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What is the Transfer Factor in Colostrum?

old message What is the Transfer Factor in Colostrum? Darrell Miller 05/26/11


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Date: May 26, 2011 12:12 PM
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Subject: What is the Transfer Factor in Colostrum?

Colostrum, Transfer Factor, And Your Health.

Transfer factor refers to any immune molecule found in the milk produced by the mammary glands in the first days after childbirth. It comprises a group of amino acids that are smaller than cells. Since its discovery in the 20th century, it has been suggested as a treatment for a host of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, infertility, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, hepatitis, herpes, and HIV. It has grown in popularity in the past few years due to a resurgence of interest in natural remedies.

The quality of milk that mammals make in the last weeks of pregnancy is called colostrum, which is believed to be superior to ordinary milk. For one, it is lower in lipids and fats, but higher in proteins. More importantly, it contains antibodies called immunoglobulins, which are central to the identification of bacteria and viruses during infections. These antibodies alert the rest of the immune system to effectively deal with pathogens encountered for the first time. Colostrum contains transfer factors.

Like any other form of milk, colostrum is subjected to the digestion process when taken orally. The human gastrointestinal tract treats the carbohydrates, proteins, and even antibodies present in colostrums just like any other bioactive compounds, which are either absorbed or excreted. With the sole exception of transfer factors, everything else undergoes first pass metabolism in the liver. Transfer factors are so small that they pass through physiological screens and filters.

Natural Antibiotic

It is becoming common knowledge that transfer factors have antibiotic properties. Indeed they are one of the antibiotics that occur naturally in nature. They are produced by the mammary glands for the sole purpose of transferring the immunity of the mother to the newborn child. Newborns are completely sterile, making them especially susceptible several hours after birth. Transfer factors prepare the immune system of newborns against common pathogens the mother has encountered before.

Antiviral Properties

One of the unique characteristics attributed to transfer factors in colostrum is its antiviral properties. Transfer factors were first observed to interfere with the rapid multiplication of rotavirus, which causes diarrhea in infants. More recent studies have looked into its medicinal potential against other viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus and herpes. The scientific community has not come to a conclusion yet, with most of the antiviral researches on transfer factors being in their initial stages.

Performance Enhancer

Transfer factors have been linked to faster muscle recover. Proponents believe that the group of proteins that constitutes transfer factors is capable of speeding up the healing rate of skeletal muscles after intense physical exertion. They raise the stress tolerance of individual cells amid harmful levels of aerobic metabolism. By so doing, they also make a viable treatment for muscle weakness and physical fatigue following continued exposure to stress without taking adequate time for recovery.

Boost Your Immune System with Colostrum Daily, you are never to young!







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