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  Messages 1-20 from 20 matching the search criteria.
10 Benefits of Fennel and Fennel Seeds, Based on Science Darrell Miller 4/30/19
Here's What Happens When You Eat Garlic On An Empty Stomach Darrell Miller 9/30/17
Is garlic the key to stopping this silent killer? Darrell Miller 4/6/17
How to grow garlic from a single clove Darrell Miller 2/24/17
Fennel Seeds Darrell Miller 11/12/09
Garlic Darrell Miller 8/27/09
Garlic Darrell Miller 9/1/08
What Is Fiber? Darrell Miller 7/21/08
Fennel Darrell Miller 6/30/08
Weight Loss and Calories Darrell Miller 6/24/08
Supports Healthy Blood Pressure Darrell Miller 4/18/08
HDL Booster - Boost your good cholesterol Darrell Miller 3/16/06
The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals Darrell Miller 10/13/05
Curcumin - Turmeric Extract Darrell Miller 8/19/05
HISTORY Darrell Miller 6/25/05
GARLIC (allium sativum) Darrell Miller 6/25/05
Mane Attraction - lustrous Hair... Darrell Miller 6/14/05
Botanical Arsenal - Plants can help our bodies fight off cancer's deadly ... Darrell Miller 6/13/05
Aromessentials Darrell Miller 6/10/05
Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips Darrell Miller 6/9/05



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10 Benefits of Fennel and Fennel Seeds, Based on Science
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Date: April 30, 2019 04:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: 10 Benefits of Fennel and Fennel Seeds, Based on Science





Culinarily, fennel is appreciated for its mild licorice flavor, but it should also be cherished for its many medicinal properties. Fresh fennel bulb and its seeds (both are edible) are low in calories and high in manganese. The bulbs are also a good source of Vitamin C, while the seeds have the ability to curb one's appetite, according to some research, and thus abet weight loss. Antioxidants have been shown to provide numerous health benefits, and fennel bulb and seeds are loaded with them. There are even studies suggesting (although not conclusively proving) that fennel can help fight cancer. Overall, fennel is as healthy as it is delicious.

Key Takeaways:

  • Besides possessing a pleasing and mild licorice-type flavor, crunchy fennel seeds are also packed with minerals and fiber.
  • Data suggests that a tea made with fennel seeds may have the ability to suppress appetite.
  • Nutrients found in fennel include msgnesium, potasspot, iron, calcium, manganese and vitamin C.

"Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects."

Read more: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/fennel-and-fennel-seed-benefits

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Here's What Happens When You Eat Garlic On An Empty Stomach
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Date: September 30, 2017 12:14 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Here's What Happens When You Eat Garlic On An Empty Stomach





Garlic has many important health benefits. We are told to add it to our diets. It can be a natural antibiotic. There are times when you shouldn't eat it, though. It can contribute to heartburn for example. This explains what could happen if you consume it on an exmpty stomach. This could make you think about garlic differently. You definitely don't want to cut it out but do need to be careful about eating it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kps-55TYLhI&rel=0

Key Takeaways:

  • When taken on an empty stomach, this powerful Bulb is capable of destroying the bad bacteria in both our small and large intestines.
  • When consumed, garlic increases the production of a protein that helps in the absorption and release of iron.
  • Since it helps with these tasks, those who consume natural remedies that contain garlic are less likely to suffer from a lack of iron in the blood.

"Used as an aphrodisiac, garlic is known to increase the libido in both men and women"

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Is garlic the key to stopping this silent killer?
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Date: April 06, 2017 03:44 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Is garlic the key to stopping this silent killer?





Garlic may do more for us than give our favorite dish more flavor. Research published in The Journal of Nutrition in 2016 shows that this delicious bulb is also effective at treating heart disease by preventing plaque from building up in key coronary arteries. Garlic also lowers cholesterol levels, reduces blood pressure, has antioxidant properties and acts as an anti-inflammatory agent. Altogether, these collective benefits make garlic a powerhouse tool in the battle against heart disease – without the negative side effects of medication.

Key Takeaways:

  • Scientists claim that garlic is an effective treatment for heart disease.
  • The nutrients in the garlic bulb prevent the calcification of coronary arteries by preventing plaque build up.
  • Garlic does not have the side effects of conventional medicines used to treat heart disease.

"It is crucial that proper lifestyle habits and diet be practiced to prevent heart disease."

Read more: http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-04-02-is-garlic-the-key-to-stopping-this-silent-killer.html

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How to grow garlic from a single clove
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Date: February 24, 2017 11:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: How to grow garlic from a single clove





There is a way to grow garlic from a single clove. Garlic has been used for various purposes since ancient times. It was once described as being a cure for many different medical conditions. Over the years, science has actually backed up many of his claims. It can help to lower your cholesterol and also lower your blood pressure.

Key Takeaways:

  • While garlic is one of the world’s most potent foods, the Chinese Bulbs are covered with harmful chemicals to prevent sprouting, kill insects and whiten the Bulbs for a more appealing look.
  • While there are many garlic varieties to choose from, Natural Living Ideas recommends starting with Elephant garlic, which produces a mild-flavored Bulb that even kids can stomach. On the other hand, if you live in a colder climate, hard neck types are the way to go.
  • When the leaves appear withered and pale, it’s time to harvest the Bulbs. Loosen the soil, gently pull them out with a digging fork, wash them with water, and let them dry in the sun.

"While the optimal planting time to produce beautiful, large Bulbs is fall, just after the first frost has passed, cloves can also be planted in late winter or early spring."



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/2017-02-19-how-to-grow-garlic-from-a-single-clove.html

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Fennel Seeds
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Date: November 12, 2009 04:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fennel Seeds

fennel plantFennel is a plant species that is part of the genus Foeniculum. A member of the family Apiaceae, this plant is a hardy, perennial, umbelliferous herb. The plant has yellow flowers and feathery leaves. It is generally found growing on the shores of the Mediterranean, but it has become widely naturalized elsewhere. Now, the plant can be found growing wild in many parts of the world, especially on dry soils near the sea-coast and on river-banks. The plant is highly aromatic and flavorful. It is actually one of the primary ingredients of absinthe. Some species of fennel possess a swollen, Bulb-like stem base, which is used as a vegetable. Fennel is used as food plant by some moth and bird species.

The fennel plant is native to the southern areas of Europe and Asia Minor. The herb is now cultivated in the United States and Great Britain. It was used anciently in many civilizations. Used in ancient Egypt, this herb aids in digestion and flatulence. In Italy, fennel was used to bring surgical patients out of anesthesia. Fennel was recommended by Hippocrates and Dioscorides to increase milk production in nursing mothers. The ancient Greeks used this herb for weight reduction, while the seventeenth-century herbalist Nicholas Culpeper also recommended this herb for losing weight.

Fennel is extremely helpful in weight reduction, as it suppresses the appetite. This herb aids in stabilizing the nervous system and can be used as a sedative for small children. Fennel can be used to expel phlegm from the throat, eliminate toxins from the body, and purify the blood. This herb is known for its ability to fortify the immune system and be good for the eyes. Additionally, fennel aids in digestion, improves night vision, relieves gas, expels worms, improves the quality of milk in nursing mothers, and cleans the bladder and liver. This herb has been used to stimulate menstruation and can help too soothe the smooth muscles of the digestive tract, as it aids in digestion and related problems.

Research on rats has found that the fennel seeds have estrogenic effects on the genital organs. The herb has been found to promote the production of milk in nursing mothers. Fennel is good for digestion, colic, and other stomach complaints. This herb contains essential oils that have a composition similar to catnip and peppermint. fennel plant The seeds of the fennel plant are used to provide anorectic, antacid, anti-inflaamtory, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic, estrogenic, expectorant, galactagogue, sedative, and stimulant properties. The primary nutrients found in this herb are calcium, magnesium, niacin, potassium, sodium, sulfur, vitamins A, C, B1, and B2. Primarily, fennel is extremely beneficial in dealing with abdominal cramps, colic, gas, gastric disorders, indigestion, intestinal problems, and weight-related conditions.

Additionally, this herb can be very helpful in treating excessive appetite, asthma, constipation, convulsions, coughs, uterine cramps, gout, kidney ailments, absence of lactation, liver disorders, lung disorders, and nervous disorders. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by this herb, please feel free to contact a representative from your local health food store.

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Garlic
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Date: August 27, 2009 02:40 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Garlic

Garlic is very popular because of its health benefits. A perennial plant and member of the lily family, the Bulb of the garlic plant is used for many medicinal purposes. Garlic was used by the ancient Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, and Egyptians. The Chinese used this herb at least three thousand years ago to treat various ailments. The Egyptians ate garlic while building pyramids to increase their strength and endurance. Hippocrates suggested that this herb be used for treatment of uterine cancer. Native Americans used garlic to fight abdominal cancer, while the Europeans used this herb during the plague years to provide immunity. The main historical uses of garlic were to treat colds, coughs, toothaches, earaches, diarrhea, infection, arteriosclerosis, headaches, dandruff, tumors, worms, and hypertension.

Garlic is nature’s antibiotic. This herb is very effective in fighting bacteria which may be resistant to other antibiotics. The herb stimulates the lymphatic system in order to throw off waste material. Garlic is different from other antibiotics in the fact that it has the ability to stimulate cell growth and activity. This herb rejuvenates all body functions. Garlic opens up blood vessels, reducing hypertension. It is known as a health-building and disease-preventing herb.

Several studies have linked garlic to a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease. This herb has been found to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood, while lowering blood pressure, increasing immunity, and reducing the blood’s clotting ability. Research suggests that eating the equivalent of one-half to one clove of garlic daily can decrease total serum cholesterol levels by about nine percent. Anticoagulant capabilities have also been found in garlic by German researchers. Garlic is able to benefit those individuals who are suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease, which is better known as blood clots in the legs.

Garlic also contains antitumor properties, with studies showing it having the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer-causing nitrosamine. The National Cancer Institute even recommends adding more garlic, onions, and other similar vegetables to the diet. This would lower the risk of developing stomach cancer. Results from one study showed that garlic may be toxic to some cancer cells. It may encourage the immune system to spot the invaders and destroy them, allowing a natural immune process to destroy tumor cells.

Garlic is believed to stimulate the lymphatic system by ridding itself of toxins. The Russians consider garlic to be a natural antibiotic, which is why they consume it regularly. This herb is often used to prevent disease and heal the body. It is nourishing for the entire body, especially the heart, circulation, stomach, spleen, and lungs. Additionally, it has been used to stimulate circulation and to help the immune system function more effectively. Some believe that this herb may help prevent some forms of cancer, heart disease, strokes, and infections.

In summary, the Bulb of the garlic plant is used to provide adaptogen, alterative, antibiotic, anticoagulant, antifungal, antineoplastic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, blood purifier, diaphoretic, digestive, expectorant, febrifuge, rubefacient, stimulant, and vulnerary properties. Primarily, garlic is extremely beneficial in dealing with asthma, blood impurities, high blood pressure, bronchitis, cancer, candidiasis, poor circulation, colds, colitis, coughs, infectious diseases, ear infections, fevers, flu, fungus, gastric disorders, heart disease, indigestion, infection, liver disorders, lung disorders, parasites, blood poisoning, prostate problems, respiratory problems, and staph/strep infections.

This herb is also good for treating acne, allergies, arthritis, childhood diseases, diabetes, diarrhea, edema, emphysema, gallbladder problems, hypoglycemia, insomnia, kidney ailments, pneumonia, rheumatism, sinus problems, ulcers, warts, and worms.

Garlic is a wonderful all purpose herb that can be found at your local or internet health food store. Always look for name brands when buying garlic to ensure quality and purity of the product you purchase.

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Garlic
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Date: September 01, 2008 01:04 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Garlic

Garlic is a member of the lily family, related to onions and chives, and offers many health benefits other than deterring vampires. There is now ample scientific evidence and proof of its beneficial effect on both a healthy immune system and the circulatory system.

The active ingredients in garlic are thiosulfinates, of which the predominant one is allicin, sulfoxides such as alliin and dithiins, of which ajoene is the most widely researched. These compounds are not only responsible for the pungent odor of garlic, but also for its benefits to your health. Among the other components of garlic are selenium, manganese and vitamins B6 and C.

Before considering the other effects of garlic on your health, we shall first consider how it benefits the immune system. The immune system is an essential part of human biology, and protects your body from invasion by pathogenic organisms. Without the immune system your body would rapidly be overcome by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites and other foreign bodies, and your body would rapidly fail to function.

The immune system consists of several components that can act in concert to protect you from these foreign invaders. It is too large a subject to be discusses in this article, although its major components are the thymus, the spleen, the lymphatic system, bone marrow, antibodies, and white blood cells of various types. Without it your body would rapidly be broken down to nothing, and would revert to a skeleton in a few weeks.

It is your immune system that causes inflammation, fevers, boils and pus. These are all examples of the immune system at work to protect your body, and even a fever is the immune system raising your body temperature to one that is unfavorable to invaders. Arthritis and hay fever are other examples of how your immune system reacts to invaders, in one case mistaking damaged joint tissue as being foreign and responding by causing inflammation to protect the joint, and in the other a reaction to invading bodies such as pollen.

So what does garlic do to help your immune system? Let's first have a look at the inflammatory reaction of the immune system, a prime example of which is rheumatoid arthritis. The inflammation is caused by compounds known as prostaglandins and thromboxanes, the biosynthesis in your body of which requires the enzymes lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase (LOX and COX). If these enzymes can be inhibited, then the inflammatory response can be modulated, and LOX and COX inhibition is one of the studies currently being carried out into the treatment of some forms of cancers.

However, where garlic comes in here is that two effective non-reversible inhibitors of LOX and COX are the chemicals Di(1-propenyl) sulfide and ajoene, and both of these are components of garlic. Garlic can therefore be used, not to stop the inflammatory response altogether since it is an essential part of the immune system for certain infections, but to modulate it and protect you from the more severe effects of conditions such as arthritis - both osteo and rheumatoid - and asthma, which is also an immune response.

Allicin has been shown to work with vitamin C to kill certain types of bacteria and viruses, and can help the immune system to protect you from colds and flu, Candida and some gastroenteric viruses. It can also be effective against some of the more powerful pathogens such as tuberculosis. It should be stressed that garlic will not cure these conditions, but help the immune system to deal with them. In fact with respect to the common cold, a study at Munich University has shown that garlic significantly reduces the activity of kappa-B, which is a nuclear transcription factor that mediates the inflammatory response. In other words, the cold symptoms are greatly reduced.

This is significant, since increased kappa-B levels can be triggered off by any pathogen that causes an inflammatory response by the immune system (e.g. infection, allergens, physical trauma). The study showed that unfertilized garlic provided a reduction of 25% in kappa-B activity, while garlic fertilized with sulfur reduced it by 41%.

There have been other studies carried out that demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori, the organism responsible for gastritis and peptic ulcers, was less active in those that took a regular amount of garlic in their diet. This was shown by measuring the antibody concentration, and while H.pylori was found in both sets (with and without garlic in the diet), the antibody count in the garlic-eating set was much lower indicating a significantly lower population of the bacterium.

Another unexpected result was that a group taking both cooked and uncooked garlic had a lower antibody count than those taking either cooked or uncooked. This appears to indicate that cooking changes the chemical nature of garlic, so that both forms work together to provide a more potent effect that cooked and uncooked separately.

What has also been established is that odorless garlic has less of an effect on the immune system that natural garlic, so while the odorless type is more socially acceptable, it is not so good at supporting your immune system. The allicin levels in odorless garlic are very much lower than in the natural Bulb.

Garlic has also been found to be able to help with certain types of cancer. Two servings weekly have been found effective in protecting from colon cancer. Allicin has been found to protect colon cells from the toxic effect of various chemicals, and also reduce the growth rate of any cancerous cells that develop. People in Southern Europe consuming large quantities of garlic have been shown to be 39% less liable to contract cancer of the mouth and pharynx, and 57% less liable to contract cancer of the esophagus. It also had an effect on other cancers, including breast and ovarian cancer. However, the effect of onions on such cancers is even greater.

Most people are aware of the cardiovascular benefits of garlic, and it can reduce blood pressure, cholesterol levels and serum triglyceride levels, thus protecting against the harmful condition of atherosclerosis and also of diabetic heart disease. Reduced atherosclerosis means a reduced chance of heart attacks or strokes. It also appears to possess antioxidant properties.

There is no doubt that garlic helps to promote a healthy immune system, although the odorless form appear to be less effective in this respect as natural garlic, and there is evidence that a diet containing uncooked and cooked garlic can be more effective than either of these alone.

--
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What Is Fiber?
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Date: July 21, 2008 02:56 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: What Is Fiber?

Fiber often has been called roughage, as it technically is a food component that is undigested and processed through the gastrointestinal tract. Since it readily absorbs water, it helps to add to the bulk that is required in order to form a good bowel movement. Fiber is often described as a complex carbohydrate, which consists of the polysaccharide and lignin substance that often gives structure to the cell of a plant and is the portion of plant food that is not digested.

Fiber which is insoluble has the capability of passing through the intestines intact and unchanged. Unlike fats, carbohydrates, and proteins, fiber does not give the body nutrients or fuel for energy, and has no caloric value. Dietary fiber can only be found in plant components including vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Primarily, there are only two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble, with some foods containing both types.

Soluble fiber is eventually digested in the large intestine, causing it to have limited bulking power. Soluble fibers dissolve in water and have often been linked to helping prevent blood sugar highs and lows, helping to lower blood cholesterol, lowering the risk of heart disease, helping to control high blood pressure, and encouraging friendly bacteria growth. Soluble fiber can be found in pectin, lignin, gums, mucilages, and other sources such as psyllium, beans, apples, pears, and oat bran.

Soluble fiber doesn’t usually seem like fiber. It is digestible and, when broken down, it creates a gel as it absorbs water in the intestinal tract. It does not bulk the stool to the extent of insoluble fiber, but it does slow down the rate at which food is digested. Soluble fiber is found in vegetables, particularly onions, Bulbs, leeks, and asparagus, and also fruits, including dried varieties.

Insoluble fiber remains undigested for the most part and promotes a faster stool transit time. Insoluble fiber can keep the bowel clean and operative and also help to bind dangerous toxins and hormones in order to promote better excretion. Insoluble fiber also fosters regularity in the body, contributes to better digestion, prevents constipation, and helps to lower the risk of bowel disease.

Insoluble fiber is primarily composed of cellulose and hemicelulose. Cellulose is a non-digestible form of fiber, found in outer portions of vegetables and fruits. Bran or seed covering of whole grains is another type of insoluble fiber. Hemicellulose fibers remain unchanged and absorb water as they travel the digestive tract. They increase stool bulk and transit time, preventing constipation and conditions like hemorrhoids. Stalks, stems, peels, and fruit and vegetable skins are all made up of insoluble fiber. However, the insoluble fiber content of fruits is actually found in its flesh and stringy membranes, rather than its peelings.

The average person needs a good variety of foods that contribute to at least 35 grams of dietary fiber in our diet daily. Most foods contain both types of fiber, but the ones that are most fiber rich are not usually the ones that we commonly eat. Whole grain cereal, raw fruits and vegetables, split peas, beans, lentils, millet, and barley are the best sources of fiber. Unfortunately, statistics have shown that most of us only get 9 grams of fiber each day, if we are lucky.

Finally, fiber has the ability to increase fecal bulk by retaining water, decrease stool transit time, keep blood sugar levels more stable, lower blood serum and liver cholesterol, help prevent weight gain by slowing the rate of digestion and absorption and controlling hunger, expediting the removal of dangerous toxins, binding with bile salts to help decrease the risk of gallbladder disease and certain types of cancer, and creating the presence of healthier intestinal bacteria.

--
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Fennel
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Date: June 30, 2008 04:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Fennel

If there has ever been an overlooked vegetable, it would definitely be fennel. Some people have an aversion to its licorice-like scent, while others feel as if fennel is a bizarre and obscure vegetable that they have no interest in learning how to prepare. However, those who have discovered it know that ignoring fennel is a waste of a versatile vegetable’s amazing flavor and healthful benefits. Even those who already cook with fennel might find that they aren’t taking advantage of its versatility. For example, many people use only the delicate, lacy parts of fennel as a flavor-enhancing garnish for soups or salads. Others stick to just using the green-white Bulbs, while tossing the remaining pieces aside. However, there’s no season like now to start using and enjoying all the parts of fennel.

Fennel is available from autumn until early spring and both its stems and Bulbs have been found to contain many nutrients. Fennel spice, which is made from the vegetable’s seeds, can be found year round, as it is one of five spices in Chinese five-spice powder. One cup of raw, sliced fennel is a huge source of vitamin C, folic acid, fiber, and potassium. History has shown that fennel can be taken to alleviate bad breath, indigestion, intestinal spasms, cramps, and gas. It is thought that Puritans chewed the seeds in order to tame hunger during fasts. Recently, scientists have found that fennel contains antioxidants which promote good health.

In order to gain these healthful benefits, be sure to purchase white or pale-green fennel that has clean, firm Bulbs. The Bulbs should not be split, bruised, or spotted, while the stalks that grow from the Bulb should be relatively straight. Additionally, the vegetable’s fronds would be green but not flowering because blooms indicate that the Bulb is past maturity. When consumed right away, fennel is at its best. But, it can be kept in the crisper for up to four days. Be sure to wash it before using its base in hors d’oeuvres, salads, and gratins. Also, make sure to reserve its fronds in order to enhance dishes in a potent way. With such versatility in the kitchen, there is absolutely no excuse not to include fennel in your meals this season.

Once you discover that fennel is both crunchy and slightly sweet, you will want to incorporate it into many of your daily meals. Thankfully, fennel can enhance many dishes and make them extraordinary. Here are some quick ideas for using fennel this season. You can thinly shave the desired amount of a fennel Bulb and toss it with a bit of olive oil, fresh lemon juice, and a small amount of Parmesan cheese to make a fennel salad at moment’s notice. Another option is sauté sliced fennel with equal parts of onion and bell pepper in order to make a simple vegetarian side dish. One can take advantage of fennel’s ability to enhance flavors by adding fennel with tuna or grilled sea bass. Fennel can also be cut vertically, leaving Bulb, stalk, and leaves intact and then brushed with olive oil and grilled until lightly browned. Another idea is to garnish your favorite vegetable soup with coarsely chopped fennel fronds.



--
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Weight Loss and Calories
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Date: June 24, 2008 02:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Weight Loss and Calories

Although conventional wisdom argues that a calorie is a calorie, regardless of where it comes from, whether that be from a salmon fillet or an ice cream cone. But you don’t have to be a nutritionist to realize that there’s a huge difference between the nutrition of salmon verses that of ice cream. Legions of chronic dieters understand the differences, based on their personal experiences. For example, they claim that they gain a large amount of weight after eating one slice of pizza that is rich in carbohydrates, but do not after eating a large chicken breast and steamed broccoli meal that contains even more calories.

There is now a legitimate scientific explanation for why some calories are different from others. Doctors Eugene J. Fine, MD, and Richard D. Feinman, PhD, of the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn have explained that the widely held calorie-is-a-calorie belief is based on the law of thermodynamics, which is a key concept in physics. The first law in thermodynamics is about the amount of energy that goes into a system being equal to the amount of energy being released. To lose weight along this line of thinking, you need to either eat fewer calories or burn off more of them.

However, researchers have pointed out that the second law of thermodynamics can be associated with living creatures. The second law of thermodynamics claims that an inherent variation and inefficiency in all biological and biochemical processes. This can also be understood by saying that people burn energy less efficiently than cars and light Bulbs do, while some people burn energy less efficiently than other people do.

There are many reasons that a calorie is not always a calorie. If you have a higher resting metabolic rate, you will do a much better job of burning all sorts of calories, as compared to someone who has a lower metabolic rate. If you secrete a lot of insulin due to being pre-diabetic or overweight, then you’ll be much more likely to make fat than muscle. Also, if you eat foods that have transitive fats, you’re a lot more likely to gain weight around your waist. It is recommended that people eat the highest quality of calories as possible. This includes nutrient-dense foods such as fish, chicken, fresh vegetables, minerals, quality protein, and healthful fats. These foods provide us with the most vitamins that are necessary for a healthy and balanced diet.

The alternative, which is not recommended, is a lot of sweets, soft drinks, breads, pastas, bagels, and muffins. These foods provide mostly empty calories in the form of sugars and starches. These foods also trigger the production of excess insulin, which will cause you to store these calories mostly around your waste, which is an occurrence that is definitely unwanted by the majority of people.

Due to the above facts, we can finally conclude that a single calorie from a salmon fillet is not the equivalent to a single calorie from an ice cream cone, as the calorie from the salmon fillet is packed with many more vitamins and nutrients that the ice cream cone is lacking.

--
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Supports Healthy Blood Pressure
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Date: April 18, 2008 03:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Supports Healthy Blood Pressure

  • A comprehensive Bio-Aligned Formula™ that can help maintain blood pressure already within the normal range, when used as part of a healthy diet and exercise plan.
  • A complex array of 35 nutrients, botanicals and special ingredients provides balanced support for blood pressure.
  • Supports two of the most important SystemiCare™ metabolic systems identified by Source Naturals as critical for your optimal health: Heart/Circulation (including healthy blood vessels, blood flow, homocysteine levels, and blood lipid regulation) and Antioxidant Defense.

3 tablets contain:
(Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 45 mg
Vitamin D-3 (as cholecalciferol) 240 mg
Vitamin B-6 (as pyridoxine HCl) 24 mg
Folate (folic acid & calcium folinate) 480 mcg
Vitamin B-12 (as methylcobalamin) 600 mcg
Magnesium (magnesium oxide, chelate & succinate) 240 mg
Selenium (as L-selenomethionine) 120 mcg
Potassium (as potassium citrate) 59 mg
L-Arginine (as L-arginine HCl) 1.44 g
L-Citrulline 360 mg
Hibiscus Flower Ext (20% total acids) 120 mg
gamma-vitamin E Complex 90 mg
L-Taurine 60 mg
Masson Pine Bark Extract(95% procyanidolic value) 60 mg
Garlic Clove 60 mg
Freeze Dried White Onion Bulb 60 mg
Arjuna Bark Ext (0.5% arjunolic acid) 60 mg Ashwagandha Root Extract(5% withanolides) 60 mg
Forskohlii Root Extract(ForsLean®) (20% forskohlin) 60 mg
Guggul Extract (10% guggulsterones) 60 mg
Grape Seed Extract (Proanthodyn™) 48 mg
Chinese Salvia Root Extract (MSV-60®)
(60% magnesium salvianolate B) 45 mg
Ginkgo Leaf Extract (50:1)
24% Flavoneglycosides 36 mg
Hawthorn Berry Extract (4:1) 30 mg
Hawthorn Leaf and Flower Extract (4:1) 30 mg
Olive Leaf Ext. (15% Oleuropein) 30 mg
Trimethylglycine (TMG) 30 mg
Total Resveratrols (from Polygonum cuspidatum) 24 mg
Nattokinase (NSK-SD™) 21 mg
Coenzyme Q10 18 mg
Tocotrienol Complex (Tocomax®) 12 mg
Lycopene 3 mg

Suggested Use: 3 tablets mid-morning and 2 tabs mid-afternoon between meals on an empty stomach.

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HDL Booster - Boost your good cholesterol
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Date: March 16, 2006 12:51 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HDL Booster - Boost your good cholesterol

 

                                      

 

 

HDL BOOSTER

(Product No. 02922)

 

 

 

DESCRIPTION:

 

HDL Booster is a physician-developed dietary supplement that has been clinically shown to increase good cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-2, the best form of cholesterol.* The formula combines essential vitamins and minerals, at levels recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA), with key amino acids, powerful antioxidants, and traditional herbal extracts to provide superior support for cardiovascular health.*  

 

HDL Booster:

 

·         Formulated by Dr. Dennis Goodman, Chief of Cardiology at Scripps Memorial Hospital

·         Clinically studied to increase good cholesterol levels up to 23%*1

·         All-inclusive formula; includes ingredients recommended in accordance with the American Heart Association

·         Replaces the CoQ10 depleted by cholesterol lowering (statin) drugs.*2

 

STRUCTURE/FUNCTION:

 

HDL Booster has been clinically shown to increase HDL cholesterol levels.* HDL Booster also supports healthy cholesterol and healthy triglyceride levels already within the normal ranges.* By reducing C-reactive protein levels, HDL Booster helps support the body’s natural anti-inflammatory response.*  

 

FORMULA:

 

Two tablets (one serving) contain:

 

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)                                                          148 mg

Vitamin E (as natural mixed tocopherols)                                    35 IU

Niacin (as niacinamide)                                                              21 mg

Vitamin B6 (as pyridoxine HCl)                                                  3 mg

Folic Acid                                                                                 301 mcg

Vitamin B12 (as cyanocobalamin)                                              20 mcg

Magnesium (from magnesium amino acid chelate)                       10 mg

Selenium (as L-selenomethionine)                                               49 mcg

Proprietary Blend                                                                      388 mg

   hawthorn (Crategus oxyacantha) berry extract,         

   taurine, garlic (Allium sativum) Bulb, grape seed (Vitis

   vinifera) extract, grape skin (Vitis vinifera) extract,

   N-acetyl-L-cysteine, alpha-lipoic acid, soy (Glycine

   max) isoflavones, tocotrienols

L-Arginine (as L-arginine HCl)                                                  153 mg

L-Carnitine (as L-carnitine L-tartrate)                                        51 mg

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)(ubiquinone 10)                         25 mg

Policosanol                                                                                7 mg

 

Other ingredients: See label for most current information.

 

Contains no: sugar, salt, yeast, wheat, gluten,  corn, dairy products, artificial coloring, artificial flavoring, or preservatives.  This product contains natural ingredients; color variations are normal. 

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Cholesterol, the soft, waxy substance present among the lipids (fats) in the bloodstream and in all cells, is important for wide variety of physiological functions. It is essential for the formation of cellular membranes, necessary for the production of bile salts, and also plays a role in the synthesis of certain hormones.3-5

 

Cholesterol is both produced by the body and obtained from food. Endogenous cholesterol is formed by human cells, particularly liver cells, whereas exogenous cholesterol is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract from food.3,4

 

Because cholesterol can not be metabolized for energy, it must be removed from the body once it has served its function. The major route of removal is through the liver, where it is processed and subsequently excreted from the body.3,4

 

Types of Cholesterol

 

Cholesterol is lipophilic (“fat loving” or water insoluble) by nature. It can not be dissolved in the blood, and must, therefore, be transported by carriers known as lipoproteins. These carriers are classified by density, with LDL (low density lipoproteins) and HDL (high density lipoproteins) being the most common.4,5

 

LDL is often referred to as “bad” cholesterol. LDLs carry cholesterol throughout the body. Conversely, HDL, or “good” cholesterol, is responsible for carrying cholesterol away from the arteries to the liver where it is eventually processed and eliminated from the body.3,4,6

 

Scientific studies have shown that both types of cholesterol are important indicators of cardiovascular health. But recent research, focusing on the beneficial subtypes of HDL, has found that certain fractions of HDL may be more supportive of cardiovascular health than others. The two most notably supportive HDL fractions are HDL-2 and HDL-3.7

 

The smaller HDL-3 is synthesized by the liver and intestines. This form, which is known as “free cholesterol-rich” HDL, scavenges or “scoops up” free cholesterol. The cholesterol is then chemically altered by the addition of an ester group. When sufficient cholesterol is esterified, HDL-3 becomes HDL-2, which is therefore referred to as “cholesterol ester-rich” HDL. HDL-2 is larger in size and has been shown to be more cardiosupportive than HDL-3.*7  

 

HOW IT WORKS:

 

HDL is known to possess antioxidant activity and to help balance the body’s natural anti-inflammatory response, both of which are important for cardiovascular health, but its most important function is the role it plays in cholesterol transport.6,8 High levels of HDL cholesterol are also associated with reduced platelet activity, another key indicator of arterial and venous health.9

 

Both HDL and LDL levels are important indicators of healthy cardiovascular function.* Therefore, supplements that increase the level of good cholesterol can profoundly impact heart health.* In 2002, an open label pilot study was conducted at Scripps Memorial Hospital to evaluate the effects of a proprietary supplement on lipid profiles. The dietary supplement, which mirrors HDL Booster and contains a combination of antioxidants, B-vitamins, amino acids, and botanical extracts, was developed by Dr. Goodman, the leading cardiologist at Scripps. The trial involved 50 people, who were evaluated prior to the study, then again at three and six months. After three months of supplementation, good cholesterol levels increased in all groups.* The changes were more pronounced at the six-month time point, where good cholesterol rose up to 23 percent and levels of HDL-2 (the best cholesterol) increased 50 percent in one subset of participants (HDL <40 mg/dL).*1 Additionally, the supplement also helped maintain healthy triglycerides levels that were already within the normal ranges.* Decreases in homocysteine, an amino acid found in the blood that plays a role in cardiovascular health, were observed as well.*1,10

 

The following chart summarizes the benefits of each of the ingredients in HDL Booster:

 

Ingredient

Benefit

Vitamin C

An antioxidant clinically shown to support the health of the cardiovascular system and increase HDL-2 cholesterol levels.*11,12 An important factor in many metabolic reactions, including the conversion of cholesterol to bile salts and the formation of healthy connective tissue. Vitamin C provides protection for the inner lining of the arteries.*13,14

Vitamin E

Another powerful antioxidant, which inhibits the oxidation of low density lipids by inactivating free radicals.* Thought to inhibit the breakdown of certain fatty acids that help form cell structures, especially membranes13

Also supports healthy cholesterol levels already within the normal range.*15,16

Niacin

In lipid metabolism, supports normal cholesterol production and metabolism to help retain healthy cholesterol levels that are already within normal limits.*13 Increases good cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-2 (the best cholesterol).*17 Through peripheral vasodilatation, niacin also supports the retention of healthy blood pressure that is already within the normal range.*13

Vitamin B6

An essential coenzyme for normal amino acid metabolism. In particular, vitamin B6 is necessary for the breakdown of homocysteine, an amino acid that plays a supporting role in cardiovascular health.* Also involved in the production of circulating antibodies.13 High levels of circulating vitamin B6 have been associated with reduced levels of C-reactive protein, another important indicator of heart health.*18

Folic Acid        

Another homocysteine lowering agent, folic acid is essential for the formation of red and white blood cells and involved in the synthesis of certain amino acids.*13

Vitamin B12

A ubiquitous coenzyme necessary for DNA synthesis. Also lowers homocysteine levels.*13

Magnesium

Increases HDL levels, supporting a healthy lipid profile, and helps maintain healthy blood pressure already within the normal limits.*19 Magnesium is a constituent of many coenzymes and is required for normal functioning of muscle and nervous tissue.20

Selenium

An essential trace mineral with powerful antioxidant capabilities.*20 Research has revealed that selenium supports cardiovascular function.*21

L-Arginine

An important amino acid and precursor to nitric oxide (NO), which is important for the health of the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems.*22 In clinical study, an L-arginine-enriched diet increased good cholesterol levels.*23

L-Carnitine      

A naturally occurring hydrophilic amino acid derivative, both produced in the kidneys and liver and derived from dietary sources. Along with coenzyme Q10, L-carnitine is a key factor in metabolism, supporting the production of cellular energy.*24 Also shown to increase good cholesterol (HDL) levels.*25 L-carnitine supports healthy blood flow.*26

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

A fat-soluble nutrient present in the mitochondria of virtually all cells, CoQ10 is an essential factor for cellular energy production.27 Also a powerful free radical scavenger, clinically shown support arterial health.*27,28

Supplementation significantly improves good cholesterol levels.*29 Additionally, CoQ10 supports healthy heart contractility and circulation.*

Policosanol

A unique mixture of essential alcohols, including octacosanol, tetracosanol, hexacosanol and triacontanol, derived from sugar cane.30 In a clinical study, supplementation resulted in a 14 percent increase in HDL cholesterol over an 8-week period.*31

Hawthorn Berry Extract

Helps retain healthy cholesterol levels already within the normal range.* Supports the muscle strength of the heart, helping to maintain healthy heart rhythm, contractility, and vascular circulation.*32 A source of antioxidant constituents that protect against oxidative damage.* Supports the health of veins and arteries.*33,34 Also helps maintain healthy blood pressure levels already within the normal ranges.*

Taurine

An essential amino acid, present in high amounts in the brain, retina, myocardium, skeletal and smooth muscle, platelets and neutrophils. Possesses both antioxidant and membrane-supportive properties.*35 Helps maintain a healthy lipid profile by increasing good (HDL) cholesterol levels.*36,37

Garlic Bulb

A powerful antioxidant that possesses wide-ranging cardiovascular health benefits.*38 Clinically shown to increase good cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-2 cholesterol.* 39

Grape Seed Extract

A source of free-radical scavenging phytonutrients, known as polyphenols.* Promotes healthy circulation.* Also supports cardiovascular health by increasing HDL cholesterol levels*40,41

N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC)

A derivative of the amino acid, cysteine, NAC is a key intermediary in the conversion of cysteine into glutathione, one of the body’s primary cellular antioxidants.* Supports the health of the cardiovascular and immune systems.* Also shown to significantly increase in HDL cholesterol.*42

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

An antioxidant and vital cofactor necessary for the production of cellular energy, ALA helps recycle other important antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, CoQ10, and glutathione. Also helps maintain healthy blood flow and healthy heart contraction.*43

Soy Isoflavones

Provide antioxidant protection, supporting cardiovascular and immune system health.* Soy protein-enriched diet has been shown

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The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals
TopPreviousNext

Date: October 13, 2005 01:08 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals

The “Power of Electrolyte Trace Minerals

The form of different minerals also play a key role in how well they are transported through the circulatory systemand the aqueous micro-environment of the cells. “whatever the nutritional potential of a food, its contribution is nonexistent if it does not pass the test of absorption”. Those minerals that your body is unable to break down to their ionic form are likely to pass completely from the body unassimilated, and for all nutritional intents and purposes, were never eaten. Authors Rosenberg and solomons offer the following insight:

“Insofar as minerals in the diet are often bound to protein, complexed with organic molecules in food, or otherwise imbedded in the matrix of food-stuffs, the mechanical processes of mastication, dissolution, dispersion, and often digestion are important preparative steps to absorption. Moreover, at the conclusion of the aforementioned reductive process, minerals generally emerge in the intestinal lumen as charged ions, e.g. Fe, Zn, PO4, SeO3.”

“Minerals should be ionic to be readily absorbed through transfer in the small intestine.”

Minerals that are absorbed in their ionic form are true liquid solution and have either positive or negative charges. They also have properties that distinguish them from each other and allow them to freely take part in biochemical communication throughout the body. These communications help nutrients move to those areas of the body that are in most need of their help.

“Imbalances of any of these ions or certain trace ions in the body…can lead to dysfunction in the conduction of electrical messages. This dysfunction quickly leads to a general body disturbance and loss of ability to maintain somewhat stable internal conditions.

The Light Bulb demonstration that Trace Minerals Research uses is a simple yet effective scientific experiment to show how well different minerals break down into ionic solutions in water and their concentration in that form. The experiment uses a broken circuit from the electrical cord that is connected to two probes which are then inserted into distilled water. When a mineral is placed in the water, it will connect the circuit and light the Bulb in direct relation to how well it breaks down into ionic solutions and it’s concentration in ionic form. If a mineral does not break down in water, it will not light the light Bulb.



--
Vitanet ®

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Curcumin - Turmeric Extract
TopPreviousNext

Date: August 19, 2005 12:47 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Curcumin - Turmeric Extract

Curcumin

Turmeric- History and Traditional Usage

Native to Southeast Asia, Curcuma longa is a tall
tropical shrub with large oblong leaves and pale yellow flowers.
The genus “Curcuma” belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, which
includes ginger.1 The plant possesses a large root structure
with fleshy, Bulbous underground parts called “rhizomes.” These
rhizomes, known as turmeric root, are harvested at maturity,
dried and cured for commercial use. Chemical analysis shows that
dried turmeric contains essential and volatile oils, with a
curcuminoid content of 2.5 to 5.0 %.2

In addition to its
popularity as a spice, turmeric is used as a dye for cloth and
coloring agent in foods and cosmetics, thanks to its rich yellow
color. Turmeric also serves as a preservative, probably owing to
the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of curcumin.
Extracts of Curcuma longa have demonstrated in vitro
antibacterial and anti-fungal effects.3

Turmeric is named in
ancient Ayurvedic and Chinese herbal texts as a traditional folk
remedy. Historically, turmeric was used externally for wounds,
and sprains, and internally for digestive complaints,
rheumatism, liver disorders, coughs and colds.4
Benefits

Protects cells and tissues by fighting free radicals.*

Supports joint function*

The numerous beneficial
effects attributed to turmeric stem in large measure from the
antioxidant properties of curcumin. Antioxidants neutralize free
radicals, which are highly unstable molecules that can damage
cellular structures through abnormal oxidative reactions.
Curcumin is a potent “scavenger” of the superoxide radical, a
free radical that initiates potentially harmful oxidative
processes such as lipid peroxidation.5 Through this activity,
curcumin has been shown to protect skin cells from the injurious
effect of nitroblue tetrazolium, a toxin that generates
superoxide radicals. Curcumin also increases survival of cells
exposed in vitro to the enzyme hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase,
which stimulates superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production.
Curcumin itself is not toxic to cells, even at high
concentrations. Pure curcumin was shown to be less protective
than a mixture of curcuminoids, indicating a possible synergism
among curcuminoids.6 Because free radicals are involved in aging
and exert harmful effects on skin, these results suggest
curcumin may help slow skin aging.

Curcumin demonstrates
several other in vitro effects linked to free radical
scavenging. Curcumin scavenges nitric oxide, a compound
associated with the body’s inflammatory response.7 Pure curcumin
and turmeric extracts protect red blood cells from lipid
peroxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide.8 Curcumin has been
shown to protect DNA from oxidative damage, inhibit binding of
toxic metabolites to DNA, and reduce DNA mutations in the Ames’
test.9 Although additional studies suggest an anticarcinogenic
effect of curcumin, through protection of DNA,10 one in vitro
study found that curcumin induced DNA damage in human gastric
mucosal cells.11 It is speculated that curcumin may act as a
pro-oxidant in the presence of transition metal ions such as
copper and iron. (This is true for other antioxidants, including
vitamin C.) Curcumin also demonstrates in vitro inhibition of
COX-I and COX-II enzymes, which are involved in the inflammatory
reaction.12 Together these results strongly suggest that
curcumin is a potent bioprotectant with a potentially wide range
of therapeutic applications.

Animal studies- In vivo protective effects

Through its free radical scavenging
properties, curcumin has shown bioprotective effects in animals.
In one study, rats were treated with isoproterenol, a chemical
that causes cardiac hypertrophy (enlargement of the heart) due
to abnormal collagen metabolism. Co-treatment with curcumin
reversed the degradation of collagen and cardiac hypertrophy
induced by isoproterenol.13 Curcumin protects mice from
detrimental effects of radiation, by stabilizing the glyoxalase
system, a biological system that regulates cell division.14
Curcumin protects livers of rats from the damaging effects of
carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a potent hepatoxin that injures the
liver via its free radical metabolite, CCl3.15,16 Curcumin
protected rats from alcohol-induced brain damage, in a study in
which oral administration of curcumin reversed lipid
peroxidation, reduced levels of free-radical metabolites and
increased levels of glutathione, a major physiologic
antioxidant.17 Curcuma longa extracts have shown
anti-inflammatory effects in rats.18

Human Trials

Curcumin exhibits free-radical scavenging ability when
administered to humans. In an open trial (uncontrolled), 18
healthy individuals ranging in age from 27 to 67 years consumed
a Curcuma longa extract, at a dose supplying 20 mg curcuminoids,
for 45 days. Before and after blood tests showed a statistically
significant decrease in lipid peroxides.19 Preliminary trials
have tested the anti-inflammatory action of curcumin, with
results that verify the traditional use of turmeric as an
anti-rheumatic herb. In a short-term double-blind, cross-over,
comparative study, 18 people received curcumin (1200 mg daily)
or phenylbutazone for two week periods. Both curcumin and
phenylbutazone produced measurable improvements in joint
flexibility and walking time. The subjects reported results only
with phenylbutazone, which may be explained by the short
duration of the trial.20 In a small placebo-controlled trial
comparing curcumin to phenylbutazone, 45 patients with
post-operative inflammation received curcumin, phenylbutazone or
placebo. The anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin and
phenylbutazone were comparable and superior to placebo.21
Curcumin has not been found to produce an analgesic (pain
relieving) effect.

Bioperine-Nature’s Absorption Enhancer
Boosts Curcumin Absorption*

Traditional Ayurvedic herbal
formulas often include black pepper and long pepper as
synergistic herbs. The active ingredient in both black pepper
and long pepper is the alkaloid, piperine. Experiments carried
out to evaluate the scientific basis for the use of peppers have
shown that piperine significantly enhances bioavailability when
consumed with other substances.22 Several double-blind clinical
studies have confirmed that Bioperine® increases absorption of
nutrients.23

Curcumin is poorly absorbed in the intestinal
tract, limiting its therapeutic effectiveness. Oral doses are
largely excreted in feces, and only trace amounts appear in the
blood. Concomitant administration of 20 mg of piperine with 2
grams of curcumin increases the bioavailability of curcumin by
2000%.24

Scientific References


1. Majeed, M., Badmaev,
V., Shivakumar, U., Rajendran, R. Curcuminoids. 1995.
Piscataway, NJ: NutriScience Publishers.
2. Srimal, R.C.
Turmeric: a brief review of its medicinal properties.
Fitoterapia 1997;68(6):483-93.
3. Ammon, H.P.T., Wahl, M.A.
Pharmacology of Curcuma longa. Planta Medica 1991;57:1-7.
4.
Snow, J.M. Herbal Monograph: Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae).
The Protocol Journal of Botanical Medicine, Autumn
1995:43-46.
5. Rao, N.S., Rao, M.N.A. Free radical scavenging
activity of curcuminoids. Arzneim.-Forsch./Drug Res.
1996;46(2):169-171.
6. Bonté. F. et al. Protective effect of
curcuminoids on epidermal skin cells under free oxygen radical
stress. Planta Medica 1997;63:265-66.
7. Rao, S., Rao, M.N.A.
Nitric oxide scavenging by curcuminoids. J Pharm. Pharmacol.
1997;49:105-7.
8. Lalitha, S., Selvam, R. Prevention of
H2Os-induced red blood cell lipid peroxidation by aqueous
extracted turmeric. Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr
1999;8(2):113-14.
9. Deshpande, S.S., Maru, G.B. Effects of
curcumin on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene derived DNA adducts
in vitro. Cancer Letters 1995;96:71-80.
10. Subramanian, M., et
al. Diminution of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage by curcumin
and related antioxidants. Mutation Research
1994;311:249-55.
11. Blasiak, J., Trzeciak, A., Kowalik, J.
Curcumin damages DNA in human gastric mucosa cells and
lymphocytes. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and
Oncology 1999;18(4):271-76.
12. Ramsewak, R.S., DeWitt, D.L.,
Nair, M.G. Cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory
activities of Curcumins I-III from Curcuma longa. Phytomedicine
2000;7(4):303-308.
13. Nirmala, C. Anand, S., Puvanakrishnan,
R. Curcumin treatment modulates collagen metabolism in
isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Molecular and
Cellular Biochemistry 1999;197:31-37.
14. Choudhary, D.,
Chandra, D. Kale, R.K. Modulation of radioresponse of glyoxalase
system by curcumin. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1999;64:1-7.
15. Park, E-J. et al. Protective effect of
curcumin in rat liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride. J
Pharm. Pharmacol. 2000;52:437-40.
16. Deshpande, U.R. et al.
Protective effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract on
carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in rats. Indian
Journal of Experimental Biology 1998;36:573-77.
17.
Rajakrishnan, V. et al. Neuroprotective role of curcumin from
Curcuma longa on ethanol-induced brain damage. Phytotherapy
Research 1999;13:571-74.
18. Arora, R.B. Basu, N., Kapoor, V.,
Jain, A.P. Anti-inflammatory studies on Curcuma longa
(Turmeric). Indian J Med Res 1971;59(8):1289-95.
19.
Ramirez-Bosca, A. et al. Antioxidant curcuma extracts decrease
the blood peroxide levels of human subjects. Age
1995;18:167-69.
20. Deodhar, S.D., Sethi, R. Srimal. R.C.
Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin
(diferoyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.
21.
Satoskar, R.R., Shah, S J. Shenoy, S.G. Evaluation of
anti-inflammatory property of curcumin (diferoyl methane) in
patients with postoperative inflammation. International Journal
of Clinical Pharmacology, Therapy and Toxicolgy
1986;24(12):651-54.
22. Atal, C., Zutshi, U., Rao, P.
Scientific evidence on the role of Ayurvedic herbals on
bioavailability of drugs. Journal of Ethnopharmacology
1981;4:229-232.
23. Bioperine®–Nature's Bioavailability
Enhancing Thermonutrient. Executive Summary. 1996; Sabinsa
Corporation, Piscataway, N.J.
24. Shoba, G., et al. Influence
of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and
human volunteers. Planta Medica 1998;64(4):353-6.

© 2002
Doctor's Best, Inc. Revised 8/13/02

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.



--
Vitanet ®

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HISTORY
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 25, 2005 09:58 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: HISTORY

HISTORY

For thousands of years amazing magical and medicinal powers have been attributed to garlic. Prized as a legendary protectant against vampires in Transylvania, it has also been used to enhance sexual prowess and fight off infections. Referred to as “the stinking rose,” it is mentioned in Bible, the Talmud, and in the Odyssey by Homer as well. The Egyptians looked to garlic as a tonic which boosted physical strength and consumed it while building the pyramids. The Greeks utilized its laxative properties, and the Chinese prescribed it for high blood pressure. Vikings and Phoenicians alike extolled the virtues of garlic and used it both for flavoring foods and treating disease.

Garlic is a hardy, perennial Bulb which is native to the Mediterranean regions of Africa and Europe. Along with onions, leeks, chives and shallots, garlic is a member of the lily family. The botanical name for garlic, allium sativum may have been derived from the celtic word all which refers to “pungent.” The edible portion of the garlic plant grows underground and consists of a cloved Bulb.

Hippocrates believed that garlic could treat uterine cancer and Native Americans used it for stomach cancer. During the Bubonic Plague years in Europe, garlic was used to boost immunity against the infectious organism responsible for so many deaths. Several accounts relate that survivors of the plague were frequently those who had routinely ingested large amounts of garlic. A sixteenth- century herbalist writes, referring to garlic, “The virtue of this herb is thus. It will unbind all wicked winds within a man’s body.”1

During the eighteenth century, Russians utilized garlic to treat influenza. Eventually, garlic would become known as “Russian penicillin.” American colonists regarded garlic for its ability to kill parasites.

In the nineteenth century, Louis Pasteur finally proved scientifically that garlic contains antibiotic properties. His discovery led to the initiation of hundreds of studies which have substantiated his findings. What was thought to be nothing more than a culinary ingredient has medicinal value. Garlic can effectively kill bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. In the late nineteenth century, garlic was routinely used by physicians as an effective treatment for typhus, cholera and whooping cough. It was highly recommended by medical practitioners and considered as staple treatment for infection. Albert Schweitzer used garlic for treating amebic dysentery in Africa. Early in this century, tuberculosis was treated with garlic and it was also used as an antibiotic/antiseptic for wounds during World War II. American and European doctors alike noted a remarkable high cure rate in tuberculosis patients treated with garlic.

2 Septic poisoning and gangrene, which can so quickly develop in battlefield wounds were prevented to a significant degree by using garlic. During the 1950’s Chinese scientists used garlic to successfully treat influenza. Subsequently, western studies found that garlic was an effective treatment for the common cold. Today the widespread use of antibiotics have relegated garlic to the back burner of medicinal therapies for infection. The discovery of penicillin resulted in classifying garlic as nothing more than a folk remedy. Unfortunately, for several decades its medicinal potential was no longer taken seriously by scientists. Over the last decade, scientific interest in garlic has dramatically escalated. In 1990, the First World Congress on the Health Significance of garlic and Garlic Constituents was held in Washington D.C. Herbalists have always considered garlic as an effective treatment and preventative agent against colds, flu and other infectious diseases. The present focus on garlic as a medicinal agent promises to support the notion that garlic should be utilized by medical practitioners much more than it currently is.

Recently, medical research has focused on garlic’s potential value in treating cardiovascular disorders and as an anti-cancer agent. This renewed interest in garlic has contributed to the development of the “Designer Foods Program” which is sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.3 This agency investigates foods that may be effective cancer preventatives. Garlic is one of those foods which may have profound cancer prevention potential.

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GARLIC (allium sativum)
TopPreviousNext

Date: June 25, 2005 09:54 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: GARLIC (allium sativum)

GARLIC (allium sativum)

Common Names: Stinking Rose, Poor Man’s Treacle

Plant Parts: Bulb

Active Compounds: Garlic contains more than 200 chemical compounds.

Some of its more important ones include: volatile oil with sulphur-containing compounds: (allicin, alliin, and ajoene), and enzymes: (allinase, peroxidase and myrosinase). Allicin is what gives garlic its antibiotic properties and is responsible for its strong odor. Ajoene contributes to the anticoagulant action of garlic. Garlic also contains citral, geraniol, linalool, Aphellandrene and B phellandrene. The allyl contained in garlic is also found in several members of the onion family and is considered a very valuable therapeutic compound.

Pharmacology: The allicins contained in garlic have a fibrinolytic activity which reduces platelet aggregation by inhibiting prostaglandin E2. Allivium sativum has also exerted some effect on glucose tolerance for both hypo-and hyperglycemia by reducing insulin require-ments to control blood sugar. The compounds contained in garlic have also demonstrated their ability to lower total serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels while elevating HDL levels. LDL synthesis is suppressed by garlic. Garlic allicins have also acted as a larvacide and bacteriostat, active against gram-positive or gram-negative microorganisms. In addition, the compounds can destroy certain fungi such as Candida albicans. Several other microbes are effected by garlic, including some viruses. Most researchers agree that the sulfur containing compounds of garlic, especially allicin, alliin, cy-croalliin, and dialllyldisulphide are the most biochemically active. In addition, certain unidentified substances of garlic will probably emerge as other therapeutic agents.

(Note: Before a Bulb of garlic is crushed or chopped, it contains relatively few medically active compounds. Once it is cut, however, chemical reactions take place which create dozens of new compounds.)

Vitamin and Mineral Content: B-vitamins especially B-1, vitamin C, vitamin A, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, phosphorous, potassium, sulphur, selenium, calcium, magnesium, germanium, sodium, iron, manganese and trace iodine. Seventeen amino acids are found in garlic, including eight essential ones.

Character: antibiotic, antihistamine, anticoagulant, expectorant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, alterative, diaphoretic, diuretic , expectorant, stimulant, antispasmodic, promotes sweating, lowers blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels, lowers blood pressure Body Systems Targeted: respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, and nervous systems

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Mane Attraction - lustrous Hair...
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Date: June 14, 2005 08:19 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Mane Attraction - lustrous Hair...

Mane Attraction by Chrystle Fiedler Energy Times, February 12, 2004

  • The Nature of Hair
  • Hair's Natural Nutrients
  • Ancient Chinese Hair Secrets
  • Revive Hair Glow
  • Go Natural
  • Everyone wants thick, lustrous hair. Think of the allure attached to the locks of Samson and Lady Godiva and-fast-forward to the present-the full heads of Antonio Banderas and Julia Roberts.

    " We're naturally attracted to hair as humans; it catches the light, it frames the face, we like the feel of it," says Catherine Jones, ND, LAc, a resident naturopathic physician at Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Seattle, Washington. "Fair or not, historically in many cultures, rich, thick hair has been a sign of fertility and strength."

    Along with that allure, latching onto natural ways to have great-looking hair gives you the benefits of looks and health. Every hair starts with a shaft that grows from a root. "The root is contained deep within the hair follicle," says Dr. Jones. "Each one has a sebaceous or oil gland, which supplies the hair with necessary lubrication as it approaches the surface of the scalp." Each hair follicle has its own growth cycle, including a resting period, the telogen phase, when hair falls out. Because of these constant hair phases, each of us loses, on average, about 100 hairs a day.

    " The number of hairs the average person loses in a day tends to increase in the fall as the leaves fall from the tree and tends to decrease in the spring as the Bulbs emerge from the soil," Dr. Jones says. "We really are connected to nature." Stress-due to rapid weight loss, infection, anemia, prolonged illness, hormonal changes, hypoactive thyroid disease, autoimmune conditions, eczema or psoriasis-can influence hair growth and loss.

    The Nature of Hair

    Hair consists of proteins, lipids (fats), carbohydrates and pigment (gray hair has reduced pigment; white, none at all). Each shaft's structure is divided into a medulla, a cortex and an outer cuticle. " The cuticle is coated with an outside lipid-like layer, which protects the hair," says Dr. Jones. "As the hair grows out of the follicle, the cortex and cuticle become keratinized and harden." Dry or damaged hair is more susceptible to breakage. "The condition of the cuticle affects how the light reflects off the hair, giving it highlights and luster," Dr. Jones says. "Luster is affected both by what occurs inside the body as the hair is developing and what happens to the hair after it has grown from the shaft."

    Sun, heat, moisture, pollution and hair products, dyes and bleaches can all dull the hair. "Applying chemical solutions to the hair, color, permanent waves or curl relaxers, damage the protein molecules that wrap around the shaft, leaving hair brittle and dull," says Christina Pirello, author of Glow: A Prescription for Radiant Health and Beauty (HP Books).

    Conditioners and oils can leave a residue or weigh hair down. Hair sprays and products that contain alcohol can dry and damage the hair, as can using blow dryers and curling irons.

    Hair's Natural Nutrients

    To combat hair-raising havoc, feed your hair natural nutrients for health. Silica and plants that contain silica/silicon both strengthen hair and promote growth. "Silica is a good mineral for hair health," says Walter Siegordner, founder of The Aurora Group, a personal care company. "It helps in the keratinization process of the cells that produce hair."

    " Silica is a mineral that is involved in the synthesis of bone and connective tissue," adds Dr. Jones. "The hair follicle contains connective tissue so silica may promote the health and function of the follicle itself." Silica-containing herbs include nettles (Urtica dioica), horsetail (Equisetum arvense), oatstraw (Avena sativa) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    Sea plants like seaweed and kelp also provide vital nutrients. "Sea plants are essential ingredients in many natural shampoos and can be used to fortify damaged hair," says Pirello. "They're rich in vitamin A that prevents the build-up of dead skin cells, which can clog the hair follicles, inhibiting the growth and health of the hair, and also contain vitamin B, linked to the prevention of oily hair, baldness and dandruff. Calcium found in sea plants is essential to the structure of the hair shaft."

    Eaten on s daily basis, sea plants are rich in nutrients that help maintain healthy, shiny hair, free of split ends, Pirello says. Try wakame in soups and salads, kombu or kelp in bean and vegetable dishes, nori in sushi, and hiziki and arame as side dishes. Since hair health is affected by digestive health, the fiber found in whole grains also helps. "Fiber prevents accumulation in the intestines that can result in the formation of toxins," says Pirello.

    Miso, she adds, is especially good hair food. It "is rich in living enzymes that ease digestion, fortify the quality of the blood nourishing the body and hair, and provide us with essential oils, vitamins and minerals."

    Key nutritional support includes adequate protein and amino acids, essential fatty acids such as cold-pressed flax seed oil and fish oil, copper, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin D, biotin, iron and vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid). Zinc and selenium can help combat the effects of hyperthyroidism, which can result in thinning, lackluster hair.

    Vitamin C can boost adrenal health. "When the adrenals are overtaxed and become fatigued, hair follicles will go into a resting phase," says Dr. Jones. (If you have a medical condition, she adds, check with your health care practitioner first before taking supplements.)

    Ancient Chinese Hair Secrets

    In Traditional Chinese Medicine, hair is associated with the kidneys' qi, energy that originates in these organs, and with blood quality. " From the traditional Chinese perspective, excess amounts of fat, protein, dairy, sugar, alcohol and salt in the diet acidify the body, damage the Kidney qi and are not good for the hair," says Dr. Jones. A diet rich in vegetables and grains is a great way to support healthy hair. "Iron and mineral-rich foods are considered blood builders and hair tonics. Foods such as blackstrap molasses, seaweed, nettles, and the herb polygonum multiflorum (also known as He Shou Wu and Fo-Ti) have been used throughout the years. Fo-Ti has also been used to prevent graying of the hair and support the immune system."

    Revive Hair Glow

    " Hair is extremely strong but at the same time it's extremely delicate," says Barsoum Bouchar, a cosmetologist and owner of the Virtuoso Salon in Birmingham, Michigan. "Many products work against the hair texture, so the cuticle is always raised. This causes tangles and split ends. With blow dryers, chemicals, colors and styling elements, the hair is tremendously abused." If you don't have to chemically treat the hair, he says, don't.

    When replenishing the hair it's important to remember that it's composed of 97% protein and 3% moisture, says Bouchar. Shampoo cleanses the hair and removes buildup. "A moisturizer brings moisture back into the hair and smoothes the cuticle down, which is what makes hair shiny and gives it bounce. The one key ingredient in both shampoo and moisturizers is aloe vera. It heals the hair." " Avoid products with harsh surfactants like sodium laurel sulfate and propylene glycol," warns Siegordner. "These decrease the circulation in the scalp, reducing the pathway for nutrition to the hair Bulb." Conditioners that aren't natural can also cause build-up. "When you apply heat to the hair through blow drying or styling, you end up 'burning' the hair," says Bouchar.

    To stimulate hair growth, add a few drops of essential oils of rosemary, lavender and thyme to jojoba and almond oils, and rub into the scalp. Leave it overnight and then rinse it off. " Essential oils have antimicrobial and antifungal properties, stimulate the circulation to the hair follicles and combat dryness. They also smell good," says Dr. Jones.

    For hair that's not chemically treated, "a vinegar rinse cleanses the hair, removes build-up and boosts shine," says Bouchar. Use one part vinegar to ten parts water, apply after a shampoo, comb though and rinse it off. To naturally lighten the hair, use the same ratio in a lemon rinse for five minutes for, say, four days in a row, and then stop.

    If you want to color your hair, choose natural elements, too. "The best natural dye is henna," says Bouchar. "It's organic, just like hair is." Blonde hair becomes warmer with a coppery tone, brunette hair takes on a mahogany hue, gray hair looks like highlights.

    Go Natural

    To find a good natural hair stylist, Bouchar suggests asking which products they use and why. If your hair is chemically treated, it's especially important to work with a stylist you trust for the best care.

    Keep your eye on the big picture when it comes to hair health. "Be proactive and treat the body holistically," urges Dr. Jones. "Nourish the glands, the organs and the vessels that are responsible for getting the necessary nutrients to the hair follicle. Pay attention to the physical, emotional and mental aspects of health. Once hair is lost it may come back but it will likely be thinner than it was before. It's important to take care of what you have."



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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    Botanical Arsenal - Plants can help our bodies fight off cancer's deadly ...
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    Date: June 13, 2005 10:31 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Botanical Arsenal - Plants can help our bodies fight off cancer's deadly ...

    Botanical Arsenal by Fred Thomas Energy Times, May 3, 1999

    The complexities surrounding the various types of cancer stem from the variety of ways in which these diseases can wreak their havoc. Luckily, the equally complex world of plants contains novel compounds that can help our bodies fight off cancer's deadly progress.

    Research Expands

    Research into these botanical compounds is mushrooming. An example: The mighty maitake, a fungus with flair, alternately known as the king (it can grow as large as a basketball, worth its weight in silver to the ancient Japanese); the prince; the Hen of the Woods (it sticks out of from trees when it grows in the wild); and the dancing mushroom to those who leaped for joy when they found one growing in its native northeastern Japan.

    Researchers today dub it with a new moniker: Herbal Heavyweight.

    Mushroom with Potential

    The maitake, with such other medicinal mushrooms as shiitake and reishi, historically has been eaten to promote general well-being and vitality. In the modern lab, however, scientists focus on the potent immune enhancing powers of maitake, which spotlight its cancer fighting potential.

    Twenty years ago, maitake, Grifola frondosa, was an obscure, largely unavailable mushroom. A series of significant Japanese studies then catapulted it into prominence-and popularity.

    Maitake Magic

    Hiroaki Nanba, PhD, of the department of immunology at Kobe Women's College of Pharmacy on Kobe, Japan, and a leading international researcher on maitake, conducted the preliminary tests on the mushroom, demonstrating that it stimulates immune function and inhibits tumor growth.

    In 1986, Dr. Nanba fed powdered maitake to mice injected with tumor cells; 86.3% displayed inhibited tumor growth.

    Dr. Nanba and his colleagues went on to run additional mouse tests, finally reporting that this potent mushroom "directly activates various effector cells (macrophages, natural killer cells, killer T-cells, etc.) to attack tumor cells."

    From then, maitake mushrooms were headed to fame as cancer ninjas.

    Stoking The Immune Engine

    Like other mushrooms, maitake is rich in complex polysaccharides, immunomodulators that successive tests after Dr. Nanba's have shown to be effective in cancer and AIDS treatment.

    The polysaccharides in maitake have a unique structure, rendering them some of the most powerful to be studied (Chem Pharm Bull 1987:35:1162-8).

    What makes maitake a particularly hot property is beta-D-glucan, its primary polysaccharide. Studies show that the body absorbs it readily, at which point it effectively stimulates interleukin-1, natural killer cells and macrophages, anti-tumor warriors that battle solid cancers (Chemotherapy 1990;38:790-6; also International Conference on AIDS, Amsterdam, 1992).

    Effective And Safe

    In addition to lab tests, trials on people have shown that maitake may offer powerful therapy against liver and stomach cancer (studies in China), breast and colon cancer (US research) and Kaposi's Sarcoma, the virulent cancer attacking AIDS sufferers.

    Importantly, studies show that no side effects or interactions accompany maitake's efficacy.

    Maitake fortunately has won the interest and enthusiasm of the scientific community. Currently, researchers at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, headed by Denis Miller, MD, are completing an exhaustive test of the anticancer and immunostimulatory actions of maitake on folks with advanced colorectal cancer. These investigators hypothesize that the polysaccharide beta-glucans derived from the fruitbody of maitake fight tumors and boost immune function. "Though it cannot be said that maitake ...[is] the cancer cure," said Dr. Nanba in his closing remarks at the Adjuvant Nutrition in Cancer Treatment Symposium in Tampa, Florida, in October 1995, "one can safely say that they do maintain the quality of life of patients and improve the immune system, resulting in the possible remission of cancer cells with no side effects."

    More Bodily Benefits

    Maitake maven Dr. Nanba also has tested-with strongly positive results-the effect of maitake on blood glucose, insulin and triglycerides in mice, whose levels of all three substances declined when they were fed the mushroom (H. Nanba working paper, Anti-Diabetic Activity by Maitake Mushroom, 1994).

    With colleagues, Dr. Nanba showed that maitake lowered blood pressure in hypertensive rats (Chem. Phann. Bu//36:1000-1006,1988). Other studies suggest it may accelerate weight loss.

    This admirable adaptogen (meaning it helps the body adapt to stress and normalize its functions) is water soluble and may be eaten in food or taken as a supplement. Vitamin C is believed to intensify maitake's beta-glucans and enhance their absorption.

    Tea Time

    It's not just what you eat that may help protect against cancer, but what you drink as well. Research from China and Japan, where tea is the everyday drink and rates of several cancers like breast and prostate are lower, may persuade you to turn over a new leaf in your own beverage choice. One of the first studies to spark interest in tea came from Shanghai (Journal of the National Cancer Institute, June 1, 1994), where people who drank two to three cups a day were found to have about a 60% reduction in the risk of cancer of the esophagus. The reason: tea leaves contain compounds called polyphenols, potent antioxidants.

    In fact, in tests at the University of Kansas, three of these, known as catechins, far outshone the common antioxidant vitamins C and E. Clinical trials are just starting, but early results are encouraging. A team of Chinese scientists reported that in a third of people with precancerous mouth sores who drank three cups of a mixture of green and black tea the lesions shrank significantly.

    Researchers at the Saitama Cancer Center in Japan found that green tea seems to improve the prognosis of breast cancer. They followed a group of women with early-stage tumors for seven years. Those who drank more than five cups of green tea a day were only half as likely to suffer a recurrence as patients who consumed fewer than four cups a day.

    Lung Help

    And at the University of Indiana, toxicologist James Klaunig found that the lungs of cigarette smokers who drank the equivalent of six cups of tea a day suffered 40 to 50 percent less damage from the toxins in smoke, potentially lowering their risk of lung cancer and other pulmonary problems. Simultaneously, research from Purdue University suggests tea's cancer-discouraging powers go beyond being an antioxidant. Scientists Dorothy and D. James Morre showed that a tea catechin dubbed EGCG inhibits a growth-promoting enzyme on the surface of many cancer cells-happily without affecting normal cells. And researchers at the Ohio State University College of Medicine found that EGCG counteracted another enzyme, urokinase, that helps cancer cells spread. To top it off, Mayo Clinic scientists recently showed that EGCG prompted prostate cancer cells to commit suicide (Cancer Letters, Aug. 14, 1998).

    Tea Research

    So far, most tea research has focused on green tea, and investigators agree it's more potent than the black tea most Americans favor. But because both kinds come from the same plant, Camellia sinensis (it's the processing that makes the difference as black tea is fermented, green tea isn't) both contain cancer-fighting polyphenols, just in different quantities. As long as the tea you drink (even decaffeinated) is fresh brewed, it's likely to provide some benefit; powdered and prepared teas probably don't. And adding milk may dilute the effect.

    Astragalus Against Tumors

    Astragalus, an herb commonly used in Asia to boost stamina, has impressed western doctors for its potential for helping people cope with chemotherapy. As John Diamon, MD, W. Lee Cowden, MD and Burton Goldberg point out in the Definitive Guide to Cancer (Future Medicine), "Astragalus appears to protect the liver against the harmful toxic effects of chemotherapy and may be effective in treating terminally ill liver cancer patients." (They cite a study in the Jrnl of Ethnopharmacology 1990, 30:145-149.) In addition, they point out, research in Japan supports using a ginseng-astragalus combination to improve the function of natural killer (NK) cells which can boost immunity (Japanese Jrnl of Allergy, 37:2, 1998, 107-114).

    Other studies confirm astragalus' potential in fighting off cancer. Research at the General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, showed that flavonoids (pigments) in astragalus could help protect cell membranes from oxidative damage caused by ultraviolet exposure (Chung Kuo Chung Yao Tsa Chih, 21(12):746-8; 1996 Dec).

    A study of laboratory animals at Cunma University in Maebashi, Japan, found that Astragalus could help preserve immune function against the harmful side effects of chemotherapy (Chung Kuo Chung Hsi I Chieh Ho Tsa Chih, 15(2):101-3, 1995 Feb).

    Garlic Benefits

    Like a flame attracting moths, garlic Bulbs have irresistibly drawn the attention of medical researchers. A study at Aarhus University, Denmark, found that skin cells in laboratory dishes treated with garlic supplements lived longer, healthier lives than untreated cells (Jrnl Ethnopharm, 1994. 43:125-133).

    Meanwhile, a long list of research demonstrates that garlic's phytochemicals may fight tumors and reduce the carcinogenicity of the pollutants and chemicals that assault us daily. A study in China reported in the American Journal of Chinese Medicine showed that garlic helped slow tumors in lab animals (1983, 11:69-73). Another study in the Journal of Nutrition found that compounds in garlic could "suppress the growth of human colon tumor cells" (126, 1355-1361).

    Added to those benefits, Robert A. Nagourney, MD, reports in the Journal of Medicinal Food (1:1, 1998, 13-28), garlic may "modify the carcinogenicity of foodstuffs." In other words, studies show that garlic can make chemicals in foods like pork less likely to cause your cells to become cancerous. (Ind J Physiol Pharmacol, 39:347-353).

    DNA Protection

    DNA, the stuff that genes are made of, face constant threats from free radicals, caustic molecules that can alter cellular structure and possibly cause genetic mutations that lead to cancer. But research into what are called oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC), flavonoids (pigments) derived from fruits vegetables, grape seed extract and the bark of maritime pine trees shows that OPC may be able to shield DNA from injury.

    In particular, studies of a grape seed extract called Activin have demonstrated this substance can help liver cell DNA escape a destructive process called peroxidation (FASEB, 11:3, 2/28/97).

    In these experiments, Activin demonstrated the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor cells as well as slow the replication enzymes of HIV viruses. This protective ability proved to be more potent than that of vitamin C, beta carotene and vitamin E.

    Future Promise

    What does the future promise to reveal? Scientists believe that many unexamined plants probably contain undiscovered phytochemicals that hold great potential for helping us fight the cancer epidemic.

    Certainly, if the next few years produce as many results as the past decade, the next millennium will witness a long line of cancer-prevention discoveries. Before long, you should be able to take advantage of these potent substances.

    As you gulp your garlic, tip your tea cup, mull your maitake, acquire Activin and await your astragalus, you may meditate on what may soon be added to our growing anti-cancer arsenal. Undoubtedly, scientists with a botanical bent will be uncovering more coveted anti-cancer secrets before too long.



    --
    Vitanet ®

    Solaray - Ultimate Nutrition - Actipet Pet supplements - Action Labs - Sunny Greens - Thompson nutritional - Natural Sport - Veg Life Vegan Line - Premier One - NaturalMax - Kal

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    Aromessentials
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    Date: June 10, 2005 05:38 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Aromessentials

    Aromessentials by Joanne Gallo , February 3, 2002

    Aromessentials By Joanne Gallo

    But aromatherapy is more than just a '90s-style novelty. The practice of using aromatic essential oils for psychological and physical well-being dates back more than 4,000 years to medicinal practices in Egypt and India.

    The term "aromatherapy" was coined in 1937 by French cosmetic chemist R.M. Gattefosse, who discovered the benefits of essential oil after burning his hand in a laboratory accident. Gattefosse immersed his hand into the nearest available cool liquid: a vat of lavender oil. The near miraculous soothing of his pain and rapid healing spurred him to dedicate his life to the study of aromatic plants and their therapeutic effects.

    How it Works

    For those who turn their noses up at this most seemingly-subtle of senses, keep in mind that the perception of smell is 10,000 times more sensitive than the sense of taste. "The sense of smell is the sense of the imagination," noted French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau; this emotional connection lies at the heart of aromatherapy.

    Aromas are transmitted rapidly from olfactory cells in the nose to the limbic system in the brain which perceives and responds to emotion, pleasure and memory. Scents trigger the limbic system to release neurochemicals which influence mood. Well-known neurochemicals like endorphins and serotonin help create a sense of well-being.

    When you inhale essential oils, some of the molecules travel to the lungs, where they proceed to enter the bloodstream and circulate throughout the body.

    Oils applied to the skin are absorbed into the bloodstream as well. Because they are oil/fat soluble, essential oils are highly absorbed by the body, where they circulate for anywhere from 20 minutes to 24 hours and are eventually eliminated through sweat and other bodily secretions.

    Plant Power

    Essential oils are extremely potent and volatile: approximately 75 to 100 times more concentrated than dried herbs.

    Most essential oils are steam distilled from herbs, flowers and plants. Others are cold expressed from the rind of the fruit, which produces the purest essential oils because no heat or chemical treatment is involved.

    The components of various oils are beneficial for a wide variety of beauty and hygiene conditions. Some of the more indispensable essential oils include:

    Chamomile (anthemis nobilis): soothing properties for sensitive and inflamed skin; calming, balancing and relaxing.

    Clary Sage (salvia sclarea): warming, female balancing herb used for PMS; calms anxiety, tension and stress; also used as a muscle relaxant for aches and pains.

    Eucalyptus (eucalyptus globulus): antibacterial; fresh, herbal menthol aroma; widely used as an inhalant for colds, coughs and congestion; excellent for massaging tired or sore muscles.

    Geranium (pelargonium graveolens): one of the best all-around tonic oils for mind and body; soothes nervous tension and mood swings; balances female hormones and PMS; gently astringent and antiseptic, it improves general tone and texture of skin.

    Jasmine (jasminum grandiflorum): a warm, rich, sensual floral scent used historically as an aphrodisiac; moisturizing for dry/mature skin.

    Lemon (citrus limonum): refreshing and invigorating; eases tension and depression; useful for oily skin and treatment of acne.

    Peppermint (mentha piperita): cool, menthol, invigorating stimulant; cleans and purifies the skin.

    Rosemary (rosmarinus officinalis): stimulating and uplifting; purifying and cleansing for all skin types; warm and penetrating for massage to ease muscular aches and pains.

    Tea Tree (melaleuca alternifolia): an antiseptic from the leaves of the Australian tea tree; antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral; excellent for skin irritations like cold sores, insect bites and acne.

    Ylang Ylang (cananga odorata): enticing and sensual; helps alleviate anger, stress, insomnia and hypertension; helps balance the skin's sebaceous secretions.

    Oil Well

    Essential oils can be utilized in a variety of ways: in electric or candle-based diffusers, to spread the aroma through a room; in sachets and air fresheners; added to shampoos and lotions; or diluted and applied to pulse points like the temples, on neck or on wrists. Undiluted essential oils should never be applied to the skin. First mix them with carrier oils: pure vegetable oils such as sweet almond oil, grapeseed oil and apricot kernel oil. Use a general guideline of six to 18 drops of essential oil per one ounce of vegetable oil. Blended, diluted oils are also available which can be used directly on your skin.

    Pond's Aromatherapy Capsules come in four scents: Happy, which is fruity and floral; Romantic,with musk and vanilla; Relaxing, a floral and woodsy aroma; and Energizing, with fresh citrus and bright floral scents.

    Sarah Michaels offers four essential oil blends: Sensual Jasmine, Soothing Lavender, Refreshing Citrus and Invigorating Peppermint.

    The San Francisco Soap Company's Simply Be Well Line features an essential oil light ring set, a diffuser that uses the heat of a light Bulb to spread an aroma through your room.

    Tub Time

    One of the most popular and luxurious ways to enjoy aromatherapy is in a steaming hot bath. Numerous bath products formulated with plant essences can turn your tub time into a rejuvenating experience. Body & Earth features Body Wash, Foam Bath and Soap in five essences: Vanilla Serenity, Lavender Whisper, Playful Peach, Raspberry Rapture and Pear Essence.

    The Healing Garden offers a full line of aromatherapy products; try their Tangerinetherapy Wake Up Call Body Cleanser, Gingerlily Therapy Upbeat Bath & Shower Gel; or Minttherapy Fresh Start Bath & Shower Gel.

    Simply Be Well products take traditional aromatherapy one step further by combining essential oils with herbal extracts and natural nutrients.

    The line includes Shower Gel and Bath Salts in four fragrances: Explore contains ginkgo, eucalyptus, lemon and vitamin B6; Share features dong quai, passionflower, ylang ylang and zinc; Unwind includes kava kava, geranium, lavender and vitamin E; and Celebrate contains ginseng, wild mint, hemp and vitamin C.

    Yardley London Bar Soaps, formulated with botanicals and moisturizers, are available in five fragrances: soothing English Lavender, exfoliating Oatmeal and Almond, Aloe Vera for natural healing, skin-softening Chamomile Essence, and astringent Evening Primrose.

    Skin Deep

    "Aromatherapy and the cosmetic use of essential oils have made a tremendous contribution to skin care," asserts Joni Loughran, author of Natural Skin Care: Alternative & Traditional Techniques (Frog, Ltd.). "Every type of skin (such as oily, dry, and normal) can benefit." Some of the natural products that can help balance your skin include these:

    Kiss My Face Foaming Facial Cleanser for Normal/Oily skin features citrus oils which act as antiseptics, marigold for healing, licorice root for toning, lavender to normalize oil production, plus the antioxidant green tea.

    Kiss My Face's Gentle Face Cleaner for Normal/Dry skin includes essential oils plus organic, detoxifying herbs goldenseal and red clover, echinacea and rose hips with natural vitamin C.

    Naturistics Almond Facial Moisture Cream contains almond, allantoin and calendula to smooth dry skin; Wild Chamomile Facial Lotion with rose hips and honeysuckle soothes and conditions rough skin.

    Simply Be Well products, which use essential oils combined with herbal extracts like ginkgo and dong quai, are available in Body Lotion and Body Mist.

    Wicks and Sticks

    Perhaps the easiest way to get your aromatherapy fix is to light a candle and just sit back, relax and breathe.

    The Healing Garden offers a wide variety of aromatic candles to suit your every mood; try their Green Teatherapy Meditation Candle; Jasminetherapy Embrace the Light Love Candle; or Lavendertherapy Peace & Tranquility Candle.



    --
    Vitanet ®

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    Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips
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    Date: June 09, 2005 09:12 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips

    Source Naturals' Allergy and Sinus Lifestyle Plan

    Allergies are a growing health problem in the United States, according to a recent report issued by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAI). Every year more than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies. They are the sixth leading cause of chronic disease and affect more than 20% of the population. Hay fever alone accounts for more than eight million doctor visits annually, at a cost of $3.4 billion!

    Source Naturals, as part of its commitment to Strategies for Wellness offers you these healthy lifestyle tips for allergy and sinus support.

    Allergy & Sinus Season: Healthy Lifestyle Tips

    Allergies are adverse reactions of the immune system to normally harmless substances?allergens. Some common allergens are pollen, weeds, molds, dust mites, animal dander, and latex particles.

    Allergens can enter the body through inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, or injection (either intentionally as in the case of certain medications or through insect stings). Although there is a strong genetic component to allergies, there are also lifestyle factors we can control to prevent or minimize allergic reactions. Allergies are actually 'mistakes' or overreactions by the immune system. They are learned responses, which can be unlearned.

    Allergy Proof Your Home

    Cut down your exposure to dust mites and other indoor allergens by dust proofing your bedroom. Eliminate wall-to-wall carpets, down-filled blankets, feather pillows, and other dust catchers. Use window shades instead of venetian blinds, which can trap dust. Wash curtains and bedding regularly in hot water. Encase your mattress and pillows in airtight, dust-proof plastic covers. Dust and vacuum regularly.

    If you have pets, especially cats, you should try to keep them out of your bedroom. Frequent brushing and bathing of pets can help get rid of excess hair.

    Consider using a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter system if you have allergies to pollen, dust, or other particles -- or if you live with a smoker, or in a smoggy urban area. Dehumidifiers can help cut down on molds.

    Avoid Outdoor Allergens

    You may need to limit your time outdoors when pollen or mold spore counts are high. Walking through uncut fields or raking leaves can increase exposure to molds and fungi. Avoid tobacco smoke and polluted air. Keep windows and doors closed, and dry clothes in a vented dryer instead of outside.

    Watch Your Diet

    Sometimes 'avoidance therapy' to control allergies is impractical or undesirable. Diet is easier to work with and can have a significant influence on immune reactions. Excess or undigested dietary proteins may worsen an overresponsive immune system?cows' milk and wheat are frequent offenders. Cut down on protein, especially animal protein, avoid dairy products, and eat more fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates. You should also avoid nutritionless foods such as simple sugars.

    Maintain Healthy Mucous Membranes

    The mucosal cells that line the nasal passages, throat and lungs are our first line of defense against airborne substances. One of the primary means of maintaining healthy mucous linings is to drink lots of pure water (6 to 8 glasses daily). This keeps mucus fluid thin and cleanses membranes. Nasal cleansing is helpful when sinuses are clogged. You can rinse the nasal passages with a warm solution consisting of a quarter-teaspoon of salt to a cup of warm water, about the same sodium concentration found in your blood and tissue fluids. This practice washes away pollen grains and soothes irritated mucous membranes. Nasal cleansing can be done using a rubber suction Bulb or a neti pot?a ceramic container used in Ayurveda that allows you to pour water directly into the nose. Inhaling steam with a little oil of eucalyptus in it may also ease clogged sinuses. Many people find acupuncture to be very effective for promoting sinus drainage.

    Supplementation

    Nutrients and herbs offer you safe, natural alternatives for supporting seasonal health. The bioflavonoid quercetin has been found in human cell culture studies to inhibit the release of histamines from immune cells. Ginkgo has been found in human cell culture studies to inhibit platelet-activating factor, a substance that stimulates the release of histamines. (Research is needed to determine if these effects occur in humans.) Stinging nettle is another herb that has been used traditionally to support a healthy respiratory system and sinuses. Vitamin A enhances macrophage function, is specifically needed for a healthy lung lining, and is beneficial for increasing the health of tissue cell membranes.



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