SearchBox:

Search Term: " packaging "

  Messages 1-22 from 22 matching the search criteria.
6 Health benefits to make you love manuka honey (if you don'talready) Darrell Miller 5/6/19
Chitosan: A more environmentally friendly food packaging materialthan plastic Darrell Miller 4/12/19
What eating too much salt does to your body Darrell Miller 3/19/17
Toxins in Your Fast-Food Packaging? Darrell Miller 2/6/17
Chemicals In Makeup That Lower Vitamin D Levels Darrell Miller 9/22/16
The Ox Bile Extracts Guide - Why You Need it and Top 5 Health Benefits Darrell Miller 12/22/12
Red Yeast Rice New Larger 240 Veg-Capsule Size Darrell Miller 9/28/09
Acidophilus Darrell Miller 8/23/08
FDA proposes to allow irradiated foods to go label-free Darrell Miller 7/30/07
Compiled by the FDA and EPA - The 10 Worst Foods for Pesticide Residue. Darrell Miller 6/6/07
About George’s and Warren Laboratories Darrell Miller 4/21/07
The Important Role of Nutritional Magnesium & Calcium Balance in Humans Living with Stress Darrell Miller 8/23/06
Now Foods -QUALITY- High Standards and Attention to Detail Darrell Miller 12/27/05
Peaceful Planet Vegan Protein Line... Veglife Darrell Miller 12/24/05
Carnitine Creatinate Darrell Miller 12/8/05
NOW is the leader in quality and value Darrell Miller 10/21/05
Source Naturals - Flawless Finished Goods Darrell Miller 8/20/05
Source Naturals - Our Commitment to Your Well-Being Darrell Miller 8/20/05
Take Your Vitamins: Reviewing Scientific Approaches to Selecting Daily Multiple Supplement Darrell Miller 6/21/05
Your Healthy Harvest Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Truth in Labeling Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Certified Foods Darrell Miller 6/12/05




6 Health benefits to make you love manuka honey (if you don'talready)
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 06, 2019 03:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 6 Health benefits to make you love manuka honey (if you don'talready)





Manuka honey is touted as a super food due to its numerous therapeutic benefits. Manuka honey is a strong antibacterial that can strengthen your immune system during flu season and all year-round. Because of its antimicrobial properties, manuka honey is particularly effective in soothing sore throats. Manuka honey is also quite good for oral health and can be used to prevent gingivitis. When purchasing manuka honey, be sure there is a UMF rating on the packaging, which shows that it has been tested for purity. A high UMF rating correlates to strong antibacterial properties and a potent flavor.

Key Takeaways:

  • Manuka honey should always be available in the home because it is important for boosting the immune system due to the various antibacterial properties it possesses.
  • It has been shown by research that Manuka honey is effective against staph infections like MRSA due to its ability to interfere with the cell cycle of the bacteria.
  • Manuka oil can not only fight against the bacteria that is causing sore throat when one has an infection, it acts as a relief to the throat itself.

"Manuka honey is a unique kind of honey from New Zealand. It comes from the manuka tree and has many therapeutic properties."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-04-07-health-benefits-to-make-you-love-manuka-honey.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6268)


Chitosan: A more environmentally friendly food packaging materialthan plastic
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 12, 2019 04:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Chitosan: A more environmentally friendly food packaging materialthan plastic





Itsaso Leceta, an academic researcher from the University of Basque Country has developed a biodegradable polymer, hoping to change packaging standards. Chitosan, made from crustacean chitins, prevents fungi and bacteria from infecting whole foods. It does not, however, block gas, water, or vapor. On the plus side, this new environmentally conscious food packaging is completely biodegradable, even edible. Everyone can make a difference, and consumers can start by choosing alternative means in their lives, like Chitosan.

Key Takeaways:

  • Although fruit is often coated in plastic films to protect it from contaminants, these plastics pollute the sea, and their productions involves the use of hazardous chemicals.
  • Chitosan is produced by processing the material that makes up crustaceans’ exoskeletons, and it has antimicrobial properties that make it a good potential coating for fruit and vegetables.
  • You can help reduce the impact of packaging materials on the environment by bringing your own bag when you buy produce, and by buying from local farmers.

"It is a biodegradable, biocompatible (not harmful to living tissue) polymer that can be used to wrap vegetables and fruits. Its purpose is to prevent bacteria and fungi from infecting whole foods, and prolonging their shelf life."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-02-17-chitosan-environmentally-friendly-food-packaging.html

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=6129)


What eating too much salt does to your body
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 19, 2017 01:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What eating too much salt does to your body





Salt is good for you in the right quantities but having too much is not healthy at all. Salt is hidden in many foods as well. You have to watch for it. This explains exactly what will happen if too much is consumed so that you can be more aware of it.

Key Takeaways:

  • While sodium is needed to carry out normal bodily functions, there is such a thing as overdoing it
  • Too much salt could cause High blood pressure, Unquenchable thirst, Osteoporosis, and Persistent bloating.
  • Cook as much as you can from scratch, processed foods have too much salt.

"While sodium is needed to carry out normal bodily functions, there is such a thing as overdoing it – and adding it to your cooking, shaking it habitually onto your potatoes or snubbing the warnings on supermarket packaging can come with a price."



Reference:

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=//home.bt.com/lifestyle/health/healthy-eating/what-eating-too-much-salt-does-to-your-body-11364164547999&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGmU0N2NhMzY3ZTc4ODMzY2U6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNFxA9CgTmA4UWlGpRBrGS4uE6khGA

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=4222)


Toxins in Your Fast-Food Packaging?
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 06, 2017 07:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Toxins in Your Fast-Food packaging?





Fast food isn’t exactly known for its health benefits, but a new U.S. study suggests even the packaging may be harmful. That’s because the study found one-third of fast food packaging contains chemicals that give it stain-resistant, water-repellant and nonstick properties. The trouble is these fluorinated chemicals have also been linked to an increased risk of certain cancers, hormone problems, high cholesterol, obesity and immune suppression in human and animal studies.

Key Takeaways:

  • Testing on more than 400 samples from restaurants nationwide revealed that nearly half of fast-food wrappers and one out of five paperboard food boxes contained detectable levels of fluorine, said lead researcher Laurel Schaider. She's an environmental chemist at the Silent Spring Institute in Newton, Mass.
  • Previous studies have linked some fluorinated chemicals such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) to kidney and testicular cancer, low birth weight, thyroid disease, decreased sperm quality, pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, and immune system problems in children, the study authors said in background notes.
  • Major U.S. manufacturers voluntarily phased out PFOA and PFOS for most uses starting in 2011, but other countries still produce them. These study results show that fluorinated chemicals are still widely present in food packaging, the authors said.

"Major U.S. manufacturers voluntarily phased out PFOA and PFOS for most uses starting in 2011, but other countries still produce them."



Reference:

//www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=201372

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3893)


Chemicals In Makeup That Lower Vitamin D Levels
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 22, 2016 05:01 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Chemicals In Makeup That Lower Vitamin D Levels

Vitamin D is a steroid derived hormone that impacts the calcium levels in the body. It also is produced in the skin upon exposure to UV light.Vitamin D can be useful addition to a sunscreen product, and it is used to treat psoriasis.

It is lowered by the following chemicals in makeup:

Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates are chemicals found in most of cosmetics, plastics, and food packaging may reduce vitamin D level. BPA,phthalates, and other endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been linked to health and reproductive problems.they appear to be risky for young children and pregnant women. But this is the first research to find a link between them and vitamin D levels in a large group of adults.

Avoid These chemicals:

  • Bisphenol A (BPA)
  • Phythalates

Vitamin D is important for brain, bone, and heart health. Low levels of vitamin D in the blood have a whole host of problems including mental decline in older adults,chronic magraines in young people, and severe outcome in people diabetes and cancer.

If you wear makeup, check it for the above chemicals or switch to Mineral Makeup that is safe and natural.  It Doesn't Hurt to take extra Vitamin D-3 as well.


Reference: www.newshealth.com

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3308)


The Ox Bile Extracts Guide - Why You Need it and Top 5 Health Benefits
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 22, 2012 11:38 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Ox Bile Extracts Guide - Why You Need it and Top 5 Health Benefits

No matter how healthy your diet is or how fit you are, if you are have digestion problems that are wrecking your health and disrupting your regular activities, then you might be in urgent need of some ox bile extracts.

Ox Bile Extracts or Beef Bile Supplements are a combination of bile salts and bile acids that enhance or intensify the production of bile in the digestive system. It is produced from a source of cattle and dried in the freezer at high vacuum or 'lyophilized'.

The next step is powdering it and packaging it into pills which are easily available online and in supplement shops. The bile from oxen resembles the bile which is produced in our bodies naturally in its chemical structure. That is why ox bile has been successfully proven to replicate and augment the production of bile in the human liver for faster and better food breakdown and nutrient absorption.

Now, you might be forced to ask - why do we need Ox Bile supplements at all? 

Bile helps the body beak down fats!

First off - bile is a very important constituent of our digestive system. The liver excretes it; after which the gall bladder stores it till we eat food. Then, the bile does its vital job of breaking down the food particles (bile salts attack the cholesterol and other fatty food constituents to break them down) and aiding in the absorption of lipids or fats.

What happens when your gall bladder is removed surgically?

Or why is animal-derived bile needed, anyway?

Aging causes our digestive processes to slow down. The secretion of bile is affected as well.

You might believe you're healthy as a horse but if you are prone to symptoms like :

  1.  constipation,
  2.  Irritable Bowel Syndrome,
  3.  flatulence,
  4.  indigestion,
  5.  bloating,
  6.  lack of energy,
  7.  bad headaches, and
  8.  heartburn or GERD.

You are very likely to be suffering from a lack of digestive enzymes in your body and you need artificial ones to help you get your digestive system in order again.

And if have had a gall bladder removed by surgery, then you must know just

HOW crucial these digestive enzymes are to your natural digestive system.

Top 5 Benefits of Ox Bile Extracts

  • One - It is beneficial in emulsifying the fats in your food and augmenting the assimilation of Vitamins E, K, D and A (all fat-soluble).
  • Two - It helps in treating many severe liver diseases like Cirrhosis and Hepatitis.
  • Three - It increase your body's metabolic rate, which burns more calories and it also keeps a check on your cholesterol.
  • Four - It is even proved to cause a decrease in gallstones.
  • Five - Ox bile also helps in treating small intestine diseases like Crohn's disease.

Warnings

A warning here - some people using the ox bile extracts have had certain allergic reactions to it like nausea, diarrhea and an upset stomach. This usually happens as a result of increasing the dosage.

For the most part, 99% of the people who consume digestive enzymes do not experience any negative side effects.


(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2773)


Red Yeast Rice New Larger 240 Veg-Capsule Size
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 28, 2009 02:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Red Yeast Rice New Larger 240 Veg-Capsule Size

Red Yeast Rice 600 mg - 240 Vcaps

When it comes to Red Yeast Rice, purity and potency are NOW’s top priorities. As part of our Genuine Whole Foods line, NOW® Red Yeast Rice is welltested and free of potentially harmful contaminants, such as citrinin, a fermentation byproduct. Our QA/QC experts are involved throughout all stages of manufacturing, from inspection and delivery of raw materials, to the final packaging process. Best of all, NOW continues to offer Red Yeast Rice at prices that are well below our competitors.

Looking for a good way to break the ice with new or uncertain customers? Just ask them how their digestion is. It will tell you volumes about their overall health status, allowing you to more effectively assist them in choosing the products that are best for their unique needs. For those who are in need of digestive support, NOW® Psyllium Powder is a great place to start. It offers all the benefits that has made psyllium the digestive staple it is today, in a form that allows for easy mixing or encapsulation.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2093)


Acidophilus
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 23, 2008 11:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Acidophilus

Acidophilus is correctly named Lactobacillus acidophilus, and is one species of Lacobacillus used commercially in the preparation of certain types of yoghurt. The name refers to the fact it is found in milk (lacto), is rod-like in shape like many bacteria (bacillus) and it likes acidic conditions (acidophilus). It not only likes them, but creates them.

In fact, acidophilus thrives at a pH of 4-5 or less, and occurs naturally in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals, and also the mouth and vagina. It ferments milk to lactic acid, and dies in the presence of sunlight, excessive moisture and at high temperatures. Some, but not all, strains are probiotic, or ‘friendly’ bacteria that aid digestion and help to protect against harmful bacteria and their toxic emissions.

The fermentation of nutrients by friendly bacteria produce acids, such as the lactic acid previously referred to, hydrogen peroxide and other substances hostile to harmful organisms, and also reduces the population of harmful bacteria by competing for their food. There are additional health benefits that shall be discussed later, but first some comments about the stability of acidophilus to heat.

The growth rate of acidophilus reaches an optimum at around 36-37F (2.2C), and it tends to die off at temperatures much above this over a period of time. It also tends to be sensitive to oxygen and moisture, and if exposed to heat, moisture and oxygen, a supplement will lose its potency over time. This is true of all such supplements, and after purchase must be quickly refrigerated. It is possible, however, to purchase stabilized forms of acidophilus that die off slower than normal. This extra resistance is built in during the manufacturing process, and many forms of acidophilus claim to be stable. Although there will never be a truly stable form of the probiotic, these stabilized versions do last longer than those not claimed to be so.

During manufacture, the bacteria are first concentrated by removing the excess liquid by means of sedimentation, ultra-filtration, reverse osmosis and centrifuging. A substance is then added to protect the bacteria from the shock of freezing and the acidophilus freeze dried. A stabilizer is then added to maintain its properties between freezing and consumption.

It has also been found that bacteria grown at higher pH levels last longer than those at lower pH. The packaging is also important, and since the bacteria are sensitive to oxygen, nitrogen flushing the bottles will improve the stability of the product. Glass bottles are less porous than plastic, and so is the preferred packaging material for maximum stability and life. Another factor is refrigeration. If you keep the bottle in the fridge it was last a lot longer than at room temperature, but take care not to freeze it since acidophilus does not freeze well. If it is not refrigerated then it will quickly lose its potency.

The form in which you take the supplement is immaterial regarding the potency: at least initially. However, through time the powder will become less potent quicker, because it will adsorb oxygen and moisture. Otherwise the form in which it used is immaterial. So, yes, acidophilus can be stabilized, but only for a while, and if allowed to warm up to room temperature in the presence of oxygen will quickly degrade, although this takes more than just a day or two.

Many health benefits are claimed for Lactobacillus acidophilus, although your daily consumption to achieve these should be at least 2 billion CFU, and preferably 5 billion. You can also fortify the bacteria with a prebiotic of fructooligosaccharides (FOS). These provide nutrition for the acidophilus and accelerate its growth.

One thing to be careful of is assuming that yoghurt contains acidophilus. It does not contain sufficient to be of benefit to you. Commercial yoghurt acidifies over time and kills off the bacteria, so commercial yoghurt sitting on a supermarket shelf has very little beneficial bacterial content. Natural yoghurt is better, and certainly contains beneficial bacteria, but not enough to make a significant difference. A supplement is therefore needed if you are to keep your intestinal tract sufficiently healthy. If you cannot take dairy products, acidophilus is available in non-dairy form. The major health benefits they impart are:

1. Digestive Problems.

Acidophilus can control many types of digestive disorder, particularly traveler’s diarrhea. In fact if you are traveling to countries where drinking water might be a problem, also take some acidophilus and this will tend to prevent you from becoming ill. Even if you drink bottled water, there are still washed salads, beverages made with local water and showers and the like whereby you could ingest some dodgy water.

2. Constipation

Acidophilus, especially when supported by FOS, helps both to hydrate the feces, and improve their transport through the colon, an also to improve the general health and well-being of your entire intestinal system.

3. Yeast Infections (Candidiasis)

Acidophilus possess antifungal properties that kill off yeasts, particularly Candida albicans found in the vagina. This is due to the lactic acid produced by the bacteria, and there is evidence that gastrointestinal yeasts are affected in the same way by the oral probiotic. Furthermore, when bacteria and yeasts are killed off by medication, including friendly bacteria, the sites they occupied on the intestinal walls become free and acidophilus should be present to take these up and prevent any more yeast or bacterial infections. That is one reason why probiotics should be taken immediately after a course of antibiotic treatment.

4. Immune System Support

Lactobacillus acidophilus is believed to modify the balance of microbes in the intestine so as to lead to an enhanced production of antibodies, and white blood cells with increased phagocytic activity. The bacteria also appear to have some reducing properties, which can also give support to the immune system through the resultant antioxidant properties.

However, by far the most important property of probiotics are their properties in acidifying the intestinal tract, and so rendering them less attractive to harmful pathogens, and in producing hydrogen peroxide which has a similar effect. They also produce natural antibiotics, and there is now doubt that a supplement of acidophilus will provide you with several health benefits and also make you feel fitter and more alert.



--
Buy Acidophilus at Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1873)


FDA proposes to allow irradiated foods to go label-free
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 30, 2007 10:05 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: FDA proposes to allow irradiated foods to go label-free

Since 1986, any food sold in the United States that has been irradiated must, by law, disclose that fact to the consumer, by bearing the international radura symbol as well as the words “treated by irradiation” or “Treated with radiation.” However, if the FDA has its way, all that could change. The agency put forth a proposal in April which would require that packaging only reveal a food has been irradiated if the process created a “material change” in the food, such as a change in color, texture, or taste outside of the normal variances for the food. Additionally, the FDA is proposing allowing food manufacturers to substitute the word “pasteurization” for irradiation,” which has a decidedly negative association in the American consumer’s mind.

Does irradiation = pasteurization?

The bit about swapping the term “pasteurization” for “irradiation” is not actually new. Food manufacturers have been allowed to do that since the passage of the 2002 farm bill, which broadened the legal definition of pasteurization to include “any safe process that is at least as protective as pasteurization and is reasonably certain to kill the most resistant pathogens likely to occur in food.” The California Almond Board, apparently inspired by that legislation, recently announced its decision to irradiate raw almonds and label them “pasteurized.” However, most people still understand the old definitions, whereby pasteurization means using heat to destroy pathogens and irradiation means using ionizing radiation to do so.

Consumers want to know

What is new about the current proposal is the suggestion to lift the requirement that irradiated foods be labeled as such. And that won’t go over so well among consumers. According to a 1997 poll commissioned by the American Association of Retired Persons and Center for Science in the Public Interest, 88.6 percent of Americans want irradiated foods to be labeled. Indeed, the last time the FDA made a move to allow irradiated foods to go label free, the agency received more than 5,000 comments on the issue.

What’s at stake?

According to the consumer group Center for Food Safety, irradiation can create potentially dangerous chemical byproducts, such as benzene and toluene; cause stunted growth in lab animals fed irradiated foods; and reduces foods’ nutrition value.

Noting irradiation’s unpopularity, the FDA stated that if foods treated with irradiation were not required to be labeled, more manufacturers would probably opt to use it. The agency is particularly concerned given the E.coli outbreak last November in fresh spinach.

Fortunately, even if the proposal becomes law, there will still be one surefire way to avoid irradiated foods: buying Organic.

References used in this article.

Civic leaders and public citizen tell wal-mart “Nebraskans won’t buy meat treated with irradiation” ! public citizen. May 27, 2007. //www.tradewatch.org/pressroom/release.cfm?ID=201

FDA may loosen labeling rules for irradiated foods. Center for infectious disease research & policy (CIDRAP). //www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/fs/irradiation/news/apr1007irradiation.html

FDA proposes softening irradiated food labels. April 4, 2004. USA today. //www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-04-05-food-irradiation_N.htm

Food irradiation. The center for food safety. //www.centerforfoodsafety.org/food_irrad.cfm



--
Buy Organic at Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1589)


Compiled by the FDA and EPA - The 10 Worst Foods for Pesticide Residue.
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 06, 2007 04:15 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Compiled by the FDA and EPA - The 10 Worst Foods for Pesticide Residue.

Label Standards in the USA, when a label reads 100% Organic, any product with this label contains only organic ingredients by law. If the label reads just ORGANIC, the product must have at least 95% organic ingredients. Finally, if a label reads "Made with Organic Ingredients" this label can only be used on packaging for products with 50% - 90% organic ingredients. if the product has less than 50% organic ingredients, it must say the percentage.

Pesticide Residue:
The 10 Worst Foods.

  • Apples
  • Peaches
  • Raspberries
  • Potatoes
  • Grapes

  • Celery
  • Strawberries
  • Pears
  • Spinach
  • Green Beans

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1562)


About George’s and Warren Laboratories
TopPreviousNext

Date: April 21, 2007 01:58 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: About George’s and Warren Laboratories

George Warren, and independent research chemist in Houston Texas, developed the special processing method that prevents the spoilage with out diminishing the essential properties of the Aloe Vera Plant. This new method completely eliminates the aloins, which gives a bitter taste (and the greenish color) to Aloe Vera juice. He also successfully removed the starches and sugars from the polysaccharide molecular chain and thus George’s “Always Active” Aloe requires no refrigeration, will not spoil in its natural state. This method adds no water, no preservatives, no chemicals of any kind. The finished product looks and tastes like spring water.

In 1965 George Warren began analytical chemical separation studies that led to the development of a procedure for separating aloe vera juice into 34 component parts. At the time plants in a commercial aloe vera field were numbered. Eight leaves from each plant were harvested. Bagged and labeled. The leaves were then chemically analyzed under laboratory conditions. The results of this testing concluded that six distinct groups were found, and for field testing, were designated as aloe plants A, B, C, X, Y, and Z. this procedure was used to analyze over 2,000 aloe vera plants and it was determined that the aloe vera field contained six different types of aloe vera plants. The chemical make-up of each plant fell into one of six aloe plant groups designated. Aloe-X exerted a very pronounced and measurable effect upon the digestive system. The ability of the digestive system to convert food to energy was greatly improved, but only when Aloe-X juice was consumed daily. The other aloe groups (A, B, C, Y, and Z) did not exert this effect. The improved digestion typified only by group X seemed to occur regardless of the type of digestive system. Listed below are Warren’s findings by daily consumption of Aloe-X.

During these animal feed experiments it was noted that in the control group the digestive system was often swollen and the animal’s hide and carcass did not appear to be healthy. In the Aloe-X test group this was very noticeably not the case. In fact, the digestive system, meat, hide and hair all seemed very healthy.

During the seven years of working with the farm animals the Aloe-X plants originally harvested were growing and multiplying. The chemical analysis of each plant-X offspring revealed that they indeed were only Aloe-X plants.

Up to this point, investigators found that aloe vera did not seem to always work. They were hindered by trying to correlate chemical structure to clinical performance. The primary and reasonable deduction for aloe vera not performing consistently was the fact that only Aloe-X had the ability to cleanse the membranes in the digestive system. If Aloe-X was not present in sufficient concentrations then the aloe vera juice did not seem “active” and did not perform.

Also noted was the phenomenal ability of the plant to quickly reduce swelling and bruised, swollen tissue. Thus, it is further hypothesized that Aloe-X exerts a pronounced effect on the digestive system, rejuvenation the tissue system. By making the digestive system work properly the body appeared to be capable of repairing itself and reverting back to a healthy state. Consequently, it is the firm and un-contradicted belief of Warren that allergies, asthma, emphysema, migraine headaches, and digestive problems are improved by Aloe-X through the membranes in the digestive system.

In the early stages of experimentally using Aloe-X, it was noted that other chemical compounds were present which should not be consumed on a regular basis. In fact, the work of the University of California Professor Bruce Ames clearly points out that all plants have their own toxin defense system against predators. Therefore, not all chemical compounds of plants are good for your health. With this thought in mind, standard conventional pharmaceutical chemical engineering principles were used to remove many undesirable components. Aloe vera by nature spoils easily requiring preservatives to be added to most commercial brands to extend the shelf life of the product. This short shelf life has consistently been a problem for the exploitation of the many benefits of this remarkable plant. Thus, in Warren’s products, starches and sugars of the mucopolysaccharide molecular chain have been removed. These starches and sugars act as an energy source for undesirable micro-organisms. Several other components which earlier testing revealed to be undesirable have also been removed. These substances are removed by a proprietary purification and filtering method. Consequently, preservatives are not required. The micro0organisms picked up in the processing and handling are removed immediately prior to packaging. Testing performed by Warren supports its finding that the purification system does not destroy the active components in the company’s aloe products. Such tests, as well as the votes of confidence (indicated by the thousands of humans and confirmed by testing on chickens, pigs, birds, cows, horses, fish, dogs and cats) confirm that findings. Warren has been successful in developing and proving a unique fractional distillation process that allows for capturing the therapeutic benefits of Aloe Vera.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1526)


The Important Role of Nutritional Magnesium & Calcium Balance in Humans Living with Stress
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 23, 2006 03:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The Important Role of Nutritional Magnesium & Calcium Balance in Humans Living with Stress

 

Part I. The Stress Response

The stress reaction is a host of responses necessary for any animal to live in the world.  Commonly called the fight-or-flight reation,  we as humans often experience it in rapid heartbeat and increased breathing rate.  It comes when we exercise more vigorously than usual, or when we are suddenly and unexpectedly frightened.

We are all different.  We show a range in how strongly we experience the stress response.  Most of us are usually calm and experience the stress response when an unexpected noise frightens us to alertness, or we run to first base as fast as we can in a benefit baseball game that is not on our usual playtime schedule.  We breathe harder for a while and notice our hearts beating faster and harder then usual, but after a while these responses all calm down, and we are again in our usual state—out or the stress response.  Others of us are very low key, and it takes a lot to disturb our physiological calm.  Still others of us are very sensitive to triggers of the stress response and go into it “at the drop of a hat” and to a greater degree than do calmer people.  For some, parts of the stress response are almost always engaged—never really calming down all the way—giving one a hyper-vigilant or anxious demeanor.

When a stress trigger occurs, the body puts out stress hormones, magnesium and calcium, among other things, into the bloodstream.  At the same time, nerve cells begin to “fire,” telling heart and muscles to “speed up. NOW!!!”  These blood, nerve and organ changes make possible the instantaneous and collective rise in the body’s heart rate, blood pressure, and other necessities for the fight-or-flight reaction.

Much research has been done on the stress response, especially on the effects of stress hormones, such as adrenaline (also called epinephrine) on body, organ and cell.  You can get an idea of how widespread the stress response is-affecting every aspect of physiology—by noting some of the reactions to adrenaline, one of the major stress hormones.  See Table 1.

Table 1

The effects of Adrenaline: Adrenaline (also called epinephrine) is one of the body’s major stress hormones.  When adrenaline is released into the bloodstream, it has simultaneous, rapid, and widespread effects on the body. These include:

  • Widespread effects on circulation, muscles and sugar metabolism
  • Raised heart rate
  • Increased heart output
  • Increased rate and depth of breathing
  • Increased metabolic rate
  • Increased force of muscular contraction
  • Delayed muscular fatigue
  • Reduced blood flow to bladder (muscular walls relax and sphincters contract)
  • Reduced blood flow to intestines
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased sugar (glucose) in the blood
  • Increased breakdown of glucose for energy*, especially in muscle cells
  • Increased free fatty acids in the blood*
  • More oxidation of fatty acids to produce energy*
  • More ATP (the cells’ primary energy compound) produced*
  • Blood vessels constrict

 

*needs magnesium

 

Much study as the cellular, biochemical and physiological levels has shown that the stress response vitally involves the influx of calcium into cells,  resulting in a drastic change in the cells’ internal magnesium-to-calcium ratio (Mg:Ca).

In simple solutions, such as salt water, all ions are evenly dispersed.  Not so in living cells.  Ions are carefully and meticulously separated in living cells, and this ion “packaging” is vital to life processes and health.  Calcium ions, for the most part, are kept outside cells while magnesium ions are kept mainly inside cells.  The stress response changes this.  During stress response, calcium ions rush inside the cell, and this alters the internal Mg:Ca ratio.  This change in ratio exhibits wide effects because, while magnesium and calcium are very similar in their chemistry, biologically these two elements function and react very differently.  Magnesium and calcium are two sides of a physiological coin: they are antagonistic to one another yet comes as a team. For example:

  • Calcium excites nerves; magnesium calms them down. 
  • Calcium makes muscles contract, but magnesium is necessary for muscles to relax.
  • Calcium is necessary to the clotting reaction—so necessary for wound healing—but magnesium keeps the blood flowing freely and prevents abnormal thickening when clotting reactions would be dangerous.

Scientific study shows more and more that the underlying cellular change enabling the stress response is a low Mg:Ca ratio caused by a large and sudden influx of calcium into cells.  This stress response subsides when the cell’s magnesium returns to its dominant presence inside cells, moving extra calcium back outside cells to its “normal” Mg:Ca ratio.  This underlying principle is present in studies of nerve cell-stress hormone response, organs such as hearts, the high blood pressure response to stress, and the blood-clotting reaction during stress, among many others.  See Table 2.

 

Table 2

Magnesium and calcium are an “antagonistic” team in the fight-or-flight reaction.

Function

Calcium’s influence

Magnesium’s influence

Blood cell clumping

(platelet aggregation)

Activates

Inhibits

Other blood-clotting reactions

Encourages

Discourages

Nerve excitation

Enhances

Discourages

Adrenaline secretion

Enhances

Decreases

Adrenaline response

Enhances

Decreases

Blood vessel contraction

Increases

Decreases

 

“During stress response, calcium ions rush inside the cell, and this alters the internal Mg:Ca ratio.  This change in ratio exhibits wide effects because, while magnesium and calcium are very similar in their chemistry, biologically these two elements function and react very differently.  Magnesium and calcium are two sides of a physiological coin: they are antagonistic to one another yet come as a team.”

 

In the normal healthy state, the stress response occurs when necessary, and subsides when the crisis or trigger is over.  Since magnesium and calcium—two essential nutrients that must be obtained by the body from its dietary environment—are so essential to this important response, it is not surprising that nutritional magnesium and calcium status can affect the response. 

 

Let’s see how.

In the normal unstressed state, cellular Mg:Ca ratio is high.  If this cannot be maintained due to lack of adequate body magnesium or an overwhelming amount of body calcium, the ratio may not be able to maintain or return itself to its healthy nonstressed ratio.  In such a case, the stress response, in the absence of an appropriate trigger, can occur.  This can be seen when nutritional magnesium deficits cause high blood pressure or increase blood stickiness (platelet aggregation). Additionally, since a low Mg:Ca ratio can increase adrenaline secretion as well as cells’ response to adrenaline, a too low magnesium state can keep the stress response from subsiding in a timely way.  Even worse, when body magnesium becomes drastically low, this becomes a stress trigger in itself, alarming the body into further stress response with out enough magnesium to back it up, resulting in a low magnesium-high stress crisis that can end in sudden death.

In the industrialized world, we live in a state of chronic, on-going stress.  This environmental reality increases our daily need for magnesium in order to maintain a healthy stress response that can calm when not necessary.

 

Part II. Heart Disease Is Often a Magnesium Deficiency

Clearly, an adequate amount of nutritional magnesium—in proper balance with adequate nutritional calcium—is key to a healthy stress response.  And yet today we have diets dangerously low in magnesium.  Add the recent additions of nutritional calcium via supplements and food fortifications meant to stave off osteoporosis, and many of us are getting inadequate magnesium plus too much calcium.  This results in a large occurrence of heart disease.

Not all, but much of the heart disease in the industrialized world can be explained by the low magnesium state of these societies.  People with heart disease—for the most part—are people who are in a state of magnesium that is borderline or deficient.  Many studies on heart disease patients exist due to medicine’s effort to understand and treat this widespread malady.  Although not intended as such, this body of research shows us what stress can do to a person in a magnesium deficient state.

 

Part III. Mental and Emotional Stress Deplete Magnesium

It is commonly accepted that certain traditional risk factors for heart disease exist.  This include high cholesterol, high blood pressure, family history of heart disease, and other factors, all of which can be linked to a shortage of nutritional magnesium.  Recent studies tell us that stresses—both sudden and chronic—with their high magnesium requirements, are also strong risk factors for heart disease.

The sudden stress of the L.A. earthquake and the 9/11 World Trade Center attack showed an upsurge of adverse heart events in people with heart disease.  Even heart patients living in Florida, hundres of miles away from the WTC attack, showed more adverse heart events in response to 9/11 than in usual times.  Again, adverse heart events in this largely magnesium deficient population show that the triggered stress response tested their magnesium status and found it wanting.

Emotional stress and phobic anxiety cause heart problems in patients with heart disease—a population we know to be mostly low in their nutritional magnesium status.  Chronic states of emotional stress, including a history of childhood abuse, neglect or family dysfunction, depression, and panic disorder, must now be added to the list of traditional risk factors for heart disease such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Depression can be a symptom of low magnesium status.  So can anxiety, panic attacks, irritability, hyperactivity, and over-sensitivity to loud noises.  Do these newly found risk factors cause heart disease, or are they risk factors because the, as well as heart disease, can all be aspects of low magnesium status?  These chronic sources of stress can increase the human need for magnesium as well as be caused by its deficit.

Emotional stress triggers in susceptible people can even bring a sudden death due to heart attack, presumably by initiating a stress/low-magnesium crisis.  Such emotional “triggers” include work stress, high-pressure deadlines, social isolation and loneliness, low socioeconomic status, anxiety, war, fear of war, anger and rage.  Identical stress triggers cause more human heart attacks regardless of age, race, gender, or geographic location, including continent.

Mental stress, such as working out a math problem, can be shown to have impact upon the magnesium-stress response connection, since it can bring on heart attacks in people with heart disease.

“Recent studies tell us that stresses-both sudden and chronic—with their high magnesium requirements, are also strong risk factors for heart disease.”

 

Part IV. Stress, Magnesium and Aging

We are hearing a lot about stress in the health media, and rightly so as this constant companion to our lives brings on the fight-or-flight syndrome, a stress response that, when activated, has been shown to shorten lifespan.  When we realize that the stress response is exacerbated when we are low in magnesium, that we are living on low-magnesium foods for the most part, and that our lifestyles are more and more filled with chronic stresses and stressful events, we are not surprised to see that several aspects of magnesium deficiency are remarkably like aspects of the aging process.

When faced with out stressful lifestyles, coupled with a society presenting a chronically low-magnesium/high-calcium diet, what is our best defense? For many of us, magnesium supplements can help to preserve or restore a healthy Mg:Ca balance, so important to our health in these stressful times.

 

 



Peter Gillham's Natural Calm

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1355)


Now Foods -QUALITY- High Standards and Attention to Detail
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 27, 2005 09:00 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Now Foods -QUALITY- High Standards and Attention to Detail

QUALITY “High Standards and Attention to Detail”

  • Family Owned and Operated since 1968
  • In-House Microbiology Lab
  • Member-NNFA and AHPA
  • “A” Certified GMP Manufacturer
  • 203,000 Square Foot Manufacturing packaging Facility

As you shop for dietary supplements you’re faced with an almost dizzying array of choices. Naturally, every product claims to be this, that and the other. But you’ve heard the stories in the media of products that don’t live up to their claims. So how do you know who’s telling the truth? Perhaps a better gauge of a product’s quality is the manufacturer and their history. Do they have a legacy of producing quality goods? How long have they been in business? Is their track record good or do they have a history of product recalls and bad press? If you’re responsible for your family’s health and well-being, it pays to do your homework when it comes to the products you purchase for them. NOW® Foods has been manufacturing dietary supplements and whole foods for 35 years.

Companies that thrive and continue to grow for this long don’t do so because they produce poor quality products. They do so by maintaining extremely high standards and paying special attention to every detail, which is the secret to product quality. At NOW® Foods, these high standards and attention to detail are evident in every aspect of our operations, from receiving to production to finished goods, just as they have been for 35 years. You’re committed to buying only the best for your family, and we’re committed to supplying only the best for our customers.

Quality products are made using the highest quality ingredients. NOW Foods purchases raw materials from only the most reputable vendors, who are required to provide detailed specification sheets and lot-specific certificates of analysis for every shipment we receive. These documents provide information on the quality of the raw material and the various analyses used to verify that quality. Shipments that do not meet our quality standards are sent back to the manufacturer with a point by point report card of why the shipment was refused. We simply don’t just accept every shipment that’s delivered to our dock – no ingredient gets a free pass into our production facility. In addition, we also perform random vendor audits throughout each year to ensure that they’re meeting our stringent quality standards. NOW ® Foods is always vigilant when it comes to quality, just as you are. Another way we maintain high quality standards is by choosing to buy and incorporate registered and/or trademarked ingredients into our products. Each of these ingredients are exclusively produced by a company that owns proprietary manufacturing rights and licenses selected companies like NOW® to use these top quality ingredients in their products.

These registered/trademarked ingredients must undergo even more rigorous analysis and controls than other ingredients, and so offer additional assurance that products containing them are properly manufactured and labeled. Additionally, to maintain the integrity of their ingredient’s reputation, the trademark owner will independently test finished products from manufacturers to verify the quality meets their standards and the label claim of the company licensed to use it. You may be familiar with some of the trademarked ingredient NOW® uses such as, Ester-C® vitamin C, Chromemate® Chromium and L-Carnipure® Carnitine.

Scientific analysis of ingredients is extremely important to ensure the integrity of any dietary supplement. NOW Foods has made substantial investments in the development, construction and staffing of numerous inhouse laboratories, including an advanced instrumental analysis laboratory, a “wet lab” and a state-of-the-art microbiology lab. This saves us the time and expense of having to send samples out to commercial labs for analysis. While we use independent labs to verify our in-house test results, our capabilities allow us greater control over product quality and quicker approval of raw material shipments for production, which means fresher products for consumers. Our investment ensures that NOW® will be able to meet ever-increasing demands for accurate product analysis and outstanding product quality. NOW® is unique in the industry in that we annually spend more on Quality Assurance & Control than we do on Marketing and Advertising combined. What good is a lab without qualified people? NOW® employs an expert team of highly qualified scientists and technicians, including four Ph.D.’s. They’re constantly working to develop new and improved analytical methods, and their efforts contribute not only to our product quality but that of the entire industry as well.

This is all great, you say, but what about your facility and the equipment you use to manufacture products? Our 203,000 square foot facility is designed and built to standards that exceed food-packaging guidelines. It supports pharmaceutical-grade operations, which greatly enhances our ability to produce the highest quality products quickly. All this means fresher, more effective products on store shelves for consumers. NOW® Foods is an ‘A’ rated GMP-certified manufacturer, one of the first companies in the industry to attain GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) certification. We’re also certified by QAI (Quality Assurance International) as an organic manufacturer. As consumers become increasingly demanding of supplement quality and safety, NOW® is ready to meet this demand with sound science and state-of-the-art research, manufacturing, and packaging capabilities. We are certain that our efforts to consistently maintain the highest product quality will help make your natural product purchasing decisions easier.



--
Buy Now Foods at Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1082)


Peaceful Planet Vegan Protein Line... Veglife
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 24, 2005 01:24 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Peaceful Planet Vegan Protein Line... Veglife

VegLife® 100% Vegan Supplements began in 1992 as a product line within the Solaray® brand. The goal was to create a line of products that would be suitable for strict vegetarians who prefer not to consume products that include any animal-derived ingredients, including gelatin capsules.

The VegLife® brand was among the first to introduce a line of nutritional supplements using a cellulose-based capsule with substantially equivalent characteristics to traditional gelatin capsules. Consumers showed substantial interest in this product line, so Nutraceutical established it as a separate brand in 1995 in order to allow a management team to focus on the development of a full line of vegan products. This team scrutinizes every ingredient used in each product developed, ensuring that strict vegan standards are met.

The VegLife® brand offers over 50 vitamins, minerals, herbs and specialty products in attractive packaging. This 100% Vegan line also includes a line of protein shakes sold under the trademark Peaceful Planet.

VegLife Vegan Line

Peaceful Planet High Protein Energy Shake-Berry Bliss Peaceful Planet High Protein Shake-African Vanilla Peaceful Planet High Protein Shake-Caribbean Cocoa Peaceful Planet Soy Protein Powder


--
Buy Peaceful Planet at Vitanet

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1079)


Carnitine Creatinate
TopPreviousNext

Date: December 08, 2005 03:33 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Carnitine Creatinate

Carnitine Creatinate

Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA 6/30/05

LIKELY USERS: Athletes, Bodybuilders, Dieters, People who consume a lot of fat, People needing cardiovascular support (energy for the heart), People who need quick energy, especially for fast muscle response, People with muscle wasting problems (including the elderly), Weightlifters

KEY INGREDIENTS: L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate

MAIN PRODUCT FEATURES: Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate is a specialized form of Creatine bonded to L-Carnitine. Creatine is a compound natural to the human body that aids in the regeneration of ATP, the chemical energy used by muscle tissue. During exercise, large quantities of creatine are irreversibly consumed. Clinical studies have shown that oral supplementation with Creatine can increase the amount of Creatine available in muscles for ATP production. L-Carnitine is an amino acid that is necessary for the transfer of fatty acids into the fat-burning parts of the cell, facilitating energy production from fat. The combination of these two compounds can produce a synergistic effect, making NOW® Carnitine Creatinate an ideal energy supplement.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT USE INFORMATION & QUALITY ISSUES: Carnitine and Creatinate Monohydrate is a patented ingredient that has been the subject of research studies. It is supported by the scientific staff in the laboratories of both NOW Foods and the raw material supplier, both of which have a mutual interest in protecting the integrity and efficacy of this product. Protected by U.S. Patent No. 5,994,581 (L-Carnitine Creatinate Monohydrate).

Look at the price: this is a better way to buy both supplements than purchasing them separately.

This formula is suitable for vegetarians and is offered in both tablet and powder forms.

SERVING SIZE & HOW TO TAKE IT: As a dietary supplement, every two tablets provide 1,000 mg. (one gram) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Or one teaspoon provides 1,150 mg.) each of both L-Carnitine and Creatine Monohydrate. Take one or more servings per day with a carbohydrate source, such as fruit juice or sports drinks.

COMPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS: CoQ10, carbohydrates, B-Complex vitamins, chromium, vanadium, Hawthorn leaf and flower extract, protein supplements. Adaptogenic herbs: ginsengs, Eleuthero, Rhodiola, Maca, Ashwaganda, licorice root

CAUTIONS: none.

PRODUCT SPECIFIC: This product is very sensitive to moisture. Please keep in the original packaging or in a moisture resistant container. Do not take more than 20 grams per day. Discontinue use if cramps of stomach upset occur, especially if taking large doses. Do not take if kidney disease is present. Do not use large doses of caffeine with creatine, as it may increase the possibility of muscle cramping.

GENERAL: Pregnant and lactating women and people using prescription drugs should consult their physician before taking any dietary supplement. When taking any new supplement, use common sense and cautiously increase to the full dose over time to avoid any potential problems.

Packages may contain moisture or oxygen controlling packets or canisters that are not intended for consumption. In order to maintain maximum freshness, please do not remove these from your bottle (until the bottle is empty). Please recycle your container.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REFERENCES:

Fang S-M (1998) Carnitine Creatinate. U.S. Patent 5,994,581.

L-CARNITINE:

Beers MH, Berkow R (eds). The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, 17th ed. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck and Co., Inc, 1999, 881-3.

Broquist HP (1994) Carnitine, in Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 8th ed., Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M (eds.) Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, pp. 459-465. Casey A, Greenhoff PL (2000) Does dietary creatine supplementation play a role in skeletal muscle metabolism and performance? Am J Clin Nutr 72(suppl):607S-17S. Columbani P, Wenk C, Kunz I, et al. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on physical performance and energy metabolism of endurance-trained athletes: a double blind crossover field study. Eur J Appl Physiol 1996;73:434-9.

Dal Negro R, Pomari G, Zoccatelli O, Turco P. L-carnitine and rehabilitative respiratory physiokinesitherapy: metabolic and ventilatory response in chronic respiratory insufficiency. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 1986;24:453-6.

Dal Negro R, Turco P, Pomari C, De Conti F. Effects of L-carnitine on physical performance in chronic respiratory insufficiency. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 1988;26:269-72.

Del Favero A. Carnitine and gangliosides. Lancet 1988;2:337 [letter].

Dipalma JR. Carnitine deficiency. Am Fam Physician 1988;38:243–51.

Digiesi V, Palchetti R, Cantini F. The benefits of L-carnitine in essential arterial hypertension. Minerva Med 1989;80:227-31.

Giamberardino MA, Dragani L, Valente R, et al. Effects of prolonged L-carnitine administration on delayed muscle pain and CK release after eccentric effort. Int J Sports Med 1996;17:320-4.

Green RE, Levine AM, Gunning MJ. The effect of L-carnitine supplementation on lean body mass in male amateur body builders. J Am Diet Assoc 1997;(suppl):A-72.

Harris RC, Soderlund K, Hultman E (1992) Elevation of creatine in resting and exercised muscle of normal subjects by creatine supplementation. Clin Sci 83(3):367-374.

Kendler BS. Carnitine: an overview of its role in preventive medicine. Prev Med 1986;15:373–90.

Kobayashi A, Masumura Y, Yamazaki N. L-carnitine treatment for congestive heart failure—experimental and clinical study. Jpn Circ J 1992;56:86–94.

Murray MT. The many benefits of carnitine. Am J Natural Med 1996;3:6-14 [review].

Tamamogullari N, Silig Y, Icagasioglu S, Atalay A. Carnitine deficiency in diabetes mellitus complications. J Diabetes Complications 1999;13:251–3.

Yesilipek MA, Hazar V, Yegin O. L-Carnitine treatment in beta thalassemia major. Acta Haematol 1998;100:162-3. CREATINE MONOHYDRATE: Almada A, Mitchell T, Earnest C. Impact of chronic creatine supplementation on serum enzyme concentrations. FASEB J 1996;10:4567.

Becque MD, Lochmann JD, Melrose DR. Effects of oral creatine supplementation on muscular strength and body composition. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2000;32:654-8.

Casey A, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Howell S, et al. Creatine supplementation favorably affects performance and muscle metabolism during maximal intensity exercise in humans. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E31-E7.

Earnest CP, Almada AL, Mitchell TL. High-performance capillary electrophoresis-pure creatine monohydrate reduces blood lipids in men and women. Clin Sci 1996;91:113-8.

Earnest C, Almada A, Mitchell T. Influence of chronic creatine supplementation on hepatorenal function. FASEB J 1996;10:4588.

Earnest CP, Snell PG, Rodriguez R, et al. The effect of creatine monohydrate ingestion on anaerobic power indices, muscular strength and body composition. Acta Physiol Scand 1995;153:207-9.

Felber S, Skladal D, Wyss M, et al. Oral creatine supplementation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a clinical and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Neurol Res 2000;22:145-50.

Feldman EB. Creatine: a dietary supplement and ergogenic aid. Nutr Rev 1999;57:45–50.

Green AL, Hultman E, Macdonald IA, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments skeletal muscle creatine accumulation during creatine supplementation in man. Am J Physiol 1996;271:E821–6.

Green AL, Simpson EJ, Littlewood JJ, et al. Carbohydrate ingestion augments creatine retention during creatine feeding in humans. Acta Physiol Scand 1996;158:195-202.

Greenhaff PL. Creatine and its application as an ergogenic aid. Int J Sport Nutr 1995;5:94-101.

Greenhaff PL. The nutritional biochemistry of creatine. J Nutr Biochem 1997;8:610-8 [review].

Greenhaff PL, Bodin K, Soderlund K, et al. Effect of oral creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle phosphocreatine resynthesis. Am J Physiol 1994;266:E725-30.

Greenhaff PL, Casey A, Short AH, et al. Influence of oral creatine supplementation on muscle torque during repeated bouts of maximal voluntary exercise in man. Clin Sci 1993;84:565-71.

Harris RC, Soderlund K, Hultman E. Elevation of creatine in resting and exercised muscle of normal subjects by creatine supplementation. Clin Sci 1992;83:367-74.

Hultman E, Soderlund K, Timmons J, et al. Muscle creatine loading in man. J Appl Physiol 1996;81:232–7.

Juhn MS, O’Kane JW, Vinci DM. Oral creatine supplementation in male collegiate athletes: a survey of dosing habits and side effects. J Am Diet Assoc 1999;99:593–5.

Kreider RB, Ferreira M, Wilson M, et al. Effects of creatine supplementation on body composition, strength, and sprint performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1998;30:73-82.

Poortmans JR, Auquier H. Renaut V, et al. Effect of short-term creatine supplementation on renal responses in men. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 1997;76:566–7.

Poortmans JR, Francaux M. Long-term oral creatine supplementation does not impair renal function in healthy athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999;31:1108–10.

Pritchard NR, Kaira PA. Renal dysfunction accompanying oral creatine supplements. Lancet 1998;351:1252–3 [letter].

Sewell DA, Robinson TM, Casey A, et al. The effect of acute dietary creatine supplementation upon indices of renal, hepatic and haematological function in human subjects. Proc Nutr Soc 1998;57:17A.

Silber ML. Scientific facts behind creatine monohydrate as a sports nutrition supplement. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 1999;39:179–88 [review].

Sipila I, Rapola J, Simell O, et al. Supplementary creatine as a treatment for gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina. N Engl J Med 1981;304:867-70.

Stone MH, Sanborn K, Smith LL, et al. Effects of in-season (5-weeks) creatine and pyruvate supplementation on anaerobic performance and body composition in American football players. Int J Sport Nutr 1999;9:146-65.

Stout JR, Eckerson J, Noonan D, et al. The effects of a supplement designed to augment creatine uptake on exercise performance and fat-free mass in football players. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1997;29:S251.

Tarnopolsky MA. Potential benefits of creatine monohydrate supplementation in the elderly. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2000;3:497-502 [review].

Tarnopolsky M, Martin J. Creatine monohydrate increases strength in patients with neuromuscular disease. Neurology 1999;52:854-7.

Tarnopolsky MA, Roy BD, MacDonald JR. A randomized, controlled trial of creatine monohydrate in patients with mitochondrial cytopathies. Muscle Nerve 1997;20:1502-9.

Toler SM. Creatine is an ergogen for anaerobic exercise. Nutr Rev 1997;55:21-5 [review].

Vandenberghe K, Gills N, Van Leemputte M, et al. Caffeine counteracts the ergogenic action of muscle creatine loading. J Appl Physiol 1996;80:452–7.

Vandenberghe K, Goris M, Van Hecke P, et al. Long-term creatine intake is beneficial to muscle performance during resistance training. J Appl Physiol 1997;83:2055-63.

Walter MC, Lochmuller H, Reilich P, Klopstock T, Huber R, Hartard M, Hennig M, Pongratz D, Muller-Felber W. Creatine monohydrate in muscular dystrophies: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Neurology. 2000 May 9;54(9):1848-50. PMID: 10802796

Walter MC, Reilich P, Lochmuller H, Kohnen R, Schlotter B, Hautmann H, Dunkl E, Pongratz D, Muller-Felber W. Creatine monohydrate in myotonic dystrophy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. J Neurol. 2002 Dec;249(12):1717-22. PMID: 12529796



--
Vitanet ®

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=994)


NOW is the leader in quality and value
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 21, 2005 08:12 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: NOW is the leader in quality and value

NOW is the leader in quality and value

  • • NOW will often have the lowest price, and our quality and value is second to none.
  • • NOW offers specials every month granting retailers the opportunity to showcase extremely competitive products in many of the most popular categories.
  • • Compare our price on trademarked ingredients such as ester-c, 7-keto, Carnipure, Phase-2 and Relora to see how much money NOW can save you.

    “We only deal with companies that support the natural products industry and have a strong public service mission”

    We couldn’t agree more. NOW has, and will continue to fight for the rights of consumers to take safe supplements. As one of the most active and influential advocates in the natural products industry, we proudly support the following industry organizations.

    NFA, Citizens for health, AHPA, OTA, The Herb Research Foundation, The American Botanical Council, Consumers for Health Choice (UK), The GMO Task Force, The GMP Task Force, American Herbal Pharmacopoeia, The Campaign to label Genetically Engineered Foods, AOAC (method validation), AOCS (American Oil Chemist Society), The Dietary Supplement Education Alliance (DSEA), and More…

    “Does NOW support any Charitable or public services?”

    NOW is a leading recycling company and was awarded a silver medal for nutrition business journal in 2005 for our dedication to environmental and sustainability issues. We use environmental-friendly packaging and procedures to ensure that our impact on the environment is minimal. Here are just a few of the charities and originations NOW generously supports:

    Local Heal Clinics and food banks, Salvation Army, Marklund children’s home, African meal-a-day fund, compassion international, vitamin angel, world relief, Indian orphanage, Hephzibah children’s home, nature conservancy, Americas second harvest, world wild life, and many more

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=858)


    Source Naturals - Flawless Finished Goods
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: August 20, 2005 11:47 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Source Naturals - Flawless Finished Goods

    The packaging process requires careful coordination from start to finish. All products are meticulously tracked, counted or measured, filled into finished containers, safety-sealed, and assigned identification codes. This ensures the highest quality product – from our facility to the consumer’s hands. -Alex Rosario, packaging Supervisor

    Flawless Finished Goods

    Our packaging Department has final responsibility for seeing that our high quality supplements reach you in a form that ensures safety, freshness and accountability.

    Maintaining Freshness Source Naturals takes great care to package our products in a manner that maintains the quality and potency of the ingredients. We print “best if used by” dates on our bottles to let you know they are fresh. To protect certain products from moisture, which can lower tablet potency, desiccants are inserted into bottles. An inner seal provides further protection.

    Ensuring Uniform Safety Standards

    High-speed tablet counters correctly add the number of tablets to place in each bottle. After bottles are filled, they are capped and pressuresensitive seals are applied to make the product tamper-evident. A full body sleeve is heatshrunk to each bottle, adding a second tamper seal.

    Achieving Accountability

    Source Naturals traces all material lots used in our products from receipt to finished product. Through careful documentation, we have the ability to track a single ingredient throughout the entire manufacturing process to the completed bottled product. The material number, weight, and lot number of each ingredient are recorded on batch sheets. Each bottle is marked with a unique, traceable manufacturing lot number. This means a bottle can be taken off a store shelf and every ingredient traced back to its source.

    Inspecting Finished Products

    Our finished goods inspectors follow a very specific set of standards to determine if the finished product can be released for shipping. Our inspectors verify that bottles meet our appearance standards, are appropriately labeled, contain the correct number of tablets, have intact tamper-evident seals and, in the case of products with high iron content, child-resistant caps.

    Every ingredient in every product can be traced back to its original source and manufactured lot number.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=739)


    Source Naturals - Our Commitment to Your Well-Being
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: August 20, 2005 11:41 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Source Naturals - Our Commitment to Your Well-Being

    Source Naturals 49% OFF

    Manufacturing nutritional supplements is a profound responsibility. We are constantly aware that the products we make are incorporated into your cells and tissues—they become the very substance of your being.

    Our Commitment to Your Well-Being

    As developers of a leading line of dietary supplements, we at Source Naturals know we have a unique responsibility.

    When you take our supplements into your body, you entrust us with something precious and irreplaceable—your physical and mental well-being. You expect us to honor that trust by producing the highest quality supplements, based on advanced research, in formulations that can significantly impact your life. You expect Total Quality Assurance (TQA™).

    A Culture of Quality Our Quality Control Department employs rigorous testing Our Commitment toYour Well-Being procedures that assure every product we produce is of the highest quality. We have set in place intricate protocols of checks and balances. But our commitment to quality does not begin or end at the laboratory door. From purchasing to warehousing, from the first stage of blending to the finishing touches in packaging, we continually strive to imbue quality at all points in our systems.

    Clear protocols, policies and procedures establish the framework, but TQA at Source Naturals is a living system of dedicated people. TQA is our organizing principle. The whole company is structured around quality circle teams. They are fast and creative, enabling us to quickly take nutritional quality to the next level of performance. There is no entrenched bureaucracy, intent on maintaining the status quo. Instead, staff members participate in teams focused on the continual improvement of our products. In our everevolving quality circles, team members are encouraged to brainstorm and think “outside the box,” to discover innovative ways to raise product quality.

    In these quality circle teams, one guiding principle is always focused on and reinforced—creating products that enhance the health and well-being of our customers.

    Quality and Formulation

    And because you take our products to address critical health concerns, the heart of TQA at Source Naturals is our formulation method. We understand the need to go deep to the underlying causes of health imbalances. Whether developing groundbreaking nutrients or comprehensive formulas, we are dedicated to accessing and addressing those root causes. For a step-by-step tour of TQA at Source Naturals, please read on.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=735)


    Take Your Vitamins: Reviewing Scientific Approaches to Selecting Daily Multiple Supplement
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 21, 2005 05:10 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Take Your Vitamins: Reviewing Scientific Approaches to Selecting Daily Multiple Supplement

    Take Your Vitamins: Reviewing Scientific Approaches to Selecting Daily Multiple Supplements

    By Adina Licht, MS

    Adina Licht, M.S. is a Nutritional Scientist and Science Writer who works as a Marketing Specialist for Source Naturals. She has a B.A. in Environmental Science from UC Berkeley, an M.S. in Nutrition and Food Science from San Jose State University, and training in Technical Communication from Cal State Hayward. Her work has appeared in publications such as Advances in packaging and Development, Health Supplement Retailer and Delicious Living.

    Americans Need More Nutrients

    The U. S. population is drastically malnourished. According to the latest A. C. Nielsen survey, only 12% of Americans claim to eat the 5 recommended servings of fruits and vegetables each day (Warner, 2004). And approximately 1/3 of the calories that people do consume are from nutrient-poor foods such as alcohol and soda (Yang, 2004). This combination has led to a population that consumes too few nutrients, which according to an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Fletcher, 2002) puts people at risk for long-term health concerns. With Americans eating fewer healthy foods, taking a daily multiple is one way for people to increase their intake of nutrients. But the search for what defines a good multiple can be confusing, even to health care professionals.

    The Confusing U.S. Government Standards

    Scientists first recognized the need for vitamins in the early 1900s (Levenstein, 1993). But setting U. S. government standards for vitamins and minerals didn't start until healthy soldiers were needed to fight World War II. And when a committee of scientists was asked to determine the levels of nutrients needed to maintain good health they could only agree on "recommended allowances" to prevent deficiency with a wide margin of safety. In 1941, these allowances became the first Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for the nation (Levenstein, 1993). In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) used latest RDAs to set the new Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) standards, which included Adequate Intakes (AIs) for when there was insufficient evidence to determine an RDA, and Upper Intake Levels (ULs) as the safe daily upper limit. To simplify the information, food labels express nutrient information as a percentage of the Daily Value (DV), which includes RDA values for a healthy adult who consumes 2000 calories per day (Whitney, 2002). However, these values do not include AIs or ULs and many individuals need different levels of nutrients than these.

    Confusing Standards equals Confusing Recommendations

    The RDAs and subsequent DRIs are the basis of the nutrient standards for at least 40 different nations and many professional health organizations. Currently, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) recommends that people who cannot reach the DRIs through diet take a multiple with nutrient levels that do not exceed the RDAs (JADA, 2001). And in 2002, the American Medical Association (AMA) published a paper that included a recommendation for all adults to take RDA levels of vitamin supplements in their Journal of the American Medical Association (Fletcher, 2002). Despite the benefits of having guidelines, most people only hear about the RDAs and DVs, which may be too low for preventing deficiencies while the ULs and AIs, which can be much more beneficial are rarely discussed. For example, the Daily Value of Vitamin E to prevent deficiency is 30 IU while the daily Upper Intake Limit is 1,467 IU. But, according to the ADA, as many as 75% of cardiologists recommend vitamin E to their patients to promote heart health, usually at a dosage of 400 IU (ADA, 2001; Meydani, 2004; & Whitney, 1998). And the Daily Value for Vitamin C is 60 mg while the daily Upper Intake Limit is 2000 mg, but in clinical studies it took 500 mg per day to help maintain healthy blood pressure (Whitney, 1998, & Hendler, 2001).

    Alternative Recommendations

    Lyle MacWilliam is a biochemist and former health advisor to the Canadian Ministry of Health, who decided to research, analyze and publish the Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements. In this book, the individually published recommendations from seven nutrition experts (Phyllis Balch, CNC, Dr. Michael Colgan, Ph.D., Dr. Earl Mindell, Ph.D., Dr. Michael Murray, N.D., Dr. Richard Passwater, Ph.D., Dr. Ray Strand, M.D., and Dr. Julian Whitaker, M.D.) were combined to create an ultimate blended standard of recommended median intakes for 39 nutrients to promote health. Those nutrients include vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and other supplements, that span 14 different health categories and are much closer to the Upper Intake Limit government standards. The guide also includes information about recommended forms, safety, purity and quality (MacWilliam, 2003). One of the most profound differences between MacWilliam?s compiled recommendations and the DRIs is the difference in the number of supplements: 39 vs. 26 respectively. The Comparative Guide standard includes additional nutrients, including many more antioxidants, based on decades of clinical research about their benefits. For example, the fat-soluble antioxidant Coenzyme Q10 that your body manufactures less of as you age is included. So is the fat and water-soluble antioxidant alpha lipoic acid that helps recycle other antioxidants such as vitamins C and E (Hendler, 2001).

    Top Ranked Multiples for Optimal Health

    In the latter half of MacWilliam's book he uses this ultimate blended standard to rank and compare 500 manufactured multiples. Of the five top-ranked multiples, only the Source Naturals multiples, Life Force and Élan Vitàl, are widely available at natural product stores and health outlets. And the new and improved Life Force formulation now rates higher than any of the products evaluated in the current edition of this guide (MacWilliam, 2004; & Mac-William, 2003). The ingredients that can be found in today's multiple supplements can vary greatly. But multiple choices don't have to lead to confusion. Health professionals, such as Lyle MacWilliam, understand the importance of remaining curious, evaluating the available research, and conferring with other scientists to determine the nutrients that support optimal health.

    References

    American Dietetic Association. 2001. Vitamin E: Disease Prevention for your Good Health. American Dietetic Association Website. Available at: Public/Other/index_nfs1001.cfm Fletcher, R. H., & Fairfield, K. M. 2002. Vitamins for Chronic Disease Prevention in Adults. JAMA. (23)287:3116-3129. Hendler, S. S., et al. 2001. PDR for Nutritional Supplements. Thomson Healthcare: Montvale. Pages 11-12, 17-21, 60-62, 103, 416-421, 486-498. JADA (Journal of the American Dietetic Association) 2001. Vitamin and mineral supplementation. J AM Diet Assoc.101: 115 Available at: Public/NutritionInformation/92_8343.cfm Levenstein, H. 1993. Paradox of Plenty: A Social History of Eating in Modern America. Oxford University Press: New York. Pages 13-15, 64-67. MacWilliam, L, et al. 2003. Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements. Northern Dimensions Publishing: Vernon. Pages 62-70. MacWilliam, L. 2004. Comparative Guide Individual Assessment of New Life Force Formulation. Warner, J. 2004. Few Follow '5 a Day' Fruit and Vegetable Rule. WebMD website. Available at: ent/Article/93/102158.htm Whitney, N. W., & Rolfes, S. R. (1998). Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition, 5th ed. Page 358. Whitney, E. N., & Rolfes, S. R. 2002. Understanding Nutrition. 9th ed. Wadsworth Thomson Learning: Belmont. Pages A, B, Y, 13-20, 55-56, 307, 331, 335-341, 401. Yang, S. 2004. Nearly one-third of the calories in the US diet come from junk food, researcher finds.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=384)


    Your Healthy Harvest
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 14, 2005 11:05 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Your Healthy Harvest

    Your Healthy Harvest by Marjorie Flakowitz Energy Times, August 15, 2004

    Once frowned on by conventional farmers, organic food has won respect from everyone concerned about the health of both the earth and the people who inhabit it.

    Today, organic farming is considered one of the most rapidly growing areas of American agriculture. Organic foods sales topped $9 billion in 2002 and grew about 20%, up to almost $11 billion in 2003 (Organic Trade Association).

    So when you buy organic, you join an expanding market that takes advantage of great-tasting, good-for-you food. Long ago, when the practice of farming was first devised, all farming was organic farming. So today's organic movement is bringing farming back to its roots.

    But, safe to say, that is not what's motivating most consumers. A main reason for the popularity of organic food derives from the reassurance that organic foods, raised without artificial chemicals and pesticides, cut your exposure to toxic residues. A growing body of research shows organic food is richer in beneficial natural substances, too.

    " Organic food and organic farming represent a philosophy that goes beyond just the quality of the food," says Steve Meyerowitz in The Organic Food Guide (Globe Pequot). "It strives to maintain the integrity of the entire food chain-plants, soil, air, water, animals and people. We are all part of the same ecosystem."

    By eating organic, you eliminate pollution both from your body and the earth. Because our bodies are made of the animal and plant products we consume, our internal, physiological ecosystem and the earth's environment are inexorably entwined.

    Chilling Arctic Evidence

    As evidence of this connection, consider what's happened in the Arctic. Researchers who have analyzed Arctic water, ice, snow, soil and plants have found that chemicals used in farming and industry in other parts of the world have traveled north and accumulated in alarming quantity. How and if these chemicals break down depends on sunlight and the amount of organic matter contained in Arctic waters (American Chemical Society, 9/11/03).

    " Once pollutants enter the water column, their behavior is poorly understood-particularly the processes that govern their lifetime and concentrations," says Amanda Grannas, PhD, a researcher at Ohio State University. "Such pollutants are now being found in wildlife, from fish to seals to whales, and even in people living in the Arctic."

    Dr. Grannas and others looked at the pesticides lindane and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), two chemicals that have migrated to Arctic waters. Lindane is used by American farmers to treat seeds before they are planted. HCB, banned in the US in 1984, is still used in other countries to protect wheat from fungus.

    The scientists found that sunlight at the top of Arctic waterways can help break down some pesticides. At lower depths, however, cut off from the sun's rays, pesticides can remain largely intact. In this research, lindane proved to persist much more readily than HCB.

    " Lindane is one of the most persistent of pollutants," warns Dr. Grannas. "This could be because it's photochemically inert, whereas pollutants like HCB degrade relatively quickly. The main message is that pollutants can behave quite differently. These pollutants already affect local ecosystems, and could have repercussions for human health."

    Organics Means More Benefits

    Researchers are also finding that organic produce contains larger quantities of beneficial natural chemicals. For instance, one study (Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 2/26/03) showed that berries and corn grown organically can have almost 60% more polyphenolics. Polyphenolics are antioxidants plants use for protection against disease and which are good for humans. Researchers believe that when crops are grown conventionally, protected by pesticides and herbicides, they produce fewer of these substances. " This really opens the door to more research in this area," says Alyson Mitchell, PhD, assistant professor of food science at University of California at Davis, who led the research.

    These scientists compared levels of total polyphenolics and vitamin C content in marionberries (a type of blackberry) and corn grown organically, sustainably or conventionally, and also looked at chemicals in strawberries grown either sustainably or conventionally. (Sustainable farming falls between the organic and conventional methods, and concentrates on farming that's self-sufficient-for example, feeding cows hay you've grown yourself, and then using the cows' manure to fertilize another crop.) They found that organic marionberries and corn had 50% to 58% more polyphenolics. The sustainably grown strawberries had 19% more polyphenolics. And all the organic produce contained more vitamin C.

    Self-Defense for Plants

    According to Dr. Mitchell, the organic crops contained the high levels of polyphenolics you'd expect to find in wild plants, suggesting that, on conventional farms, pesticides reduce the necessity for plants to make these protective, natural chemicals. " If an aphid is nibbling on a leaf, the plant produces phenolics to defend itself," she says. "[P]henolics guard the plant against these pests."

    Pesticides kill insects like aphids and thereby reduce the antioxidants produced by the plant. " This helps explain why the level of antioxidants is so much higher in organically grown food," Mitchell says. "By synthetically protecting the produce from these pests, we decrease their need to produce antioxidants. It suggests that maybe we are doing something to our food inadvertently.

    " We know [polyphenolics] are beneficial [to human health], but we don't know what types of polyphenolics are beneficial, or in what quantities," Dr. Mitchell notes. " Originally, the question was just really intriguing to me. I found that the higher level of antioxidants is enough to have a significant impact on health and nutrition, and it's definitely changed the way I think about my food."

    Vitamin C in Oranges

    Meanwhile, nutritional research on the vitamin C in oranges turns up similar results: organic oranges are richer in this antioxidant nutrient than conventionally grown oranges (Great Lakes Regional Meeting, American Chemical Society, 6/2/02).

    The more common supermarket oranges are significantly larger than organically grown oranges, and they have a deeper orange color. Because of their larger size, "we were expecting twice as much vitamin C in the conventional oranges," says Theo Clark, PhD, chemistry professor at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri.

    But when he isolated the chemicals in the oranges and further refined his search with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectroscopy demonstrated that organically grown oranges possess 30% more vitamin C than the conventionally grown fruits-even though they are only about half as large.

    Dr. Clark isn't sure why organic oranges are richer in vitamin C, but he says, "...[W]e speculate that with conventional oranges, [farmers] use nitrogen fertilizers that cause an uptake of more water, so it sort of dilutes the orange. You get a great big orange but it is full of water and does not have as much nutritional value.

    " However, we can only speculate. Other factors such as maturity, climate, processing factors, packaging and storage conditions require consideration." Along with analyzing oranges, Dr. Clark and his research team questioned about 70 people to measure their concept of the nutritional value of organic oranges. In this survey, 85% of the respondents thought that organic oranges have a higher nutritional content than conventionally grown fruit.

    Dr. Clark's laboratory work shows that "they were right on." In Dr. Clark's view, these issues are important because consumers have a right to know the real nutritional content of organic produce, and the fact that analyses show that organic fruit has much more vitamin C validates the benefits of eating organic.

    Defense Mechanism

    Both plants and animals protect themselves from disease with many of the same chemicals. The natural substances that, in a farmer's field, defend vegetables from insects and microbes before they are harvested for your dinner go to work defending your body after you eat and digest them.

    When you eat organic you bolster your health with more of these natural wonders. No wonder organic is becoming so popular!



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=343)


    Truth in Labeling
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 14, 2005 10:44 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Truth in Labeling

    Truth in Labeling by Diane Stanton Energy Times, June 14, 2004

    Do you or don't you read food labels when you shop? If you don't, you're missing out on a prime source of information about your meals. If you want control of your health, focus on package labels and pick your foods carefully.

    The large print on food labels focus on what are called macronutrients: carbohydrates, fat and protein. Some of the smaller categories convey information about vitamins, fiber, and minerals, as well as the totals of fat and saturated fat contained in food. So, you have no excuse for claiming ignorance about your diet: the truth is in the labels.

    Food labels can be confusing to the uninitiated. Go into a big food store and you can be faced with what seems to be a forest of food information: more than 15,000 labels. Add to that fact that every year more than 30,000 new food products can be introduced to the marketplace, and what you're faced with is a jungle of food labels.

    That overwhelming wealth of food label information doesn't mean you should throw up your hands in dismay and give up reading and deciphering labels. You should arm yourself against that sea of labels with knowledge and, by understanding them, end your confusion and build your health.

    Label History

    A hundred years or so ago, food labels were only required to list the name of the food contained inside the package. The contents, quality and processes used to make the food were often a mystery. Little or no disclosure to consumers was made about how their food was created.

    By the early 1920s, the federal government, via the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), began requiring food companies to list the net weight of food on labels as well as the names and addresses of food processors and distributors. Finally, by the 1970s, listing basic nutritional information was mandated in a uniform way so that shoppers could have some basis for comparing foods. Then, in 1990, the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act made major alterations to the kinds of labels that had to be included on food packages.

    The FDA and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) required significant changes to food labels that were supposed to make it easier for consumers to eat healthier diets. The labels requirements of 1994 included five major changes:

  • • The nutrition information on the label had to be printed in larger, more legible type.
  • • This condensed information had to be on the back or side of food packaging and titled as "Nutrition Facts." This type of information is also shown in grocery stores near the fresh food displays of fish, fruits and vegetables.
  • • The label had to include a column of information tagged as the "% Daily Value," designed to help consumers understand how the food could fit into a healthy diet.
  • • Each label had to include information about fat, cholesterol, fiber, sugar, calories from fat, and other information relevant to designing a healthy diet.
  • • The computed serving sizes were supposed to be more realistic and reflect the amount of food people actually eat at one sitting.

    Label Questions

    Consumer questions regarding food labels have led researchers to look into ways to help shoppers comprehend what food labels tell them. These studies are designed to help consumers match up their nutrition requirements with the foods they buy.

    For instance, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, scientists have devised a label tool called See It, Do It, Teach It to help people improve their diets through comprehension of food label information. " One of the goals of the project was to help...teenaged girls and menopausal women understand how they can get the daily requirement for calcium into their diet in order to help prevent osteoporosis," says Karen Chapman-Novakofski, PhD, associate professor and nutritionist in the school's College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.

    According to the See It, Do It, Teach It program, you should think of food labels as consisting of two sections:

  • • Food items you should limit: total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium and, if you're eating a low-carb diet, total carbohydrates
  • • What you may need to increase: vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron

    " Much more attention has been paid to what people should limit rather than the nutrients needed. The average consumer doesn't know, for instance, how much vitamin A 10% of the Daily Value is, or how much calcium 25% of the Daily Value is," Dr. Chapman-Novakofski says.

    Upping Calcium Intake

    In their eight-week study of people's calcium consumption (Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 4/04), the University of Illinois research team found that people didn't know how much calcium was in the food they ate.

    After the initial part of the study, in which participants were shown how to look for calcium on labels, "the post-test revealed that the participants significantly increased their calcium intake to 821 mg per day, up from 372 mg per day," notes Dr. Chapman-Novakofski.

    " That's a lot closer to the daily requirements of 1,200 mg per day for men and women over 50, 1,000 mg for men and women aged 19 through 50 and 1,300 mg per day for [youths aged] 9 to [18] years," she adds.

    Parts of the Label

    The first item at the top of a nutrition food label tells you the portion size that the label measures. An important point to remember: these sizes are determined individually by each manufacturer. Consequently, all of the other values on the label are measured per portion.

    So, if you are comparing foods made by two different companies that employ very different portion sizes in their nutritional calculations, your label comparisons may be complicated.

    Another fact to be aware of: the listed portion size may be an odd division of the food within the container and not reflect a common-sense division. For instance, some food packages are labeled as containing 2.5 portions.

    And, to make things even more interesting, small boxes of candy that you might think contain barely enough for one helping may be labeled by the manufacturer as having two or more portions. As a result, if you eat the whole box, you often have to at least double the number of indicated calories, etc. to figure out the nutrients and calories you are consuming.

    The section of the label that notes calories, calories from fat and percent daily values is listed under the portion size. Here you are told how many calories you consume when you devour one portion and how many of those calories are derived from fat.

    This label focus on fat originated when consumers and dietitians were very concerned about Americans' fat consumption and hadn't yet switched their focus to carbohydrate consumption as a prevalent dietary health priority.

    Also included on the label: the daily value percentages aimed at showing you how much out of a total day's intake of various nutrients a portion bestows upon you.

    These percentage numbers are based on a theoretical analysis of a diet that contains 2,000 or 2,500 calories a day. (A notation at the bottom of the label tells you whether the calculation is based on 2,000 or 2,500.)

    Carb Facts

    If you've been eating a low-carb diet (or are planning this type of diet), the section of the label that lists carbohydrates may be especially useful. Under this heading, the label lists the totals for fiber and sugar.

    No matter what diet you are on, dietary fiber is desirable, since it represents indigestible carbohydrates that both pass through you without conveying any calories and keep beneficial bacteria in your digestive tract healthy.

    Most people want to limit their sugar totals, however, since this nutrient may raise your risk of being overweight and, when you eat a lot of it, may contribute to immune problems.

    Interestingly enough, when food chemists compute what is in food, they perform lab tests known as assays to distinguish its ingredients. (The manner in which these tests are performed are very strictly regulated by the FDA.)

    In fact, just about every nutrient listed on a food label is determined by laboratory test except for the carbohydrate content: the amount of water, fat, crude protein and ash are determined this way. But the total carbs are computed by simply subtracting the total of the other ingredients from the total amount of food, a kind of process of elimination.

    So while fat and protein are measured with precise lab tests, carbohydrate totals are figured by the leftovers. (The water and ash, by the way, are not usually listed on food labels.)

    Within the general carbohydrate group, are several categories of carbohydrates that produce very different effects in your body. These categories can be divided into sugar, sugar alcohols, dietary fiber and a collection of various chemicals that include organic acids, flavonoids, gums, lignans and others.

    According to the FDA, the food label only has to list the total carbs, sugar and dietary fiber. But some food companies now list things like sugar alcohols.

    Blood Sugar Effects

    Not all of these types of carbohydrates behave the same way in your body. For example, when your body digests table sugar, it turns immediately into blood sugar. So sugar and most other carbohydrate is what we call "digestible carbohydrate." Other carbs, such as sugar alcohol or glycerine, can be digested but do not turn to blood sugar. Still others, such as dietary fiber, are indigestible and pass through your body without impacting your blood sugar level.

    To date, the FDA has not focused on these important biochemical differences and treats all carbohydrates alike. This means that when you look at a food label, you do not see a number for the carbs that impact your blood sugar level. To do so, simply subtract the number of grams of fiber from the total number of carbohydrate grams.

    Net Carbs

    Recently, the phrases "low carb," "net carb" and "impact carbs" have begun to appear on food labels. These are not defined by the FDA; they were put on labels by by companies to help consumers pick out foods that are acceptable on low-carb diets. To arrive at the total of net carbs, food companies subtract the total amount of fiber and sugar alcohol from the total carbohydrates.

    Fiber Calculations

    Since the body cannot digest fiber, this nutrient (which is still important for good health) is not calculated into the total amount of carbohydrates. As for sugar alcohols, while-technically speaking-these are carbs and they do have calories, they have little effect on blood sugar and usually are not counted in total carbohydrates.

    According to the American Dietetic Association, people with diabetes who are managing their blood sugars using the carbohydrate counting method should "count half of the grams of sugar alcohol as carbohydrates since half of the sugar alcohol on average is digested.

    " Fiber is not digested, however. If the serving of food has more then 5 grams of fiber one should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate grams." As you can see, when it comes to food, as in most things, knowledge is power. If you want power over your health, you need power over the food you eat. The road to that power is by reading food labels. What's in the food you're eating every day may surprise you.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=341)


    Certified Foods
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 12, 2005 01:59 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Certified Foods

    Certified Foods by Glenda Olsen Energy Times, July 13, 2003

    What's in your food, and where does it come from? To most American consumers, that question may seem unimportant. But the answers might surprise you. Your food's origin and processing can make a big difference in its nutritional value, for better and for worse. Increasingly, concern over the quality of food and its influence on health are persuading shoppers to take a greater interest in their food. The result: More visits to natural food stores and more sales of organic food.

    Once upon a time, food used to be just food. Crops were grown on family farms, and animals were raised in barnyards. But today, corporations have conquered food production in a big way. Agribusiness is just that-a big business in which animals and plants are treated like assembly-line items and raised on factory farms.

    Organic Regulation

    While the term "organic" gets tossed around endlessly in the media, the term is often misconstrued. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), "Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones."

    In addition, organic farmers generally do not use pesticides, sewage sludge or synthetic fertilizers. This type of food is also produced without genetically modified organisms and is not subject to radiation used to zap the bugs on food. Today, USDA-approved certifying agents inspect the farms where organic food is raised to ensure organic standards are followed. In addition, the companies that process food and handle organic food have to be USDA-certified. Meeting these standards allows companies to use the USDA's organic label on foods that are at least 95% organic in origin. Labels for foods that contain between 70% and 95% organic content can use the words "Made With Organic Ingredients," but cannot use the seal.

    Solid Nutrition

    While the debate over the nutritional benefits of organic food has raged for decades, recent research is beginning to turn up evidence that organically grown fruits and vegetables may contain extra helpings of vitamins and other nutrients. A study at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri, found that organically grown oranges contain more vitamin C than conventional supermarket oranges (Great Lakes Regional Meeting, Amer Chem Soc, 6/02).

    Theo Clark, PhD, the Truman State professor who investigated the organic oranges, says that when he and his students began their research, "We were expecting twice as much vitamin C in the conventional oranges" because they are larger than organic oranges. To his surprise, chemical isolation combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed that the organically grown oranges contained up to 30% more vitamin C than the conventionally grown fruits-even though they were only about half the size. "We speculate that with conventional oranges, (farmers) use nitrogen fertilizers that cause an uptake of more water, so it sort of dilutes the orange. You get a great big orange but it is full of water and doesn't have as much nutritional value," Dr. Clark says. "However, we can only speculate. Other factors such as maturity, climate, processing factors, packaging and storage conditions require consideration."

    Dodging Pesticides

    If you want to avoid pesticide residues in your food, research shows that going organic can make it much less likely that you or your family consumes these unwanted chemicals. Research, for instance, into the diets of children (Enviro Hlth Persp 3/03) shows that dining on organic fruits and vegetables, and organic juice, can lower kids' intake of pesticides.

    These scientists took a look at the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide breakdown products in the blood of kids ages two to five who ate conventional supermarket produce and compared it with the OP found in organic kids.

    The children on the organic diet had less OP in their blood than the other kids. As a matter of fact, the children on the conventional diet had six times the dimethyl metabolites, dimethyl being a pesticide suspected of affecting nerve function and growth. "Consumption of organic produce appears to provide a relatively simple way for parents to reduce their children's exposure to OP pesticides," note the researchers. "Organic foods have been growing in popularity over the last several years," says Jim Burkhart, PhD, science editor for the journal that published the study. "These scientists studied one potential area of difference from the use of organic foods, and the findings are compelling."

    GMO Development

    On the way to tonight's dinner, researchers have created genetically modified organisms (GMO), plants and animals that have been transgenically engineered. In the food world, that means organisms containing genes inserted from another species. Chances are if you eat food purchased at the typical supermarket, those comestibles contain GMO ingredients. In the United States, food companies are not required to label for GMO content.

    A growing number of American consumers are upset about not being told about the GMO products in their food. But industry scientists, worried that informed consumers may someday turn their back on GMO foods, consider consumer ignorance to be an acceptable state of affairs.

    For instance, the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) is fighting regulations that would require GMO labeling. According to ASPB President Daniel Bush, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Urbana, "The language...(in these types of regulations) is based on a system of beliefs of what is 'natural,' rather than a scientifically defined set of criteria focused on content and nutritional value. This is a radical departure from food labeling up to now, which is designed to maximize useful information for consumers concerning what is in the food they are buying."

    Dr. Bush continues, "There are, of course, examples of voluntary labeling standards in the food industry that reflect how foods are processed, such as organic foods. The voluntary organic labeling standards were sought by the organic food industry. Kosher foods are also labeled as having been produced in accordance with specific beliefs. However, mandatory labeling of targeted production methods has never before been required and we believe would obscure rather than clarify important issues of food safety."

    In other words, Dr. Bush opposes GMO labeling because he feels it would unnecessarily stigmatize GMO food items. Others are not so sanguine about the safety of GMO foods.

    GMO Objections

    The arguments against GMO foods include:

  • * The genes from GMO plants may end up in weeds and other unintended species, creating superweeds that will be difficult to eradicate. Animals, such as fish on fish farms, may interbreed with animals in the wild and cause harmful changes.

  • * People may grow ill or die from unexpected allergies to GMO foods (NEJM 1996; 334(11):688-92).

  • * GMO plants may harm other wildlife, such as butterflies, that depends on pollen from these plants (Nature May 1999; 399(6733):214).

    These types of risks have motivated industry groups to urge more regulation of GMO crops. The Food Marketing Institute, the Grocery Manufacturers of America (GMA) and the National Restaurant Association, plus seven other food groups, are worried that GMO plants grown to produce pharmaceutical drugs could contaminate the food supply and destroy consumer trust in food.

    Mary Sophos, a vice president of GMA, warns, "To minimize the possible risks, a clear system of regulatory enforcement and liability needs to be in place. Until then, no permits for new field trials or for commercialization should be issued because there is no room for trial and error."

    These food industry groups have voiced their concerns to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the USDA. Last year, the USDA forced ProdiGene Inc., a biotech firm, to dispose of 500,000 bushels of soybeans contaminated with a drug meant to treat diabetes. What are the chances of more GMO accidents? No one knows. But if you buy and eat organic, you minimize your risk and maximize your chances of dining on safer food.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=303)



  • VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.