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The super powers of the schizandra berry Darrell Miller 6/29/18
Development of castor oil. Darrell Miller 1/3/17
Acai berries actually come from palm trees Darrell Miller 12/11/16
A brief history of cinnamon bark oil and its benefits Darrell Miller 2/14/14
Cinnamon Bark Darrell Miller 10/15/09
Long-Sought Food Labeling Law Underway Darrell Miller 3/19/09
Bilberry Darrell Miller 9/5/08
Weight Loss and Toxicity: The Missing Link Darrell Miller 11/22/05
THE FDA AND STEVIA Darrell Miller 7/15/05
Cinnamon may control sugar levels... Darrell Miller 7/8/05
Hoodia Gordonii - 20:1 Extract VS 1:1 Powder – The Whole Story Darrell Miller 6/29/05
What is the difference between the types of Ginseng? Darrell Miller 6/17/05



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The super powers of the schizandra berry
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Date: June 29, 2018 05:54 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: The super powers of the schizandra berry





The super powers of the schizandra berry

The Schizandra berry, a bright red berry native to China, Russia, Japan and Korea, has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine. The Schizandra has benefits for a variety of body systems, including the digestive system, liver and adrenals. Schizandra has a somewhat unusual, complex taste, but it can be good when mixed with other ingredients. Chinese Schizandra is often heavily contaminated by pollution, pesticides and radiation, both in China and when imported to the US, so always seek out organic American Schizandra.

Key Takeaways:

  • The schizandra berry is also called the five-flavored berry, because it encompasses the spectrum of flavor profiles, that is sweet, sour, bitter and pungent.
  • The schizandra berry is supportive of an array of human functions, including liver function, mental function, digestive functioning and immunity functioning.
  • As a dietary supplement, schizandra is available as a tonic, a tea, a capsule, or as a dried extract.

"While blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries are common, the shizandra berry is more of an ancient Chinese secret that is only now being fully discovered by health enthusiasts in North America as a medicinal berry that has a positive impact on all areas of the body."

Read more: https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-06-27-the-super-powers-of-the-schizandra-berry.html

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Development of castor oil.
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Date: January 03, 2017 09:46 PM
Author: Darrell Miller
Subject: Development of castor oil.

There are about hundreds of castor oil factories in China, of which only about 10% castor oil manufacturers start working; large processing plants have around 20; only nine plants have tens of thousands processing capacity. About 70% of Chinese castor oil processing factories in stop production or semi-shutdown state, because there are no adequate, high-quality raw material castor sources. At the end of the 1980s, China extends and built several large scale castor oil factories, each factory's total amount of annual output of castor oil are in 10 -15 thousand tons, total production capacity is about 55,000 tons per year.

The world's major markets of castor oil were concentrated in North America and Europe, of which the France, Britain, Netherlands, United States, Germany, five countries accounted for 61% of annual fuel consumption.

India castor oil used in making soap has about 1.6-1.8 million tons, the textile industry uses 2-3 thousand tons, chemical industries use 2-3 thousand tons, lubricating oil use 5-6 thousand tons, the rest for exporting. In Japan's castor oil use amount, paints accounted for 28.6%, the surfactant is 12.3%, cosmetic raw material is 8.2%, resin is 5.7%, hardened oil is 17.8%, sebum oil is 12.9%, others is 14.5%. Japan needs to import large quantities of castor beans every year; they are mostly Imported from China, Pakistan, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Philippines, Vietnam, Ethiopia, Brazil and other countries. Castor oil in the United States for the production of plastics and resins was accounted for 25.9%, fatty acids accounted for 12.7%, lubricating oil accounted for 6.3%, paint accounted for 23.7%, cosmetics (mainly synthetic waxes) accounted for 2.1%, others such as inks, surfactants accounted for 29.1%, these castor oils are Imported from foreign countries.

Every year, the world needs 700 thousand tons of castor oil, convert into 1.6 million tons castor beans. Nowadays, gasoline resource was gradually reduced, transportation, live used gasoline was rapidly increasing, use gasoline as a raw material for synthetic material will be increasingly constrained in cost. And the United States study found that long-term exposure to polymers which synthesized by gasoline was harmful to human health. California and some other states have enacted laws and regulations for this, to restrict and gradually prohibit using synthetic resin in city buildings, interior facilities and human health-related sites and articles, which is polymerized from petroleum, natural gas cleaved into monomers raw materials, it makes castor oil's demand was rising sharply.

Castor cultivation in China is very commonly; there is no open planted regional division. South from Hainan Island, north to Heilongjiang is cultivated. Because castor hybrids with drought resistance, thin ridge resistant, saline-alkaline tolerance, well-adapted, simple to manage, less invest, high efficiency and other salient features, no matter grain field or hills, rocky land, saline-alkali soil and even around the house can be grown it. So anywhere in China can be planted castor.


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Acai berries actually come from palm trees
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Date: December 11, 2016 02:59 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (support@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Acai berries actually come from palm trees





Most people have heard of acai berries by now. They are known for their high nutritional content, but a lot of people do not know of their exact origin. Many would assume they come from a bush like other similar berries. However, they actually come from palm trees in Brazil. For years, they were food for the poorer families in South America due to their availability and amount of nutrition. Unfortunately, the surge of popularity for the berries in other countries has driven up demand and prices for the fruit and caused them to be unattainable for most poor families.

Key Takeaways:

  • Acai berries have become very famous in recent years as an antioxidant-packed superfood.
  • Unfortunately, the growing global popularity of acai berries has led its price to increase in some parts of Brazil, pushing it out of reach for some of the poorest families.
  • This is a classic example of how global food politics can have unintended consequences and is a good reason to preferentially eat local superfoods over Imported ones.

"Acai berries have become so famous in recent years as an antioxidant-packed superfood that even many people who don't stay actively informed on health food topics have heard of them."



Reference:

//www.naturalnews.com/056199_acai_berries_palm_trees_antioxidants.html

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A brief history of cinnamon bark oil and its benefits
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Date: February 14, 2014 09:34 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: A brief history of cinnamon bark oil and its benefits

What is cinnamon

cinnamon barkCinnamon traces its roots to the biblical times of Moses. It was Imported to Egypt in the year 2000 BC by ancient travellers. It is one of the most valued herbs that is known to cure a variety of health complications.

Health benefits of cinnamon bark oil

The health benefits of cinnamon bark oil are attributed to the properties that it has. It is known to posses various beneficial properties. For instance, it is antifungal, antibacterial and antimicrobial. Cinnamon is also known to posses several beneficial minerals such as iron and calcium. Some of the treasured health benefits of cinnamon include:

I. Brain function

Cinnamon is one of the best products that can boost the activity of the brain. It aids in the elimination of memory loss and nervous tension. This ability was confirmed by a study that was conducted at the Wheeling Jesuit University in the USA.

II. Purification of blood

Cinnamon bark oil is a great blood purifier. This is why is normally used in treating pimples.

III. Circulation of blood

Cinnamon bark oil is the best product for those who intend to improve the circulation of blood in their bodies. Blood circulations are necessary since it aids in the transportation of oxygen and nutrients to all parts of the body. It is also important for the elimination of waste products.

IV. Pain relief

Cinnamon has always been prescribed for those who are feeling pain. It has anti-inflammatory properties that assist in getting rid of stiffness and pains in muscles as well as joints. Its anti-inflammatory property makes it an approved product for treating ailments such as arthritis.

V. Diabetes

Cinnamon bark oil can control blood sugar. According to a research study that was conducted in the United States, it was found out that cinnamon has special components that aids in the regulation of blood sugar.

VI. Control of infections

Cinnamon bark oil has anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties which aids in the control of infections that result from bacteria.

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Cinnamon Bark
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Date: October 15, 2009 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Cinnamon Bark

cinnamon treeThe cinnamon plant is a small evergreen tree that grows between thirty two and forty nine feet tall. This plant belongs to the Lauraceae family and is native to Sri Lanka. The leaves of the plant are ovate oblong in shape and approximately two to seven inches in length, while the flowers, which have a distinct odor, are greenish in color. The fruit is a purple berry about one-centimeter and contain a single seed. The flavor of cinnamon is the result of an essential oil which makes up about 1/2% to 1% of its composition. This oil can be prepared by roughly pounding the bark, macerating it in seawater, and quickly distilling the whole. The oil is of a golden-yellow color, with the characteristic odor of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste.

Cinnamon has been known from ancient times, with the first mention of particular spice in the Old Testament being of cinnamon. In this, Moses commanded the use of sweet cinnamon and cassia in the holy anointing oil. Additionally, cinnamon is also mentioned elsewhere in the bible. This herb was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was often looked upon as a gift fit for even God. Cinnamon was Imported to Egypt as early as 2000 B.C. The herb is also alluded to by Herodotus and other classical writers. Cinnamon was too expensive to be commonly used in funerals of ancient Rome. However, the Emperor Nero is said to have burned a year’s worth of the city’s supply at the funeral for his wife in 65 A.D.

Cinnamon can be harvested by growing the tree for two years and then coppicing it. About a dozen shoots will form from the roots in the next year. These shoots are then stripped of their bark and left to dry. Only the thin inner bark is used, while the outer woody portion is removed. Each dried strip of cinnamon are then cut into lengths of about five to ten centimeters for sale.

Cinnamon has been around for thousands of years. It is revered as a spice and also as a healing agent. Cinnamon was included in embalming oils by the Egyptians. This herb was used in China to treat fever, diarrhea, and menstrual problems dating as far back as 2000 BC. Cinnamon was a major trade commodity during the ancient times. Cinnamon grew in the southern regions of Asia originally. cinnamon tree This herb is used to help relieve upset stomachs, reduce milk flow, stop excessive menstrual flow, and alleviate back pain. Research has also determined that cinnamon contains components that possess antifungal and antibacterial capabilities. This herb is found in some toothpaste, which allows it to help some decay-causing bacteria. Cinnamon is also helpful for promoting healthy blood sugar levels.

The dried bark of the cinnamon plant is used to provide alterative, analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, sedative, stimulant, and stomachic properties. Primarily, cinnamon is beneficial in treating abdominal pain, candida, diarrhea, gas, gastric disorders, and indigestion.

Additionally, this herb is also extremely helpful in dealing with arthritis, asthma, backaches, bloating, bronchitis, cholera, coronary problems, fevers, excessive menstruation, nausea, nephritis, parasites, psoriasis, rheumatism, upset stomach, vomiting, and warts. For more information on the many beneficial effects provided by cinnamon, please contact a representative from your local health food store with questions.

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Long-Sought Food Labeling Law Underway
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Date: March 19, 2009 04:55 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Long-Sought Food Labeling Law Underway

Shoppers will have more information about where their food comes from under a new policy, which started this week. Labels on most fresh meats, along with some fruits, vegetables and other foods, will now list where the food originated. In the case of meats, some labels will list where the animal was born, raised and slaughtered.

This is good news to most American that fear they eat foods Imported form countries who do not have dumping regulations. Meaning some foods could be grown right next to a land fill that has all kinds of toxins brewing in it. Unhealthy to any who consume these foods.

Commodities covered under COOL must be labeled at retail to indicate its country of origin. For fish and shellfish, the method of production, wild or farm-raised, must be specified. Commodities are excluded from mandatory COOL if the commodity is an ingredient in a processed food item.

Hopefully more manufactures will comply with the new ruling and go beyond the standards to help Americans make a sound choice at the grocery store.



--
Vitanet ®, LLC

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Bilberry
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Date: September 05, 2008 09:02 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Bilberry

Bilberry has been used most commonly for centuries as a food, with the English traditionally eating bilberries with a rich cream. Large amounts of bilberries were Imported annually from Holland, Germany and Scandinavia for use by pastry cooks and restaurant keepers to make jams, liqueurs, wines, and desserts up until World War II. Bilberry’s use is not only limited to food, as the juice of bilberry yields a clear, dark blue or purplish dye that has often been used to color wool in England.

Over the years, the bilberry fruit has gained recognition for its medicinal properties. Decoctions of the leaves and bark of the root have been used for a topical application to treat mouth and throat ulcers. Syrups have also been made from a mixture of the berries and honey to treat intestinal issues.

Additionally, the berries are very rich in vitamin C, with their astringent action explaining their historical use for diarrhea and dysentery. Many believe that the berries contain a pigment that can kill many strains of bacteria. Bilberry fruit and tea that are dried have been used to treat nausea as well as indigestion. Along with the above, other traditional applications of bilberry include inflammation of the mucous membranes in the mouth and throat, eyestrain or fatigue, and as a circulatory tonic. The leaves and berries have also been used for a homeopathic treatment of diabetes.

One of the main reasons that bilberry’s medicinal value came to attention in the Western world was because of its legendary ability to improve the nighttime vision of the British Royal Air force pilots during World War II. After consuming bilberry, it was found that they experienced improved visual acuity, making it easier to carry our nighttime bombing raids. It was also found that their eyes could adjust to darkness quicker and their vision was able to better correct after the effects of prolonged glare.

In the proceeding years, scientific research found that bilberry offered a wide range of benefits for both vision and other vascular disorders. French studies found that bilberry supplementation significantly enhanced the ability to adjust for glare and darkness. Bilberry can help to prevent compromised vision for anyone who is susceptible to eyestrain. In the last few decades, more studies have confirmed the medicinal value of bilberry for a variety of eye disorders. Bilberry is routinely used by European medical practitioners for patients with cataracts, venous insufficiency, visual disorders, peptic ulcers, capillary fragility, and even dysmenorrheal.

Finally, bilberry has a great effect on the activity of many enzymes that participate in inflammatory responses. Those who bruise easily or have trouble with capillary weakness can benefit from the anthocyanidin content of bilberry. These anthocyanidins offer many actions including: stimulating the production of collagen; protecting existing collagen stores in the connective tissue; preventing the formation and release of inflammatory compounds including histamine, prostaglandins, and leukotrines; preventing certain enzyme reactions that occur as a result of inflammatory conditions; and scavenging for free radicals to reduce cellular damage from oxidizing agents.

--
Buy Bilberry at Vitanet ®, LLC

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Weight Loss and Toxicity: The Missing Link
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Date: November 22, 2005 10:44 AM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: Weight Loss and Toxicity: The Missing Link

We are THE toxic generation and therefore must become the DETOX GENERATION. The solution to all of the se conditions is to limit consumption of animal fats because most oil-soluble toxins accumulate in fat. The problem is not the saturated fat content found in animal foods, it’s the toxins that are stored in the animal’s fat. Choosing organic dairy and meats, as well as eating organic vegetables and fruits, is another helpful way to lower your exposure to fattening toxins. For good measure, it is imperative to fortify our intestinal tracts with good bacteria, because over 75 percent of the immune system’s receptor sites are located in the GI tract-so the GI tract, especially the colon, functions as a secondary immune system.

Here’s where a good probiotic can enter the picture. R. Fuller undertook the most recent and accurate description of probiotics in 1989 that redefined it as “a live microbial fee supplement beneficial to the host by improving the microbial balance within the body.” Think of a probiotic like you do your daily multi- it is, perhaps, even more essential.

Basically, there are over 100 trillion bacteria and around 400 different strains residing in your GI tract. The key is to have enough of the beneficial and essential bacteria. The optimum balance is 85 percent friendly bacteria to 15 percent unfriendly bacteria. And the trick is to make sure that if you take supplements for your probiotic needs, your supplement can really perform.

There are certain strains of lactic acid bacteria that can attach to your intestinal lining and produce antibodies that are lethal to the most disease producing bugs like the methicillin resistant staph, as well as E. coli (which is harbored in manure used as fertilizer and then shows up on your Imported foods) and H. pylor-the bug that causes ulcers, heart disease, migraines, and glaucoma. Simply put, probiotics crowd out the bad bugs by occupying most of the parking space in the bowel wall.

The most promising probiotic strain to be discovered since Metchnikoff isolated the beneficial bacteria from yogurt is the TH10 strain researched and formulated by Dr. I. Ohhira, one of Japan’s leading microbiologists, and a team of research scientists from Okayama University.

The TH10 strain is now available here in the U.S. in a probiotic formula known as Dr. Ohhira’s probiotics 12 PLUS. I have been an educator for this product for nearly five years since I discovered it and have found that after one day, my sensitive stomach no longer experienced bloating, flatulence, and other assorted discomforts. The product utilizes primary research, not borrowed science.

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THE FDA AND STEVIA
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Date: July 15, 2005 12:45 PM
Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
Subject: THE FDA AND STEVIA

THE FDA AND STEVIA

While stevia in no way qualifies as an “artificial sweetener,” it has been subject to rigorous inquiry and unprecedented restraints. In 1986, FDA officials began to investigate herb companies selling stevia and suddenly banned its sale, calling it “an unapproved food additive.” Then in 1991, the FDA unexpectedly announced that all importation of stevia leaves and products must cease, with the exception of certain liquid extracts which are designed for skin care only. They also issued formal warnings to companies and claimed that the herb was illegal. The FDA was unusually aggressive in its goal to eliminate stevia from American markets, utilizing search and seizure tactics, embargoes and import bans. Speculation as to why the FDA intervened in stevia commerce points to the politics of influential sugar marketers and the artificial-sweetener industry.

During the same year, the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) began their defense of the herb with the goal of convincing the FDA that stevia is completely safe. They gathered documented literature and research on both stevia and other non-caloric sweeteners. The overwhelming consensus was that stevia is indeed safe, and the AHPA petitioned the FDA to exempt stevia from food additive regulations.

Food Additive vs. Dietary Supplement

FDA regulations of stevia were based on its designation as a food additive. The claim was that scientific study on stevia as a food additive was inadequate. Ironically, extensive Japanese testing of stevia was disregarde—regardless of the fact that this body of documented evidence more than sufficiently supported its safe use. Many experts who have studied stevia and its FDA requirements have commented that the FDA wants far more proof that stevia is safe than they would demand from chemical additives like aspartame.

Stevia advocates point out that stevia not a food additive, but rather, a food. Apparently, foods that have traditionally been consumed do not require laborious and expensive testing for safety under FDA regulations. The fact that so many toxicology studies have been conducted in Japan, coupled with the herb’s long history of safe consumption, makes a strong case for stevia being accepted by the FDA as a safe dietary substance. Still, it was denied the official GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status and designated a food additive by the FDA.

The FDA Reverses Its Position

As a result of the Health Freedom Act passed in September of 1995, stevia leaves, stevia extract, and stevioside can be Imported to the United States. However, ingredient labels of products that contain stevia must qualify as dietary supplements.

Stevia had been redesignated as a dietary supplement by the FDA and consequently can be legally sold in the United States solely as a supplement. Its addition to teas or other packaged foods is still banned. Moreover, stevia cannot, under any circumstances, be marketed as a sweetener or flavor enhancer.

SUGAR, SUGAR EVERYWHERE

Ralph Nader once said, “If God meant us to eat sugar, he wouldn’t have invented dentists.” The average American eats over 125 pounds of white sugar every year. It has been estimated that sugar makes up 25 percent of our daily caloric intake, with soda pop supplying the majority of our sugar ingestion. Desserts and sugar-laden snacks continually tempt us, resulting in an escalated taste for sweets.

The amount of sugar we consume has a profound effect on both our physical and mental well-being. Sugar is a powerful substance which can have drug-like effects and is considered addictive by some nutritional experts. William Duffy, the author of Sugar Blues, states,“The difference between sugar addiction and narcotic addition is largely one of degree.” In excess, sugar can be toxic. Sufficient amounts of B-vitamins are actually required to metabolize and detoxify sugar in our bodies. When the body experiences a sugar overload, the assimilation of nutrients from other foods can be inhibited. In other words, our bodies were not designed to cope with the enormous quantity of sugar we routinely ingest. Eating too much sugar can generate a type of nutrient malnutrition, not to mention its contribution to obesity, diabetes, hyperactivity, and other disorders. Sugar can also predispose the body to yeast infections, aggravate some types of arthritis and asthma, cause tooth decay, and may even elevate our blood lipid levels. Eating excess sugar can also contribute to amino acid depletion, which has been linked with depression and other mood disorders. To make matters worse, eating too much sugar can actually compromise our immune systems by lowering white blood cells counts. This makes us more susceptible to colds and other infections. Sugar consumption has also been linked to PMS, osteoporosis and coronary heart disease.

Why Do We Crave Sweets?

Considering the sobering effects of a high sugar diet, why do we eat so much of it? One reason is that sugar gives us a quick infusion of energy. It can also help to raise the level of certain brain neurotransmitters which may temporarily elevate our mood. Sugar cravings stem from a complex mix of physiological and psychological components. Even the most brilliant scientists fail to totally comprehend this intriguing chemical dependence which, for the most part, hurts our overall health.

What we do know is that when sugary foods are consumed, the pancreas must secrete insulin, a hormone which serves to bring blood glucose levels down. This allows sugar to enter our cells where it is either burned off or stored. The constant ups and downs of blood sugar levels can become exaggerated in some individuals and cause all kinds of health problems. Have you ever been around someone who is prone to sudden mood swings characterized by violent verbal attacks or irritability? This type of volatile behavior is typical of people who crave sugar, eat it and then experience sugar highs and lows. Erratic mood swings can be linked to dramatic drops in blood sugar levels.

Hypoglycemia: Sign of Hard Times?

It is rather disturbing to learn that statisticians estimate that almost 20 million Americans suffer from some type of faulty glucose tolerance. Hypoglycemia and diabetes are the two major forms of blood sugar disorders and can deservedly be called modern day plagues. Hypoglycemia is an actual disorder that can cause of number of seemingly unrelated symptoms. More and more studies are pointing to physiological as well as psychological disorders linked to disturbed glucose utilization in brain cells. One study, in particular, showed that depressed people have overall lower glucose metabolism (Slagle, 22). Hypoglycemia occurs when too much insulin is secreted in order to compensate for high blood sugar levels resulting from eating sugary or high carbohydrate foods. To deal with the excess insulin, glucagon, cortisol and adrenalin pour into the system to help raise the blood sugar back to acceptable levels. This can inadvertently result in the secretion of more insulin and the vicious cycle repeats itself.

A hypoglycemic reaction can cause mood swings, fatigue, drowsiness, tremors, headaches, dizziness, panic attacks, indigestion, cold sweats, and fainting. When blood sugar drops too low, an overwhelming craving for carbohydrates results. To satisfy the craving and compensate for feelings of weakness and abnormal hunger, sugary foods are once again consumed in excess.

Unfortunately, great numbers of people suffer from hypoglycemic symptoms. Ironically, a simple switch from a high sugar diet to one that emphasizes protein can help. In addition, because sugar cravings are so hard to control, a product like stevia can be of enormous value in preventing roller coaster blood sugar levels. One Colorado internist states: People who are chronically stressed and are on a roller coaster of blood sugar going up and down are especially prone to dips in energy at certain times of day. Their adrenals are not functioning optimally, and when they hit a real low point, they want sugar. It usually happens in mid-afternoon when the adrenal glands are at their lowest level of functioning. (Janiger, 71) Our craving for sweets in not intrinsically a bad thing; however, what we reach for to satisfy that craving can dramatically determine how we feel. Stevia can help to satisfy the urge to eat something sweet without changing blood sugar levels in a perfectly natural way and without any of the risks associated with other non-nutritive sweeteners.

Diabetes: Pancreas Overload?

Diabetes is a disease typical of western cultures and is evidence of the influence that diet has on the human body. Perhaps more than any other disease, diabetes shuts down the mechanisms which permit proper carbohydrate/sugar metabolism. When the pancreas no longer secretes adequate amounts of insulin to metabolize sugar, that sugar continues to circulate in the bloodstream causing all kinds of health problems. The type of diabetes that comes in later years is almost always related to obesity and involves the inability of sugar to enter cells, even when insulin is present. Diabetes can cause blindness, atherosclerosis, kidney disease, the loss of nerve function, recurring infections, and the inability to heal. Heredity plays a profound role in the incidence of diabetes, but a diet high in white sugar and empty carbohydrates unquestionably contributes to the onset of the disease. It is estimated that over five million Americans are currently undergoing medical treatment for diabetes and studies suggest that there are at least four million Americans with undetected forms of adult onset diabetes. Diabetes is the third cause of death in this country and reflects the devastating results of a diet low in fiber and high in simple carbohydrates. Most of us start our children on diets filled with candy, pop, chips, cookies, doughnuts, sugary juice, etc. Studies have found that diabetes is a disease which usually plagues societies that eat highly refined foods. Because we live in a culture that worships sweets, the availability of a safe sweetener like stevia, which does not cause stress on the pancreas is extremely valuable. If sugar consumption was cut in half by using stevia to

  • “stretch”
  • sweetening power, our risk for developing blood sugar disorders like diabetes and hypoglycemia could dramatically decrease.

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    Cinnamon may control sugar levels...
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    Date: July 08, 2005 10:48 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Cinnamon may control sugar levels...

    Best Cinnamon

  • Use as Part of Your Diet to Help Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*
  • HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS
  • Cinnamon,
    a staple ingredient in apple pie, has remained one of the
    world's favorite spices throughout recorded history. The
    evergreen cinnamon tree (Cinnamomum verum), considered to be
    true cinnamon, is native to Sri Lanka. Chinese cinnamon
    (Cinnamomum cassia or Cinnamomum aromaticum), the cinnamon most
    commonly sold in the U.S., goes by the name “Cassia.” Usage of
    cinnamon in Chinese medicine is said to date back over 4,000
    years. Mentioned in the Bible, cinnamon was Imported to Egypt
    and Europe from the Far East by 500 B.C. In addition to its
    value as culinary spice, cinnamon has traditionally been
    utilized as a folk medicine for colds and minor digestive
    complaints. True cinnamon and cassia are very similar; cassia
    has a more pungent flavor. Cassia buds can be found in potpourri
    and used as a flavoring agent in sweets and
    beverages.1

    Recent research has revealed that constituents in
    cinnamon bark called procyanidin Type-A polymers help maintain
    the body's ability to metabolize glucose in a healthy way.* Best
    Cinnamon Extract is Cinnulin PF®, a patented, water extract of
    Cinnamon that contains Type-A polymers. Cinnulin PF® is a
    registered trademark of Integrity Nutraceuticals International
    and is manufactured under US Patent #
    6,200,569.

    Benefits

    Use as Part of Your Diet to Help
    Maintain a Healthy Blood Sugar Level*

    In Vitro and Animal
    Studies

    Research has revealed that a number of herbs and
    spices have insulin-like activity.2 In a study by the U.S.
    Department of Agriculture (USDA), cinnamon demonstrated the
    greatest ability to stimulate cellular glucose metabolism among
    49 botanicals tested.3

    In a 2001 study, researchers at the
    USDA's Human Nutrition Research Center showed that bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon trigger an insulin-like response in fat
    cells.4 These compounds stimulated glucose uptake into cells and
    increased glycogen (stored glucose) production via activation of
    the enzyme, glycogen synthase.

    The bioactive compounds in
    cinnamon appear to potentiate insulin activity at the level of
    the cell receptor for insulin. It has been shown that insulin
    resistance involves down regulation of “insulin signaling”
    characterized by dephosphorylation of the receptor.5 Enzymes
    called “protein tyrosine kinases” (PTPases) are believed to
    decrease receptor phosphorylation, and increased PTPase activity
    has been observed in insulin resistant rats.6 Cinnamon compounds
    have demonstrated the in vitro ability to inhibit PTP-1 and
    increase autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor.7

    In a
    recent animal study, cinnamon (cassia) extract was administered
    to rats for three weeks. Following this, the rats were infused
    with insulin and glucose to assess their insulin response.
    Increased phosphorylation of the insulin receptor was observed
    in skeletal muscle of these rats, suggesting that cinnamon has
    the ability to potentiate insulin function by normalizing
    insulin signaling, leading to improved uptake of glucose into
    skeletal muscle.8

    Until recently, the precise molecular
    structure of the bioactive compounds in cinnamon had not been
    clearly defined. The USDA has now determined that the bioactive
    compounds in cinnamon are water-soluble procyanidin Type-A
    polymers of catechin and epicatechin. In a 2004 study, type-A
    polymers were isolated from cinnamon and characterized by
    nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Type-A
    polymers were found to increase in vitro insulin activity by a
    factor of 20. Type-A polymers also exhibited antioxidant
    activity, as measured by inhibition of free radical production
    in platelets. These results suggest that, in addition to
    regulating glucose metabolism, cinnamon may help protect cell
    membranes by controlling the lipid peroxidation associated with
    disruptions in insulin function.9

    HUMAN CLINICAL TRIALS

    The effect of cinnamon on glucose and blood lipids
    levels on people with type 2 diabetes was tested in a recent
    randomized, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 60 subjects
    were divided into six groups administered 1, 3, or 6 grams of
    cinnamon daily, in 500 mg capsules, or equal numbers of placebo
    capsules.

    The cinnamon or placebo capsules were consumed for
    two periods of 20 days each. Serum glucose, triglyceride,
    cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol were measured
    after 20 days, 40 days and again at the end of a 20-day wash-out
    period, during which neither cinnamon nor placebo was
    consumed.

    In all three cinnamon groups, statistically
    significant reductions in blood glucose levels occurred, with
    decreases ranging from 18 to 29 percent. Interestingly, glucose
    levels remained significantly lower after the 20-day wash-out
    period (60 days from the study start) only in the group that
    took the lowest cinnamon dose (1 gram daily). The placebo groups
    showed no significant changes.

    Decreases in triglyceride
    levels ranging from 23 to 30% were observed in all three
    cinnamon groups after 40 days. When the study ended at 60 days,
    triglyceride levels remained lower than at the study start in
    the 1 and 3 gram cinnamon groups, but not in the group taking 6
    grams daily. Cholesterol reductions also occurred with the three
    cinnamon doses, with decreases ranging from 13 to 25% that were
    maintained at the study end. For LDL, the 3 and 6 gram cinnamon
    groups showed significant reductions from 10 to 24%, while in
    the 1 gram cinnamon group, non-significant reductions occurred
    after 40 days; LDL levels continued to decrease, reaching
    statistical significance at 60 days. With respect to HDL,
    significant increases were seen only in the 3 gram cinnamon
    group after 20 days; non-significant changes occurred in the 1
    and 6 gram groups after 40 days.

    The overall results of this
    trial demonstrate that cinnamon exerts a beneficial effect on
    blood glucose and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes,
    at daily intakes of 1 gram, and that this low dose is equally
    efficacious as are the higher doses of 3 and 6
    grams.10

    Safety

    The various species of cinnamon are
    classified as GRAS (generally regarded as safe) herbs.11 The
    Botanical Safety Handbook lists Cinnamomum cassia a “Class 2b”
    herb; not to be used during pregnancy.12 The water-soluble
    cinnamon extract is largely free of the lipid-soluble components
    of cinnamon most likely to be toxic at high dose of cinnamon and
    long-term consumption of the herb.9

    *This statement has not
    been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product
    is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any
    disease.

    Scientific References

    1. Manniche, L. An Ancient
    Egyptian Herbal. 1989, Austin , TX : University of Texas
    Press.

    2. Khan A, Bryden NA, Polansky MM, Anderson RA.
    Insulin potentiating factor and chromium content of selected
    foods and spices. Biol Trace Elem Res 1990;24(3):183-8.

    3.
    Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM, Anderson R. Insulin-like biological
    activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in
    vitro. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48(3):849-52.

    4. Jarvill-Taylor
    KJ, Anderson RA, Graves DJ. A hydroxychalcone derived from
    cinnamon functions as a mimetic for insulin in 3T3-L1
    adipocytes. J Am Coll Nutr 2001;20(4):327-36.

    5. Nadiv O,
    Shinitzky M, Manu H, et al. Elevated protein tyrosine
    phosphatase activity and increased membrane viscosity are
    associated with impaired activation of the insulin receptor
    kinase in old rats. Biochem J. 1998;298(Pt 2):443-50.

    6.
    Begum N, Sussman KE, Draznin B. Differential effects of diabetes
    on adipocyte and liver phosphotyrosine and phsophoserine
    phosphatase activities. Diabetes 1991;40(12):1620-9.

    7.
    Imparl-Radosevich J, Deas S, Polansky MM, et al. Regulation of
    PTP-1 and insulin receptor kinase by fractions from cinnamon:
    implications for cinnamon regulation of insulin signalling. Horm
    Res 1998;50:177-182.

    8. Qin B, Nagasaki M, Ren M, et al.
    Cinnamon extract (traditional herb) potentiates in vivo
    insulin-regulated glucose utilization via enhanced insulin
    signaling in rats. Diabetes Res Clin Pract
    2003;62(3):139-48.

    9. Anderson R, Broadhurst CL, Polansky MM,
    et al. Isolation and characterization of polyphenol type-A
    polymers from cinnamon with insulin-like biological activity. J
    Agric Food Chem 2004; 52(1):65-70.

    10. Khan A, Safdar S,
    Muzaffar M, et al. Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of
    people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care
    2003;26(12):3215-18.

    11. Duke, JA. Handbook of Phytochemical
    Constituents of GRAS Herbs and Other Economic Plants. 1992. Boca
    Raton, FL: CRC Press.

    12. Botanical Safety Handbook. American
    Herbal Products Association. McGuffin M, et al., eds. 1997; Boca
    Raton , FL : CRC Press.

    Acting as a biochemical
    "super-thiamin," it does this through several different cellular
    mechanisms, as discussed below.



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    Vitanet ®

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    Hoodia Gordonii - 20:1 Extract VS 1:1 Powder – The Whole Story
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    Date: June 29, 2005 09:51 AM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: Hoodia Gordonii - 20:1 Extract VS 1:1 Powder – The Whole Story

    Hoodia Gordonii - 20:1 Extract VS 1:1 Powder – The Whole Story

    The hoodia landscape has been unnecessarily clouded recently thanks to the misinformation circulating about concentrated extracts and socalled “100%” hoodia powder. Most of the information is highly subjective, with no studies whatsoever to support claims that socalled “pure” powder is more efficacious than 20:1 concentrated extracts. In fact, purporting to offer 100% hoodia powder is a dubious claim at best, with some groups offering little in the way of solid evidence that theirs is actually authentic Hoodia gordonii grown in South Africa and Imported to the United States legally with proper permits. Propagating the false notion that “more is better” is a risky, uncertain gamble if you’re not precisely sure what exactly you’re getting more of! At Source Naturals, a trusted company with years of experience and demonstrated excellence in nutritional supplements, we believe that nothing tops quality assurance.

    Extraction – The Bottom Line

    Much of the misunderstanding surrounding hoodia extracts directly corresponds to a common misperception that the word extract is mutually exclusive to standardization – a method of extraction that isolates and removes a constituent part of an herb or botanical for use in supplements to control potency. Unfortunately the ambiguity of the term “extract” in relation to hoodia products has led to uninformed claims that hoodia extracts somehow contain less essential Hoodia gordonii plant parts, which is patently false, and underscores the inherent confusion as to how high-quality concentrated hoodia powder is actually produced. Simply put, many of the truly effective hoodia products on the market are, by their very nature, extracts – whether they claim to be or not. That is because the concentration process by which the whole parts of the hoodia plant become dried powder is an extraction. Calling it anything but an extract would be, frankly, disingenuous.

    The Process

    Hoodia gordonii is a succulent containing excess moisture that needs to be removed in order to make an effective, concentrated powder. The process by which that moisture is removed to yield the powder is called an extraction. This process, however, is different from standardized extraction. This process does not remove a single component from the plant; rather it separates the water from the solid parts of the plant, making a concentrated powder for a more powerful, effective product.

    The End Result

    The raw materials used to make HOODIA EXTRACT have not been added to, nor have we attempted to specifically extract any constituent parts of the plant to regulate potency. What we have done is taken high-quality, authentic, certified material from one of the industry’s most respected suppliers of Hoodia gordonii and held it to our own high standards of Total Quality Assurance (TQA™) in making a supplement with 20 times more functional hoodia than had we ground the plant up water and all. By putting it through stringent testing procedures in our quality control lab we have assured our product’s quality and efficacy. The Hoodia gordonii we receive is carefully scrutinized; put through High Performance Thin Layer Chromatographic (HPTLC) analysis for authenticity, and microbiological screening for contamination, as well as other rigorous laboratory protocols.

    Quality = Results

    When you buy Source Naturals HOODIA EXTRACT, you can be assured that you’re not just getting an effective, natural dietary supplement, you’re getting part of an almost 25- year old tradition in providing quality products that support your good health. So before you buy into “more = better,” remember the Source Naturals edict: Quality = Results. Source Naturals – dedicated to excellence, committed to you.



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    Vitanet ®

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    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?
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    Date: June 17, 2005 12:45 PM
    Author: Darrell Miller (dm@vitanetonline.com)
    Subject: What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    What is the difference between the types of Ginseng?

    Ginseng has been used for thousands of years by the Chinese and Native Americans. The Chinese name, Ren Shen means "Man-Root" because it is shaped like a human. There have been over 3,000 scientific studies published on Ginseng. Studies have examined the anti-tumor, anti-infective, nervous system, lipid lowering, and anti-fatigue activity of ginseng. Experimental research indicates that Ginseng helps the body adapt to stress, protects the body against radiation, and increases sperm count, and stabilizes blood sugar levels.

    Ginseng can differ depending upon the species, the way it is prepared, and of course the dose administered. There are two main kinds of Ginseng: American and Asian. American Ginseng, Panax quinquefolium, grows wild in many states although it is cultivated mainly in Wisconsin. American Ginseng generates body fluids and is said to clear heat. Those who can benefit most from American Ginseng are individuals that are under stress, athletes, and people who feel hot and thirsty. They may also have coughing, or coughing up blood, which indicates heat according to traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Asian Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, is usually Imported to the US from either China or Korea. It is traditionally used to treat cold syndromes, which include cold limbs, weak pulse, exhaustion, and shortness of breath. White Ginseng usually refers to untreated ginseng, and is said to be less warm than red Ginseng. Typically red Ginseng is steamed and cured with other herbs giving it a dark red appearance; most Korean Ginseng is red.

    A common substitute for Ginseng in the US and China is Codonopsis, known botanically as Codonopsis pilosula. It has similar effects to Asian Ginseng: it is not as strong and not nearly as expensive. Eleuthero Ginseng, sometimes referred to as Siberian Ginseng, is really not ginseng at all but is in fact a distant cousin. It belongs in a different botanical species: Eleutherococcus Senticosus. Eleuthero Ginseng grows in northern China and Russia. Although it is used to help the body adapt to stress, it is less specific as a medicinal herb than Asian or American Ginseng.

    Traditional herbalists rarely use ginseng by itself. Herbs are usually combined with other ingredients in order to increase clinical benefits and reduce negative reactions. For example, Generate Pulse Powder (Sheng Mai San) is a traditional combination, which often combines America Ginseng with herbs to moisten the lungs; therefore it can be used for chronic cough that is difficult to expectorate, and shortness of breathe. Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan is an ancient formula that has been used for at least one thousand years to treat patients who are exhausted, feel cold, and may have weak limbs and/or chronic loose stools. In this ancient formula, Ginseng is combined with Astragalus and other harmonizing herbs, which help the body assimilate ginseng. Modern formulas with Ginseng or Codonopsis, have been used to help people overcome serious conditions such as impotence, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and fibromyalgia. Modern Ginseng formulas have also been used in conjunction with western medical approaches to treating patients with HIV, and patients undergoing chemo and radiotherapy.

    Asian Ginseng is considered a "big gun" and should not be indiscriminately used especially by itself. Headache, elevated body temperature, digestive upset, rash, fever, irritability, and insomnia are possible signs that Ginseng is not appropriate. It should not be taken at the same time as caffeine or other stimulants. Good quality Ginseng is expensive. Superior grade Ginseng can run several thousand dollars per pound. For this reason, it makes no sense to shop for the cheapest Ginseng or Ginseng products.



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    Vitanet ®

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