiency of Vitamin B12 can cause what is known as a 'methyl trap', whereby the methy-THF cannot be used, and so a deficiency in Vitamin B12 can lead to the same symptoms as a folic acid or folate deficiency.

The implications of that are that vitamin B12 is also an essential component of a pregnant woman's diet. The problem here is that this vitamin is available only from animal sources, including dairy products. Its presence in vegetable organisms such as certain algae and fungi has been proposed, but it is believed that the cobalamin (chemical term for the vitamin) from these sources is not bioavailable to humans.

Vegans, therefore, who do not eat dairy products, will need a Vitamin B12 supplement in addition to folic acid or folate, particularly when they are pregnant and with young growing children. In this respect, a vegan diet is unsuitable for young children until their rapid growth period has stabilized.

For those of you wondering why the biochemistry above was discussed: that is your answer. Such discussions can frequently explain why certain supplements are necessary, or certain diets should be reconsidered under particular circumstances. Such things are easier to understand and accept when the logic behind them are explained. A folic acid supplement taken from the onset of pregnancy up to 12 weeks at least, and also a Vitamin B12 supplement in the case of those with a low meat intake, should prevent neural tube defects such as spina bifida.

A daily supplement of 0.4 mg should be sufficient, along with a diet rich in green vegetables, fortified cereals and breads and oranges. Your greens are best steamed since prolonged boiling destroys folic acid - as it destroys Vitamin C. One source of folic acid that you might read about is liver, and its additional iron content might lead you to believe this to be a good component of your diet when pregnant. However, although normally a very nutritious food, liver should be avoided during pregnancy due to its high Vitamin A content. This can be harmful to your baby.

Finally, there are some circumstances under which the dose during pregnancy should be greater. If you have previously had a child with a neural tube defect, or have an NTD yourself (or your partner), if you are diabetic, if you have celiac disease (a gluten allergy) or are taking anti-epileptic medication, you should increase your dose to 5 mg (milligrams) for which you will likely need a prescription from your physician.

NTD is rare, so don't over-worry much about it, but take the above precautions to put your mind at rest since pregnancy is not a time during which you should be nervous but to enjoy. That will pass on to your growing baby, which will then itself be happy.

--
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Coral Calcium
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Date: May 16, 2008 02:12 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Coral Calcium

The health benefits of coral calcium were discovered in 1979, when a British journalist representing the Guinness Book of records traveled to Okinawa to talk to Shigechiyo Izumi, who at 115 years old was at the time the world’s oldest documented living human being. Not only was the journalist impressed and surprised at how healthy such an old man was, but he also found that good health to be shared by the majority of Okinawa’s aged residents.

After his report was filed on his return to England, a team of researchers were sent to the island to make further investigations in the phenomenon. They found that the key to their longevity was the water they were drinking. The water of Okinawa appeared unique, and coral calcium was discovered.

It was not only the calcium, of course, that made such as difference but the whole mineral balance of the water. Okinawa is formed of coral reefs built up over millennia, and rainwater filters down through the coral collecting minerals and other nutrients on its way. This water is both alkaline, with a pH of 8.6, and closely resembles the natural mineral composition, not only of the human skeleton but also of body fluids such as blood plasma and amniotic fluid. It seemed the ideal stuff to bottle, and there are now over 4 million users of coral calcium in Japan alone.

The commercial use of Sango coral, as it is called, is controlled by the Japanese government, and living coral is left untouched: only the dead coral sand lying on the ocean bed is used. The sand is collected and cleaned, and then pulverized and the calcium and all the rest of the minerals it contains are easily absorbed by the body.

It is this ease of absorption that renders coral calcium so useful. Most minerals find it difficult to pass from the intestine to the bloodstream, but this is not a problem for the minerals in Sango coral. Because they do not come from inorganic mined minerals, but from natural organic sources, they are present in a very bio-available form and are readily absorbed into the bloodstream. It not only contains the common minerals calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and so on, but also many trace elements that are essential for life. Not only that, however, but they also contain antioxidants to help prevent the oxidative stress caused by free radicals, and also at a pH that allows the minerals to become naturally Ionic very readily.

It is this Ionic form of each mineral that permits it to be so readily available to your system. This was a major discovery at the time, since the form that inorganic minerals generally come in had been a problem prior to this to the extent that only 10% was absorbed by the body. In comparison, 95% of the coral calcium and other minerals are able to be easily absorbed since they are in an ionized form – an even higher absorbency than colloidal minerals allow.

Why are minerals so important and how can they possible lead to such an effect on the elderly of Okinawa? In fact minerals are very important components of human metabolism and biochemistry. Most believe vitamins to be significantly more important to human health than minerals, but this is not the case. Many vitamins are useless without the synergistic effect of minerals, and the reverse is also the same.

For example, calcium needs vitamin D to be present before it can be used by the body to strengthen bone structure. There are many other such interactions involving vitamins and minerals, and without chelation (the rendering of large organic molecules to a soluble form by combining them with metal ions) many of the essential biochemical processes of life would be impossible. Coral calcium contains all the minerals found in your body, and in very similar proportions, so that you are able to use it to maintain that all important synergism and not throw the mineral balance of your body out of balance. This is very easy to do if you take individual mineral supplements.

However, there is still more to come from this remarkable substance. It is also rich in antioxidants that spell death for free radicals. Free radicals can’t really die, because they are not living entities but molecules that have a free electron, and free electrons like to pair up with other electrons. Free radicals are therefore very aggressive when near any body cell from which they can rob an electron, and that, unfortunately, destroys the cell.

Not only that but they also oxidize molecules from which they take the electron, and if that is a low density lipoprotein, or LDL, that happens to be carrying some cholesterol to one of your arteries that needs a bit of repair work, then it will cause the LDL to deposit the cholesterol immediately and form plaques that constrict and narrow your arteries. That is called atherosclerosis and it can kill you or give you a stroke. Cholesterol is essential for good health, but once the free radicals get to work you are better without it.

However, Sango coral contains substances that prevent the free radicals from oxidizing other substances, and in so doing destroy them. That’s what antioxidants do. They prevent free radicals from oxidizing other molecules and creating all sorts of havoc with your health. Excessive amounts of free radicals have been associated with over 80 different conditions, and one of the benefits of coral calcium is that it is one of the most powerful antioxidants known.

It is not only the mineral content and antioxidant properties of coral calcium that are of benefit to the human body, but also its pH. The various fluids of your body are maintained at a specific pH, which is a measurement of the acidity or alkalinity of a fluid. This should be slightly alkaline without being caustic. If your body fluids are too acidic it becomes difficult for you to absorb minerals and vitamins, and it is essential for you maintain a balance of from around 6.4 to 7.0 Any lower than that and you will find it difficult to sleep and you will feel listless with no energy.

You can measure the pH of your body by testing your urine with pH strips available at any pharmacy. Coral calcium can be used to maintain a good pH level that allows your body to absorb the nutrients it needs, and keep you feeling not only well, but young and sprightly just like Shigechiyo Izumi did at 115 years old.

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Mag Active
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Date: April 23, 2008 10:20 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Mag Active

Quick Absorption Magnesium

Source Naturals - Mag Active

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body, but an estimated 75% of Americans are magnesium deficient. This Ionic, low sodium form of magnesium and trace minerals is highly absorbable, enabling the minerals to transfer easily across the intestinal wall. Increased absorption means more minerals are available for your body’s needs. These minerals are a vital part of a healthy body, enabling all of the vitamins, enzymes and other nutrients in your diet to work effectively.

  • Contains Ionically charged magnesium and 70 trace minerals for total body needs
  • Supports healthy heart, bones, muscles, neurotransmitters
  • May decrease stress and calm the nervous system
  • Magnesium assists in 300 enzyme functions, supporting the conversion of sugars and fats into energy, and the synthesis of DNA and RNA
  • Natural minerals have been concentrated and virtually all the natural sodium removed; this product may be used by people on sodium-restricted diets

1/2 Teaspoon (approx 2.5 ml) contains: Sodium (naturally occurring) 5 mg
Magnesium (naturally occurring) 246 mg
Sulfate (naturally occurring) 36 mg

Also contains trace amounts of the following: Chloride, Potassium, Lithium, Boron, Calcium, Carbonate, Bromide, Iodine, Rubidium, Scandium, Phosphorus, Nickel, Manganese, Chromium, Strontium, Cobalt, Zinc, Lanthanum, Cerium, Barium, Copper, Iron, Silicon, Yttrium, Molybdenum, Tin, Gallium, Gold, Silver, Cesium, Beryllium, Selenium, Vanadium, Dysprosium, Holmium, Terbium, Praseodymium, Lutetium, Gadolinium, Samarium, Bismuth, Ytterbium, Erbium, Europium, Neodymium. Other minerals found in seawater.

Suggested use: ¼ to ½ teaspoon in 8 oz juice, twice daily.



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Loose Weight By Cutting Dietary Fat Absorption
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Date: December 08, 2007 06:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Loose Weight By Cutting Dietary Fat Absorption

You can lose weight by cutting dietary fat absorption, although in order to understand the need for this you have to appreciate the effect that fat has on your weight. Not only fat, but any form of calories.

The word ‘calorie’ appears to have a bad press, and there have been a lot of ill informed comments made about calories and whether calorie controlled diets are effective or not. Quite frankly, it is all said in ignorance. Whether you agree or not, the calorie is a measurement of energy and the calorie content of foods is what is calculated to be the energy value of these foods.

Once inside your body, that energy is either used up or converted to body mass. It is not necessarily converted to fat, since that extra weight could be in the form of muscle tissue. However, it is converted to body mass and so you can put on weight. The basic equation is that if you take in more energy than you use, then you add weight, and if you use more energy than you take in, then you lose weight. It is slightly more complex than that, but it is basically true.

That does not mean that if you eat a pound of dripping (the fat that drips off cooking meat) you will add a pound of weight. It is the calorific value of the dripping in terms of energy, whether measured in calories or in joules, that is the relevant factor, and if that is 4000 calories, which is about average for various types of dripping, then if you use up 4001 calories in exercise, you can safely spread your pound of lard on toast and eat it without putting on weight (you will have also to use up the calories in the toast).

It is the calorie equation that is important, and if this is negative then you will lose weight. You have to: it is a law of science! Whether your calories are in the form of cookies, candies, avocados (loads of them) or dripping, it is all the same. A meat calorie is the same as a vegetarian or vegan calorie. If you eat more than you use you put on weight.

Different foods contain different quantities of energy, or calories. If you buy a Big Mac you eat 570 calories, and 5 from your Super Pepsi. If the guy next to you has an English Muffin, he will have 140 calories. However, if he then goes home and slouches on the sofa watching TV and you go to the gym for a serious workout, he is liable to put on weight and you lose it. It’s all in the equation!

However, you don’t just use calories in exercise. Your metabolism is also important. In fact 65% - 75% of the calories you use in a day are used up by the body at rest: the metabolism that takes place 24/7 to keep you alive. The heartbeat, breathing and brain activity for example, all use up energy. So not all is doom and gloom, and you can burn up these calories even while you are sleeping.

However, there is another way to prevent the fat you eat from turning into weight. (Incidentally, if you exercise a lot, that weight will likely be in muscle mass, but if not then it will certainly be fat). You have a clue to the way that can be done in the first sentence of this article: ‘dietary fat absorption’.

If the fat is not absorbed into the body, then it is not available to be metabolized into body fat. It will pass through the body unchanged. It is not the fat you consume that makes you gain weight, but the amount of that fat absorbed through your intestines. But how is it possible to selectively prevent the fat in your diet from being emulsified by the bile and absorbed through the intestinal wall?

By means of chitosan. This is a fiber that absorbs part of the fat from the food you have eaten and hides it away from your digestive system. It cannot be broken down into sugars and then into fat to add to your unwanted weight. However, because it works after your meal, you get to eat what you want – that ‘finger lickin’ good’ stuff you love, but don’t suffer the consequences of failing to exercise to work it off. It’s like you just ate lettuce without the fried chicken with the crispy fatty skin.

So what is this miracle substance, chitosan? Biologists would recognize the name as being associated with chitin, the acetyl-glucosamine polymer that forms the carapaces, or shells, of crabs, lobsters and other marine shellfish. Chitosan is formed by deacetylating the chitin and is mainly used to enhance the growth of plants, and also as a filtration aid. So what does it do to help to remove some of the fat from your diet after you have eaten it?

The mechanism by which it does this is not fully understood, and in fact is still disputed in some quarters. However, the proof of the pudding is in the eating and it appears to act according to the claims. There are two possible mechanisms, one of which is connected with the deacetylation of the chitin molecule. Because of this, the resultant chitosan molecule has catIonic groups on the polymer chain. Cations are positively charged, and can react with acids, not the least of which are the bile acids that break down lipids (fats) to render them into a form suitable for absorption.

It is possible for the chitosan to react with the bile acids and prevent them from breaking down the fats into a condition that enables them to be passed through the intestinal wall. However, it has also been proposed that dietary fibers work by increasing the thickness of the boundary layer of the intestine through which the fats would have to pass. This would have the effect of reducing the lipid uptake.

It is also possible that since chitosan is a fibrous substance, it attracts the fats through its charge and absorbs them into a swelling ball of fats and fiber that is not only impermeable by the bile acids, but also passes through the intestinal tract unchanged and eventually excreted. In fact, there is not proof for any of these projected mechanisms, and all are theoretically possible. The fact is that it appears to work, but must be taken for several weeks for the effects to be noticeable.

It is possible to lose weight by dietary fat absorption, and whatever mechanism is used by chitosan, it is well worth trying if you like your fatty foods but also want to lose weight. Combine chitosan with a good exercise regime and you might find that you can control your weight whatever you eat. Chitosan is available over the counter at any health food store.



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Trace Mineral Concentrate (Ionic Charge)
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Date: January 08, 2007 03:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Trace Mineral Concentrate (Ionic Charge)

Ionic Charge: Trace Mineral Concentrate

  • Minerals enable every biochemical process in the body. They are the catalysts that make enzymes function and when ionized, they are the conductors of the body’s electrical current.
  • Source Naturals Ion Charge is a convenient liquid—pure and potent, and including all of the trace minerals commonly overlooked in many multivitamins or supplements.
  • Natural minerals have been concentrated and virtually all the natural sodium removed; this product may be used by people on sodium-restricted diets.
  • Ionic forms of minerals offer the highest absorption of any mineral form. Modern Americans do not obtain the minerals necessary for optimum health. Because of soil depletion and food processing, we do not get the trace minerals from our diets that we received even a generation ago. Ion Charge minerals are a vital part of a healthy body, enabling all of the vitamins, enzymes and other nutrients in your diet to work effectively.

1/2 teaspoon contains:

Sodium (naturally occurring) 5 mg

Magnesium (naturally occurring) 246 mg

Sulfate (naturally occurring) 36 mg

Also contains trace amounts of the following: Chloride, Potassium, Lithium, Boron, Calcium, Carbonate, Bromide, Iodine, Rubidium, Scandium, Phosphorus, Nickel, Manganese, Chromium, Strontium, Cobalt, Zinc, Lanthanum, Cerium, Barium, Copper, Iron, Silicon, Yttrium, Molybdenum, Tin, Gallium, Gold, Silver, Cesium, Beryllium, Selenium, Vanadium, Dysprosium, Holmium, Terbium, Praseodymium, Lutetium, Gadolinium



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Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application
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Date: November 22, 2005 09:23 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Utah's Inland Sea Minerals – Topical Application

Minerals provide a bounty of healing properties that have scientifically validated their use for topical applications. These applications have been shown to have powerful local and systemic effects. The health of ones skin and hair reflects inner health. Indeed, we judge the health of animals and humans alike by their outward appearance of fur or skin, respectively. The human skin is the largest organ of the body and is highly involved in the detoxification and maintenance processes of health. Skin not only excretes and eliminates toxins; it also has a tremendous capacity to absorb health supportive substances. The pharmaceutical industry frequently takes advantage of the skin’s absorptive capacity with drug therapies. Such therapies include the transdermal delivery of drugs like nicotine, hormone patches, progesterone creams and so forth. Thus, it is apparent that natural therapies can have pronounced and powerful health effects.

Clinical researchers have continued to document the clinical findings that have been observed for decades when it comes to the healing properties of topical minerals. Many of the studies on therapeutic baths have used minerals from the Dead Sea, an ancient inland sea. However, a similar and impressive array of minerals occurs in the other inland sea, the Great Salt Lake. Indeed, the high presence of magnesium from both inland seas appears to be the foremost active mineral. A comparison chart below clearly reflects the mineral analysis and similarity (see chart below). The following survey of medical research reflects a few of the many therapeutic roles for mineral salt baths. Of particular interest are the powerful effects of magnesium salts that are prevalent to both Utah’s Inland Sea and the Dead Sea that exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory disease. Arthritis:

103 patients with arthritic symptoms were treated for 1-2 weeks. They received various bath treatments with the Ionic trace minerals. The study showed that the higher concentration baths offered the most impressive results. Those with the greatest physical limitation had the most pronounced improvement. Over 80 percent of the patients reported having less pain, 70 percent reported improved mobility and 60 percent were able to decrease analgesic use (i). In a different double-blind study, the use of warm mineral baths with Dead Sea salt demonstrated a lasting effect for patients suffering from degenerative arthritis. (ii)

Skin:

In a clinical trial conducted by a leading research university in Germany, patients with atopic (eczema) skin disorders immersed their arms in a magnesium chloride rich bath. The participants immersed one arm in tap water the other in the therapeutic magnesium rich bath. The findings showed that skin hydration was improved and skin roughness and inflammation was reduced. The researchers stated “magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation and enhance barrier repair.” (iii) Another study showed that magnesium salts when exposed to both psoriatic and healthy skin cells provided an important anti-proliferative effect (iv). Yet another study showed that the effects of mineral baths from the Dead Sea had lasting effects for upwards of a month after treatment. (v) Head to Head Comparison (vi) (vii)

Utah’s Inland Sea Composition Dead Sea Composition
Magnesium Chloride 1.04% 4.03%
Potassium Chloride 0.64% 0.72%
Sodium Chloride 9% 3.87%
Calcium Chloride 0.08% 1.64%
Chloride 15.12% 21.11%
Sulfates (SO4) 2.13% 0.03%

By: Dr. Chris Meletis N. D.

References:
• (i) Dead Sea Balneoptherapy is Osteoarthritis, Dr. Machety (Hasharon Hospital, Petach-Tikva, Israel). Published in Proceedings of International Seminar on Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases. John Wright-PSG ,1932.
• (ii) Sukenik S, Mayo A, Neumann L et al., Dead Sea bath salts for osteoarthritis of the knee, Harefuah 1995; 129(3-4):100-3, 159, 158.
• (iii) Proksch E, Nissen HP et al., Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin. Int J Dermatol 2005; 44(2):151-7.
• (iv) Levi-Schaffer F, Shani J, Politi Y et al., Inhibition of proliferation of psoriatic and healthy fibroblasts in cell culture by selected Dead –sea salts. Pharmacology 1996; 52(5):321-8.
• (v) Sukenik S, Neumann L, Buskila D et al., Dead Sea bath salts for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Exp Rheumatol 1990; 8(4):353-7.
• (vi) The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Public Information Series #8, 1990.
• (vii) Gwynn, J. Wallace, The Utah Department of Natural Resources, Utah Geological Public Information Series 51, 1997.

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Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral
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Date: November 20, 2005 07:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride: The Forgotten Essential Mineral

Chloride is an “essential” mineral for humans. It is abundant in Ionic trace mineral preparations. It is a major mineral nutrient that occurs primarily in body fluids. Chloride is a prominent negatively charged ion of the blood, where it represents 70% of the body’s total negative ion content. On average, an adult human body contains approximately 115 grams of chloride, making up about 0.15% of total body weight.1 The suggested amount of chloride intake ranges from 750 to 900 milligrams per day, based on the fact that total obligatory loss of chloride in the average person is close to 530 milligrams per day. As the principle negatively charged ion in the body, chloride serves as one of the main electrolytes of the body. Chloride, in addition to potassium and sodium, assist in the conduction of electrical impulses when dissolved in bodily water. Potassium and sodium become positive ions as they lose an electron when dissolved and chloride becomes a negative ion as it gains an electron when dissolved. A positive ion is always accompanied by a negative ion, hence the close relationship between sodium, potassium and chloride. The electrolytes are distributed throughout all body fluids including the blood, lymph, and the fluid inside and outside cells.2 The negative charge of chloride balances against the positive charges of sodium and potassium ions in order to maintain serum osmolarity.

Pivotal Roles of Chloride in the Body

In addition to its functions as an electrolyte, chloride combines with hydrogen in the stomach to make hydrochloric acid, a powerful digestive enzyme that is responsible for the break down of proteins, absorption of other metallic minerals, and activation of intrinsic factor, which in turn absorbs vitamin B12. Chloride is specially transported into the gastric lumen, in exchange for another negatively charged electrolyte (bicarbonate), in order to maintain electrical neutrality across the stomach membrane. After utilization in hydrochloric acid, some chloride is reabsorbed by the intestine, back into the blood stream where it is required for maintenance of extracellular fluid volume. Chloride is both actively and passively absorbed by the body, depending on the current metabolic demands. A constant exchange of chloride and bicarbonate, between red blood cells and the plasma helps to govern the pH balance and transport of carbon dioxide, a waste product of respiration, from the body. With sodium and potassium, chloride works in the nervous system to aid in the transport of electrical impulses throughout the body, as movement of negatively charged chloride into the cell propagates the nervous electrical potential.

Deficiency of Chloride

Deficiency of chloride is rare. However, when it does occur, it results in a life threatening condition known as alkalosis, in which the blood becomes overly alkaline. A tedious balance between alkalinity and acidity is in constant flux, and must be vigilantly maintained throughout the entire body. Alkalosis may occur as a result of excessive loss of sodium, such as heavy sweating during endurance exercise, and in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms include muscle weakness, loss of appetite, irritability, dehydration, and profound lethargy. Hypochloremia may result from water overload, wasting conditions, and extensive bodily burns with sequestration of extracellular fluids. In a situation in which infants were inadvertently fed chloride-deficient formula, many experienced failure to thrive, anorexia, and weakness in their first year of life.3

Excess Intake?

Excessive intakes of dietary chloride only occur with the ingestion of large amounts of salt and potassium chloride. The toxic effects of such diets, such as fluid retention and high blood pressure, are attributed to the high sodium and potassium levels.4 Chloride toxicity has not been observed in humans except in the special case of impaired sodium chloride metabolism, e.g. in congestive heart failure.5 Healthy individuals can tolerate the intake of large quantities of chloride provided that there is a concomitant intake of fresh water. Other situations in which increased blood levels of chloride are seen include diseases of improper waste elimination that occur in kidney diseases. Excess chloride is normally excreted in the urine, sweat, and bowels. In fact, excess urinary excretion of chloride occurs in high salt diets. Excessive intakes of chloride can occur in a person with compromised health in addition to an unhealthy diet. However, those that follow a healthy diet and lead an active lifestyle may need to consider supplementing their diet with this important mineral.

Chloride vs. Chlorine

The mineral supplement chloride is very different from the gas chlorine. While elemental chlorine is a dangerous gas that does not exist in the free elemental state in nature because of its reactivity, although it is widely distributed in combination with other elements. Chloride is related to chlorine however, as one of the most common chlorine compounds is common salt, NaCl. Chloride is a by-product of the reaction between chlorine and an electrolyte, such as potassium, magnesium, or sodium, which are essential for human metabolism. Chloride salts are essential for sustaining human metabolism and have none of the effects of isolated chlorine gas.

Sources of Chloride

Chloride occurs naturally in foods at levels normally less than 0.36 milligrams per gram of food. The average intake of chloride during a salt-free diet is approximately 100 milligrams per day. Unfortunately, chloride is found commonly combined with undesirable dietary sources. The most common of these negative sources is table salt. Table salt is made from a combination of sodium and chloride ions. Other unhealthful sources include yeast extracts, processed lunchmeats, and cheeses. Healthier sources of chloride include kelp (seaweed), Ionic trace minerals, olives, rye, tomatoes, lettuce, and celery, although not in large enough amounts to supply the needs of an active adult.6 In its original form, however, chloride is leached from various rocks into soil and water by years of weathering processes. The chloride ion is highly mobile and is transported to closed basins, such as the Great Salt Lake, or oceans.7

Summary

Chloride is a highly important, vital mineral required for both human and animal life. Without chloride, the human body would be unable to maintain fluids in blood vessels, conduct nerve transmissions, move muscles, or maintain proper kidney function. As a major electrolyte mineral of the body, chloride performs many roles, and is rapidly excreted from the body. Active adults that eat a healthy diet devoid of salt and illnesses in which vomiting and/or diarrhea are profuse warrant the supplementation of additional chloride. Replacement of chloride is essential on a daily basis to maintain regular metabolic function. Chloride is safely utilized by the body, without negative health effects. Of the negative health effects that have been associated with diets high in chloride, these are mainly attributable to the accompanying sodium and potassium, two other electrolyte minerals to which chloride is often attached

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Wesson LG. Physiology of the human kidney. New York, NY, Grune and Stratton, 1969: 591

2 Weast RC, ed. CRC handbook of chemistry and physics, 67th ed. Boca Raton, FL, CRC Press, 1986.

3 Kaleita TA. Neurologic/behavioral syndrome associated with ingestion of chloride-deficient infant formula. Pediatrics 1986 Oct;78(4):714-5

4 Beard TC. A salt-hypertension hypothesis. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 1990;16 Suppl 7:S35-8

5 Seelig M. Cardiovascular consequences of magnesium deficiency and loss: pathogenesis, prevalence and manifestations--magnesium and chloride loss in refractory potassium repletion. Am J Cardiol 1989 Apr 18;63(14):4G-21G

6 Altschul AM, Grommet JK. Food choices for lowering sodium intake. Hypertension 1982 Sep-Oct;4(5 Pt 2):III116-20

7 Gelb SB, Anderson MP. Sources of chloride and sulfate in ground water beneath an urbanized area in Southeastern Wisconsin (Report WIS01 NTIS). Chemical abstracts, 1981, 96(2):11366g.



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What are Ionically Charged Minerals?
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Date: November 20, 2005 07:48 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What are Ionically Charged Minerals?

Trace Minerals Research

What Are Ionically Charged Minerals?

An Ionic mineral is an element that has a charge, either positive or negative. On the molecular level, that means the element has either one too many or too few electrons. This unstable Ionic state allows the element to bond readily with water, making it possible for the body to absorb it. In this state, an element has specific positive or negative electrical signatures that cause a dynamic equilibrium to take place. The body can then assimilate minor changes to move nutrients to the areas that need them.



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Where Have All the Minerals Gone?
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Date: November 20, 2005 07:45 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Where Have All the Minerals Gone?

Where Have All the Minerals Gone?

Traditionally, eating fresh grains, fruits, and vegetables grown in nutrient-rich soil have been the primary supply for the full spectrum of Ionically charged minerals.

Unfortunately in today's world, naturally occurring, nutrient-rich soil is becoming a thing of the past. Eons of vegetation growth and aggressive modern farming techniques have brought many of the earth's minerals to the surface where they have been washed away.

Synthesized fertilizers are routinely applied to farms and fields where minerals have been depleted. But man-made fertilizers provide only enough mineral substance to support basic plant life. Numerous trace minerals so essential to human life are never replenished.



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The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals
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Date: October 13, 2005 01:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals

The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals

The form of different minerals also play a key role in how well they are transported through the circulatory systemand the aqueous micro-environment of the cells. “whatever the nutritional potential of a food, its contribution is nonexistent if it does not pass the test of absorption”. Those minerals that your body is unable to break down to their Ionic form are likely to pass completely from the body unassimilated, and for all nutritional intents and purposes, were never eaten. Authors Rosenberg and solomons offer the following insight:

“Insofar as minerals in the diet are often bound to protein, complexed with organic molecules in food, or otherwise imbedded in the matrix of food-stuffs, the mechanical processes of mastication, dissolution, dispersion, and often digestion are important preparative steps to absorption. Moreover, at the conclusion of the aforementioned reductive process, minerals generally emerge in the intestinal lumen as charged ions, e.g. Fe, Zn, PO4, SeO3.”

“Minerals should be Ionic to be readily absorbed through transfer in the small intestine.”

Minerals that are absorbed in their Ionic form are true liquid solution and have either positive or negative charges. They also have properties that distinguish them from each other and allow them to freely take part in biochemical communication throughout the body. These communications help nutrients move to those areas of the body that are in most need of their help.

“Imbalances of any of these ions or certain trace ions in the body…can lead to dysfunction in the conduction of electrical messages. This dysfunction quickly leads to a general body disturbance and loss of ability to maintain somewhat stable internal conditions.

The Light bulb demonstration that Trace Minerals Research uses is a simple yet effective scientific experiment to show how well different minerals break down into Ionic solutions in water and their concentration in that form. The experiment uses a broken circuit from the electrical cord that is connected to two probes which are then inserted into distilled water. When a mineral is placed in the water, it will connect the circuit and light the bulb in direct relation to how well it breaks down into Ionic solutions and it’s concentration in Ionic form. If a mineral does not break down in water, it will not light the light bulb.



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Like Your Body, Its Only Lights Up with “Ionic” Trace Minerals.
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Date: October 13, 2005 01:07 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Like Your Body, Its Only Lights Up with “Ionic” Trace Minerals.

Like Your Body, Its Only Lights Up with “Ionic” Trace Minerals.

Every second of every day your body relies on Ionic minerals and trace minerals to conduct and generate billions of tiny electrical impulses. Without these impulses, not a single muscle, including your heart, would be able to function. Your brain would not function and the cells would not be able to use osmosis to balance water pressure and absorb nutrients. In fact, “many vital body processes depend on the movement of ions across cell membranes “Recent research indicates that minerals may play a significant role against a variety of degenerative disease and processes. They may also prevent and reduce injury from environmental pollutants and enhance the ability to work and learn. They can also protect the body from the effects of toxic minerals.

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The “Power” of trace Minerals…
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Date: October 08, 2005 11:56 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The “Power” of trace Minerals…

The “Power” of trace Minerals…

These articles piqued hartley’s interest with information about the amazing results people were receiving from drinking a little bit of sea water each day. This led him to research the great salt Lake, an inland sea located near his home. He found that the Great Salt Lake not only had the same minerals and balance discussed by George Crane, but that it was 6 to 10 times more concentrated than regular sea water without the pollution. Hartley knew there was a need for these minerals himself and had seen results from other people that the company was established with initial product sales.

Science was slow to provide answers as to why the minerals from this desert sea caused such a dramatic and varied results in people, but Hartley knew from his growing stack of testimonials that the company’s first product, Inland sea water, was effective. He and his wife, Gaye, founded Trace Minerals Research in 1968 and started selling pure Great Salt Lake water to the public and a short time later, they discovered how to use nature’s own processes to remove the sodium, thereby creating low-sodium, Concentrace TraceMineral Drops.

Hartley and Gaye founded their company on the principle that nutritional supplements should get results and that if a customer does not actually feel an improvement in their health, they should not have to pay for it. This same principle is still evident today in Trace Mineral Research.

Not a single bottle of product leaves our manufacturing facility unless we can confidently back it up with the guarantee of “Feel the Difference or your Money Back.” This guarantee is made possible because minerals and trace minerals needed by Americans today are found in rich abundance, a natural balance and a highly assimilable principle Ionic form from the Great Salt Lake. Trace Mineral Research sent most of their products into development because of the spectacular results many people were already discovering from low sodium ConcenTrace and Trace Mineral Drops. The company then combined their formulas of vitamins, herbs, enzymes and other nutrients to enhance the specific benefits people were reporting.

Trace Minerals Research now has a complete line of highly effective nutritional supplements each backed by our guarantee of “Feel the Difference of Your Money Back”. These products are also backed by research and we are continually researching new information on our existing and new products.

Our Philosophy at Trace Mineral Research has always been that the Earth was created with the prefect balance of all the nutrients that humans need to be healthy and happy. The only problem is that over the years humans have become victims of the water cycle. Dr. U. Aswathanarayana states, “Soil erosion leads to the depletion of essential nutrients elements in crops grown in depleted soil. When people consume a diet derived from such crops, the intake of essential elements becomes inadequate. This leads to the impairment of the relevant physiological functions, and causes disease.” For millions of years, every sprouting seed and towering tree has dissolved minerals to Ionic form and raised them from the depths of the soil where they could easily be washed away by water. To add to this problem, aggressive farming has further depleted the soils. Furthermore, many fertilizers and pesticides bind trace minerals in the soil so that fewer minerals are absorbed by fruits and vegetables. The importance of minerals in the soil and their effects on human health are not new concepts. Dr. Alexis Carrel, Winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1912, states, “Soil is the basis of all human life and our only hope for a healthy world… All of life will be either healthy or unhealthy according to the fertility of the soil. Minerals in the soil control the metabolism of cells in plants, animal and man … Diseases are created chiefly by destroying the harmony reigning among mineral substances present in infinitesimal amounts in air, water and food, but most importantly in the soil. Even the AMA recognized the importance of minerals in our diet. “Variations in the distribution of certain minerals in the environment are known to have an effect on health.

The Lack of minerals in our soil is evidenced through the need for constant fertilization. Plants need nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, chlorine, carbon, boron, sulfur, potassium, magnesium, phosphorous, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, and molybdenum, some of which are commonly replaced through fertilizers to provide maximum crops through minimum investment. However, humans are known to additionally need calcium, sodium, fluorine, bromine, chromium, iodine, silicon, selenium, beryllium, lithium, cobalt, vanadium and nickel, which would not necessarily be replaced through fertilization for plants.

This continual cycle of soil depletion and minor replacement of minerals through fertilization in conjunction with a diet of processed foods has left many Americans deficient in minerals and trace minerals. This does not need to follow the water cycle. As water goes through the constant cycle from evaporation to precipitation, minerals are transported through rivers and streams where it is then collected in the seas thereby creating a natural equilibrium.

Today, Trace Minerals Research harvests minerals and trace minerals from the Great Salt Lake, a uniquely rich and pure desert sea. These minerals are the basis for each of their unique products and help provide a strong foundation for balanced supplementation.



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Date: October 06, 2005 10:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)

Magnesium is a dietary mineral with a wide array of biological activities in the body. Magnesium participates in numerous life-essential processes that occur both inside and outside cells. Magnesium deficiency impacts normal physiologic function on many levels. Adequate magnesium is a fundamental requirement for optimum function of the cardiovascular system, the nervous system and skeletal muscle, as well as the uterus and GI tract. Magnesium deficiency can affect health of the heart, bones and blood vessels and alter blood sugar balance [1].

Magnesium–Important for Everyone, Deficient in Many The average person living in a modern country today very likely consumes less than the optimum amount of magnesium [2]. An abundance of data collected over the last two decades shows a consistent pattern of low magnesium intake in the U.S. This pattern cuts a wide swath across various age-sex groups. The USDA’s Nationwide Food Consumption Survey found that a majority of Americans consumed less than the recommended daily magnesium intake [3]. Twelve age-sex groups were studied and this low magnesium intake was true for all groups except 0 to 5 year olds.

An analysis of the nutrient content of the diets of 7,810 individuals age four and above included magnesium among several nutrients where the amounts supplied by the average diet "were not sufficient to meet recommended standards" [4]. The FDA’s Total Diet study examined the intakes of eleven minerals, including magnesium, among eight age-sex groups. Data was collected four times yearly from 1982 to 1984. Levels of magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc and copper were low for most age-sex groups [5]. Surveys conducted in Europe and in other parts of North America paint a similar picture. Loss of magnesium during food processing is one explanation for this global lack of adequate dietary magnesium [6].

In particular, the elderly may be susceptible to magnesium deficiency for a variety of reasons, including inadequate magnesium intake, poor absorption due to impaired gastrointestinal function and use of drugs such as diuretics that deplete magnesium from the body [7]. It has recently been theorized that magnesium deficiency may contribute to accelerated aging, through effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems, as well as muscles and the kidneys [8].

Women who take both synthetic estrogen and calcium supplements may be at risk for low blood levels of magnesium [9]. Estrogen promotes the transfer of magnesium from blood to soft–tissues. Low blood magnesium may result if the ratio of calcium to magnesium intake exceeds 4 to 1. Magnesium supplementation is thus advisable for women taking estrogen and calcium.

Young adults are not immune to magnesium deficiency. The University of California’s Bogalusa Heart Study collected nutritional data from a cross-sectional sample of 504 young adults between age 19 and 28 [10]. The reported intake of magnesium, along with several other minerals and vitamins, was below the RDA.

Glycine is a highly effective mineral chelator. This is because it is a low-molecular-weight amino acid, hence is easily transported across the intestinal membrane. A study conducted at Weber State University found this particular magnesium glycinate was absorbed up to four times more effectively than typical magnesium supplements.

Magnesium-the Versatile Mineral

The average adult body contains anywhere from about 21 to 28 grams of magnesium. Approximately 60 percent of the body’s magnesium supply is stored in bone. Soft tissue, such as skeletal muscle, contains 38%, leaving only about 1 to 2% of the total body magnesium content in blood plasma and red blood cells. Magnesium in the body may be bound either to proteins or "anions" (negatively charged substances.) About 55% of the body’s magnesium content is in the "Ionic" form, which means it carries an electrical charge. Magnesium ions are "cations," ions that carry a positive charge. In its charged state, magnesium functions as one of the mineral "electrolytes."

Magnesium works as a "co-factor" for over 300 enzymatic reactions in the body. Metabolism uses a phosphate containing molecule called "ATP" as its energy source. Magnesium is required for all reactions involving ATP [11]. ATP supplies the energy for physical activity, by releasing energy stored in "phosphate bonds".

Skeletal and heart muscle use up large amounts of ATP. The energy for muscle contraction is released when one of ATP’s phosphate bonds is broken, in a reaction that produces ADP. Phosphate is added back to ADP, re-forming ATP. ATP also powers the cellular "calcium pump" which allows muscle cells to relax. Because it participates in these ATP-controlled processes, magnesium is vitally important for muscle contraction and relaxation. By controlling the flow of sodium, potassium and calcium in and out of cells, magnesium regulates the function of nerves as well as muscles [12].

Magnesium’s importance for heart health is widely recognized. The heart is the only muscle in the body that generates its own electrical impulses. Through its influence on the heart’s electrical conduction system, magnesium is essential for maintenance of a smooth, regular heartbeat [13]. Magnesium appears to help the heart resist the effects of systemic stress. Magnesium deficiency aggravates cardiac damage due to acute systemic stress (such as caused by infection or trauma), while magnesium supplementation protects the heart against stress [14]. This has been found true even in the absence of an actual magnesium deficit in the body.

Evidence suggests that magnesium may help support mineral bone density in elderly women. In a two-year open, controlled trial, 22 out of a group of 31 postmenopausal women who took daily magnesium supplements showed gains in bone density. A control group of 23 women who declined taking the supplements had decreases in bone density [15]. The dietary intakes of magnesium, potassium, fruit and vegetables are associated with increased bone density in elderly women and men [16]. In an interesting animal study, rats were fed diets with either high or low levels of magnesium. Compared to the high magnesium-fed rats, bone strength and magnesium content of bone decreased in the low-magnesium rats, even though these rats showed no visible signs of magnesium deficiency [17]. While this finding may or may not apply to humans, it raises the possibility that diets supplying low magnesium intakes may contribute to weakening of bone in the elderly.

Maximizing Absorption––Chelated Minerals Explained Mineral absorption occurs mainly in the small intestine. Like any mineral, magnesium may be absorbed as an "ion," a mineral in its elemental state that carries an electric charge. Mineral ions cross the intestinal membrane either through "active transport" by a protein carrier imbedded in the cells lining the membrane inner wall, or by simple diffusion. The magnesium in mineral salts is absorbed in Ionic form. However, absorption of Ionic minerals can be compromised by any number of factors, including: 1) Low solubility of the starting salt, which inhibits release of the mineral ion, and 2) Binding of the released ion to naturally occurring dietary factors such as phytates, fats and other minerals that form indigestible mineral complexes [18].

A second absorption mechanism has been discovered for minerals. Experiments have shown that minerals chemically bonded to amino acids (building blocks of protein) are absorbed differently from mineral ions. This has given rise to the introduction of "chelated" minerals as dietary supplements. Mineral amino acid chelates consist of a single atom of elemental mineral that is surrounded by two or more amino acid molecules in a stable, ring-like structure.

Unlike mineral salts, which must be digested by stomach acid before the desired mineral portion can be released and absorbed, mineral chelates are not broken down in the stomach or intestines. Instead, chelates cross the intestinal wall intact, carrying the mineral tightly bound and hidden within the amino acid ring. The mineral is then released into the bloodstream for use by the body. Research by pioneers in the field of mineral chelation and human nutrition indicates that the best-absorbed chelates consist of one mineral atom chelated with two amino acids. This form of chelate is called a "di-peptide." Compared to other chelates, di-peptides have the ideal chemical attributes for optimum absorption [19]. Dipeptide chelates demonstrate superior absorption compared to mineral salts. For example, a magnesium di-peptide chelate was shown to be four times better absorbed than magnesium oxide [20].

Consumer Alert! Not all "amino acid chelates" are true chelates. In order for a mineral supplement to qualify as a genuine chelate, it must be carefully processed to ensure the mineral is chemically bonded to the amino acids in a stable molecule with the right characteristics. The magnesium bis-glycinate/lysinate in High Absorption Magnesium is a genuine di-peptide chelate ("bis" means "two"). It has a molecular weight of 324 daltons, considerably lower than the upper limit of 800 daltons stated in the definition of "mineral amino acid chelates" adopted by the National Nutritional Foods Association in 1996 [21].

Bioperine® For Enhanced Absorption Bioperine® is a natural extract derived from black pepper that increases nutrient absorption.* Preliminary trials on humans have shown significant increases in the absorption of nutrients consumed along with Bioperine® [22].

Scientific References 1. Abbott, L.R., R., Clinical manifestations of magnesium deficiency. Miner electrolyte Metab, 1993. 19: p. 314-22. 2. Durlach, J., Recommended dietary amounts of magnesium: Mg RDA. Magnesium Research, 1989. 2(3): p. 195-202. 3. Morgan, K.e.a., Magnesium and calcium dietary intakes of the U.S. population. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 1985. 4: p. 195-206. 4. Windham, C., Wyse, B., Hurst, R. Hansen, R., Consistency of nutrient consumption patterns in the United States. J AM Diet Assoc, 1981. 78(6): p. 587-95. 5. Pennington, J., Mineral content of foods and total diets: the Selected Minerals in Food Survey, 1982 to 1984. J AM Diet Assoc, 1986. 86(7): p. 876-91. 6. Marier, J., Magnesium Content of the Food Supply in the Modern- Day World. Magnesium, 1986. 5: p. 1-8. 7. Costello, R., Moser-Veillon, P., A review of magnesium intake in the elderly. A cause for concern? Magnesium Research, 1992. 5(1): p. 61-67. 8. Durlach, J., et al., Magnesium status and aging: An update. Magnesium Research, 1997. 11(1): p. 25-42. 9. Seelig, M., Increased need for magnesium with the use of combined oestrogen and calcium for osteoporosis treatment. Magnesium Research, 1990. 3(3): p. 197-215. 10. Zive, M., et al., Marginal vitamin and mineral intakes of young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study. J Adolesc, 1996. 19(1): p. 39-47. 11. McLean, R., Magnesium and its therapeutic uses: A review. American Journal of Medicine, 1994. 96: p. 63-76. 12. Graber, T., Role of magnesium in health and disease. Comprehensive Therapy, 1987. 13(1): p. 29-35. 13. Sueta, C., Patterson, J., Adams, K., Antiarrhythmic action of pharmacological administration of magnesium in heart failure: A critical review of new data. Magnesium Research, 1995. 8(4): p. 389- 401. 14. Classen, H.-G., Systemic stress, magnesium status and cardiovascular damage. Magnesium, 1986. 5: p. 105-110. 15. Stendig-Lindberg, G., Tepper, R., Leichter, I., Trabecular bone density in a two year controlled trial of peroral magnesium in osteoporosis. Magnesium Research, 1993. 6(2): p. 155-63. 16. Tucker, K., et al., Potassium, magnesium, and fruit and vegetable intakes are associated with greater bone mineral density in elderly men and women. Am J Clin Nutr, 1999. 69(4): p. 727-736. 17. Heroux, O., Peter, D., Tanner, A., Effect of a chronic suboptimal intake of magnesium on magnesium and calcium content of bone and bone strength of the rat. Can J. Physiol. Pharmacol., 1975. 53: p. 304-310. 18. Pineda, O., Ashmead, H.D., Effectiveness of treatment of irondeficiency anemia in infants and young children with ferrous bisglycinate chelate. Nutrition, 2001. 17: p. 381-84. 19. Adibi, A., Intestinal transport of dipetides in man: Relative importance of hydrolysis and intact absorption. J Clin Invest, 1971. 50: p. 2266-75. 20. Ashmead, H.D., Graff, D., Ashmead, H., Intestinal Absorption of Metal Ions and Chelates. 1985, Springfield, Illinois: Charles C. Thomas. 21. NNFA definition of mineral amino acid chlelates, in NNFA Today. 1996. p. 15. 22. Bioperine-Nature's Bioavailability Enhancing Thermonutrient. 1996, Sabinsa Corporation: Piscataway, N.J.

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Doctor's Best•1120 Calle Cordillera•Suite 101, San Clemente, CA 92673



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Strontium Bone Maker 60 VC - Strengthen Bones
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Date: July 27, 2005 12:06 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Strontium Bone Maker 60 VC - Strengthen Bones

Benefits

Helps maintain strong, healthy bones.*

In Vitro and Animal Studies

Strontium is a bone-seeking mineral incorporated by Ionic substitution for calcium onto the crystal surface of bone.2 In the test-tube (in vitro), strontium inhibits the activity of osteoclasts, bone cells that break down bone, or “resorb” bone as part of the normal bone remodeling process.3 The effect of strontium, in the form of strontium ranelate (a salt of strontium and ranelic acid), was studied in monkeys over a six-month period. Strontium altered the remodeling of bone in the monkeys, resulting in decreased bone resorption with a concomitant maintenance of bone formation. A trend toward increased volume of osteoid, the organic matrix of bone, was observed, although this was not associated with defects in bone mineralization.4 In another animal study, monkeys fed strontium at high doses for six weeks showed a marked increase in bone strontium content. No harmful effects on bone mineral chemistry or structure occurred.5 At low doses, strontium has been shown to increase the number of bone forming sites in thighbones of adult rats, without adverse effects on the mineral content of bone or mineralization of the organic bone matrix.6 Strontium was shown to reverse bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency in rats.7

Clinical Trials

Human clinical trials have examined the effect of strontium on bone in postmenopausal women. In the dose-ranging (Phase 2) PREVOS trial, women in early menopause were administered strontium ranelate or a placebo for two years. Strontium ranelate was given at daily doses of 125 mg, 500 mg or 1 gram. (Total weight of compound; strontium plus ranelic acid). Compared to women in the placebo group, who lost bone, women on strontium at the 1 gram dose showed statistically significant increases in bone mineral density (BMD) of the hip, thigh and lumbar spine. Biochemical markers of bone formation, such as serum alkaline phosphatase, increased. No effect on markers of bone resorption was observed, leading to the conclusion that strontium ranelate, at the 1 gram daily dose, increased bone formation without decreasing bone resorption proportionally. It was concluded that 1 gram per day is the minimum effective daily dose of strontium ranelate in these women.8

In another Phase 2 trial (STRATOS trial), 353 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, who had experienced at least one spinal fracture, took strontium ranelate for two years at daily doses of 500 mg, 1 gram or 2 grams. Women on the 2-gram dose showed a significantly greater increase in lumbar spine BMD than those on placebo. The number of subjects who had new spinal deformities was significantly reduced.9 As in the PREVOS trial, serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, a marker of bone formation, increased, while markers of bone resorption (breakdown) decreased. The overall conclusion is that the minimum effective daily dose of strontium ranelate (whole compound) is 1 gram in early postmenopausal non-osteoporotic women and 2 grams in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.10

Phase 3 efficacy studies on strontium ranelate have been conducted on 1649 subjects in 12 countries. These studies began with an open-run (non-controlled study period in which subjects took calcium and vitamin D supplements to normalize their blood levels of these nutrients.11 Following this, two parallel groups were administered 2 grams daily of strontium ranelate or placebo for 3-years. The subjects continued to take calcium and vitamin D during the study. In subjects on strontium ranelate, BMD increased in the lumbar vertebrae by 14.4 percent and in the thighbone by 8.3 percent. The number and risk of vertebral fractures decreased.12

Safety

Suggested Use: Take two capsules daily. Calcium intake must also be adequate. Do not take this product with calcium supplements.

Strontium ranelate was well-tolerated in the trials discussed above. The incidence of adverse events in subjects on strontium ranelate was statistically equivalent to the placebo groups, and no negative effects on hematology and other biochemical parameters have been observed.

In view of the fact that subjects on the strontium trials also took calcium, and in some cases vitamin D, to maintain normal blood levels of these nutrients, it is important to ensure calcium and vitamin D intakes are adequate when supplementing with strontium. This is underscored by earlier research on animals suggesting that increasing the intake of strontium via diet may demineralize bone when calcium is deficient.13 In rats with chronic kidney failure, strontium has been shown to cause osteomalacia, a condition in which bone is softened due to lack of mineral content. For this reason, people on kidney dialysis should not use strontium supplements.14

Scientific References

1. Shorr E, Carter AC. The usefulness of strontium as an adjuvant to calcium in the remineralization of the skeleton in man. Bull Hosp Joint Dis 1952; 13:59 -66.

2. Dahl SG, Allain P, Marie PJ, et al. Incorporation and distribution of strontium in bone. Bone 2001;28(4):446-53.

3. Baron R, Tsouderos Y. In vitro effects of S12911-2 on osteoclast function and bone marrow macrophage differentiation. Eur J Pharmacol 2002; 450:11-17.

4. Buehler J, Chappuis P, Saffar JL, et al. Strontium ranelate inhibits bone resorption while maintaining bone formation in alveolar bone in monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) Bone 2001;29(2):176-79.

5. Boivin G, Deloffre P, Perrat B, et al. Strontium distribution and interactions with bone mineral in monkey iliac bone after strontium salt (S 12911) administration. J Bone Miner Res. 1996 Sep;11(9):1302-11.

6. Grynpas MD, Hamilton E, Cheung R, et al. Strontium increases vertebral bone volume in rats at a low dose that does not induce detectable mineralization defect. Bone 1996;18(3):253-9.

7. Marie PJ, Hott M, Modrowski D, et al. An uncoupling agent containing strontium prevents bone loss by depressing bone resorption and maintaining bone formation in estrogen-deficient rats. J Bone Miner Res 1993;8(5):607-15.

8. Reginster JY, Deroisy R, Dougados M, et al. Prevention of early postmenopausal bone loss by strontium ranelate: the randomized, two-year, double-masked, dose ranging, placebo-controlled PREVOS trial. Osteoporosis Int 2002; 13:925-31.

9. Meunier PJ, Slosman DO, Delmas PD, et al. Strontium ranelate: dose-dependent effects in established postmenopausal vertebral osteoporosis––a 2-year randomized placebo controlled trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2002;87(5):2060-66.

10. Reginster JY, Meunier PJ. Strontium ranelate phase 2 dose-ranging studies: PREVOS and STRATOS studies. Osteoporosis Int 2003; 14(Suppl 3):S56-S65.

11. Meunier PJ, Reginster JY. Design and methodology of the phase 3 trials for the clinical development of strontium ranelate in the treatment of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Osteoporosis Int 2003;14(Suppl 3):S66-76.

12. Meunier PJ, Roux C, Seeman E, et al. The effects of strontium ranelate on the risk of vertebral fracture in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. N Engl J Med 2004;350(5):459-68. 13. Grynpas MD, Marie PJ. Effects of strontium on bone quality and quantity in rats. Bone 1990;11:313-19.

14. Schrooten, I, Cabrera W, Goodman WG, et al. Strontium causes osteomalacia in chronic renal failure in rats. Kidney Int 1998;54:448-56.



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REFERENCES
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Date: June 25, 2005 08:13 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: REFERENCES

REFERENCES

1 a. The Surgeon General’s “Nutrition and Health Report.” b. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES III)” c. The National Academy of Science’s. Diet and Health Report: Health Promotion and Disease Objectives (DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 91-50213, Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1990). e. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 2 Rolls BJ. Carbohydrates, fats, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr 1995; 61(4 Suppl):960S-967S. 3 McDowell MA, Briefel RR, Alaimo K, et al. Energy and macronutrient intakes of persons ages 2 months and over in the United States: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Phase 1:1988-91. Advance data from vital and health statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; No. 255. 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Digestive Diseases. 1969;14(6) 60 Nauss JL , Thompson JL and Nagyvary J. The binding of micellar lipids to Chitosan. Lipids. 1983;18(10):714-19. 61 Braconnot H, Sue la natrue ces champignons. Ann Chim Phys 1811;79:265. 62 Odier A. Memoire sur la composition chemique des parties cornees des insectes. Mem Soc Hist Nat Paris 1823;1:29. 63 Johnson EL, Peniston QP. Utilization of shellfish waste for chitin and Chitosan production. Chp 19 In: Chemistry and Biochemistry of Marine Food Products. Martin RE, Flick GJ, Hebard CE and Ward DR (eds.) 1982. p.415-. AVI Publishing Co., Westport, CT. 64 Shahram H. Seafood waste: the potential for industrial use. Kem Kemi 1992;19(3),256-8. 65 Rouget C. Des substances amylacees dans le tissue des animux, specialement les Articules (Chitine). Compt Rend 1859;48:792. Commission on Natural Health Products. 1995 67 Peniston QP and Johnson EL. Method for Treating an Aqueous Medium with Chitosan and Derivatives of Chitin to Remove an Impurity. US Patent 3,533,940. Oct. 30:1970. 68 Poly-D-Glucosamine (Chitosan); Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance. Federal Register. 1995;60(75):19523-4. Rules and Regulations. Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Part 180. April, 19, 1995. 69 Arul J. “Use of Chitosan films to retard post-harvest spoilage of fruits and vegetables,” Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 70 Karlsen J, Skaugrud O. “Excipient properties of Chitosan,” Manufacturing Chemist. 1991;62:18-9. 71 Winterowd JG, Sandford PA. Chitin and Chitosan. In: Food Polysaccharides and their Applications. Ed: Stephen AM. Marcel Dekker 1995. 72 Chitin Workshop. ICNHP, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. 73 Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 74 Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 75 Zikakis, JP. Chitin, Chitosan and Related Enzymes. Academic Press, Inc. 1984. 76 Abelin J and Lassus A. Fat binder as a weight reducer in patients with moderate obesity. ARS Medicina, Helsinki, Aug- October, 1994. 77 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Increasing effect of a Chitosan and ascorbic acid mixture on fecal dietary fat excretion. Biosci Biotech Biochem 1994;58(9):1617-20. 78 Maezaki Y, Tsuji K, Nakagawa Y, et al. Hypocholesterolemic effect of Chitosan in adult males. Biosci Biotchnol Biochem1993;57(9):1439-44. 79 Kobayashi T, Otsuka S, Yugari Y. Effect of Chitosan on serum and liver cholesterol levels in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutritional Rep. Int., 1979;19(3):327-34. 80 Sugano M, Fujikawa T, Hiratsuji Y, Hasegawa Y. Hypocholesterolemic effects of Chitosan in cholesterol-fed rats. Nutr Rep. Int. 1978;18(5):531-7. 81 Vahouny G, Satchanandam S, Cassidy M, Lightfoot F, Furda I. Comparative effects of Chitosan and cholestryramine on lymphatic absorption of lipids in the rat. Am J Clin Nutr, 1983;38(2):278-84 82 Suzuki S, Suzuki M, Katayama H. Chitin and Chitosan oligomers as hypolipemics and formulations containing them. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 63 41,422 [88,422] 22 Feb1988. 83 Ikeda I, Tomari Y, Sugano M. Interrelated effects of dietary fiber on lymphatic cholesterol and triglyceride absorption in rats. J Nutr 1989;119(10):1383- 7. 84 LeHoux JG and Grondin F. Some effects of Chitosan on liver function in the rat. Endocrinology. 1993;132(3):1078-84. 85 Fradet G, Brister S, Mulder D, Lough J, Averbach BL. “Evaluation of Chitosan as a New Hemostatic Agent: In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 86 Malette W, Quigley H, Gaines R, Johnson N, Rainer WG. Chitosan A New Hemostatic. Annals of Thorasic Surgery. 1983;36:55. 87 Malette W, Quigley H, Adickes ED. Chitosan effect in Vascular Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday, Eds: Chitin in Nature and Technology. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 88 Okamoto Y, Tomita T, Minami S, et al. Effects of Chitosan on experimental abscess with Staphylococcus aureus in dogs. J. Vet. Med., 1995;57(4):765-7. 89 Klokkevold PR, Lew DS, Ellis DG, Bertolami CN. Effect of Chitosan on lingual hemostasis in rabbits. Journal of Oral-Maxillofac-Surg, 1991;Aug. 49(8):858-63. 89 Surgery, Tissue Culture and Tissue Regeneration. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 90 Hiroshi S, Makoto K, Shoji A, Yoshikazu S. Antibacterial fiber blended with Chitosan. Sixth International Conference on Chitin and Chitosan. Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland. August 1994;16-19. 91 Shimai Y, Tsukuda K, Seino H. Antiacne preparations containing chitin, Chitosan or their partial degradation products. Jpn. Kikai Tokkyo Koho JP 04,288,017 [92,288,017] 13 Oct 1992. 92 Suzuki K, Okawa Y, Suzuki S, Suzuki M. Candidacidal effect of peritoneal exudate cells in mice administered with chitin or Chitosan: the role of serine protease in the mechanism of oxygen-independent candidacidal effect. Microbiol Immunol. 1987;31(4):375-9. 93 Sawada G, Akaha Y, Naito H, Fujita M. Synergistic food preservatives containing organic acids, Chitosan and citrus seed extracts. Jpn, Kokai Kokkyo Koho JP 04 27,373 [92 27,373] 30 Jan 1992. 94 Min H-K, Hatai K, Bai S. Some inhibitory effects of Chitosan on fishpathogenic oomycete, Saprolegnia parasitic. Gyobyo Kenkyu, 1994;29(2):73-4. 95 Nelson JL, Alexander JW, Gianotti L, Chalk CL, Pyles T. The influence of dietary fiber on microbial growth in vitro and bacterial translocation after burn injury in mice. Nutr 1994;10(1):32-6. 96 Ochiai Y, Kanazawa Y. Chitosan as virucide. Jpn Kokai Tokkyo Koho 79 41,326. 97 Hillyard IW, Doczi J, Kiernan. Antacid and antiulcer properties of the polysaccharide Chitosan in the rat. Proc Soc Expl Biol Med 1964; 115:1108-1112. 98 Shibasaki K, Sano H, MatsukuboT, Takaesu Y. pH response of human dental plaque to chewing gum supplemented with low molecular Chitosan. Bull- Tokyo-Dent-Coll, 1994:35(2): 61-6. 99 Kato H, Okuda H. Chitosan as antihypertensive. Jpn. Kikoi Tokyo Koho JP 06 56,674 [94 56,674] 100 Kato H, Taguchi T. Mechanism of the rise in blood pressure by sodium chloride and decrease effect of Chitosan on blood pressure. Baiosaiensu to Indasutori 1993;51(12):987-8. 101 Muzzarelli R, Biagini G, Pugnaoni A, Filippini O, Baldassarre V, Castaldini C, and Rizzoli C. Reconstruction of Periodontal Tissue with Chitosan. Biomaterials. 1989;10:598-603. 102 Sapelli P, Baldassarre V, Muzzarelli R, Emanuelli M. Chitosan in Dentistry. In Chitin in Nature and Technology. Eds: R Muzzarelli, C Jeuniaux, GW Gooday. Plenum Press, New York. 1986. 103 Borah G, Scott G, Wortham K. Bone induction by Chitosan in endochrondral bones of the extremities. In Advances in Chitin and Chitosan. Eds: CJ Brine, PA Sandford, JP Zikakis. Elsevier Applied Science. London. 1992. 104 Ito F. Role of Chitosan as a supplementary food for osteoporosis. Gekkan Fudo Kemikaru, 1995;11(2):39-44. 105 Nakamura S, Yoshioka T, hamada S, Kimura I. Chitosan for enhancement of bioavailability of calcium. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 07 194,316 [95 194,316] 01 Aug 1995. 106 Maekawa A, Wada M. Food Containing chitin or its derivatives for reduction of blood and urine uric acid. Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho JP 03 280,852 [91 280,852], 11 Dec 1991. 107 Weisberg M, Gubner R. Compositions for oral administration comprising Chitosan and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Antacid preparations for alleviating gastric hyperacidity. U.S. patent 3257275 108 Kanauchi O, Deuchi K, Imasato Y, Shizukuishi M, Kobayashi E. Mechanism for the inhibition of fat digestion by Chitosan and for the synergistic effect of ascorbate. Biosci Biotech Biochem1995;59(5):786-90. 109 McCausland CW. Fat Binding Properties of Chitosan as Compared to Other Dietary Fibers. Private communication. 24 Jan1995. 110 Deuchi K, Kanauchi O, Imasato Y, Kobayashi E. Biosci Biotech Biochem. 1994:58,1613-6. 111 Ebihara K, Schneeman BO. Interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, cholesterol and triglyceride with dietary fibers in the small intestine of rats. J Nutr 1989;119(8):1100-6. 112 Weil A, M.D. Natural Health Natural Medicine: Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1990:182. 113 Chen Y-H, Riby Y, Srivastava P, Bartholomew J, Denison M, Bjeldanes L. Regualtion of CYP1A1 by indolo[3,2-b]carbazole in murine hepatoma cells. J Biol Chem 1995;270(38):22548-55. 114 Intestinal Absorption of metal ions and chelates. Ashmead HD, Graff DJ, Ashmead HH. Charles C Thomas, Springfield, IL 1985. 115 Nutrient Interactions. Bodwell CE, Erdman JW Jr. Marcel Dekker New York 1988. 116 Heleniak EP, Aston B. Prostaglandins, Brown Fat and Weight Loss. Medical Hypotheses 1989;28:13-33. 117 Connor WE, DeFrancesco CA, Connor SL. N-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Effects on plasma lipoproteins and hypertriglyceridemic patients. Ann NY Acad Sci 1993;683:16-34. 118 Conte AA. A non-prescription alternative in weight reduction therapy. The Bariatrician Summer 1993:17-19. 119 McCarty MF. Inhibition of citrate lyase may aid aerobic endurance. Unpublished manuscript. 120 Bray GA. Weight homeostasis. Annual Rev Med 1991;42:205-216. 121 Dulloo AG, Miller DS. The thermogenic properties of Ephedrin/Methylxanthine mixtures: Human studies. Intl J Obesity 986;10:467-481. 122 Arai K, Kinumaki T, Fujita, T. Bulletin Tokai Regional Fisheries Res Lab. 1968;No. 56. 123 Bough WA. Private communication. 124 Freidrich EJ, Gehan, EA, Rall DP, Schmidt LH, Skipper HE. Cancer Chemotherapy Reports 1966;50(4):219-244. 125 A Drovanti, AA Bignamini, AL Rovati. Therapeutic activity of oral glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis: A placebo-controlled double-blind investigation. Clinical Therapeutics 1980;3(4):260-272. 126 K Deuchi, O Kanauchi, M Shizukuishi, E Kobayashi. Continuous and massive intake of Chitosan affects mineral and fat-soluble vitamin status in rats fed on a high-fat diet. Biosci. Biotech. Biochemistry. 1995;59(7):1211-6. 127 . BesChitin W in Chitin Wound Healing (video), Unitika Corporation, April 1992.

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REFERENCES
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Date: June 22, 2005 09:57 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: REFERENCES

REFERENCES


1. Interview with Dr. Michael Pariza, July 3, 1997.
2. “Effects of Temperature and Time on Mutagen Formation in Pan-Fried Hamburger,” by M. Pariza, Samy Ashoor, Fun Chu and Daryl Lund, March 10, 1979, Cancer Letters, 7 (1979) 63-69.
3. “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, August 25, 1987. IRL Press limited, Oxford, England.
4. Interview with Dr. Mark Cook, July 3, 1997.
5. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Cancer Prevention Research: A Report of Current Status and Issues,” A special report prepared for the National Live Stock and Meat Board, Ip, Clement, Ph.D., May 1994. See also “Conjugated linoleic acid, a newly recognised nutrient” in the June 17, 1997, issue of Chemistry and Industry by M. Pariza, pp. 464-466.
6. Op.Cit. Pariza, Chemistry and Industry.
7. Op. Cit. Ip, National Live Stock and Meat Board. See also, “Conjugated Linoleic Acid (9,11 and 10,12-Octadecadienoic Acid) is Produced in Conventional by Not Germ-Free Rats Fed Linleic Acid,” Sou F. Chin, Et. Al, Dec. 16, 1993, Journal of Nutrition 124: 694-701 1994.
8. Ibid.
9. Interview with Cook. 10. Op. Cit. Ip, National Live Stock and Meat Board.
11. Ibid.
12. Op. Cit., interview with Pariza., and “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L. Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, Aug. 25, 1987, IRL Press Limited, Oxford England.
13. “Conjugated linoleic acid: An anticarcinogenic fatty acid present in mile fat,” by Peter Parodi, Australian Journal of DairyTechnology. Nov. 1994, 49 p. 93-94.
14. The Washington Post “Now We’re a Nation of Lite Heavyweights,” Sept. 1, 1994, Sec. B. P. 10.
15. “A beef-derived mutagenesis modulator inhibits initiation of mouse epidermal tumors by 7, 12 dimethylbens[a]anthracene,” by M. Pariza and W. Hargraves, Jan. 2, 1985, Carcinogenesis, vol 6., no. 4 pp. 591-593, 1985, IRL Press, Limited, Oxford, England.
16. Op. Cit. Pariza, Chemistry and Industry.
17. “Anticarcinogens from fried ground beef: heat-altered derivatives of linoleic acid,” Y.L. Ha, N.K. Grimm and M.W. Pariza, Aug. 25, 1987, IRL Press Limited, Oxford England.
18. “Mammary Cancer Prevention by Conjugated Dienoic Derivative of Linoleic Acid,” Clement Ip, Sou Fe Chin, Joseph Scimeca and Michael Pariza, Cancer Research, 51, 6118-6124, Nov. 15, 1991.
19. “Refiguring the Odds: What’s a woman’s real chance of suffering breast cancer?” Facklemann, K.A., Science News 144 (1993) 76-77.
20. “Inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene-induced mouse forestomach neoplasia by conjugated dienoic derivatives of linoleic acid.” Ha, Y.L, Storkson, J., Pariza, M.W. Cancer Research 50: 1097-1101; 1990.
21. “Protection of Conjugated linoleic acid against 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline-induced colon carcinogenesis in the f344 rat: a study of inhibitory mechanisims,” Liew, C.; Schut, H.A.J., chin, S.F., Pariza, M.W., and Dashwood, R.H. (1995), Carcinogenesis 16, 3037-3044.
22. Op. Cit., Ip, Cancer Research, 1991.
23. “Potential of Food Modification in Cancer Prevention,” Ip, C.; Lisk, Donald J. and J. Scimeca, Cancer Research, 54, 1957-1959, April 1, 1994.
24. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA), A Newly Re c o g n i ze d Anitcarcinogenic Nutrient,” unpublished paper by Michael Pariza.
25. “Effects of conjugated dienoic linoleic acid on lipid metabolism in mouse liver,” Belury, M.A. and Vanden Heuvel, J.P. (1996), Proc. Am. Assoc. Cancer Res. 37: 1918.
26. “Protection Against Cancer and Heart Disease by Dietary Fatty Acid, Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Potential Mechanisms of Action,” Belury, M.A.; Vanden Heuvel, J.P; Submitted to Nutrition and Disease Update Journal, Sept. 28, 1996.
27. Interveiw with Pariza.
28. Op. Cit., Pariza, Cancer Research, 1990.
29. “Fatty Acids that Inhibit Cancer,” unpublished paper by M. Pariza.
30. Op. Cit. Liew.
31. “Reinvestigation of the antioxidant properties of conjugated linoleic acid,” van den Berg J.J.; Cook, N.E.; Tribble D.L.; Lipids, 73, 1995, Jul 30 (7), 595-598.
32. “Furan Fatty acids detrmined as oxidation products of conjugated octadecadienoic acid,” Yurawecz, M.P., Hood, J.K., Mossoba, MM., Roach, J.A.G., and Ku, Y. Lipids 30, 595-598.
33. Interview with Pariza.
34. “Vital Statistics of the United States” from the Centers for Disease Control for 1989.
35. “Conjugated linoleic acid and atherosclerosis in rabbits.” Lee, K.N., Kritchevsky, D. And Pariza, M.W.; Atherosclerosis 108, 19-25.
36. Interview with Pariza.
37. “Dietary conjugated linoleic acid reduces aortic fatty streak formation greater than linoleic acid in hypercholesterolemic hamsters,” Nicolosi, R.J., and Laitinen, L. (1996), FASEB J. 10 A477.
38. “Ionic Basis of Hypertension, Insulin in Resistance, Vascular Disease and Related Disorders. The Mechanism of ‘Syndrome X”, Resnick, LM, American Journal of Hypertension. 1993 (4Suppl) 123S-134S.
39. “Protection by coenzyme Q10 from myocardial reperfusion injury during coronary artery bypass grafting,” Chello-M, et. Al, Ann-Thorac. Surg., 1994, Nov; 58(5): 1427-32.
40. “Immune Modulation by Altered Nutrient Metabolism: Nutritional Control of Immune-Induced Growth Depression,” M.E. Cook, C.C. Miller, Y. Park and Ma Pariza, Poultry Science 72: 1301-1305 (1993).
41. “Feeding Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Animals Partially Overcomes Catabolic Responses Due to Endotoxin Injection,” Miller, C.C., Park, Y., Pariza, M, and Cook, M. Feb. 15, 1994, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, pages 1107-1112.
42. Op. Cit. Cook, Poultry Science, 1993.
43. Interview with Cook.
44. Ibid.
45. Op. Cit. Washington Post.
46. “Obesity, Pathogenesis & Treatment, a series of reports on obesisy issues edited by G. Enzi, et. Al, 1981, Academic Press.
47. William Howard Taft: The President who became Chief Justice, by Severn, Bill 1970, David McKay company.
48. “Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduces Body Fat,” abstract only of a speech g i ven at En v i ronmental Bi o l o g y, 96. See also U.S. Patent Nu m b e r 5,554,646, dated Sep. 10, 1996.
49. Interveiw with Cook.
50. Information of Dr. Parizi provided to PharmaNutrients, Inc.
51. Interview with Cook.
52. Op. Cit. Parodi.
53. Obesity & Weight Control: The Health Pro f e s s i o n a l’s Guide to Understanding & Treatment. Edited by Frankle, R. T. 1988.
54. Ibid.
55. Op. Cit. The Washington Post.
56. Interview with Pariza.
57. Pariza in information to Pharmnutrients, Inc., indicates a Dr. Reid studied content in 1963 of milk fat.
58. Op Cit. Parodi.
59. Bill Phillips, Supplement Review, 3rd Edition.
60. Interview with Pariza.
61. Interview with Cook.
62. Interviews with Cook, Pariza.
63. Research conducted by Medstat Research Ltd., Lillestrom, Norway for the Herbal Marketing Group, HMG, Ltd., Oslo, Norway. “A pilot study with the aim of stydying the efficacy and tolerability of CLA (Tonalin) on the body composition in humans.) by Erling Thom Ph.D., Medstate Research Ltd., Liilestrom, Norway, July 1997.



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Winter Survival Kit
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Date: June 13, 2005 07:35 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Winter Survival Kit

Winter Survival Kit by Joanne Gallo Energy Times, February 4, 2000

Now that the flesh-baring season is but a distant memory, skin care may have dropped off your list of priorities. But unless you're planning on hibernating until May, Old Man Winter can play a cruel joke on your smooth, glowing complexion-causing cumulative damage not easily remedied. Defend yourself with our survival kit and keep the harsh elements from wreaking havoc on your outer sheath.

Winter Blast

Frigid temperatures and blustery winds take their toll on everyone's skin, whether it's normal, oily or dry. Cold dry air, combined with arid indoor heat, results in less natural sebum (oil) production. This oil acts as a protective barrier that helps hold moisture on the surface of the skin; hence less sebum leads to a rough and dry exterior. Icy winds can also cause redness as the stress induces tiny capillaries just underneath the skin's surface to burst.

So the first order of business for winter skincare is preserving your skin's moisture. Along with external methods of bundling up all exposed areas, dietary habits can help preserve moisture internally.

Skincare consultant Lynn J. Parentini, author of The Joy of Healthy Skin: A Lifetime Guide to Beautiful, Problem-Free Skin (Prentice Hall), suggests reducing your intake of coffee and tea, which act as diuretics; eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, which contain natural, vitamin-rich moisture; and increasing the amount of water you drink (those daily recommended eight glasses of water are even more important in winter).

A Cleansing Experience

Bathing can strip skin of its natural oils, so you should be careful of washing with overdrying soaps. Avoid deodorant soaps with harsh detergents which can irritate the skin, and look for milder soaps with moisturizers or a skin-softening shower gel. Neutrogena Rainbath Shower & Bath Gels gently cleanse and condition skin with a rich, full lather that won't leave a residue. Showers tend to be less drying than baths, but if you prefer soaking in a tub you can use bath oil to lubricate the skin. Also avoid very hot showers and baths as they can pull moisture out of the body.

For extremely dry and sensitive skin, shower at night and follow with a rich moisturizer. Skin then can replenish its protective oils before the morning's icy blast.

Skin Savers

Now's the time to use a heavier cream moisturizer to counteract all these dehydrating forces, so finding the right one is imperative. In simpler times, choosing a body moisturizer came down to which one possessed the most pleasing smell. Today, lotions are formulated with nutrients and natural ingredients for powerful, soothing benefits. • CAMOCARE Soothing Cream contains patented Camillosan Camomile, a natural anti-inflammatory. This thick, therapeutic cream is great for dry patches on hands or elbows.

  • • Curel Ultra Protective Concentrated Antioxidant Moisturizer with SPF 15 features an exclusive "catIonic technology" that delivers a high level of long-lasting hydration, as well as antioxidants like vitamin E to protect against environmental elements that can cause damage and premature aging.
  • • Nivea Creme, developed in 1911, reportedly smooths roughness even 12 hours after being applied. More than 98% of Nivea's ingredients are natural, and its Eucerit base resembles human sebum.

    Face the Season

    Faces need extra-special protection during winter, as moisturizers do double duty to fight the elements and aging. Many formulas contain alpha (AHA) and beta hydroxy acids: gentle exfoliants that slough off the top layer of dead skin cells to allow younger, smoother-looking skin to emerge. • Oil of Olay's Age Defying Series: Protective Renewal Lotion contains moisturizers, a beta-hydroxy complex, vitamin E and SPF 15. • Neutrogena Healthy Skin Face Lotion is formulated with alpha-hydroxy acids to ease lines, blotches and discoloration; vitamin A and pro-vitamin B5 to increase firmness and moisture levels; and antioxidant vitamins C and E to fight free radical damage and protect new skin.

    Sun Damage

    So you think the sun is the least of your problems in the winter? Better reflect on that matter again. The general public has finally warmed up to wearing sunblock in the summer, but year-round protection against ultraviolet (UV) rays is crucial to avoid premature aging.

    There are two types of UV rays, UVA and UVB: the former are responsible for aging and the latter for burning. Although UVB rays produce a more blatant sign of skin damage, it is limited to the epidermis, or outer layer of the skin.

    UVA rays, on the other hand, don't cause any discomfort, but they penetrate deep to the dermis or second layer of skin. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Department of Dermatology have shown that chronic exposure to sunlight can cause holes and breaks in the elastin and collagen fibers that give the skin its shape, definition and supple quality. This damage is what is known as "photoaging." Severely photoaged skin appears dry, scaly, leathery, spotted and deeply wrinkled.

    While the burning UVB rays are most intense during the summer months, UVA rays are prevalent year-round. Their effect on the skin is cumulative, so that the more you're exposed the more likely your skin is to age prematurely. And as only 14% of Americans wear sunscreen year-round (according to the American Academy of Dermatology), most of us are getting more UVA exposure than we realize.

    " New clinical evidence proves that sun damages the skin much faster than previously thought," notes Zoe Draelos, MD, clinical associate professor of dermatology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. "It only takes small amounts of sun exposure, such as walking to the car or to the mailbox, to start skin damage."

    And for those who engage in popular winter sports like skiing, UVA rays are even stronger at higher elevations. Sunblocks with high SPFs (sun protection factor) guard against UVB rays but they do not block against UVAs, so many sunscreen products do not sufficiently protect against the entire range of UVA rays.

    It is crucial, then, to look for products that guard against the entire spectrum of UVA/UVB rays. Sunblocks that contain zinc oxide, titanium dioxide or Parsol 1789 provide complete protection against aging and burning rays. Try Coppertone Shade UVA Guard SPF 30, Hawaiian Tropic 30 Plus Broad Spectrum Sunblock, L'Oreal Ombrelle Sunscreen Lotion or Spray in SPF 15, or PreSun Ultra SPF 30.

    Lip Tips

    Don't forget that the lips are particularly susceptible to sun damage too. In comparison to other facial skin, they have far fewer oil glands, no sweat glands, a much thinner protective outer layer and very few melanocytes, the cells that produce the protective pigment melanin. Accumulated sun exposure makes the lips less plump as UV rays damage their collagen and elastin fibers, resulting in rough spots, scaly patches or faded areas.

    Even if you wear lipstick on a regular basis, most do not contain the sunscreens and conditioners you can find in a lip balm. Blistex offers a wide range of lip care products, like their new Blistex Herbal Answer, which contains the conditioning qualities of five natural, herbal extracts: aloe, chamomile, avocado, jojoba and shea butter, plus SPF 15; Blistex Ultra Protection with SPF 30 has six protectants for advanced defense against cold, wind and sun; Blistex DCT (Daily Conditioning Treatment) with SPF 20 contains aloe, lanolin, cocoa butter, and vitamins A and E to help keep lips soft and supple. o



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    COLLOIDALIFE Trace Minerals - The Precious Elements of Life...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 01, 2005 11:41 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: COLLOIDALIFE Trace Minerals - The Precious Elements of Life...

    ColloidalLife

    Throughout history, minerals were crucial to the growth and success of civilizations. From the iron spear to the silicon chip, elements of the earth have influenced the fate of nations. Today, we’re beginning to appreciate the importance of minerals to the growth and health of the human body – especially in light of so many new challenges to our health. It’s no surprise then that trace minerals are in great demand; after all, our lives depend on them. Due to denatured soils and the widespread use of agricultural chemicals, food plants now contain fewer essential minerals. These precious elements of health are our real wealth, and like a modern gold rush, the search is on for valuable trace minerals. Unfortunately though, there’s a lot of “fools’ gold” on the market. Source Naturals built its reputation with leading-edge formulas that make a difference you can feel. Now, after very thorough research, we are proud to offer COLLOIDALIFE, the finest and safest complete trace mineral formula available today.

    The ColloidaLife Advantage

  • • 72 colloidal minerals and Ionic electrolytes
  • • 20 individually produced, discrete, stable mineral colloids
  • • Trace amounts of 52 other minerals in the form of Ionic electrolytes from highly purified ocean water
  • • Emulates fluid found in blood system: colloidal particles suspended in Ionic fluid
  • • Neutral in taste due to its low concentrations and small particle size: can be held under the tongue or swallowed directly
  • • No toxic levels of minerals

    Minerals – the Foundation of Life

    As human beings, we are profoundly connected with our world. The elements of this earth become the minerals essential to every cell in the body. The millions of chemical reactions occurring within us each second – as molecules are continually broken down and rebuilt into necessary forms – cannot take place without enzymes; and enzymes can’t work unless they’re activated by the right mineral or vitamin. For example, magnesium is the activator mineral for over 300 different metabolic enzymes that facilitate the biochemical processes of life. Most of us are familiar with the minerals that are found in significant quantities in our bodies. We’re aware of the importance of calcium, magnesium, and potassium. There are, however, other minerals that we need in minute quantities called “trace minerals.” Though less understood, research is revealing the vital role they have in the overall structure and function of the human body. Many people are recognizing the need to supplement their diets with trace minerals such as copper, zinc, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iodine, selenium, silver, and boron.

    Modern Agriculture and Mineral Deficiencies

    Minerals cannot be produced by the human body and therefore must be obtained from the diet. However, intense agriculture has depleted the soil of most essential minerals, returning only a few used in fertilizers to stimulate rapid plant growth: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Consequently few people get anywhere near a hundred percent of the RDA (Recommended Daily Allowances) of minerals (and these RDAs are only the minimum amount needed to avoid a full-blown deficiency condition).

    A Superior Solution

    The key to formulating colloidal trace mineral supplements is found at the molecular level. Colloids are particles in a solution that are completely dispersed and will not settle out. Many trace mineral products are just water leached through mineral deposits, and contain high levels of undesirable minerals. COLLOIDALIFE is prepared through a proprietary process whereby 20 minerals are individually prepared as colloids. These USP grade minerals are then blended with 52 charged Ionic mineral electrolytes derived from highly purified ocean water. This Ionic solution strengthens the net surface charge of the colloidal particle, creating a more stable colloid. The trace mineral electrolytes in COLLOIDALIFE are present in extremely small, but optimal quantities that prevent the colloids from precipitating out. Because the Ionic matter is easily absorbed and is highly reactive in the body, only trace amounts of the different electrolytes are needed. COLLOIDALIFE therefore provides protection from possible deficiencies while avoiding the possibility of toxicity.

    Safety First

    Some trace mineral formulas have multi-gram per liter levels of aluminum, iron, or sulfur – much higher than desirable – as well as high amounts of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury. (Although a high level of iron produces an energy rush, in the long run it may promote excessive free radicals.) Because COLLOIDALIFE’s mineral colloids are individually prepared, their quantities are specifically controlled. COLLOIDALIFE contains safe levels of the minerals that should be limited in the diet, unlike simple solutions of earth and water. The ocean water containing the Ionic minerals is purified by several procedures that remove any environmental or biological contaminants.

    The Ocean Within

    The minerals in COLLOIDALIFE emulate the way minerals are carried in the blood and used by the cells: colloidal particles suspended in Ionic fluid. Sea water – except for its higher salt content – has a mineral profile very compatible to that of the body’s three fluid systems: blood plasma, lymphatic, and extra-cellular. This similarity underscores our intimate connection to the earth and its oceans. Neutral in taste, Source Naturals COLLOIDALIFE can be held under the tongue for sublingual absorption, or swallowed directly. COLLOIDALIFE is the perfect solution to compensate for a mineral-poor diet that may be limiting your ability to enjoy a healthy and vital life.

    ColloidaLife – Mineral Profile*

    COLLOI D A L MI N E R A L S

    PER TSP: PER TSP:
    Boron 0.26 mcg Molybdenum 0.075 mcg Calcium 100 mcg Phosphorus 0.279 mcg Chromium 0.012 mcg Potassium 30.75 mcg Copper 0.045 mcg Rhodium 0.035 mcg Iodine 0.035 mcg Selenium 0.002 mcg Iridium 0.002 mcg Silicon 40.5 mcg Iron 0.54 mcg Silver 0.205 mcg Lithium 0.079 mcg Sulfur 12.4 mcg Magnesium 105 mcg Vanadium 0.105 mcg Manganese 1.71 mcg Zinc 33.5 mcg Ionic MI N E R A L S PER TSP: PER TSP : Antimony 0.01 mcg Neodymium 0.0005 mcg Aluminum1 0.42 mcg Nickel 0.014 mcg Arsenic2 0.0004 mcg Niobium 0.001 mcg Barium 0.24 mcg Osmium 0.00002 mcg Beryllium 0.00007 mcg Palladium 0.625 mcg Bismuth 0.0015 mcg Platinum 0.002 mcg Bromine 0.001 mcg Praseodymium 0.002 mcg Cadmium3 0.025 mcg Rhenium 0.0002 mcg Cerium 0.0001 mcg Rubidium 0.007 mcg Cesium 0.1 mcg Ruthenium 0.003 mcg Chlorine 175 mcg Samarium 0.00003 mcg Cobalt 0.0009 mcg Scandium 0.00005 mcg Dysprosium 0.00004 mcg Sodium 1.205 mg Erbium 0.00001 mcg Strontium 0.275 mcg Europium 0.0001 mcg Tantalum 4.2 mcg Fluorine 0.8 mcg Tellurium 0.001 mcg Gadolinium 0.00001 mcg Terbium 0.0001 mcg Gallium 0.005 mcg Thallium 0.0001 mcg Germanium 0.006 mcg Thorium 0.00003 mcg Gold 0.0002 mcg Thulium 0.000005 mcg Hafnium 0.00015 mcg Tin 0.22 mcg Holmium 0.0025 mcg Titanium 0.21 mcg Indium 0.13 mcg Tungsten 0.01 mcg Lanthanum 0.0025 mcg Ytterbium 0.0015 mcg Lead4 0.003 mcg Yttrium 0.015 mcg Lutetium 0.00005 mcg Zirconium 0.0015 mcg

    *minute variations may occur among lots.
    At 1 teaspoon per day, a 4 ounce bottle of ColloidaLife is a 24 day supply.
    1) 0.01% of the daily intake of aluminum in a typical diet
    2) 0.0003% of the daily intake of arsenic in a typical diet
    3) 0.08% of the daily intake of cadmium in a typical diet
    4) 0.002% of the daily intake of lead in a typical diet
    Percentages are based on estimated average U.S. daily intake per person.
    (Nutritional Biochemistry & Metabolism, edited by Maria C. Linder, 1991)



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