SearchBox:

Search Term: " Apricot "

  Messages 1-18 from 18 matching the search criteria.
Essential Oils: How to Choose the Right Carrier Oils for Them VitaNet, LLC Staff 9/5/18
19 Benefits Of Apricot Kernel Oil For Beauty And Health Darrell Miller 6/12/18
5 Signs You're Not Getting Enough Potassium and How To Overcome It Darrell Miller 2/21/18
Umeboshi Plums: Liver Cleanser & Cancer Fighter Darrell Miller 7/24/17
Importance of Magnesium in the body. Darrell Miller 5/8/14
All that you may need to know about antioxidants Darrell Miller 11/5/13
Can Lycopene Help with Prostate Problems Darrell Miller 5/9/11
L-Carnitine Darrell Miller 5/7/09
Antioxidants For The Body Darrell Miller 6/10/08
Beta Carotene Is The Safe To The Liver Form Of Vitamin A Darrell Miller 3/19/08
Galactose Darrell Miller 3/8/07
Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen Darrell Miller 7/27/05
CLEANSING DIET Darrell Miller 7/14/05
Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness - The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a ... Darrell Miller 7/14/05
Nature's Cancer fighters ... Darrell Miller 7/7/05
Aromessentials Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Real Solutions Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin Darrell Miller 6/6/05



QUEEN HELENE Apricot Facial Scrub
   6 oz $5.76 34% OFF $ 3.80
EARTH SCIENCE Apricot Gentle Facial Scrub Creme
   4 oz $11.99 34% OFF $ 7.91
Xyloburst Apricot Jam Sugar Free
   10 oz $6.99 15% OFF $ 5.94
EARTH'S CARE Apricot Kernel Oil
   8 oz $9.49 28% OFF $ 6.83
Now Foods APRICOT KERNEL OIL 16 OZ
   16 oz $11.99 45% OFF $ 6.59
NOW FOODS APRICOT KERNEL OIL 4 OZ
   4 OZ $4.99 45% OFF $ 2.74
EARTH SCIENCE Apricot Night Cream
   2 oz $17.99 34% OFF $ 11.87
ANDALOU NATURALS Apricot Probiotic Cleansing Milk
   6 oz $13.99 20% OFF $ 11.19
JASON NATURAL PRODUCTS Apricot Satin Body Wash
   30 fl oz $13.81 34% OFF $ 9.11
JASON NATURAL PRODUCTS Apricot Scrubble
   4.5 fl oz $9.57 34% OFF $ 6.32
NOW FOODS APRICOTS UNSWEET UNSULF Organic
   1 LB $8.99 13% OFF $ 7.82
DEEP STEEP Argan Oil Body Lotion Fig Apricot
   8 oz $12.95 37% OFF $ 8.16
HOBE LABS Beauty Oil Apricot Kernel
   4 oz $5.49 34% OFF $ 3.62
NATURE'S ALCHEMY Carrier Oil Apricot Kernel
   4 oz $7.95 34% OFF $ 5.25
CLIF BAR INC CLIF BAR APRICOT 12 BX
   12 box $24.31 29% OFF $ 17.26
JASON NATURAL PRODUCTS Deodorant Apricot With Vitamin E Stick
   2.5 oz $6.35 34% OFF $ 4.19
TOM'S OF MAINE Deodorant Stick Long Lasting Apricot
   2.25 oz $9.12 34% OFF $ 6.02
EO PRODUCTS Everyone Foaming Hand Soap - Apricot + Vanilla
   10 ounce $4.99 18% OFF $ 4.09
EO PRODUCTS Everyone Hand Soap Apricot Vanilla
   12.75 oz $5.99 18% OFF $ 4.91
EO PRODUCTS Everyone Lotion Apricot + Vanilla
   6 oz $5.99 18% OFF $ 4.91
DEEP STEEP Fig Apricot Liquid Hand Wash
   17.6 oz $11.95 37% OFF $ 7.53
Collective Wellbeing Keratin Sleek Conditioner (Apricot)
   14.5 oz Liq $12.19 33% OFF $ 8.17
Collective Wellbeing Keratin Sleek Shampoo (Apricot)
   14.5 oz Liq $12.19 33% OFF $ 8.17
KIND SNACKS KIND BAR ALMND And APRICOT 12 BX
   1 $25.08 23% OFF $ 19.31
NATROL Laci Le Beau Super Dieter's Tea Natural Apricot
   30 bags $9.59 34% OFF $ 6.33
NATROL Laci Le Beau Super Dieter's Tea Natural Apricot
   60 bags $16.69 34% OFF $ 11.02
BEAUTY WITHOUT CRUELTY NATURAL LIPSTICK SWEET APRICOT
   3PK.14OZ $23.95 34% OFF $ 15.81
LIFE-FLO HEALTH CARE Pure Apricot Oil
   16 oz $15.89 44% OFF $ 8.90
LIFE-FLO HEALTH CARE Pure Apricot Oil
   16 oz $15.89 34% OFF $ 10.49
AURA CACIA Pure Skin Care Oil Apricot Kernel
   4 fl oz $5.00 34% OFF $ 3.30
THATS IT NUTRITION THATS IT BAR APPLE/APRICOT
   12 per box $22.04 37% OFF $ 13.89
SUNCOAT PRODUCTS INC The Classics Nail Polish Apricot
   0.43 OZ $9.99 28% OFF $ 7.19

Essential Oils: How to Choose the Right Carrier Oils for Them
TopPreviousNext

Date: September 05, 2018 05:52 PM
Author: VitaNet, LLC Staff (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Essential Oils: How to Choose the Right Carrier Oils for Them





Essential Oils: How to Choose the Right Carrier Oils for Them

Carrier oils make it easier and safer to apply essential oils for therapeutic purposes, and some have their own beneficial qualities. For example, apricot kernel, borage seed, coconut, flaxseed and avocado oil all have anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce pain and improve joint and skin health. Others are full of vitamins and nutrients that benefit your skin, including argan, jojoba, and sesame oil. Yet others can be beneficial to your hair’s health and appearance, including castor and coconut oils.

Key Takeaways:

  • There are many oils that are now considered healthy to be applied to one's self.
  • Of course, many are skeptical over what kind of benefit oils can have for one person.
  • Different people have different needs and their bodies react to different things at times.

"Essential oils have powerful effects on our bodies, but you need to use a carrier oil to ensure safe topical application."

Read more: https://acedmagazine.com/essential-oils-how-to-choose-the-right-carrier-oils-for-them/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5748)


19 Benefits Of Apricot Kernel Oil For Beauty And Health
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 12, 2018 05:16 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 19 Benefits Of Apricot Kernel Oil For Beauty And Health





19 Benefits Of Apricot Kernel Oil For Beauty And Health

When apricot kernel oil is extracted from its original form, it ends up providing you with a product that smells delightful while being full of important vitamins and minerals. Apricot kernel oil can be used for a variety of health and self-care purposes. Using it as massage oil can help prevent against skin cancer and makes the skin more elastic. It is also great for reducing inflammation in tumors and other growths that can cause painful symptoms.

Key Takeaways:

  • Using apricot kernel oil is a great way to detox your body from several harmful substances due to its antioxidant properties.
  • Being a natural anti-inflammatory, apricot kernel oil is great for treat tumors or other inflamed growths.
  • Massaging the skin with apricot kernel oil can help skin elasticity, as well as prevent skin cancer in some instances.

"One ingredient I love to incorporate into my concoctions is apricot kernel oil. It’s light, easily absorbed and has a faint fruity fragrance."

Read more: https://www.thealternativedaily.com/19-benefits-of-apricot-kernel-oil-for-beauty-and-health/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5632)


5 Signs You're Not Getting Enough Potassium and How To Overcome It
TopPreviousNext

Date: February 21, 2018 10:59 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 5 Signs You're Not Getting Enough Potassium and How To Overcome It





When we are sick, we lose vitamins and minerals. We lose electrolytes through the flu and stomach viruses. When we lack potassium if we have water retention. Numberness or tingling can be caused to the loss of potassium. Potassium is responsible for the nervous system. The rhythm that a heart beats to can be changed when we do not have enough potassium in our system. Fruits are great for their levels of potassium, especially pomegranates and Apricots.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0_7mkwycFs&rel=0

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5536)


Umeboshi Plums: Liver Cleanser & Cancer Fighter
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 24, 2017 04:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Umeboshi Plums: Liver Cleanser & Cancer Fighter





Umeboshi plums help out as a liver cleaner and a cancer fighter. These things are sour, salty and full of many different health benefits. They are also known as the sour plumb. It is made from dry and pickled ume fruit. That is a fruit that is very closely related to the apricot. They are round and wrinkled and have a very distinct sour taste to them. That is because they have a high content of citric acid.

Key Takeaways:

  • Sour, salty and chockfull of health benefits, umeboshi plums have been a staple in Japanese cuisine for centuries
  • Also known as the “sour plum,” “Japanese apricot” and “Japanese plum,” the umeboshi plum is made from dried and pickled ume fruit, a type of fruit closely related to the apricot.
  • Besides boasting a pretty impressive nutrient profile and distinct flavor, this pickled plum has also been shown to have many beneficial effects on health

"In terms of nutrition, umeboshi contains a good chunk of the potassium, manganese and fiber you need in a day"

Read more: https://draxe.com/umeboshi-plums/

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=5029)


Importance of Magnesium in the body.
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 08, 2014 08:48 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Importance of Magnesium in the body.

magnesium foodsImportance of magnesium

Magnesium is an important element that is essential for hundreds of biochemical reactions in the body. Its functions is to maintain normal nerve and muscle function, regulates blood glucose levels and aids the production of energy and protein, helps bones remain strong, supports a healthy immune system and lastly, keeps the heart beat steady.

Cause of lack in magnesium

Lack of magnesium causes many diseases. Substantial magnesium deficiencies have led to deaths caused by coronary diseases, diabetes, cancer and strokes. On the other hand mild magnesium deficiency causes nervousness, mental depression, increased sensitivity to noise, confusion, insomnia, twitching and trembling and apprehension.

Sources of magnesium are from foods we eat

  • Dark green, leafy vegetables
  • Fruits or vegetables e.g. bananas, dried Apricots avocados
  • Whole grains e.g. brown rice, millet
  • Nuts e.g. almonds and cashews
  • Peas and beans
  • Soy products e.g. soy flour

Symptoms indicating lack of magnesium are: sleepiness, muscle weakness and hyperexcitablity.

Magnesium works in the brain miraculously as remarked by many scientists through researches. Magnesium L-Threonate has the capability to cross into the brain and boost magnesium levels. Magnesium L-Threonate boosts magnesium levels in the brain in that, it maintains a state of healthy sustained action. Through maintaining this healthy homeostasis, mental demands in the brain can respond well and perform cognitive responsibilities with less stress and fatigue.

The blood-brain barrier is a diffusion barrier, which impedes influx of most compounds from blood to brain. It is composed of high-density cells that prevent passage of substances from the blood stream, but in a more action than the endothelial cells in the capillaries do in other parts of the body. Due the reasons, why most magnesium supplements do not cross blood barrier magnesium Threonte was introduced. Threonate is a vitamin C metabolite that acts as a carrier to help magnesium to penetrate into the brain.

Sources

  1. https://www.naturalhealthadvisory.com/daily/cognitive-decline-and-memory-issues/the-best-magnesium-supplement-for-reversing-memory-loss-in-alzheimers/
  2. //blog.lef.orh/2012/01/brain-helath-magnesium-theonate.html
  3. //www.healthindeed.com/magnesium-l-threonate/

 

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=3115)


All that you may need to know about antioxidants
TopPreviousNext

Date: November 05, 2013 10:00 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: All that you may need to know about antioxidants

 antioxidant foodsAll that you may need to know about antioxidants

Oxidants are elements whose main role is to protect your cells from the harmful effects of free radicals. Free radicals, on their part, are molecules that may be produced by the body when it breaks down food. These molecules may also be produced when your body is exposed to environmental factors like tobacco smoking and radiation. It is worth noting that free radicals have the ability of wrecking damage to cells and causing such diseases as cancers and heart complications. Over the years, studies have consistently revealed that diets high in antioxidants are essential in preventing diseases like Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular diseases.

Main Source of Antioxidant

The main source of antioxidants is fruits and vegetables. Amazingly, all foods rich in antioxidants are high in fiber, low fat, and are also excellent sources of important vitamins and minerals. It is also important to add that fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants have bright colors, including purple, yellow, red and orange.

Type of Antioxidant

The five main types of antioxidants are beta carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, Zinc, and selenium. Others are lucopene and lutein. Beta-carotene (and other carotenoids), can be derived from a long list of fruits and vegetables. Some of these are asparagus, Apricot, broccoli, water melon, sweet potato, kale, mango, turnip and peaches.

Vitamin C, as a major and critical antioxidant, can be obtained from kiwi, broccoli, honeydew, kale, orange, papaya, nectarines, strawberries, and snow peas among others.

Vitamin E, another major vitamin antioxidant, can be derived from spinach, red peppers, sunflower seeds, papaya, pumpkin and carrots among others.

Zinc and selenium are other antioxidants that are essential in maintaining overall body health and boosting the immune system. Common sources of zinc include red meat, poultry, oysters, dairy products, and whole grain foods. Selenium, on the other hand, can be obtained from foods such as tuna, nuts, whole grains, and beef.

Fact About Antioxidant

The most important fact to realize is that popular sources of antioxidants are fruits and vegetables. Where possible, these foods should be eaten raw or steamed. Boiling will do more harm than good.

References:

  1. //www.webmd.com/food-recipes/antioxidants-your-immune-system-super-foods-optimal-health

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2878)


Can Lycopene Help with Prostate Problems
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 09, 2011 11:14 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Can Lycopene Help with Prostate Problems

Lycopene and The Prostate.

Lycopene is an organic compound often associated with tomatoes. It is almost always touted to prevent prostate cancer, though the scientific community has not come to a conclusion yet. Scientists are nevertheless positive that it is good for the prostate, for it displays antiproliferative effects on prostate cells. Laboratory studies are very promising as it appears to inhibitory effect on tumor growth.

Prostate health has long been tied to consumptions of foods rich in lycopene. It is a carotenoid that is bright red in color, and as such can easily be obtained from brightly colored plant products, such as watermelon, papaya, pink guava, and Apricots in addition to tomatoes. Like other carotenoids, it displays antioxidant properties. In fact, it is the most efficient scavenger of singlet oxygen of all antioxidants that are classified as carotenoids.

Reverses Oxidative Damage

There have been numerous studies on lycopene in the past few decades, and many of them have noted its antioxidant potential. It has become common knowledge that lycopene is good for the prostate, but not all people know that the prostate gland is its primary storage in the human body. Indeed lycopene interferes with the health of cells and tissues that make up the prostate gland.

One study that tracked down malignant prostate tissues prior to scheduled surgical removal studied the effects of regular intake of lycopene. It was documented and published that lycopene concentrations in the prostate doubled and the oxidative damage to DNA in prostate tissues decreased, suggesting a dose-related efficiency in the prevention of cellular damage brought on by free radicals and other reactive oxygen species.

Induces Apoptotic Death

High consumptions of lycopene appear to directly counteract with cancer cells and tumor growth, not only in the prostate gland, but also in the lungs, breasts, ovaries, stomach, and cervix. It has also been tied to other disorders of the prostate, such as prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH. It has been noted to slow down cell proliferation that leads to the enlargement of the prostate.

More imporatantly, lycopene seems capable of inducing the cellular process called apoptosis, or programmed cell death, in prostate tissues, most notably in carcinoma regions. This is also evidenced by a significant decrease in prostate-specific antigen in the blood, the reason why lycopene has gained the attention of researchers for prostate health, spurring a number of studies in recent years.

Maintains Prostate Health

Lycopene levels in the human body are largely dependent on dietary intake. As a general rule, the higher the intake of lycopene is, the healthier the prostate becomes. First, it neutralizes reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen and free radicals. It also inhibits the multiplication of prostate cells, effectively preventing benign prostatic hyperplasia, which is believed to afflict up to 80 percent of the male population. For those suffering from prostate enlargement, it slows the progression of the disease.

If you are, 40 years old or more you should consider taking lycopene as a preventative daily!

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2291)


L-Carnitine
TopPreviousNext

Date: May 07, 2009 05:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: L-Carnitine

L-carnitine is amino acid essential for the metabolism of fats into a form of energy necessary for extended aerobic activity. Originally discovered in Russia, and Germany a year later, the structural formulation of carnitine, as it is correctly known, was determined in 1927, although it is physiological and biochemical activity was not understood until the 1960s.

The amino acid is biosynthesized in the liver and kidneys from lysine and methionine. The vitamins niacin, B6, C and iron are essential for this reaction to take place. However, the supply of L-carnitine has to be supplemented by the diet, good sources being dairy products, red meat, nuts and seeds, pulses and fruits such as Apricots, bananas and avocado. Most of the L-carnitine supply of the body is stored within the muscle tissue. However, it is not unusual for conditions to arise making it difficult for the body to obtain all the carnitine required.

L-carnitine enables fatty acids to be transported into the mitochondria, where cell metabolism occurs. The biochemistry is discussed below, although in simple terms the amino acid allows body fats, in the form of triglycerides, to be made more readily available for the generation of energy required for extended exertion. In this way, body fats can be used for energy and the supplies of glycogen stored by the liver can be retained for emergency use.

By providing the energy for endurance and stamina in this way, carnitine makes use of an otherwise unavailable energy source, and has the added benefit of reducing body fat stores and reducing strain on the heart.

Although there is generally a plentiful supply of L-carnitine available in a healthy diet, supplementation can ensure that a deficiency does not occur. Supplements are available in the form of L-carnitine or its acetylated derivative, acetyl L-carnitine.

In order for fatty acids to be used in the production of energy, their long-chain acetyl groups have to get inside the mitochondria where they are oxidized to the acetate to be used for the production of energy via the Citric Acid or Krebs cycle.

In order for the biochemistry to take place, fatty acids must be rendered suitable for binding to the carnitine molecule. The chemical grouping with a good affinity for L-carnitine is the acetyl or acetyl group, available in the molecule acetyl coenzyme A (CoA). The free fatty acid, therefore, is attached to coenzyme-A by means of a thioester bond, catalyzed by means of the enzyme fatty acetyl-CoA synthetase. The reaction is then completed by means of in organic pyrophosphatase.

In this way, the fatty acid in the form of an acetyL-carnitine derivative can be transported through the mitochondrial wall. This transportation takes place by means of several steps. These are:

1. As explained, the acetyl-CoA is attached to L-carnitine by means of the enzyme carnitine acetyltransferase I. This enzyme is conveniently located on the outer mitochondrial membrane.

2. The enzyme carnitine-acetylcarnitine translocase helps the acetyL-carnitine through the membrane.

3. Another enzyme, carnitine acetyltransferase II, located on the inner mitochondrial membrane, converts the acetyL-carnitine to acetyl-CoA, liberating the carnitine which returns to the muscle mass.

L-carnitine is the only known substance that allows fatty acids to cross the mitochondrial membrane, and therefore deficiencies must be avoided.

Another way in which carnitine is used in energy production is in the Krebs cycle itself. Part of this cycle involves the conversion of guanine diphosphate to the higher energy form guanine triphosphate. In this way energy can be stored in much the same way as it is in the conversion of ADP to ATP. Succinyl CoA is involved in this conversion, and one of the by-products of it is a corresponding succinate, that is then converted to a fumarate by the action of L-carnitine fumarate. Carnitine, therefore, has two parts to play in the production of long-term energy from the fatty acids contained in body fats.

Since the fatty acid triglycerides contained in body fats are a major source of energy in the heart and skeletal muscles, it is easy to understand how L-carnitine is believed to lead to the increased energy levels required for stamina and staying power. A major reason for its effect on longer-term or extended energy requirements is that in enabling stored body fats to be used for immediate and longer-term energy requirements, L-carnitine allows emergency glycogen stores to be retained for use once immediate fatty acid supplies or those of carnitine have been depleted, and so allows the energy supply to be extended even farther. Research has also suggested that the amino acid can possibly be used to treat liver and kidney disease, diabetes and chronic fatigue syndrome.

As with many supplements, the question is often asked how does L-carnitine work in practice as opposed to the claims made for it by the supplement providers? Recent research indicates mixed results, but sufficient to justify its use. It is generally accepted that a supplement is necessary when there is a deficiency, but once that deficiency has been corrected further intake is unnecessary. However, it is also believed that during long and extended periods of exercise a carnitine deficiency does occur as L-carnitine is used up, and the supplement is necessary to ensure sufficient energy supply throughout the period of exercise.

There has also been a case reported in the Journal of Clinical Neurology (Negoro, Tsuda, Kato & Morimatsu, 1995) where a deficiency, caused by anorexia nervosa damaging the liver to the extent that it was unable to synthesize L-carnitine, was remedied by means of an oral supplement. Studies on endurance athletes have been mixed, ranging from no effect to L-carnitine being found to promote weight loss.

Carnitine has no unknown harmful side effects, and has been studied for medical applications other than as an energy supplement. For example it possesses extensive antioxidant properties, and can be used as a supplement against oxidative stress and the prevention of the lipid peroxidation that is a precursor to atherosclerosis.

Its use in osteoporosis and reducing bone mass is also being studied. The concentration of L-carnitine diminishes with age, and affects fatty acid metabolism in a number of tissues. Bones are particularly affected since they require continuous reconstruction. Without detailing the biochemistry involved in this, administration of carnitine helps to reduce the speed by which this occurs. Trials are so far been carried out only on animals.

In studies on both healthy volunteers and patients with type II diabetes, L-carnitine was found to improve storage of glucose in both groups, although its oxidation increased only in the group with diabetes. Other studies carried out include improving the function of neurotransmitters in the brains of elderly patients and in the treatment of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, and other neurological disorders.

In conclusion then, although the jury is out on the use of L-carnitine is an energy-giving or weight-loss supplement, it appears to be effective where the body's stores of carnitine could be depleted such as with long-term exercise, natural deficiencies or deficiencies caused through age. It is also under study in the treatment of various medical conditions. On balance, it would appear that the prospective benefits of L-carnitine render it worthy of use.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=2004)


Antioxidants For The Body
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 10, 2008 11:27 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Antioxidants For The Body

Eating the fruits and vegetables that naturally contain antioxidants is the best way to get them into your system. Mixing them into a well-balanced and healthy diet is the best method of all. This way you reap the benefits of all of the antioxidants in a natural combination.

The benefit of dietary antioxidants is that they slow the chemical process of oxidation. This oxidation is what causes narrowing of the arteries and heart-related health problems due to cholesterol deposits. Eating a regular variety of herbs, vegetables and fruits that contain antioxidants is the best way to maintain good health. Some foods that contain antioxidants include:

* Tomatoes
* Garlic
* Onions
* Rosemary
* Grapes
* Pomegranates

Antioxidant supplements are available, lab testing have shown that they are just as effective as their natural counterparts. Natural foods contain ranges of antioxidants that work together synergistically. These combinations of antioxidants are much more effective.

More Benefits:

Antioxidants and other nutrients are needed by the body to protect against cell damage. They also may reduce the risks of certain forms of cancer.

It has been discovered that the mitochondria (cell power plants) are a major source of oxidant production. They are also a target for the damaging effects of the very oxidants that they produce. This is a major cause in the advancement of cellular aging, called apoptosis.

It is believed that in apoptosis, each cell has a fixed number of cell divisions that it is capable of. After the cell has used its allotted number of divisions, it ceases to function. Oxidative damage is also a contributing factor of DNA mutation, which causes further malfunction of the cells.

Most Common Antioxidants:

The following is a list of the most common antioxidants, what benefits they offer and where to find them:

*Beta-carotene keeps the skin healthy and promotes growth and development of bones. It also helps to prevent night blindness and fight infection. Beta-carotene is found in vegetables and fruits: carrots, cantaloupe, Apricots, broccoli, peppers, tomatoes, spinach, sweet potatoes and pumpkin.

* Vitamin C destroys free radicals inside and outside cells. It helps in the healing of wounds, preventing bruising, formation of connective tissue, iron absorption and keeping gums healthy. Vitamin C is being studied for its beneficial effects in reducing cataracts, cancer and heart disease. Foods high in vitamin C include tomatoes, citrus fruits and juices, berries, mango, papaya, peppers, cabbage, spinach, broccoli and potatoes.

* Vitamin E acts as the essential fat protector in cell membranes and red blood cells. It reduces the risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases associated with age. Vitamin E is found in peanut butter, nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, margarine, whole grains, wheat germ, salad dressings and avocado.

* Selenium helps the body maintain healthy hair and nails. It also enhances immunity and, along with Vitamin E, prevents cell damage. Vitamin E reduces the risk of cancers, especially prostate, lung and colorectal. The best sources of Selenium include brazil nuts, garlic, meat, eggs, poultry, seeds, seafood and whole grains. The amount of selenium found in plants depends on the soil content in which they are grown.

Antioxidants benefit the body by providing a layer of protection for the tissues and cells. They are the front line of the body's protection against free radicals. Free radicals are unstable by-products of oxygen that cause premature aging and degenerative diseases. They also come from environmental sources, such as pollution, UV rays and other toxins. Foods rich in antioxidants help to clean free radicals from the body. They also help to prevent various age-related diseases, cancers and heart disease.

Maintaining a healthy, nutritionally balanced body that has the ability to fight disease and infection is a prime way to live a long, disease free and happy life. Regular ingestion of antioxidant rich foods or supplements is the best method to achieve this.

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1813)


Beta Carotene Is The Safe To The Liver Form Of Vitamin A
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 19, 2008 08:17 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Beta Carotene Is The Safe To The Liver Form Of Vitamin A

The fact that beta carotene is stated to be a safe form of vitamin A suggests that vitamin A is in some way unsafe. In fact an overdose of vitamin A can lead to any one of a number of conditions, including nausea, jaundice, vomiting, abdominal pain and headaches. This vitamin is fat soluble, and so any excess is not easily washed out of the body but can build up in the tissues.

Toxicity in the liver can occur at fairly low concentrations, and the toxicity of the vitamin is increased by excessive alcohol intake. However, toxicity only occurs with vitamin A already formed such as that obtained from liver.

There are several forms of vitamin A, including the retinoid form originating from animal sources and the carotenoid forms that have a vegetable origin. Carotenoids are converted to vitamin A in the liver, but the higher the concentration of beta carotene in the body, the smaller the percentage that is converted to vitamin A, so beta carotene is a safer source of vitamin A than retinoids. It is only the finished form of vitamin A that is toxic, and beta carotene is therefore self-regulating in its production.

This vitamin is stored in the body in the form of the alcohol (retinol) and of retinyl esters. Studies have indicated that as much as 95% if the stored vitamin is in the form of the ester. The liver is responsible for releasing vitamin A to the body as it is required. One of its better known effects is on vision, and the old wives tale that carrots help you to see in the dark has an element of truth in it.

In order for it to aid vision, retinol is oxidized to the aldehyde, retinal, that forms a complex with a molecule of opsin, a light sensitive protein found in the retina. Rhodopsin, as the complex is called, is an essential component of the biochemical chain of events that lead to the perception of light. It is extremely sensitive, and enables you see in very low levels of light. In other words it is essential for good night vision, so carrots do help you to see in the dark! When a photon of light hits a molecule of rhodopsin, it leads eventually to an impulse being sent up the optic nerve to the brain.

One of its properties is its reaction to white light. When rhodopsin is exposed to white light it loses its pigmentation, and hence its photoreceptor properties and can take 30 minutes to regenerate. That is why you lose your night sight if your retina is exposed to bright light. The more rhodopsin you can generate the quicker you develop night sight.

The other biochemical processes of the vitamin include the synthesis of some glycoproteins and maintenance of normal bone density. Without vitamin A, calcium is not properly absorbed by the body and glycoproteins are involved in this process. A deficiency of vitamin A can lead to the abnormal development of bone and other health problems, so there are limits between the levels of vitamin A in the body that must be maintained: above or below these limits will lead to health problems, some of which can be extremely serious.

Most of the biochemistry of vitamin A in the liver is initiated by the presence of alcohol, and otherwise it is though to passively store the vitamin until needed when it is released into the blood. There are several ways in which the presence of alcohol allows the liver to deplete its store of retinol, but generally there are a number of enzymes that, in the presence of ethanol, can render vitamin A into a water soluble form that is excreted by the urine.

The benefits of vitamin A other than its effect on night sight and the healthy development of bone tissue, includes a powerful antioxidant effect that neutralizes free radicals that can destroy body cells. These free radicals are generated by the body’s metabolism in generating energy from blood glucose, and are also created through exposure to pollutants such as cigarette smoke and traffic fumes. They are electron deficient, so when they are generated they grab an electron from tissue close by which destroys the cells involved. This can lead not only to the appearance of premature aging as the skin cells are damaged but also to serious health problems such as atherosclerosis and some forms of cancer. Vitamin A helps to protect against these by destroying the free radicals before they can do damage. It also helps build up resistance against infections by supporting the immune system.

Beta carotene is converted to vitamin A either by cleaving at the center of the molecule, or by breaking it down from one of the ends. This latter process is carried out in the small intestine, and the resultant vitamin stored in the liver in the ester form. Only a proportion of what you eat is converted to retinol ester in this way, and the more beta carotene you consume, the less is converted, so you can never suffer from an overdose of beta carotene-derived vitamin A. It might turn you yellow, but you won’t suffer from excess vitamin A since the excess beta carotene is stored in your body fat, including the subcutaneous fat reserves.

Alpha carotene can also be used in the synthesis of vitamin A, but not as actively as beta carotene. The best natural sources are fruits and vegetables, especially the red, yellow and orange varieties such as carrots and Apricots, and also the leafy green vegetables, although supplements are also a convenient way of maintaining your beta carotene uptake. It is a much safer supplement than straight vitamin A for the reasons explained earlier. The supplement is not useful just for its antioxidant effect, but also for its ability to protect you from excessive exposure to the sun. While not as effective as a good sun blocker, beta carotene does provide some protection.

There is no doubt that beta carotene is a safer way to maintain an adequate vitamin A uptake due to the fact that you cannot take an overdose, since an overdose of beta carotene does not translate into the same dose of vitamin A, and the change is self-regulating. It is therefore safer to obtain your vitamin A needs from colored fruits and vegetables or beta carotene supplements than from eating liver, from which the retinol is in a form that can cause damage in the event of consuming an excess.

The old adage that you should never eat polar bear livers is a true one, and certainly has a provable scientific basis, so use beta carotene as your main vitamin A source for maximum health benefits in the safest possible way.



--
Vitanet ®, LLC

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1725)


Galactose
TopPreviousNext

Date: March 08, 2007 05:03 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Galactose

Dairy products
fenugreek
kelp
apple pectin
apples
Apricot
banana
blackberries
cherries
cranberries
currants
dates
grapes
kiwi fruit
mango
orange
nectarine
peach
pear
pineapple
plums
prunes
raspberries
rhubarb
strawberries
passionfruit
echinacea
boswellia
chestnuts
broccoli
brussels sprouts
avocado
cabbage
carrot
cauliflower
celery
cucumber
potato
eggplant
tomatoes
leeks
asparagus
lettuce
green beans
mushrooms
beetroot
onions
parsnip
green peas
pumpkin
spinach

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=1484)


Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 27, 2005 03:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

Cuddlin’ in the Kitchen

You and your sweetie can turn up the heat by cooking together.

Since the beginning of time, the pleasures of the table have been intertwined with those of the boudoir. (Remember the scene in the film Tom Jomes in which Tom and his amorata-of-the-moment wolf down a meal while staring lustily into each other’s eyes?) But when most of your kitchen time is spent trying to get everyone fed and out of the house in time for the night’s soccer game/ PTA meeting/ballet lesson, it can be tough keeping the pilot light lit on your love.

That’s why one of the best ways to spice up your sex life is to prepare a sensuous meal together sans offspring (thank heavens for doting grandparents with spare rooms!). A little fourhanded cooking- preferably while sharing some suggestive banter- can create chemistry that allows your playful, non-parenting side s to emerge, enhancing intimacy and setting the stage for the seductive feast to follow.

Just as the frenzied pace of modern living can often foster a sense of separation, cooking together as a couple can promote a sense of union. “Eventually you get a feel for your partner’s rhythms and adjust yours accordingly,” says food TV personality Jacqui Malouf, author of Booty Food (Bloomsbury). “Before you know it you’re passing the coriander, peeling the potatoes and stirring the risotto at precisely the right moments.”

With time, you can learn what each of you does best: Who has a flair for combining spices in just the right proportions? Who can chop carrots into perfect little matchsticks without taking all night? Since nothing kills the mood more than arguing over who misplaced the baker’s chocolate or the pasta platter, buy your ingredients earlier in the day and have all the necessary utensils out and at the ready. (Safety note: while two in a tiny kitchen can be steamily cozy, do be careful with hot pots and sharp knives.)

Four hands can also be better than two, so why not make the most of it? Malouf suggests approaching your combined efforts with a sense of adventure: “Use more than three ingredients in a salad dressing! Be daring with your desserts! Try concocting something with squab or squid or quince or quail- the sky’s the limit.”

Intriguing Ingredients

One advantage of using exotic ingredients (or at least foods not normally found on your weekly shopping list) is that they can help you and your partner break through the limits of everyday experience by reawakening long-dormant senses. Go ahead- run your fingertips over the rough rind of a pomegranate before feeling the smooth, full seeds within. Inhale the sweet, perfumed scent of a dead-ripe Apricot, and appreciate its downy skin. Admire the cool green beauty of a cut avocado, and share a spoonful with your sweetie.

Avocado, in fact, is one of the foods known for inflaming passion based on its suggestive shape, along with artichoke and asparagus- and that’s just the AS! (Chocoholics rejoice: Chocolate, full of the same feel-good chemical released by the brain when one falls in love, also makes the ecstasy encouraging grade, even when obtained in standard shapes.) “coincidentally, many foods long considered aphrodisiacs are low in fat (avocado and chocolate are delectably healthy exceptions) and are high in vitamins and minerals,” write Martha Hopkins and Randall Lockridge in Intercourses: An Aphrodisiac Cookbook (Terrace Publishing). “A diet heavy in these foods, then, yields a healthy blood healthy body with the energy, blood flow and nutrients needed for a peak sexual experience.” (The way these foods feed the imagination- the ultimate smorgasbord of pleasure- is a bountiful bonus.) Other foods, such as honey, have been treasured for supplying the energy needed to fan love’s flames far into the night; no wonder the sweet, sticky stuff shows up in a number of naughty-night concoctions.

Just as Venus, the Roman goddess of love, emerged fully formed from the sea, so do the foods that best encourage those under her spell. In addition to being chockfull of healthy protein, “seafood is elegant, clean and light enough to keep your sleek loving machine fully fueled but never weighed down,” says Jacqui Malouf. Oysters are famous- or infamous- for their amorous effects (Cassanova was fond of them) but aren’t for everyone; other romantic dining favorites include shrimp or scallops.

Time to Eat

Once you’ve worked your kitchen magic together, it’s time to move the action into the dining room. Again, a little preparation can keep the evening at a slow, sensuous boil. Use the best china you have, along with matching silverware, cloth napkins and nice glasses (sippy cups don’t count). The warm glow of candlelight can both set off your tantalizing table and set your hearts aflame, along with a rose or two in the most decorative vase you own. Music (from Mozart to Motown, depending on your taste) is another surefire mojo mover. But please guys- catch up with CNN or ESPN some other time.

When you do finally sit down to dinner don’t rush, even (especially) if fast-forward eating is the norm in your house. “Treat the food as if you are making love for the first time,” advises Kerry McCloskey in The Ultimate Sex Diet (True Courage Press). “Before putting any in your mouth, inhale its aroma to get your digestive juices flowing…Cut your food into small, bite-sized pieces, (which) will ensure that you enjoy each bite.” The idea is to enhance all of your senses, which will come in handy later on in the evening.

You can make your couple dining experience even more intimate by feeding each other; some foods. Like asparagus spears and shrimp, beg for finger-feeding. McCloskey recommends also trying chopsticks: “Because it will take longer to maneuver your food when using them, you will feel full sooner with less food.” That’s important since you don’t want to overeat- passing out right after dessert is not the way to impress your partner (they’ve seen you snoring away on the couch a hundred times before).

In the wee hours, happily exhausted, you can ponder this: No matter how hectic your lives get, you should always make time for each other. You already share a mortgage and kids. Cooking together is a great way to share sensuality, too.
-Lisa James

(https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=710)


CLEANSING DIET
TopPreviousNext

Date: July 14, 2005 05:05 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: CLEANSING DIET

CLEANSING DIET

  • *A few days or weeks before beginning a cleansing diet, it is a good idea to eat only whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables to prepare the body. *Eliminate all processed foods, coffee, tea, sugar, alcohol, tobacco and red meat.
  • *Add some of the cleansing herbs, combinations of herbs or cleansing herbal teas. A cleansing diet could consist of the following:
  • *Herbs to aid the cleansing
  • *First day eat fruit such as apples, berries, watermelon, pears, cherries and Apricots. Do not eat bananas.
  • *Second day drink all the herbal teas you want. Some suggestions are chamomile, raspberry, spearmint, hyssop, pau d’arco, and red clover blends.
  • *Third day eat all the vegetables you want. Eat them raw or steamed.
  • *Fourth day make a pan of vegetable broth using cauliflower, cabbage, onion, green pepper, parsley or whatever is on hand. Season with natural or vegetable salt.

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=620)


    Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness - The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a ...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 14, 2005 09:28 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness - The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a ...

    Moderating Male Midlife Moodiness

    The lesser known guy version of menopause is now a syndrome

    Question: How can you tell if a man has irritable male syndrome?
    Answer: You ask him to pass the salt and he yells, "Take, take, take - that's all you ever do!"

    Irritable male syndrome (IMS) may sound like a joke, but it's really no laughing matter. Just as women experience anxiety, depression and irritability with hormonal changes, men too can suffer from cyclic and menopausal symptoms-they're just more likely to be chastised for it instead of being consoled with a pint of Ben & Jerry's ice cream.

    Since men's hormones actually fluctuate every hour rather than every 28 days, it should come as no surprise that male behavior should be affected. For some men over 40, however, the behavior swing can be quite dramatic, leaving a guy in a chronic bad mood. But try telling the grouch that he suffers from "male menopause" and he just might chuck the Ben & Jerry's at you.

    The term "irritable male syndrome" was coined by Gerald A. Lincoln, a researcher at the Medical Research Council's Human Reproductive Sciences Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. Lincoln first observed IMS while studying Soay sheep, a large, curly-horned variety known for their boisterous rutting rituals that rival the masculine intensity of any Super Bowl party. After mating season, however, Lincoln noticed that as testosterone levels dropped off, the rams became agitated, fearful, withdrawn and likely to irrationally strike out at other males. The hypothesis behind this behavior is that the withdrawal of androgens affects melatonin and serotonin uptake and can make for one cranky ram. However, IMS in two-legged, human subjects can present itself with more complexity.

    Psychotherapist Jed Diamond, author of The Irritable Male Syndrome: Managing the Four Key Causes of Depression and Aggression (Rodale Books), defines IMS as "a state of hypersensitivity, anxiety, frustration and anger that occurs in males and is associated with biochemical changes, hormonal fluctuations, and loss of male identity" that can occur at any time during a man's life. A lot of IMS involves depression; normally thought of as a female problem, this emotional downer often comes out differently in men, more outwardly than inwardly directed.

    One point of similarity between the sexes is that IMS, like depression in women, is often linked to the multi-source stress that pervades modern living. The result? According to Diamon, "Up to 30% of men, especially those in adolescence and midlife, exhibit symptoms of IMS. In its mildest forms, it can cause men to be moody and irritable. At its worst, it can lead to violence and even suicide."

    Is it a Bad Day or a Bad Decade?

    So how can you really tell if a man has irritable male syndrome? Since a guy isn't likely to say flat out that he's having trouble with relationships or is having hot flashes (you read that right), there are other, more telltale signs to look for. While we all may temporarily experience bad moods, if you or someone you know exhibits one or more of these feelings with frequency over a period of time, IMS may be the cause: anger, sarcasm, defensiveness, blaming, withdrawal, anxiety, defiance, being argumentative, feeling unappreciated, frustration.

    Physical IMS symptoms include fatigue, unexpected weight gain or loss, frequent urination, hair loss (besides the typical male pattern) and impotence. The thyroid gland, which serves as the body's master energy controller, is often out of whack on men suffering from IMS. If that sounds familiar, see your practitioner for a thyroid hormone check.

    Less Flabby Means Less Crabby

    Sometimes, IMS is not a matter of lowered testosterone levels but one of elevated estradoil, the usable form of the female hormone estrogen. This condition can develop with consumption of too many hormone-laced meats (eating organic meat is a good option). In addition, a diet high in high-glycemic carbs such as white breads and white pasta will undermine testosterone levels as well as pack on unwanted pounds.

    To help trim down and keep IMS symptoms at bay, Larrian Gillespie, MD, author of The Gladiator Diet: How to Preserve Peak Health, Sexual Energy, and A Strong Body at Any Age (Healthy Life Publications), recommends a diet that's 40% protein, 35% low-glycemic carbs (read: green veggies) and 25% fat, of which only 10% should be saturated fat. To help keep testosterone levels up, avoid Apricots, carrots, white potatoes, white rice (whole wheat past and rise are okay) and-sorry guys-dark beer.

    Gillespie also recommends that men take a multivitamin daily along with calcium, magnesium and the herb saw palmetto to inhibit the breakdown of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone a precursor to prostate disease.

    Now that you know IMS is real, you can take the bull (or Soay ram) by the horns and do something about it. IMS can be treated through diet, natural hormone replacement therapy and counseling, if necessary.

    Question: What do you call a man who is always tired, miserable and irritable?
    Answer: Normal.

    Wrong answer! That was the old guy. Mr. Nice is back. -Karyn Maier



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=614)


    Nature's Cancer fighters ...
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: July 07, 2005 12:36 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Nature's Cancer fighters ...

    Cancer has always been a word no one wants to hear from a doctor's lips. But as a fatal disease, cancer has gone from dread to worse, passing heart disease as the number-one killer of Americans under the age of 85 (a category that includes the overwhelming majority of us). While death rates for both illnesses has dropped over the past few years, the improvement has been much more pronounced for cardiovascular disorders.

    According to the American Cancer Society, 476,009 people died of cancer in 2002 (the last year for which statistics are available). Behind every one of those numbers is a web of lives tangled by cancer's relentless onslaught: A child who misses a mother's comforting arms, a bride without a father to walk her down the aisle, a spouse coming home to a dark, cold house every night. And for those fortunate enough to survive a cancer encounter, there's always the dark worry of recurrence that surfaces with every ache or twinge.

    Many people think of cancer as either a random calamity of a genetically driven inevitability, but it ain't necessarily so. Diet is coming up big as a major cancer-risk player: For example, eating a lot of red meat, especially highly processed meats such as bacon, has been linked to high colorectal cancer risk in an investigation published by the Journal of the American Medical Association. On the positive side, a number of nutrients have shown cancer-fighting power, such as the recently discovered link between the B vitamin folate and reduced risk of colon and other cancers (see page 57). Other useful nutrients appear on the chart that follows.

    Of course, risk always varies from person to person, and there are some lifestyle issues, like not smoking, that are no-brainers when it comes to cancer deterrence. But isn't it nice to know that protection from such a terrible disease might be as close as the end of your fork?

    Nature's Cancer fighters

    Berries

  • Description: Black or blue, rasp or straw, these tiny fruits pack a huge health punch; notable phytonutrients include anthocyanadins, ellagic acid and quercetin, along with vitamins and fiber.
  • Function: Among the plant world's most powerful antioxidants; have shown the ability to inhibit cancer cell growth.
  • Citrus Bioflavonoids

  • Description: These substances, found in oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruits, include hesperidin and limonene.
  • Function: Have shown promising anti-cancer effects in early studies; grapefruit compounds may be praticularly helpful in fighting lung cancer among smokers and colon cancer.
  • Curcumin

  • Description: A reddish yellow compound found in the spice turmeric, a staple in indian cookery.
  • Function: Interfers with cancer cell proliferation and with tumor blood-supply developement. Cooking use thought to be responsible for lower childhood cancer rates in asia.
  • EPA

  • Description: An Omega-3 acid found in such fatty fish as salmon and sardines; complete name: eiscosapentaenoic acid.
  • Function: Increased intake linked to reduced rates of several types of cancer, including those of the breast, colon, lung and prostate. May help make standard chemotherapy more effective (Consult your physician first).

    Green Tea

  • Description: Leaves of the Camilla sinensis plant, which is extensively cultivated in China, India and Japan; One of the world's most popular beverages that's also available in extract form.
  • Function: Contains potent antioxidants; has been associated with lower cancer rates in large population studies. Extract may make it more difficult for cancer cells to invade healthy tissues.
  • Lycopene

  • Description: Best known for putting the red in tomatoes, this phytonutrient is also found in Apricots, pink grapefruit and watermelon.
  • Function: Associated with reduced risk of, and slower growth rates in, prostate cancer; recent research also links lycopene to lower pancreatic cancer risk. Reduces DNA damage in white blood cells.
  • Mushroom Polysaccarides

  • Description: Complex sugar compounds found in a variety of mushrooms, include shiitake, maitake, and reishi.
  • Function: Different polysaccarides have shown different anti-cancer effects in laboratory studies: Some fight tumor formation, others induce apoptosis. In Japan, mushroom eaters have lower cancer death rates.
  • Selenium

  • Description: Trace mineral found in grains, meats, seafood and some nuts, most notably brazil nuts. If using supplements, follow package directions.
  • Function: Supports production of glutathione, a natural antioxidant. Has reduced prostate cancer risk in men with low blood selenium levels. May lower colon cancer risk.
  • Soy

  • Description: Soy foods include soy milk, tempeh, edamame (Vegetable green soybeans) and tofu; also available as soy protein extract.
  • Function: Populations that consume high amounts of soy foods have lower breast and prostate cancer rates.
  • Vitamin C

  • Description: Found in citrus fruit, cabbage and related vegetables (broccoli, brussels sprouts,cauliflower), Potatoes, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes and tomato juice.
  • Function: The body's primary water-based antioxidant; has neutralized toxic byproducts of normal fat metabolism in some studies. Recharges its partner, Vitamin E.
  • Vitamin D

  • Description: While vitamin D is found in egg yolks, butter and cod liver oil, the main source is sun-exposed skin.
  • Function: Regular sun exposure is linked with lower overall cancer death rates, while rates for breast, colon and prostate cancers are all higher in northern parts of the US.
  • Vitamin E, Natural

  • Description: Found in almonds, fruit, peanuts, vegetable oils, whole grains (including brown rice).
  • Function: The body's primary fat-based antioxidant; may retard prostate cancer developement.
  • Glossary

  • Apoptosis - process by which cell normally die and are replaced; becomes disabled in cancer cells.
  • Antioxidant - counters harmful molecules called free radicals that can damage DNA, which can lead to cancer.
  • Phyonutrient - Substances found in plant foods that promote good health in humans.
  • Proliferation - unregulated growth and reproduction that characterizes cancer cells.
  • Tumor
  • - Solid mass formed by some cancers; capable of developing its own blood-vessel network.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=558)


    Aromessentials
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 10, 2005 05:38 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Aromessentials

    Aromessentials by Joanne Gallo , February 3, 2002

    Aromessentials By Joanne Gallo

    But aromatherapy is more than just a '90s-style novelty. The practice of using aromatic essential oils for psychological and physical well-being dates back more than 4,000 years to medicinal practices in Egypt and India.

    The term "aromatherapy" was coined in 1937 by French cosmetic chemist R.M. Gattefosse, who discovered the benefits of essential oil after burning his hand in a laboratory accident. Gattefosse immersed his hand into the nearest available cool liquid: a vat of lavender oil. The near miraculous soothing of his pain and rapid healing spurred him to dedicate his life to the study of aromatic plants and their therapeutic effects.

    How it Works

    For those who turn their noses up at this most seemingly-subtle of senses, keep in mind that the perception of smell is 10,000 times more sensitive than the sense of taste. "The sense of smell is the sense of the imagination," noted French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau; this emotional connection lies at the heart of aromatherapy.

    Aromas are transmitted rapidly from olfactory cells in the nose to the limbic system in the brain which perceives and responds to emotion, pleasure and memory. Scents trigger the limbic system to release neurochemicals which influence mood. Well-known neurochemicals like endorphins and serotonin help create a sense of well-being.

    When you inhale essential oils, some of the molecules travel to the lungs, where they proceed to enter the bloodstream and circulate throughout the body.

    Oils applied to the skin are absorbed into the bloodstream as well. Because they are oil/fat soluble, essential oils are highly absorbed by the body, where they circulate for anywhere from 20 minutes to 24 hours and are eventually eliminated through sweat and other bodily secretions.

    Plant Power

    Essential oils are extremely potent and volatile: approximately 75 to 100 times more concentrated than dried herbs.

    Most essential oils are steam distilled from herbs, flowers and plants. Others are cold expressed from the rind of the fruit, which produces the purest essential oils because no heat or chemical treatment is involved.

    The components of various oils are beneficial for a wide variety of beauty and hygiene conditions. Some of the more indispensable essential oils include:

    Chamomile (anthemis nobilis): soothing properties for sensitive and inflamed skin; calming, balancing and relaxing.

    Clary Sage (salvia sclarea): warming, female balancing herb used for PMS; calms anxiety, tension and stress; also used as a muscle relaxant for aches and pains.

    Eucalyptus (eucalyptus globulus): antibacterial; fresh, herbal menthol aroma; widely used as an inhalant for colds, coughs and congestion; excellent for massaging tired or sore muscles.

    Geranium (pelargonium graveolens): one of the best all-around tonic oils for mind and body; soothes nervous tension and mood swings; balances female hormones and PMS; gently astringent and antiseptic, it improves general tone and texture of skin.

    Jasmine (jasminum grandiflorum): a warm, rich, sensual floral scent used historically as an aphrodisiac; moisturizing for dry/mature skin.

    Lemon (citrus limonum): refreshing and invigorating; eases tension and depression; useful for oily skin and treatment of acne.

    Peppermint (mentha piperita): cool, menthol, invigorating stimulant; cleans and purifies the skin.

    Rosemary (rosmarinus officinalis): stimulating and uplifting; purifying and cleansing for all skin types; warm and penetrating for massage to ease muscular aches and pains.

    Tea Tree (melaleuca alternifolia): an antiseptic from the leaves of the Australian tea tree; antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral; excellent for skin irritations like cold sores, insect bites and acne.

    Ylang Ylang (cananga odorata): enticing and sensual; helps alleviate anger, stress, insomnia and hypertension; helps balance the skin's sebaceous secretions.

    Oil Well

    Essential oils can be utilized in a variety of ways: in electric or candle-based diffusers, to spread the aroma through a room; in sachets and air fresheners; added to shampoos and lotions; or diluted and applied to pulse points like the temples, on neck or on wrists. Undiluted essential oils should never be applied to the skin. First mix them with carrier oils: pure vegetable oils such as sweet almond oil, grapeseed oil and Apricot kernel oil. Use a general guideline of six to 18 drops of essential oil per one ounce of vegetable oil. Blended, diluted oils are also available which can be used directly on your skin.

    Pond's Aromatherapy Capsules come in four scents: Happy, which is fruity and floral; Romantic,with musk and vanilla; Relaxing, a floral and woodsy aroma; and Energizing, with fresh citrus and bright floral scents.

    Sarah Michaels offers four essential oil blends: Sensual Jasmine, Soothing Lavender, Refreshing Citrus and Invigorating Peppermint.

    The San Francisco Soap Company's Simply Be Well Line features an essential oil light ring set, a diffuser that uses the heat of a light bulb to spread an aroma through your room.

    Tub Time

    One of the most popular and luxurious ways to enjoy aromatherapy is in a steaming hot bath. Numerous bath products formulated with plant essences can turn your tub time into a rejuvenating experience. Body & Earth features Body Wash, Foam Bath and Soap in five essences: Vanilla Serenity, Lavender Whisper, Playful Peach, Raspberry Rapture and Pear Essence.

    The Healing Garden offers a full line of aromatherapy products; try their Tangerinetherapy Wake Up Call Body Cleanser, Gingerlily Therapy Upbeat Bath & Shower Gel; or Minttherapy Fresh Start Bath & Shower Gel.

    Simply Be Well products take traditional aromatherapy one step further by combining essential oils with herbal extracts and natural nutrients.

    The line includes Shower Gel and Bath Salts in four fragrances: Explore contains ginkgo, eucalyptus, lemon and vitamin B6; Share features dong quai, passionflower, ylang ylang and zinc; Unwind includes kava kava, geranium, lavender and vitamin E; and Celebrate contains ginseng, wild mint, hemp and vitamin C.

    Yardley London Bar Soaps, formulated with botanicals and moisturizers, are available in five fragrances: soothing English Lavender, exfoliating Oatmeal and Almond, Aloe Vera for natural healing, skin-softening Chamomile Essence, and astringent Evening Primrose.

    Skin Deep

    "Aromatherapy and the cosmetic use of essential oils have made a tremendous contribution to skin care," asserts Joni Loughran, author of Natural Skin Care: Alternative & Traditional Techniques (Frog, Ltd.). "Every type of skin (such as oily, dry, and normal) can benefit." Some of the natural products that can help balance your skin include these:

    Kiss My Face Foaming Facial Cleanser for Normal/Oily skin features citrus oils which act as antiseptics, marigold for healing, licorice root for toning, lavender to normalize oil production, plus the antioxidant green tea.

    Kiss My Face's Gentle Face Cleaner for Normal/Dry skin includes essential oils plus organic, detoxifying herbs goldenseal and red clover, echinacea and rose hips with natural vitamin C.

    Naturistics Almond Facial Moisture Cream contains almond, allantoin and calendula to smooth dry skin; Wild Chamomile Facial Lotion with rose hips and honeysuckle soothes and conditions rough skin.

    Simply Be Well products, which use essential oils combined with herbal extracts like ginkgo and dong quai, are available in Body Lotion and Body Mist.

    Wicks and Sticks

    Perhaps the easiest way to get your aromatherapy fix is to light a candle and just sit back, relax and breathe.

    The Healing Garden offers a wide variety of aromatic candles to suit your every mood; try their Green Teatherapy Meditation Candle; Jasminetherapy Embrace the Light Love Candle; or Lavendertherapy Peace & Tranquility Candle.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=279)


    Real Solutions
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 10, 2005 04:01 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Real Solutions

    Real Solutions by Susan Risoli Energy Times, November 1, 1997

    The alarm sounds, you stumble out of bed and head to the bathroom. Suddenly, a burning sting wakes you with a jolt as you begin to urinate. One doctor visit later, you're on a strict antibiotic regimen to treat your urinary problem.

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect 8 million to 10 million Americans, mostly women, each year. The culprit: the bacteria E. coli. Neglect may allow a UTI to spread to the bladder (where it causes cystitis), or kidneys: possibly life-threatening.

    The good news: medical experts recognize that a diet change and avoiding certain risk factors may help fight off UTIs.

    According to the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, about 20% of women experience UTI at least once, and many suffer recurrences. Sexually active women tend to incur more UTIs because of anatomical vagaries: the bladder sits just above the vagina, while the urethra, a structure from the bladder to the outside, protrudes in a tubelike ridge down the top part of the vagina to just above the vaginal opening. This structure allows sexual intercourse to push infecting bacteria into the urethra. Women's vulnerability to UTI also derives from their short urethras which are located near the rectum, a main source of UTI germs. These tubes provide an easy path to a bacterial home in the bladder.

    Another risk booster: pelvic exams which may increase chances of UTI. A 1996 study conducted at the University of Illinois at Chicago and reported in the Archives of Family Medicine (1996;5:357-360) found that 43% of women with UTIs had received a pelvic examination within the two months preceding infection. Only 16% of the uninfected had been examined.

    Bladder infections can occur frequently in postmenopausal women due to thinning and drying of the vaginal lining. And mid-life women are not immune. "With the loss of estrogen support, the urethra becomes less flexible and elastic and, like the vagina, it can become easily irritated after sexual intercourse and, thus, much more prone to infection," reports Susan Lark, MD, in her book, Women's Health Companion: Self Help Nutrition Guide and Cookbook (Celestial Arts). "As women age, the lower urinary tract also stops manufacturing anti-adherence factors, which help to prevent bacteria from attaching to the bladder wall."

    Every woman should keep her own "female" botanicals on hand to help boost her immune system when she is at high risk of developing a bladder infection. These include:

    Cranberry: This immune-boosting, vitamin C-rich berry prevents germs from invading the lining of the urinary tract. A 1994 study of 153 elderly women conducted by researchers at the Harvard Medical School and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (1994:271: 751-4) showed that cranberry juice may keep harmful bacteria at reduced levels. More recently, a study by Amy B. Howell, PhD, and a team at Rutgers University found that cranberries contain a type of condensed tannin, a chemical compound called proanthocyanidins, that seemed to stunt the growth of E. coli, preventing it from adhering to the walls of the bladder and kidneys.

    "However, once you have an infection, cranberry juice cannot eradicate the bacteria. So drinking cranberry juice may be helpful in preventing an infection, but not in treating an existing one," according to Larrian Gillespie, MD, in her book You Don't have to Live with Cystitis (Avon Books).

    Drinking two glasses of juice a day can help if you're UTI-prone. To avoid the sugar added to cranberry juice, concentrated cranberries are available in a gel-cap form.

    Echinacea: This North American herb bolsters immune function and is believed to possess antiseptic and antiviral properties which may rev up the white blood cells that fight infection, reports John Cammarta, MD, in his book A Physician's Guide To Herbal Wellness (Chicago Review Press).

    While cranberry is most commonly recommended for prevention, other herbs can also kill bacteria and are diuretic. These include:

    Barberry: "The chemical berberine found in this herb is an impressive infection fighter. Studies show it kills the bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections," says author Jim O'Brien in his book Herbal Cures for Common Ailments (Globe).

    O'Brien recommends making a tea with one half teaspoon of powdered root bark, then put it on low boil for 30 minutes. "The taste is unpleasant, so you may wish to add natural sweeteners and flavorings."

    Uva-ursi: contains the ingredient arbutin, which fights germs in the urinary tract. "In addition," adds O'Brien, "the herb contains several diuretics that help flush the urinary tract, leading to faster healing. It also has several tannins, which act as powerful astringents drying out swollen, infected tissue. A third property of uva-ursi is allantoin, which promotes the growth of new cells."

    "For this herb to be effective you must not eat or drink anything of acidic nature, such as citrus fruits or juices. Don't even take vitamin C supplements while using it," cautions O'Brien.

    Coping With Pain

    In her book Herbal Remedies for Women (Prima), medical herbalist Amanda McQuade Crawford offers an herbal recipe to help restore the urinary tract's normal pH. Herbal Formula I calls for 4 ounces of uva-ursi leaf, three ounces of marshmallow leaf, two ounces of yarrow flower (omit during pregnancy) and one ounce (or to taste) cinnamon bark. Steep the herbs for 10 to 20 minutes, then strain through bamboo or wire mesh. Drink 2 to 5 cups daily for 10 days. Crawford advocates drinking one to two cups per day for a week to 10 days after all symptoms have disappeared.

    Diet Strategies

    Urologist Gillespie has found that women with cystitis may notice certain foods and beverages (such as alcohol and acidic foods) exacerbate problems of pain and burning. Gillespie recommends cystitis sufferers avoid foods like apple juice, apples, Apricots, melon, carbonated drinks, spicy foods, citrus fruits, coffee, ginger, grapes, guava, lemon juice, peaches, pineapple, plums, rhubarb, strawberries, tea, tomatoes and vinegar.

    Limit refined sugar: this nutrient may stunt immune reactions. Most importantly, you can lower the risk of UTIs by drinking liquids. Water helps flush bacteria from the body so drink at least 6 to 8 eight-ounce glasses of filtered water daily.



    --
    Vitanet ®


    Where to find Super CranActin on VitaNet?

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=273)


    Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin
    TopPreviousNext

    Date: June 06, 2005 08:45 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Skin Eternal - Replenish Your Skin

    Skin Eternal

    Source Naturals is proud to introduce our new SKIN ETERNAL Cosmetic Line. Our advanced skin care products recharge and revitalize your skin. Each product features scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin. You can nourish your skin with Source Naturals’ richly emollient SKIN ETERNAL CREAM smoothed under your eyes or on your neck. Or use our light, aqueous SKIN ETERNAL SERUM. Both products gently addresses imbalances and infuse skin with visible radiance. For a luxuriant, moisturizing bath, simply add SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL under warm running water. Whatever your individual preference, Source Naturals has a SKIN ETERNAL product that will leave your skin looking refreshed and energized.

    Now available from Source Naturals®: a variety of elegant cosmetics to moisturize, smooth and tone your skin.

    Your skin is a reflection of your health and well-being. To attain skin that looks truly alive, energized and refreshed, we believe a holistic approach is necessary. This includes nourishing your body with fresh, organic foods, exercising every day to motivate your mind and spirit, and eliminating unhealthy lifestyle choices. As part of this holistic approach, the Skin Eternal™ cosmetic line feeds your skin cells with scientifically advanced nutraceuticals: nutrients and botanicals with an inborn affinity for skin.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ CREAM

    Apply this rich and luxurious blend under and around your eyes or massage it with upward strokes onto your neck—your skin will immediately feel the difference! SKIN ETERNAL CREAM features nutrients, natural oils and plant extracts. Included are alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, jojoba oil, MSM, squalane, tocotrienols, and vitamin C-ester, as well as extracts of grape seed, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, sage, marigold, and grapefruit seed.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ SERUM

    SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is an aqueous moisturizing serum that contains a rich blend of nutrients and plant extracts. It is easily absorbed, and immediately makes skin feel softer and replenished. SKIN ETERNAL SERUM is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils, and contains nutrients and herbs unavailable in other topical preparations. These include aloe vera, alpha lipoic acid, biotin, CoQ10, DMAE, MSM, vitamins A, C-ester, D-3 and E, and chamomile. Source Naturals also offers SKIN ETERNAL DMAE SERUM.

    SKIN ETERNAL™ BATH OIL

    OUR NEW SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL adds to your skin’s hydrolipic film, lightly coating your skin with nutrients. It holds moisture inside and protects your skin. Its unique formula is rich in alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, essential fatty acids, vitamins C-ester and E, plus other nutrients and plant extracts. SKIN ETERNAL BATH OIL is lightly scented with pure lavender and lemon oils. And it is hypoallergenic and contains no alpha hydroxy acids—so it can be used even on delicate, sensitive skin.

    Lifestyle Tips for Healthy Skin: A Strategy for WellnessSM

    Eat a Healthy Diet Low-nutrient foods, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates, will not provide the vitamins and minerals your skin needs. Choose unprocessed organic foods, high in antioxidants such as beta carotene (carrots, Apricots, and squash), vitamin C (oranges and peppers), vitamin E (cold-pressed oils, nuts and seeds), selenium (tuna, garlic, onions and broccoli) and zinc (whole grains, most seafood, and onions). Essential fatty acids, such as those in oily fish, flaxseed and olive oil, are important for skin repair. Eat high-fiber fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals, and brown rice. Restrict excess sodium intake.

    Take Supplements

    Key nutraceuticals can help radiate beauty from within, by supporting body systems involved with healthy, radiant skin. These nutraceuticals include alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, ascorbyl palmitate (vitamin C-ester), vitamin E and grapeseed extract. Source Naturals offers you SKIN ETERNAL™ tablets with these five ingredients, to protect against free radical damage and provide cofactors for healthy skin tissue. Source Naturals SKIN ETERNAL PLUS is a Bio-Aligned Formula™, which includes these key nutraceuticals plus 30 more! It is designed to support multiple body systems: antioxidant defense, connective tissue, cell membranes, cell renewal, blood and liver cleansing, muscle and nerve function, and stress response. It is also useful to supplement with essential fatty acids, such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, flaxseed and primrose oil.

    Drink Water

    Our bodies are made up of 50-70% water, so it’s important to drink at least 1.5 liters daily. Water flushes out wastes, and acts as an internal moisturizer, keeping skin hydrated and supple. Spring water is beneficial since it contains trace minerals vital to healthy skin.

    Protect Your Skin from the Sun

    Avoid direct sun from 10 am to 4 pm, when ultraviolet radiation is strongest. Use sunscreen even during winter and on cloudy days. Wear a broad-brimmed hat and sunglasses with full UV protection.

    Get Plenty of Sleep

    Research has shown that skin regenerates itself between 1-3 am; lack of sleep during those hours can cause skin to look dull or puffy. Taking a melatonin supplement can be helpful in supporting your body’s normal sleep cycle.

    Exercise Regularly

    Exercise increases circulation, which delivers nutrients necessary for a clear, glowing complexion. It also burns off fat, helps eliminate toxins, and is a great stress reliever. Exercise three to five times a week until you are perspiring freely and breathing deeply.

    Avoid Excessive Alcohol and Coffee

    Alcohol weakens the immune system and depletes nutrients. It causes dehydration, depriving skin of moisture, and overtaxes the liver, which helps keep impurities from reaching other organs. Alcohol consumption can lead to broken or distended capillaries, especially over the nose and cheeks. Caffeine-rich beverages like coffee promote dehydration, leaving skin flaky and dry. Substitute herbal or green tea for coffee.

    Stop Smoking

    Smoking slows healing and regeneration, causes carbon monoxide to increase in blood, and induces free radical formation. Nicotine constricts blood vessels and reduces blood flow to skin. The benzopyrene in cigarette smoke inhibits absorption of vitamin C, which is important for collagen synthesis.



    --
    VitaNEt ®
    VitaNet ® Staff

    (https://vitanetonline.com:443/forums/Index.cfm?CFApp=1&Message_ID=195)



    VitaNet ® LLC. Discount Vitamin Store.