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Magnesium Vital to Energy, Heart Disease, and Diabetes

old message Magnesium Vital to Energy Darrell Miller 04/20/07
old message Heart Disease and Low Magnesium Darrell Miller 04/20/07
old message Too Little Magnesium Can Cause Health Problems Darrell Miller 04/20/07
old message Magnesium and Diabetes Darrell Miller 04/20/07
old message Osteoporosis, Calcium and Magnesium Darrell Miller 04/20/07


TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On Magnesium Vital to Energy

Date: April 20, 2007 11:55 AM
Author:
Subject: Magnesium Vital to Energy

Energy in the body is produced in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate—present in all living tissue, provides energy for processes such as muscle contraction), through the process of cellular respiration. Magnesium is perhaps the most important nutrient co-factor involved in cellular respiration, as it is actively involved in every single step. Carbohydrates, lipids and proteins cannot produce the source of muscle contraction energy ATP without the presence of magnesium. Optimal magnesium status can therefore facilitate oxygen and energy being delivered to working muscle tissue. Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, states: “In my book [The Miracle of Magnesium], I talk about magnesium being ‘the spark of life’ in the body, and in fact it is responsible for creating the energy in the cells and the energy in the body. So when a person is feeling fatigued, it can actually be coming from a magnesium deficiency.”



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On Heart Disease and Low Magnesium

Date: April 20, 2007 11:57 AM
Author:
Subject: Heart Disease and Low Magnesium

According to A Rosanoff, PhD, founder of the Center for Magnesium Education and Research, “The most important market for impeding heart disease is a low magnesium to calcium ratio (Mg:Ca) in the cells. All the usual markers (or risk factors) for heart disease—e.g., high total cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol and High LDL cholesterol, high Homocysteine, high C reactive protein, syndrome X with its high blood sugar, active type 2 diabetes and hypertension—can all be a result of low magnesium status.”

The vast scientific evidence backing this bold statement is summarized for the lay public in the book The Magnesium Factor by Mildred S Seelig, MD, and Andrea Rosanoff, PhD.



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On Too Little Magnesium Can Cause Health Problems

Date: April 20, 2007 12:04 PM
Author:
Subject: Too Little Magnesium Can Cause Health Problems

The Recommended Daily Allowance of magnesium (which is the minimum level needed to stave off deficiency symptoms not the maximum level) varies by age and gender:

Children 1 to 3 years: 80mg, Children 4 to 8 years: 130mg, Children 9 to 13 years: 240mg

Boys 14 to 18: 410mg, Girls 14 to 18: 360mg

Men 19 to 30: 400mg, Men 31 plus: 420mg

Women 19 to 30: 310mg, Women 31 plus: 320mg

Pregnant women 19 to 30: 350mg, pregnant women 31 plus: 360mg

A survey conducted by The Gallup Organization found that 72 percent of adult Americans fall short of the Recommended Dietary Allowance of magnesium.

Because magnesium is required for hundreds of enzymatic reactions (enzymes are protein molecules that stimulate every chemical reaction in the body), deficiency can cause a wide variety of symptoms, such as low energy, fatigue, weakness, PS and hormonal imbalance, inability to sleep, weakening bones, muscle tension, spasms and cramps, abnormal heart rhythms, headaches, anxiousness, nervousness and irritability.

Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of The Miracle of Magnesium states: “The recommended daily allowance (RDA) is about 350mg per day, but most researchers say you need two and three times that amount, partly because it’s not in foods. If it is in foods, if you cook and process the foods in any way, you lose magnesium.”



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On Magnesium and Diabetes

Date: April 20, 2007 11:59 AM
Author:
Subject: Magnesium and Diabetes

Insulin is the hormone that helps with the regulation of glucose (sugar) metabolism. Magnesium has been found to improve insulin’s response to dietary sugar and to improve the action of insulin in regulating blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, projections of a continued rapid growth in the incidence of type 2 diabetes requires a cost-effective approach that can be widely employed to prevent or delay this major disorder. Published in the Journal Diabetes Care, two recent studies suggest that an increased intake of magnesium could have a role in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

The National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, reports that there is an increased interest in the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.



TopPreviousNextListen To An Article On Osteoporosis, Calcium and Magnesium

Date: April 20, 2007 12:06 PM
Author:
Subject: Osteoporosis, Calcium and Magnesium

Consider the following: what country has the highest rate of pasteurized milk consumption? USA Today reports that more than 45 percent of Americans, aged four years and older, drink milk. Now, what country has the highest calcium supplement consumption? America. So, America must have the lowest occurrence of osteoporosis, calcium loss and bone fragility. Right? Wrong! We have the highest rate! Why? Excess calcium combined with low magnesium.

One research study concludes that neither milk nor a high calcium diet appears to reduce the risk of osteoporotic hip fractures in postmenopausal women. Another study concluded that findings “do not support the hypothesis that higher consumption of milk or other food sources of calcium by adult women protect against hip or forearm fractures.” On the other hand, a recent double-blind trial conducted by Yale University School of Medicine found that magnesium significantly increased bone mineral content of the hip bones of girl’s ages 8 to 14 years.

It is magnesium that will handle a calcium deficiency as well as the lack of adequate magnesium, and it will dissolve excess calcium from the body while helping any needed calcium to assimilate. Today we have diets dangerously low in magnesium. Factor in the recent addition of nutritional calcium via supplements and food fortifications that are meant to stave osteoporosis, and many of us are getting inadequate magnesium plus too much calcium.

Magnesium is crucial to increasing bone mass, since it is magnesium that allows calcium to assimilate. People taking supplemental calcium should accompany their calcium with the magnesium necessary for absorption. Women taking calcium supplements to ward off osteoporosis, with out adequate magnesium nutrition, can further exacerbate the effects of a magnesium deficit. (Calcium supplements taken without sufficient magnesium can actually LOWER the bone mineralization process.) Magnesium is as important as calcium in the prevention of osteoporosis and is vital to increase bone mass.



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